UC Pro Diamond frame prototype build pics. Painting / Decal / lights etc will be done in Boston.

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Stock colors are blue or silver (not white). If you want something that makes for a nice contrast with black I can say the red on my CC looks amazing, Frey knocked it out of the park with that color and I get tons of compliments wherever I go but of course, I don't want another red bike. If you spend $6K on a bike do it right and give it more personality than white. :D

The custom metallic paint job that @FlatSix911 posted over here is pretty darn cool. I would be all over than in a blue theme.

Thanks... I think a custom paint job is almost required a high-end bike.

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pushkar

Well-Known Member
Hey everyone - I want to temper everyone's expectations when it comes to paint. There are very few shops that can reach the level of paint done here. Also, based on my conversations with some top shops in the north east, this is more like $800- $1200, or potentially even more, depending on the complexity of design.

If we need to do fade-ins, jmulti coats etc - we need to set up the right templates.

Large firms have invested in templates and they own a lot of the paint process upfront- and they usually only offer this on the higher level trims.


I am happy to offer these options, but the pricing will be ~$1200 or more (depending on complexity and intricacy), and it will add ~6-7 weeks once the bike build is available. We may be able to restrict the cost to around 1k if we restrict the number of colors, or keep out crazy design elements (fade ins, multi layer multi coat etc.

As a reference - I am doing a custom paint + anodizing for a customer - including brakes, pedals, handlebars, rims, lights etc et, which for a 2 color prismatic, with frame and components is around $900-950 .

Another reference - Trek offers custom paint- https://projectone.trekbikes.com/us/en#model/domanelt pick marble or cosmos and it adds $1k to the price.
 
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TomD

Well-Known Member
Ha, I'm good with the matte blue I pre ordered. It's nice to dream though...
 

Johnny

Well-Known Member
Looking very nice Pushkar. It looks like you did a good job of cable management too.

On a side note I even like this color.
 

CityExplorer

Active Member
Looks too close to the FLX without nice contouring on the beams. Looks like the FLX was used as the basis for the design, then the ascetic elements rolled back to reduce costs. ...or... NOT

Looks ok though.
 

pushkar

Well-Known Member
Looks too close to the FLX without nice contouring on the beams. Looks like the FLX was used as the basis for the design, then the ascetic elements rolled back to reduce costs. ...or... NOT

Looks ok though.
1. You are right - we are sharing the same downtube as FLX, and a lot of other bikes (the new biktrix, etc). This is done to ensure that batteries are available longer term and you are not tied to a single vendor (in this case WW).

2. Our geometry is substantially different from FLX.

3. Nice contouring any bike is great - but having a "straight line" is not feasible with multiple bike sizes that the US Pro is available in.

4. Straight line contour is also hard to do if we have to do dual batteries (the triangle needs to be bigger) - which is what UC Pro does, and FLX doesnt.

5. I posted somewhere else - we ran the FLX geometry (among others) through differnt modeling scenarios and we found cases where some of those frames may have critical structural failure points. These frame also have a load limit of 225/ 250lbs. Our bikes are built for 300+lbs and in our modeling have far fewer critical structural points. We are using substantially different amount of material.

5. We also have the same load limit on our step-though frame. That is a form factor that is not available on the FLX.

Yes, you are absolutely right that our downtube is common (by design). IMO would say that the downtube precisely where both bikes start to diverge pretty substantially.

Edit: I also want to add that (to my knowledge) UC Pro was the first one to pair a rohloff (and a red rohloff at that) with the belt drive. We set the guiness record with that bike nearly a year ago to the day.


FLX blade 2 now has borrowed the same config .....and also a red rohloff. 😂


coincidence.gif
 
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MKBike

New Member
1. You are right - we are sharing the same downtube as FLX, and a lot of other bikes (the new biktrix, etc). This is done to ensure that batteries are available longer term and you are not tied to a single vendor (in this case WW).

2. Our geometry is substantially different from FLX.

3. Nice contouring any bike is great - but having a "straight line" is not feasible with multiple bike sizes that the US Pro is available in.

4. Straight line contour is also hard to do if we have to do dual batteries (the triangle needs to be bigger) - which is what UC Pro does, and FLX doesnt.

5. I posted somewhere else - we ran the FLX geometry (among others) through differnt modeling scenarios and we found cases where some of those frames may have critical structural failure points. These frame also have a load limit of 225/ 250lbs. Our bikes are built for 300+lbs and in our modeling have far fewer critical structural points. We are using substantially different amount of material.

5. We also have the same load limit on our step-though frame. That is a form factor that is not available on the FLX.

Yes, you are absolutely right that our downtube is common (by design). IMO would say that the downtube precisely where both bikes start to diverge pretty substantially.

Edit: I also want to add that (to my knowledge) UC Pro was the first one to pair a rohloff (and a red rohloff at that) with the belt drive. We set the guiness record with that bike nearly a year ago to the day.


FLX blade 2 now has borrowed the same config .....and also a red rohloff. 😂


View attachment 61971
Mic drop 😉

also... as a tall guy, I’m excited there is a sizing option for us 6’4-6’9-ers. This sets WW apart for sure!
 

Bluzrif

Member
This is just the frame test build. We will assemble and paint in Boston.
Nice looking so far Pushkar.. Is the frame test a standardized process or company specific ?.. i.e. What you are comfortable putting a warranty on and name behind. Thanks
 

pushkar

Well-Known Member
Great question
1. The frame passes EN / ASTM tests.
2. We test for load ( cargo) - so heavier seat tube, and headtubes + better quality welding.

In general typical frame welding that you notice on regular bikes will cost around $40-$70 / frame (typical). Ours is double welding + smoothening. So our welding costs are double of that number, broadly speaking, ignoring frame style (step through or diamond).

Essentially we are building a cargo bike in a commuter geometry and style for all intents and purposes. ;)
 

Ebiker33

Well-Known Member
Great question
1. The frame passes EN / ASTM tests.
2. We test for load ( cargo) - so heavier seat tube, and headtubes + better quality welding.

In general typical frame welding that you notice on regular bikes will cost around $40-$70 / frame (typical). Ours is double welding + smoothening. So our welding costs are double of that number, broadly speaking, ignoring frame style (step through or diamond).

Essentially we are building a cargo bike in a commuter geometry and style for all intents and purposes. ;)
Is that step through design being welded up by your guy in Boston?