User Review: BMC Alpenchallenge AMP Sport Two

OldRyder

New Member
User Review: BMC Alpenchallenge AMP Sport Two.
Small 2020-BMC-Alpenchallenge-AMP-Sport-Two.jpg
This edit is an update of my review below...My problem with the computer display has been solved with a recent software update to the display, and I upgrade the rating to to 5 stars!

This is a review of the BMC Alpenchallenge AMP Sport Two. The short version is: 4 stars out of 5 and I really like this bike! Located in Switzerland, BMC is best known for its carbon fiber or aluminum, high end, racing machines. I ended up selecting this bike after some rental riding and lots of on-line research because it was all the things important to me. So while I think it's great, it may not be the cat's meow for others.

My desires were a quiet, lightweight, mid motor, trek bike that would be reliable, low maintenance, easy to ride, easy to transport in my car, and not too expensive. BTW, I ended up adjusting my expectations of "not too expensive!" The list price is $3499 US, although I have seen it on sale for less.

I have a little over 300 miles on it as I write this review and it has performed flawlessly, although it has a minor issue with the computer display that I’m still working to correct. It’s a matter of calibration and I suspect it is related to Shimano’s code that converts km to miles. That's why only 4 stars.

With my water bottle, spare tire, pump, and tools, this aluminum frame ebike weights only 41 lbs. It is easy to remove the front wheel and strap down in the back of my car just like any 10 speed. The way the Shimano E6100 power assist works (torque sensor) makes the bike feel like a normal road bike, but with someone else adding power to the pedals. I have no accurate idea yet what the max range of the 418 wh battery might be, but I suspect it is at least 40 miles in HIGH assist over mostly level terrain with a couple of hill climbs. Two other reduced assist modes will extend the miles even more. And a nice feature of this ebike is there is no drag when turned off. So, if you're on the way home and the battery gives out, you turn it off and pedal home with a 40 lb 11 speed bike.

Unlike some of the hub motor ebikes I've ridden, this bike requires you to apply a small amount of push (torque) to the pedals in order to get any assist. But, I really like this, as it's just like riding a normal bike. The pressure you put on the pedals is simply multiplied, so it feels like you just got stronger. This is a Class 1 ebike, limited to 250 watts and 20 MPH, but being mid-motor, the 250 watts and 16 Newtons are applied to the chain wheel, and through the gear you have selected, to the rear wheel. So, when you start up a steep hill, you naturally shift to a larger sprocket (low gear) and motor power is applied with a mechanical advantage to the rear wheel. The result is an extremely powerful hill climber with the capability to go fast in a high gear on level terrain.

This ebike is very quiet. I cannot hear the motor at all over the normal chain/sprocket sound and wind noise. The pedal assist has 3 settings – ECO (low), NORM (medium), and HIGH (high). I normally start in ECO and then switch up to HIGH, and then control the assist with my pedal force. The 20 mph limit is handled very smoothly with a taper off beginning at about 19.5 mph. There is a really nice sweet spot at about 19.2 -19.5 mph where one achieves maximum speed for minimum effort on level terrain. Once it reaches the limit, it magically disengages without any drag, and it’s no problem to pedal the bike faster than 20 mph or coast downhill at speeds above 20 mph.

The Shimano shifter is indexed and shifts perfectly without any hesitation. This is a “one by” with 11 gears. The hydraulic disk brakes are awesome.

However, one must be careful with these mid-motor machines and remember to down shift (big sprocket) before starting up a hill or stopping. If you start from a stop light in a high gear, or attempt starting up a steep hill on a small sprocket, the torque you apply to the pedals is multiplied, and you risk breaking a chain someday - especially if you pedal hard while shifting. BTW, this can happen with a normal 10 speed bike and a strong rider. So, you need to remember to pedal lightly during a shift change, and anticipate when you will need a low gear to avoid the possibility of breaking a chain. Once appropriate habit patterns are established, this becomes a non-issue.

There are (only) two things I wish were different about this ebike. First, it came with a narrow road bike saddle and I had to purchase a more comfortable “old guy” seat. Second, I wish the front forks had a little more “rake” to them, which would make the steering a little less lively and the ride a little more comfortable. But, its excellent agility helps to avoid pot holes and obstacles, and the light front end is easy to lift up over the bumps.

Sunny days, tail winds, and safe rides to you!

Details:

FRAMEAlpenchallenge AMP, Flat Mount, 12x142mm thru-axle
TUBINGAl-13 Premium Hydroformed, Smoothwelded Aluminum
DRIVE UNITShimano STEPS E-6100 250W, 60Nm output
BATTERY PACKShimano STEPS BT-E8014 418Wh
FORKAlpenchallenge AMP Premium Aluminum, Flat Mount, 12x100mm thru-axle
GEARS1×11
CHAINWHEELShimano 105
CASSETTShimano 105, 11-34T
CHAINShimano HG-601
REAR DERAILLEURShimano 105
SHIFTERSShimano RS700 Rapidfire Plus 105
BRAKESShimano MT500 (180/160)
HANDLEBARBMC LSB 02
STEMBMC RSM 01
SEATPOSTBMC LSP 03
SADDLESelle Royal 2043HRN
HUBSFormula, Thru Axle (12mm)
RIMSDT Swiss R500
TIRESVittoria Rubino Pro, 30mm
 
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Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
This bike is kind of obsolete by now ,came out almost 3 years ago. Shimano has a new motor the Ep8. The Amp 2 should be 1200-1500$ max.

Specialized Turbo Vado SL is three grand and has the latest technology , downtube battery and looks much slicker. Very light also .

But this Bmc , it was a 5 Five stars ebike in it's prime . It's just that it is old tech. by today's standards . Also you should learn how to use or adjust the computer before you criticize it.

Enjoy the ride and the Ebr forum !


33lb
28mph🚀🥇
3.3k
 
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plutus

New Member
As far as I see, the street price of the two bikes is quite different ( 3.3k$ vs 2.5/2.7k$)
 

BillH

Active Member
This bike is kind of obsolete by now ,came out almost 3 years ago. Shimano has a new motor the Ep8. The Amp 2 should be 1200-1500$ max.

Specialized Turbo Vado SL is three grand and has the latest technology , downtube battery and looks much slicker. Very light also .

But this Bmc , it was a 5 Five stars ebike in it's prime . It's just that it is old tech. by today's standards . Also you should learn how to use or adjust the computer before you criticize it.

Enjoy the ride and the Ebr forum !


33lb
28mph🚀🥇
3.3k
How is it obsolete? The external battery? What's the capacity of the Vado battery without the extra bottle battery? The Vado you link to has a 35Nm motor and my outdated AMP One with Shimano 6100 has 60Nm and both bikes weigh within a pound of each other. The only thing the Vado has over the BMC is dealer support in the States.
 

FrancoPoz

Member
I just bought a BMC AMP Alpenchallenge Sport Two. I consider it an eRoad not an eBike. It has a Shimano Steps E6100 motor and a 630Watt battery replacing the standard 504 battery. In my first use with a charge I did two laps of about 100 km and 1800m of elevation gain for each lap. I have always used the ECO mode. I am fairly trained but on the uphill I need to have assistance to keep my heart down. The bike is very manageable, very light and of excellent driveability. The E6100 engine adapts perfectly to the pedaling of a cyclist because its motor torque of 60 Nm is more than enough to make climbs with important and significant slopes. The E6100 engine is silent and not too invasive. From an aesthetic point of view, the external battery is an excellent solution because it lowers the center of gravity of the mass and makes the eRoad very easy to drive. The almost 15 kg are absolutely not felt when cycling on the flat and, of course, on routes with hills. Even on undulating roads, discomfort is not so important when pedaling. I got to try a Pinarello Nytro but there is no comparison in terms of driveability and handling. Even as a build quality assembly, and only for eRoads, the BMC is of an excellent level even if it has been in the market for some years. I believe that E6100 is an excellent engine for eRoad maybe it will not be for eMTB but for an eRoad it is very good because light, reliable and very powerful.
 

ephemere

Member
Region
USA
City
Bay Area, CA
This bike is kind of obsolete by now ,came out almost 3 years ago. Shimano has a new motor the Ep8. The Amp 2 should be 1200-1500$ max.

Specialized Turbo Vado SL is three grand and has the latest technology , downtube battery and looks much slicker. Very light also .

But this Bmc , it was a 5 Five stars ebike in it's prime . It's just that it is old tech. by today's standards . Also you should learn how to use or adjust the computer before you criticize it.

Enjoy the ride and the Ebr forum !


33lb
28mph🚀🥇
3.3k

A 35-lb bike with Shimano E6100 and 105 groupset for $1200-1500? Dream on. There are few bikes that directly compete with the BMC regardless of price.

The Specialized Turbo Vado SL 4.0 ($3350) has inferior components. A more even comparison with the OP's bike is the Specialized Turbo Vado SL 5.0 ($4350). But then you still have a motor with just over half the torque of the BMC, so it's not going to cover all the use cases that the BMC handles.

As far as "obsolete", the Shimano E6100 is a current product, and you will still see it in 2021 bikes. There has definitely been a trend toward battery packs hidden in the downtube, but this is more a style trend than a technology change.
 

BillH

Active Member
I just dislike the big battery that sticks out on the downtube and I made a error with the price -maybe ~ 2500 for an E6000 Ebike.
This looks better? I beg to differ. And you need it to come close to the BMC range and it adds 2.2 lbs of weight and $450 in additional cost.

1607866179875.png
 

Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
The paintjob it'sreally nice on Specialized and you can also customize the paint. Most of the bikes from this company I don't like because they are heavu , thisTurbo SL is very sexy looking and the tubes are slim and it just looks really nice.
 

OldRyder

New Member
If you remember my review above, I gave this fine bike 4 out of 5 stars because of a problem with the 7000 computer display. The problem has been corrected by a recent software update via Shimano's E-Tube Project and it works fine now. I'll also upgrade my review to 5 stars. I am really enjoying this ebike!
Happy Holidays All - from sunny Arizona.
 

Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
Also the Turbo SL is about 33lb, That's without the bottle battery .
For me this one is better looking but yours ,the BMC has a bigger battery (604wh) and The motor can also be the limited for 30 miles an hour plus. Each one in it's one ways it's a five star bike.
 

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FrancoPoz

Member
I just dislike the big battery that sticks out on the downtube and I made a error with the price -maybe ~ 2500 for an E6000 Ebike.
I am a happy owner of a BMCAMP Sport Alpenchallenge. It has Steps E6100 motor and 630 Watt battery. I have already tried the bike and I can give you a term of comparison with a Pinarello Nytro. In terms of autonomy there are no comparisons. The 630 Watt battery allowed me to make two sworns each of 100 km and 1,800 m of elevation with a single charge. both always in ECO mode and only for a few km in Normal mode. The power of the E6100 engine with 60Nm is like the Nytro Fazua. For eRoad I believe that 60Nm is the ideal torque value because it does not alter the pedaling and allows you to have sufficient assistance even for the most demanding climbs. From the point of view of the quality of the vehicle, the BMC, but only for the eRoad, has a much higher quality than the Nytro but also Wilier or other brands. the painting, the technical solutions and the components are more than dignified. Under the aesthetic aspect I find the BMC very glamorous. The canons by which an eRoad is judged are not similar and must not be the same as those that are normal muscle road bikes. Someone who has a Pinarello F10 muscle bike tells you. The BMC has a great personality and the position of the battery allows excellent and unimaginable handling of the vehicle even when pedaling out of the saddle. In order for you to realize the qualities of BMC you have to try it and then you will also understand my writing. Happy holidays from Italy.
 
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FrancoPoz

Member
Greetings from Italy and best wishes. I post the photo of my AMP with 630 watt battery. I am on a hill near my city Padua. A nice 6 km long climb with an average gradient of 8% and a maximum gradient of 12%. I always use my BMC in ECO mode because this level of assistance is more than enough to ride with the dignity of a muscle bike. I am fairly trained and I make good use of relationships. Today I did about 110 km and almost 1400 m in altitude. I still have 120 km of autonomy on the battery charge which allows me to take a new lap. I have always left the engine running in ECO mode even when I pedaled on the flat. I can push the BMC on an average of 30 km / h and I have found that with the 30 "wheels you can reach 35 km / h but it is very difficult to keep higher averages alone and perhaps in a group you can do it but you have to disconnect the engine and pedal with the engine off because in this way the bottom bracket is smoother. In any case, the bike is very pleasant to ride and gives excellent uphill sensations in terms of handling and responsiveness. The weight distribution is fantastic and very very good. Even when "out of the saddle" you do not feel the weight of the battery in the slightest, which is still felt but it is not so invasive in pedaling. What else to say? Downhill the bike is formidable and I will struggle to still pedal with my muscular F10 coin 25 "wheels. As soon as the temperatures allow it, I will climb Monte Grappa: 24 km of ascent with an average gradient of 9% and a maximum of 17%. An important and well-known climb that very often hosted stages of the Giro d'Italia. A very popular climb for passionate cyclists. The thing that satisfies me the most is the fact that the heart rate when climbing is low and under control. This is why I bought an eRoad to be able to ride again on the paths of my youth. Greetings to all.
 

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ephemere

Member
Region
USA
City
Bay Area, CA
Franco, how much do you pedal unassisted in these rides? Do you turn the motor on and off often or do you mainly leave it in Eco? I am an inexperienced cyclist with poor skills, but I am enjoying a similar BMC AMP with flat bars (Cross LTD). Today I did a 50 km ride with 1000 m of climbs, which I estimate used about 25% of the battery. Mine has the E8000 motor and a 504 Wh battery. I often toggle the motor on/off, and for today's ride I used only Eco. I am very pleased with this bike.

Below is a shot from today. In the background you see the San Pablo Reservoir in Contra Costa County, California.

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FrancoPoz

Member
Franco, how much do you pedal unassisted in these rides? Do you turn the motor on and off often or do you mainly leave it in Eco? I am an inexperienced cyclist with poor skills, but I am enjoying a similar BMC AMP with flat bars (Cross LTD). Today I did a 50 km ride with 1000 m of climbs, which I estimate used about 25% of the battery. Mine has the E8000 motor and a 504 Wh battery. I often toggle the motor on/off, and for today's ride I used only Eco. I am very pleased with this bike.

Below is a shot from today. In the background you see the San Pablo Reservoir in Contra Costa County, California.

View attachment 74509
 

FrancoPoz

Member
Hello. I have a 630 Watt battery not the standard one and mine is Shimano Steps E6100. In these first outings I have concentrated mainly on understanding the logic with which the engine provides assistance. after 25 km the engine stops working. Below 15 km the engine does not provide assistance well but works in jerks. I understand that the E6100 engine is very puffy in power delivery. Let me explain. If you have a slope with slopes of 15% and more you do not need to put the engine in NORMAL mode - mode between ECO and HIGTH - if you do not have sufficient physical training to manage this type of assistance. By sufficient training I mean that you have to do the climb with the NORMAL mode at a speed between 70 and 80 minute rides. An absolutely important value for an amateur cyclist. This allows you to have speeds above 15 km and therefore the engine provides assistance constantly and without jerking. The pedaling must be very regular, not hysterical, with constant and continuous jerking without pauses. A PRO thing to understand. If you use but ECO mode to tackle the same 15% gradient you have to use an agile rear gear. I have the 44 X 34 for these slopes which gives me sufficient agility. With the ECO mode and with an agile ratio you can position your pedaling regime on 60 rides per minute even above if you are sufficiently trained. This allows you to be able to climb smoothly above 15 km / h. I have never used the HIGTH mode because it is too violent and on climbs you have to brake when you face a hairpin bend due to the too much speed you go up. But in any case with this assistance mode you go up above 15 km and then you have to use a harder gear than the ECO and NORMAL. I did a test on the same climb and with the ECO mode I climbed with the ratio 44 x 34 to 63 64 rides per minute. With the NORMAL mode I climbed, always on the same slope, with a ratio of 44 x 32 or 44 x 28. With the HIGTH mode I climbed with a ratio of 44 x 26. What changes is that with ECO and NORMAL my heart had between 120 and 125 bpm while in HIGTH I was above 130 bpm. So at the end of the fair ... - so they say in Italy to summarize a reasoning ..... the Shimano engine at least E6100 works with a logic where the power is delivered according to the number of pedal strokes and the agility of the cyclist. The more you have agility, that is to say the number of pedal strokes, the better the assistance that the engine delivers. As far as I am concerned, the ECO mode and a good use of the gears allows you to tackle even important gradients and have a homogeneous pedaling and with good indeed excellent performance of the engine. I attack the engine when I am near the hills because with the engine off the friction is not felt just while the weight is quite felt. The good or rather excellent handling of the bike allows you not to have in mind the too much weight of the bike. You ride well and excellently even in the plains with the engine off. When I attach the engine I always leave it in ECO mode. I have a decent level of training even if I have to check my heart rate that does not exceed certain regimes. I'm always about 130 bpm maximum and using the ratios I can use the engine in ECO mode for important outputs. By the term important I mean that with a recharge and using the ECO mode only in the climbs and in the ascents, thus excluding the plain, I managed to do about two exits with 100 km each and about 1800 positive altitude difference. I repeat, I am fairly trained when I manage to push the bike over 25 km / h and therefore the engine does not attack. Here in my part of Italy there are routes with fairly long climbs even if not very long on 6 km even less but with slopes that bite the legs up to 25% and stretches of false floor where you travel without assistance above 25 km / h. What is certain is that with my muscle bike - a Pinarello F10 of Olympic champion Pete Kennaugh when he was racing for Team SKY - I keep a step on the plains and on false plans unimaginable with the BMC but the blank bill is honored by the BMC AMP when I face the climb in an easy way and that safeguards my heart in a great and absolute way. I wrote too much. Excuse me
 

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