Using E-Bike to get back into cycling.

MikeBike

New Member
Region
USA
City
Murfreesboro, TN
I’m a avid cyclist from way back and I really want/need to get back into cycling. I’ve somehow added some pounds since I haven’t been riding like I used to. Will an E-Bike help me get there? What do I need to look out for? Thanks in advance for your help and suggestions…
 

dodgeman

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Macomb, Illinois
Yes it will help. The best description I have heard of an e bike is you will ride further, faster, and more often. This seems to be true. What to look for? A huge choice. Lots of difference in price. Make a budget, my opinion is a quality e bike will cost at least $3000 and it’s very easy to spend more.
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Northeast Pennsylvania
My e-bike helped me continue the sport after two hip replacements and I've lost 20# over 3 seasons of riding. Prior to buying an e-bike, I was lucky to be able to ride 10 miles in a 2 hour period on my old Trek MTB. Now, I'm out there for 5 or 6 hours and cover 50 to 60 miles!

The best advice I can offer is to take some time and read the informative posts here on EBR. By all means, ask questions!

If you aren't mechanically inclined, test ride a few bikes at local bike shops that will support their products. E-bikes often require more service than their conventional counterparts. Travel if you have to but ride as many as you can!

If you aren't physically fit, consider a step thru model. The ease of mounting and dismounting can make a big difference in your enjoyment of the sport. This is especially true if you're older. You may be able to swing a leg over a diamond frame bike now but consider the future. E-bikes are expensive and you'll want to be able to ride as long as you can. I see many riders, including myself, who ride step thru bikes. The stigma of a man riding a "girls bike" has all but disappeared.

The number of available makes, models and styles can sometimes be daunting. Test riding will help you weed out the ones that don't suit your style of riding.

Keep in mind when you finally find a bike you like, there may be a considerable wait time for delivery.

Again, don't be afraid to ask specific questions. There are a great many here that are willing to help.

Welcome to the forum and good luck with your search!
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
Welcome to EBR. Since this is an ebike forum, we are all likely to recommend ebikes for almost everyone 😀.
As far as just weight loss, there are some on here that have lost a lot of weight via biking and diet, etc. There are others (me included) that haven't lost a single pound . There is a great thread about ebikes and health challenges here.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
As far as just weight loss, there are some on here that have lost a lot of weight via biking and diet, etc. There are others (me included) that haven't lost a single pound .
Metformin, diet, and riding make miracles :) Not sure whether you're qualifying for Metformin though!
 

EMGX

Well-Known Member
I’m a avid cyclist from way back and I really want/need to get back into cycling. I’ve somehow added some pounds since I haven’t been riding like I used to. Will an E-Bike help me get there? What do I need to look out for? Thanks in advance for your help and suggestions…
what is/are your current bike/bikes?
 

mclewis1

Active Member
Region
Canada
City
Fredericton, NB
Yes, along with EMGX's questions ... what kind of bike riding did you used to do (on or off road, distances, etc.)? What are your expectations now? What's your budget?
 

97redz3

New Member
Region
USA
I just bought a Gazelle 380+ with a gates drive and enviolo hub. It brings bikes into the modern age and makes my Tour Easy LWB recumbent and Rivendell step-through feel like dinosaurs. I LOVE riding this thing. I’m finding excuses to ride rather than excuses not to ride. I’m going farther and faster with way less effort. It’s an absolute hoot.

I’m using cycling to augment a weight loss program. With an e-bike, you can adjust the amount of electric boost to match your desired level of effort. If riding for fun or commuting, dial it up. If exercising, dial it back or take longer rides.

Something to watch out for is speed; these things are effortless to ride fast, and you’ll likely find yourself maintaining a faster pace than you’re able to achieve without boost. That introduces safety concerns. If you haven’t ridden in a while, take it slow until you’re sure of your ability to handle the bike’s weight and speed. Make sure you like the braking system and test its ability to panic stop. Be careful pedaling through turns until you understand the boost dynamics and your ability to maintain balance at higher speeds.

I’m so confident I made the right move that I’ve already sold my Rivendell. I have a feeling my recumbent won’t be far behind!
 

DaveMatthews

Well-Known Member
I wanted to get more exercise after a medical issue. Had always loved MTB and dirt bikes. Also disliked the idea of a trainer in the house because it seemed boring.
This was in 2018 and my lightbulb went on. Started researching ebikes and found numerous great options.
No regrets and now I'm out riding as often as possible. This year I've tripled my yearly output.
Do it. :)
 

fooferdoggie

Well-Known Member
I wanted to get more exercise after a medical issue. Had always loved MTB and dirt bikes. Also disliked the idea of a trainer in the house because it seemed boring.
This was in 2018 and my lightbulb went on. Started researching ebikes and found numerous great options.
No regrets and now I'm out riding as often as possible. This year I've tripled my yearly output.
Do it. :)
y cant imagine riding a Rainer. I need a reason to rid.e for me its to get to places and to make my wife happy on the tandem. no way I could 200+ miles a week on a trainer.
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Northeast Pennsylvania
My only regret is, I live in the northeastern US and there just aren't enough days with suitable weather to satisfy my desire to ride. I enjoy the sport so much, I'd be out there every day if I could. Right now, I'm a "fair weather" rider and look for temps between 40 and 85 degrees. Appropriately dressed, I'll ride in a light rain but avoid the downpours. I've tried riding in sub freezing temps but I'm just not comfortable on slippery surfaces. I've already had a bout of heat exhaustion when riding in humid 90 degree weather and that's no fun either.

I'd move to California, the southwest or Florida in a heartbeat if I could convince my wife to do so.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
In short, you need to define your mission as best possible, then find a suitable bike.

There's a school of thought too, that says plan on using this first bike to teach you enough to make MUCH better/more informed decisions when it comes to the next one. MANY (most?) of us struggled with the giant leap of faith required when it came to spending the money for our first bike (will this bike be used enough to justify it's price?). After that, and spending the next few months with a big grin that won't go away, it's not unusual at all to start making a shopping list of attributes desired on the next bike. And so it goes. You're hooked at that point.

One of the first calls that needs to be made early on is who is going to service this bike? Are you willing (including willing to learn as required) and able, with a place you can do this? Or, are you going to depend on a dealer? This is a really important call as it's going to affect what bike brands you have to choose from. Do not plan on getting a dealer to work on your bike that was purchased consumer direct without a previous agreement. You need to know many (most?) will refuse to work on anything they didn't sell. This is important to know because it affects you available bikes to select from. There is no point shopping consumer direct bikes if you are forced to shop at a dealer to get them to work on your bike....

If you are able and willing to do your own work, there's a TON of support available via forums like this one, Youtube videos, and dozens of articles written on about any aspect of an e-bike.

Regarding that first bike, back to that idea, assuming you decide that you really enjoy the e-bike concept and it's working out well for you, you may want to sell that first bike. Would just like to share that I think MANY will agree, the bikes sold by RAD are very likely going to be the easiest to sell with the best resale value. They are just killing it....

Happy hunting! -Al
 

Kayakguy

Active Member
My e-bike helped me continue the sport after two hip replacements and I've lost 20# over 3 seasons of riding. Prior to buying an e-bike, I was lucky to be able to ride 10 miles in a 2 hour period on my old Trek MTB. Now, I'm out there for 5 or 6 hours and cover 50 to 60 miles!

The best advice I can offer is to take some time and read the informative posts here on EBR. By all means, ask questions!

If you aren't mechanically inclined, test ride a few bikes at local bike shops that will support their products. E-bikes often require more service than their conventional counterparts. Travel if you have to but ride as many as you can!

If you aren't physically fit, consider a step thru model. The ease of mounting and dismounting can make a big difference in your enjoyment of the sport. This is especially true if you're older. You may be able to swing a leg over a diamond frame bike now but consider the future. E-bikes are expensive and you'll want to be able to ride as long as you can. I see many riders, including myself, who ride step thru bikes. The stigma of a man riding a "girls bike" has all but disappeared.

The number of available makes, models and styles can sometimes be daunting. Test riding will help you weed out the ones that don't suit your style of riding.

Keep in mind when you finally find a bike you like, there may be a considerable wait time for delivery.

Again, don't be afraid to ask specific questions. There are a great many here that are willing to help.

Welcome to the forum and good luck with your search!
When some sassy kid says, "Hey boomer, how come ya riding a girl's bike," you can say, "This ain't no girl's bike, kid, this here's a STEP THROUGH!"