Vado 4.0 SL or BMC CityOne

stevebmd

New Member
Region
USA
Hi All, recently bought a second hand Haibike SDuro 4.0 for my son, who has a daily 16 mile commute for school/sports. We got a great deal on a low mile bike with the older Yamaha PW mid drive. I have considered for myself a lighter weight bike to use for commuting to work 3-4 day a week and have been considering the above bikes. One is Class 1 the other classes three. One had concealed battery the other note. Anyone have any thoughts... Seems BMC bikes are not very common were as the specialized bikes are much more so. Help...BTW 51 year old who was an avid cyclist in the past, but needs to get back in the saddle
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
Don't know the BMC, but lots of Vado riders on here. I ride a Como, the comfortable alternative to the Vado from Specialized, and am pleased with it for casual riding in a hilly area with moderate temperatures.
My unscientific opinion is that class 3 speed is often overrated because of the hit to battery range involved in high speeds. But if your commute is long or in city traffic it might matter a lot to you. So perhaps tell us where you want to ride.
 

BEC111

Active Member
All I can say is I love my Vado SL. Art Deco’s comment on class 3 battery life is well taken, but I have to add that I can go well over 20 MPH at all three assist levels under the right conditions, though it’s easier at higher levels. I also was able to ride a couple of miles at about 18 mph the other day with no assist - I’d not fully charged up and was battery less.

I’m 73 and have only been riding as an adult for two years, so I’m not a super fit fellow.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
I should mention that I am neither skilled nor skinny, but those who are can do amazing distances and climbs on their stock class 3 Vados. Some do carry an extra battery.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
FWIW, Vado SL -- while it is an excellent leisure e-bike for healthy people -- is not a good commuter option. To really maintain speed in the range over 20 mph, you need both a strong motor and a large battery; Vado SL offers a low-power motor and small battery. Also, commuting assumes "no sweat": Vado SL is made the way to rely on the rider's leg power while "full power" e-bikes provide a lot of assistance to come to work dry. Third thing: as Vado SL battery is not removable, charging at workplace might turn to be problematic.

Now, BMC Alpenchallenge CityOne is a carbon-fibre e-bike equipped with a stronger motor than Vado SL but still of not the top torque, and it is Class 1. Now: If your area is infested with potholes -- don't buy it. Carbon-fibre frames are apt to crack, and few brands offer warranty on CF frames. (You would't like the thought of the frame breaking under you while commuting either).

If you think of combining commuting with leisure rides, a non-SL, or full power Vado (4.0 or 5.0) could be the answer.

Still, if your main goal Steve is commuting not recreation, just think of a 750 W hub-drive motor Class 3 e-bike: these are made for effortless commuting (but are not good for any workout).