Vado mount & dismount

rochrunner

Active Member
At my age and with all the running I've done over the years (tight hip flexors), there's no way I can stand on the ground and kick my leg over the seat to straddle the bike before starting out. I can do it if I lean the bike way over, but that's not always convenient. So the way I've been starting out on my bikes for years now is to put my left foot on the pedal, then push off and swing my leg over, and the reverse for dismounting. Never had a problem.

But today I was reading the Vado manual that I downloaded from Specialized and noted that in there they warn you never to do that since, with the motor assist, pushing on the pedal to start moving on one foot can cause the bike to "take off" a bit unexpectedly and cause a fall or whatever.

So does anyone here get on and off their bike like I do? Is it really "dangerous"? I don't have mine yet so am only going by what the manual says at this point. (And yes, I'm aware that a step-through would get around this issue.)
 

Nxkharra

Active Member
At my age and with all the running I've done over the years (tight hip flexors), there's no way I can stand on the ground and kick my leg over the seat to straddle the bike before starting out. I can do it if I lean the bike way over, but that's not always convenient. So the way I've been starting out on my bikes for years now is to put my left foot on the pedal, then push off and swing my leg over, and the reverse for dismounting. Never had a problem.

But today I was reading the Vado manual that I downloaded from Specialized and noted that in there they warn you never to do that since, with the motor assist, pushing on the pedal to start moving on one foot can cause the bike to "take off" a bit unexpectedly and cause a fall or whatever.

So does anyone here get on and off their bike like I do? Is it really "dangerous"? I don't have mine yet so am only going by what the manual says at this point. (And yes, I'm aware that a step-through would get around this issue.)
@rochrunner , I always start my bike the way you described. This was taught to me when I was a kid.
I did (and sometime still do) start my Vado the same way except recently due to my knee issue I have to lean the bike and get on. I don’t like it but I have to do that. Interesting that my current uncomfortable way is the recommended way.
some days wish I had step through version. But I am old and that version used to be called ladies version and that made me buy the step over. Oh well...I guess I will continue to ride like men.
 

rochrunner

Active Member
@rochrunner , I always start my bike the way you described. This was taught to me when I was a kid.
I did (and sometime still do) start my Vado the same way except recently due to my knee issue I have to lean the bike and get on. I don’t like it but I have to do that. Interesting that my current uncomfortable way is the recommended way.
some days wish I had step through version. But I am old and that version used to be called ladies version and that made me buy the step over. Oh well...I guess I will continue to ride like men.
You're right -- I probably picked up that habit when I was a kid. Which makes me think exactly how long I've been riding bicycles!! As in the attached photo ;)
 

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Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
@rochrunner, I am in a similar position to yours but from different reasons. My legs suffer from inadequate blood supply. So I have to lean my bike to a side very much and straddle the step-through frame first.

I created a thread under General Discussion a couple days ago to ask users how they mount their high-step frames. The best answer was:
Put the pedal on your side to the 6 o'clock position, step onto the pedal and straddle the bike as usual. For added safety, set the Assist Mode to OFF (0).

A variation of the technique is:
Keep the handlebars firmly with both hands. With the pedal at 6 o'clock position, step onto the pedal and give the bike momentum by swinging the other leg on the ground, then straddle the bike as usual. Assist Mode OFF (0) is recommended for safety.

The third option is to buy and install a dropper post. The MTB dropper post lets you slide the saddle down by pushing a lever on the handlebars and simultaneously pushing the saddle down. It is very easy to mount (and especially dismount) the bike with the dropper post. Once you have mounted the bike with the saddle down, you just stand on the pedals to make the bike move, press the lever and the saddle slides up to the original position. Before any stop, you activate the lever and press the saddle down with your body. It lets you patiently wait at the signals with both feet on the ground and it also makes dismounting easy and elegant as there is no saddle/post in the way of your leg.

Driven by an advice of a Forum user, I have ordered a suspended dropper post from PNW, the only in its kind. (A regular dropper post has no suspension). If you order any dropper post, pay attention to three factors:
  1. The diameter of your original seatpost. The Vado seatpost diameter is 30.9 mm.
  2. The cable routing shall be external. The dropper seat post cable needs to run along the tube of the frame on the outside. (The internal cable would require disassembling the bike! Don't!)
  3. Choose such a lever that can be easily mounted on your handlebars.
If you are not mechanically apt, leave the setup to your LBS.
That's what I ordered, it is only an example:
1582608706518.png


Here is how the Puget 2x lever looks like:
1582608800078.png

The link to the web-page:
 
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rochrunner

Active Member
The third option is to buy and install a dropper post. The MTB dropper post lets you slide the saddle down by pushing a lever on the handlebars and simultaneously pushing the saddle down. It is very easy to mount (and especially dismount) the bike with the dropper post. Once you have mounted the bike with the saddle down, you just stand on the pedals to make the bike move, press the lever and the saddle slides up to the original position. Before any stop, you activate the lever and press the saddle down with your body. It lets you patiently wait at the signals with both feet on the ground and it also makes dismounting easy and elegant as there is no saddle/post in the way of your leg.
Thanks, Stefan! I'm aware of dropper posts from various mentions by MTB people and had an idea of what they did, but never really looked at the details of how they work. This might be a good option although I'm really adverse to having a cable running externally along the top tube. When I get the bike I'll have to check to see if the internal routing option is feasible (I'm a decent bike mechanic) or if there's some other option. But first I'll have to decide if I need to go that way at all if I'm comfortable doing what I've always done.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Please don't :D Have you seen the video where a mechanic dismantles a Vado into small pieces just to route cables for the TCD-W display? First of all, the Vado harness will not allow yet another cable to be routed...
 

FreeWheelie

Active Member
I mount the same way. Just make sure the medal is at the lowest point before pushing off and you wont get an unexpected boost. You dont even need to be really moving, just use it as a step and then start pedaling
 

Nxkharra

Active Member
I have issues with my left knee which is the one I used to mount the bike. Now I raise my right leg while the left is on the ground. I have to lean the bike to be able to mount.
oh well. Sucks getting old but at least I can ride.
 

Nxkharra

Active Member
The same here but because my legs "got heavy" due to my illnesses.
The other way to mount is to get on the seat with both legs still on the left side (f you mount on the left side) and bring your leg over the bar from front. This is similar to ladies mounting on horse.
I like this and have seen some ladies do that well but haven’t been able to do it myself.
this will prevent loading fully on my left leg (bad knee).
 

Hanz

Member
I once seen a blue tooth enable dropper post. I don’t want to have a external cable on my beautiful Vado. Anyone with experience with this type of dropper post?
 

rochrunner

Active Member
I once seen a blue tooth enable dropper post. I don’t want to have a external cable on my beautiful Vado. Anyone with experience with this type of dropper post?
Here you go, but it's a lot of money (about 1/4 the price of the bike!).
https://www.jensonusa.com/Rockshox-Reverb-Axs-150mm-Seatpost

Or here's a slightly less outrageous one (and what the heck is "Royal Blood" mineral oil? Does the Queen know about this?).
https://www.jensonusa.com/Magura-Vyron-eLECT-Seatpost
 

e-levity

Member
You might consider a KS (Kind Shock) eTen dropper post. They employ a simple lever under the seat and do not require a cable.
The post comes in different drops (75-125mm), overall lengths, and diameters. Cost is about $100.

I use a 75mm dropper on my Vado 6. Main reason is to lower the seat at times for better handling, but it does also help getting on & off.

You can't see it very well in my Avatar, but click on the thumbnail image below to enlarge.
 

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Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
By the way, the dropper post you bought appears to be air-filled. Does that mean that you have to have a high-pressure MTB shock pump with a gauge and all that?
I presume so. The suspension dropper post is expected to be delivered the coming Monday. I'm going straight to the LBS with the Vado and the delivery, and the mechanic will do everything necessary. I will report.
 

rochrunner

Active Member
You might consider a KS (Kind Shock) eTen dropper post. They employ a simple lever under the seat and do not require a cable.
The post comes in different drops (75-125mm), overall lengths, and diameters. Cost is about $100.

I use a 75mm dropper on my Vado 6. Main reason is to lower the seat at times for better handling, but it does also help getting on & off.

You can't see it very well in my Avatar, but click on the thumbnail image below to enlarge.
That looks like a reasonable solution that won't break the bank. After all, I'm not a MTBer who needs to constantly pop the seat up and down for quick maneuvers or tackling steep downhills!
 

Marci jo

Well-Known Member
I presume so. The suspension dropper post is expected to be delivered the coming Monday. I'm going straight to the LBS with the Vado and the delivery, and the mechanic will do everything necessary. I will report.
Looking forward to to how the suspension dropper post works on the Vado. A dropper post would be great in town at all the stop lights and stop signs. However, I absolutely love the Kinect seat post that I currently use so it be a tough decision to switch.