Vado SL 4.0: Alternative pedals , chainring ?

rochrunner

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Rochester Hills
As a Lefty who does not automatically know left from right - yikes!!!!

I have SPD pedals on ALL of my bikes. I goofed when I got the Creo as I could have removed a pair from a bike I really don't use and saved some money. But both mt bikes had spd pedals. I mt biked in Moab on some gnarly terrain with them. I guess those "cleaty/pinny" things are the new scheme. I like being able to pull the pedal around to position with the cleats. Years ago I had toe clips and my first clipless were Look - stopping on a hill was like being on ice skates with that plastic glob on the sole ready to slide any which way!
Same here. I've put them on my road bikes for years so that I can wear shoes that I can actually walk around in when off the bike.
 

PedalUma

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I put some better handlebars on my friend Alan's Vado. They have a bit of rise and sweep back. We also put on a better saddle for his needs. It is gel with a prostate cutout, $40. He is still riding the sandpaper pedals and I am trying to get him motivated to upgrade them so he can get more back sweep and lift. I just visualize that pedals tighten when going forwards - otherwise they would fall out. Bottom brackets are the opposite so they are extracted in the direction of pedaling forwards. But that will not be an issue with this bike. Show some photos.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
There were several things that made me resign from using (otherwise excellent) Shimano PD-324 MTB clipless pedals:
  • Always the wrong side up. I'd expect the cleat receiver would always point up (there are other pedals that have receivers on two or even four sides)
  • You ride up a crossing and your field of view is obscured by hedge rows. You have spotted a car approaching the junction at the very last moment, so you energetically brake. Even if PD-324 allow you unclip by any of three different heel movements, you have no time for that and majestically crash. Hopefully not under the car.
  • You need to wear special shoes, the sole of which has a hole. Good luck in wintertime!
  • No possibility to change the foot orientation/position. While a healthy rider feels nothing wrong with that, a person like me suffers feet numbness soon.
It is necessary to mention I'm talking about the SPD-MTB system and a novice pedals. Now, try the SPD-SL (road bike pedals/shoes). You'll discover that system expects you to spend 100% of time in the saddle (not 99; I said 100%), and you better do not try to brake at all... (A known saying of roadies is "Brakes? Road bike doesn't need any brakes!")
 
Last edited:

PedalUma

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I like riding on road and off with lightweight rock climbing shoes and supper grippy pedals. Last week I went down stairs on a trail as part of a 35-mile ride. I would not do that clipped in. It is getting dry in California. That is me on the same trail with the stair run.
 

Attachments

  • 07152101.jpg
    07152101.jpg
    371.1 KB · Views: 23