Vado sl

MRE

Member
I have a 2017 Turbo with the year hub motor. It has a much larger motor than the Vado 4.0 sl but also weighs a lot less.
With my older Turbo in turbo mode I have no problem with LONG and STEEP hills.
My question:
1. anyone have a Vado SL that also rode the older Turbo and can compare the 2?
2. How does the Vado 4.0 SL do on long, steep hills?
 

Allan47.7339

Active Member
I have a 2015 Turbo S and a 2021 Vado SL 5EQ. I used the Turbo S for commuting generally set at 40% with full turbo for only a few busy intersections and steep hills when I was tired. The Vado SL at full turbo is about like the Turbo S at half power so hills will require more rider input. The Vado SL will not be passing everyone on long steep hills but you will still feel the help. The Vado SL is ride-able with the power off and I usually ride the flat sections with no assist to increase the range. The Turbo S feels like a loaded touring bike with the power off so I don't use that mode except under duress. I once had to ride the 18 miles to home from work due to a battery issue. The Specialized calls the Vado 4x you and the Vado SL is 2x you. The Vado SL is lower power but you get a much lower weight and a bike that rides well without always using power. I call it a class 3 ebike with a class 1 motor which means you will never be fighting the cutoff at 20mph and you probably will not have enough rider input to get it to the acutal 28 mph limit. It doesn't have unusual acceleration if you are riding in a group.
 

Oberst

Well-Known Member
The regular Vado vs the SL is basically a diesel truck vs a sports car (high torque at low revs vs less torque but good horsepower requiring high revs). I consolidated from a Vado, a Levo and a Creo E5 to a Levo and a Creo Carbon Comp Evo. Picked up the Creo yesterday and took a short test ride. To get from my neighborhood to a series of bike paths requires a short dirt trail with a steep section (uphill coming home, of course). With the Creo, I felt the hill much more with the Vado but I was able to get up whereas on a regular bike I would have had to walk. By late Spring should be a lot easier with better fitness.
On the other hand, I was able to ride on the flats with power completely off with zero drag whereas the regular Vado with no power is a struggle for me.
Basically, if I am having a weak, lazy day, the Levo will be my ride and get me up anything and the Creo will make me work harder for the same result.
 

MRE

Member
I have a 2015 Turbo S and a 2021 Vado SL 5EQ. I used the Turbo S for commuting generally set at 40% with full turbo for only a few busy intersections and steep hills when I was tired. The Vado SL at full turbo is about like the Turbo S at half power so hills will require more rider input. The Vado SL will not be passing everyone on long steep hills but you will still feel the help. The Vado SL is ride-able with the power off and I usually ride the flat sections with no assist to increase the range. The Turbo S feels like a loaded touring bike with the power off so I don't use that mode except under duress. I once had to ride the 18 miles to home from work due to a battery issue. The Specialized calls the Vado 4x you and the Vado SL is 2x you. The Vado SL is lower power but you get a much lower weight and a bike that rides well without always using power. I call it a class 3 ebike with a class 1 motor which means you will never be fighting the cutoff at 20mph and you probably will not have enough rider input to get it to the acutal 28 mph limit. It doesn't have unusual acceleration if you are riding in a group.
Thanks. I'm hoping Specialized comes up with a motor with a bit more power/torque.
 

Allan47.7339

Active Member
The Vado has stronger motor and bigger battery. The design goal for the Vado SL is a moderately assisted bicycle that is rideable without power and relatively light. I think when they get better batteries they would use that to increase the range and make it lighter.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
The Vado has stronger motor and bigger battery. The design goal for the Vado SL is a moderately assisted bicycle that is rideable without power and relatively light. I think when they get better batteries they would use that to increase the range and make it lighter.
SL e-bikes are not for everyone. I doubt more and more if I would be happy with a Vado SL. But... What a beautiful e-bike!