We pedal our bikes. Dealers peddle (sell) bikes.

Handlebars

Well-Known Member
Region
Canada
OK, EBR grammar goons, explain why a) is correct and b) is not correct, or forever hold your piece.
a) I am at EBR Forum, aren't I?
b) I am at EBR Forum, amn't I?
 

voidedwarranty

Well-Known Member
OK, EBR grammar goons, explain why a) is correct and b) is not correct, or forever hold your piece.
a) I am at EBR Forum, aren't I?
b) I am at EBR Forum, amn't I?
They are both correct. One is just less common and known about. "amn't I" is a very Ireland/Scotland way of speaking. "aren't I" is standard English
 

voidedwarranty

Well-Known Member
They are both correct. One is just less common and known about. "amn't I" is a very Ireland/Scotland way of speaking. "aren't I" is standard English

I'm not a grammar goon however I do try to be as correct as I can. All of my posts are done via smartphone so errors slip and you will find most of my posts are edited after the fact to correct grammatical mistakes.
 

Lantley

Member
Correct grammar is necessary to get your point across.
Misplaced punctuation, a missing comma or misspelled word can change the meaning of a sentence.
If others cannot understand what your trying to say, there is no longer 2 way communication going on! If communication is lost there is no point in posting.o_O
 

Handlebars

Well-Known Member
Region
Canada
They are both correct. One is just less common and known about. "amn't I" is a very Ireland/Scotland way of speaking. "aren't I" is standard English
I heard "amn't" from a German.
But nothing yet explains it by any rules.
"I are", isn't in good form - or is it?
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Nevada City, CA & Paradise Valley, AZ
Lesson time, then. Why the difference pronouncing the "a" in "cat", "car", and "call"?
What can I say, it's 'American'. Those of us brought up with it can barely speak it, much less communicate with it. 🤣
 

tomjasz

Well-Known Member
Correct grammar is necessary to get your point across.
Misplaced punctuation, a missing comma or misspelled word can change the meaning of a sentence.
If others cannot understand what your trying to say, there is no longer 2 way communication going on! If communication is lost there is no point in posting.o_O
Oh FFS. Nothing here is that critical. I retired in 2007, to never again give two hoots about my grammar. But a few misteaks due drive me nuts...and it’s a shoret trip. :eek:
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
I'm so glad English is my second language. The only issues I'm experiencing with written English are: (a) proper use of "a" and "the" in sentences; (b) sequence of tenses. Neither (a) nor (b) occur in my mother's tongue (Polish).
 

Handlebars

Well-Known Member
Region
Canada
I'm so glad English is my second language. The only issues I'm experiencing with written English are: (a) proper use of "a" and "the" in sentences; (b) sequence of tenses. Neither (a) nor (b) occur in my mother's tongue (Polish).
1609589902466.png

Do the Polish polish Polish shoes?
 

Gionnirocket

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Y. O.
So a chinease man pedalled me a Bafang BBS02B for my acoustic bicycle.
Now when I peddle, its very easy.. but reindeering it no longer analog, especially if I use the throttle. 👍
 

Readytoride

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Loudoun County, Virginia
...
And use more paragraph breaks, people! The older I get, the harder it becomes to follow 20+ line paragraphs, even without run-on sentences and frequent misspellings.

Shall I go on?...
[Rising from my seat in the audience...]

If I may speak, as a writer, of course, in the defense of the planned and well articulated "run on sentence"? There is a time and place for them in a narrative when a writer wants to pull their audience into a particular scene or moment in time by stretching out the descriptive to fully paint, in articulate exhaustion, the background surroundings. However, the trick to the run-on being a success (here is the key) is the immediate follow up by a quick two or three word sentence. Rather like a cymbal crashing "one hit" crescendo to finish a prolonged draw of stretched out notes from the string section of an orchestra.

It's a wonderful literary technique, but requires educated fitness to pull It off. In essence, done correctly the "long drop followed by a short stop" can be very freshening to the reader's mind, cleanse the mental palate, so to speak, and set them up eager to read what follows.

Can't do too many of them in a rendition, however, as they do tend to muddle some readers with eleventh hour minds, regardless of the following "short stop".

[Starting to sit down, but then half rising for a moment]

BTW - Won't speak in defense of misspellings. I loath them... (said while glaring sideways at Spellchecker for its constant attempts to circumvent oftentimes quite correct spelling for something decidedly off the wall rediculous and highly irritating, nay, make that keyboard pounding, infuratingly incorrect, that this maniacal piece of supposedly "helpful" software attempts to implement into a previously pristine piece of literary genius to make it look like it was written by the village idiot. I'd stab it with a pointy object if I could...IF I wasn't all worried about accidentally destroying my laptop, or tablet or phone, or whatever digital device I'm using to write upon at the moment) ...but accept them as a product of rushing a story to press without checking to see if all the nomenclature is spelled and used correctly, or if it has been highjacked (hijacked?) by a software assistant that is well-known for "behind one's back" re-editing that can be infuriating at best, and murderous at worst.

Thank you.

[Continuing to stare daggers at Spellcheck while sitting down again with popcorn in one hand and pointy pen in the other.]
 

voidedwarranty

Well-Known Member
[Rising from my seat in the audience...]

If I may speak, as a writer, of course, in the defense of the planned and well articulated "run on sentence"? There is a time and place for them in a narrative when a writer wants to pull their audience into a particular scene or moment in time by stretching out the descriptive to fully paint, in articulate exhaustion, the background surroundings. However, the trick to the run-on being a success (here is the key) is the immediate follow up by a quick two or three word sentence. Rather like a cymbal crashing "one hit" crescendo to finish a prolonged draw of stretched out notes from the string section of an orchestra.

It's a wonderful literary technique, but requires educated fitness to pull It off. In essence, done correctly the "long drop followed by a short stop" can be very freshening to the reader's mind, cleanse the mental palate, so to speak, and set them up eager to read what follows.

Can't do too many of them in a rendition, however, as they do tend to muddle some readers with eleventh hour minds, regardless of the following "short stop".

[Starting to sit down, but then half rising for a moment]

BTW - Won't speak in defense of misspellings. I loath them... (said while glaring sideways at Spellchecker for its constant attempts to circumvent oftentimes quite correct spelling for something decidedly off the wall rediculous and highly irritating, nay, make that keyboard pounding, infuratingly incorrect, that this maniacal piece of supposedly "helpful" software attempts to implement into a previously pristine piece of literary genius to make it look like it was written by the village idiot. I'd stab it with a pointy object if I could...IF I wasn't all worried about accidentally destroying my laptop, or tablet or phone, or whatever digital device I'm using to write upon at the moment) ...but accept them as a product of rushing a story to press without checking to see if all the nomenclature is spelled and used correctly, or if it has been highjacked (hijacked?) by a software assistant that is well-known for "behind one's back" re-editing that can be infuriating at best, and murderous at worst.

Thank you.

[Continuing to stare daggers at Spellcheck while sitting down again with popcorn in one hand and pointy pen in the other.]
I see what you did there. You just made me want to put my phone down and pick up a good book. Thank you. 👍👍
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
said while glaring sideways at Spellchecker for its constant attempts to circumvent oftentimes quite correct spelling for something decidedly off the wall rediculous and highly irritating,
"rediculous"? :D
The problem is, "peddle" is a valid word for a Spellchecker...