What bike to choose? Furo x max vs Volt Metro

naya812

New Member
Region
United Kingdom
Hi guys,

Im buying my first ebike and I think ive narrowed it down to these two. The main points it should hit for me are:

1. I need to ride minimum 10 miles 2 times a week. The main thing is id like to not feel tired on my journey and perhaps arrive at my destination a little quicker than I currently do(takes me about 30 mins), so may use higher assist levels? Im sure most ebikes cover this range anyway.

2. Weight is a big one for me, im an 8 stone female and dont really want to end up with a bike thats too heavy, I currently ride a decathlon single speed bike thats 13kg which is perfect for me weight wise. I dont mind heavier but not if its going to feel drastically different.

3. Should be folding.

4. 20'' Wheels preferably.

I am also open to doing a conversion job on my single speed bike, was thinking of getting a Bafang motor like the Furo X and converting it myself too, what do you think? Open to any suggestions!

Heres the spec pages for each:

Furo X (Max)

Volt Metro (Standard one)


My current bike - Decathlon Btwin Single Speed Folding

What bike do you guys think is better overall or more suitable, thanks in advance!

Maria x
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
Unless you have a dirty shop area with a vise, bench, drill motor, drill set, hacksaw, set wrenches & drivers, plus a terminal crimp tool, I wouldn't try a conversion. Not likely in London, but you may be out in the country somewhere.
I don't see bike weight being crucial for an electric bike, unless you have to lift it up stairs or into a motor vehicle. In particular, that furo carbon fiber has no business being ridden at speed. Your pavement may be much more perfect than mine, pavement was certainly perfect in W. Germany when I was there Reforger 82. But I wouldn't ride 20" wheels through a pot hole. Then again, I don't have to store my bike in a closet.
The 11 speed rear on one of the bikes with a mid drive would get you about 500 miles per chain at speed. Not too practical for a commuter. I get about 5000 miles per chain with an 8 speed hub driven bike. About 2 1/2 years.
UK is pretty civilized, I'd say connect with a local dealer. Ebikes are subject to flaky electrical problems and if you pay more than the $221 I did for motor+controller+display+handles+PASpickup, then you want a dealer to handle hassling with the factory. At $221, I just threw away my system when it wore out (4500 miles) and bolted on another hub motor.
And for an ebike, don't be afraid of 6120 aluminum cast frame. Mine has lasted 6000 miles so far, no issues, and I weigh it down with up to 80 lb groceries or ag supplies. If you find picking it up annoying, lift more weights. I do in the winter, & I'm age 70. Summers I spend picking up tree limbs & throwing them in the gulley; no weights required. Carbon fiber frames are for racers, not for commuters. I pedal 174 lb bike+groceries up grades up to 15%, frequently unpowered, and it doesn't run my heart rate up over 144. That is more than me, I'm 160-170 lb. I'm pretty slow though, I average 8-9 mph. Club riders blow by me without speaking or waving. Pavement & derailleurs are wonderfully efficient.
 
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McCorby

Well-Known Member
The 11 speed rear on one of the bikes with a mid drive would get you about 500 miles per chain at speed. Not too practical for a commuter.
I don’t think this is true at all. If you don’t lug the bike in higher gears, and you perform simple chain maintenance, there’s no reason you can’t get a few thousand miles on a chain.

Edit: With more thought, depending on riding habits and with an 11 speed cassette, 3000 miles may be a slight ”stretch”, but a couple thousand miles on a chain should be doable. Definitely more than 500 miles!
 
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naya812

New Member
Region
United Kingdom
Unless you have a dirty shop area with a vise, bench, drill motor, drill set, hacksaw, set wrenches & drivers, plus a terminal crimp tool, I wouldn't try a conversion. Not likely in London, but you may be out in the country somewhere.
I don't see bike weight being crucial for an electric bike, unless you have to lift it up stairs or into a motor vehicle. In particular, that furo carbon fiber has no business being ridden at speed. Your pavement may be much more perfect than mine, pavement was certainly perfect in W. Germany when I was there Reforger 82. But I wouldn't ride 20" wheels through a pot hole. Then again, I don't have to store my bike in a closet.
The 11 speed rear on one of the bikes with a mid drive would get you about 500 miles per chain at speed. Not too practical for a commuter. I get about 5000 miles per chain with an 8 speed hub driven bike. About 2 1/2 years.
UK is pretty civilized, I'd say connect with a local dealer. Ebikes are subject to flaky electrical problems and if you pay more than the $221 I did for motor+controller+display+handles+PASpickup, then you want a dealer to handle hassling with the factory. At $221, I just threw away my system when it wore out (4500 miles) and bolted on another hub motor.
And for an ebike, don't be afraid of 6120 aluminum cast frame. Mine has lasted 6000 miles so far, no issues, and I weigh it down with up to 80 lb groceries or ag supplies. If you find picking it up annoying, lift more weights. I do in the winter, & I'm age 70. Summers I spend picking up tree limbs & throwing them in the gulley; no weights required. Carbon fiber frames are for racers, not for commuters. I pedal 174 lb bike+groceries up grades up to 15%, frequently unpowered, and it doesn't run my heart rate up over 144. That is more than me, I'm 160-170 lb. I'm pretty slow though, I average 8-9 mph. Club riders blow by me without speaking or waving. Pavement & derailleurs are wonderfully efficient.

Thanks indianajo, I do have most of those tools and space to do it so that wouldnt be a problem if I needed them. I was thinking a rear hub motor if I was converting it. I like the idea of a cheaper solution though, because it does make me slighly nervous to lock up an expensive ebike when I go shopping compared to something that didnt cost so much.

Well the Volt is a local dealer, so in that sense it may be a better choice.

Without going into too much detail, Im mainly getting this bike as I have to care for my mum, and while I dont generally mind getting stronger or putting up with a bit more weight, those days can be stressful for me so for this particular journey I just want it to be as easy as it can be as I normally finish the day around 10pm before I have to come back home and by that time I can be physically and emotionally tired, so if I can get a bike that will be as easy as possible to use all the better. Although thats good to hear if you think I wont really notice its weight, although I have to bear in mind I will want to fold it and transport it sometimes but I dont think that will be too often.
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
I find pedaling the bike and watching the scenery roll by wonderfully relaxing. Yes my muscles are working, sometimes pretty hard, but my mind is just recording the variations of the land. Even in town people change their houses & lots around, always something. Sometimes a raccoon, fox, rabbit, cat, or horse. Nothing like driving with all the hassles and competition. I just have to pay attention at intersections, driveways, and bad pavement. Then, if I had a good workout, when I get home I don't have trouble falling asleep at night (unless I'm sneezing). Bodies used give you lots of benefits, read Dr. Ken Cooper. Being in shape helped a lot when I had covid19 for 137 days this summer. No hospital or drugs required, just patience with weakness fatigue dizzyness & headaches. Still rode the bike to/from summer camp, just a little slower some days.
 
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vincent

Well-Known Member
i like furo but agree good pavement etc would matter

big weight jump to the volt but a local dealer would be good, do they have any to rent for a week...??

if you dont really need 2 bikes i think the kit is a good idea, not sure how hard it is to do the hub motor vs like a bbs02, may be the same amount of work