What do I need for my new bike?

antboy

Well-Known Member
On my analog road bike, can't ride without the padded shorts. On my ebike which I added the kinekt seat post, don't need the padded shorts. And I have done a 50 mile ride on the new ebike without the padded shorts.

For long distance riding, I can't recommend a suspension seat post enough. It's a world of difference. Personally, I'm using the Redshift Shockstop. Was looking at the Kinekt, but I was considering a Kinekt, but I didn't have enough clearance between the seat and the top of seat tube.

I'd also recommend a suspension stem to @bigcanoe but I don't think there's an easy way to add that to a Lectric XP without completely rethinking the handlebars.
 

cldlhd

Active Member
While I am waiting for my bike to be delivered, I am shopping for the extras I will need.

Helmet (ordered)
Toolkit, tire pump (any recs)
Water bottle and holder (any recs)
Anything else I am forgetting? This is my first new bike in over 20 years so I want to be sure I am prepared :)
I bought an Lectric XP step thru.
I like the bike tool bottle holder and mini pump that mounts right to it, I got it on Amazon for a good price. I got a saddlebag and a tool kit which has come in handy, I slimed both my tubes but after removing the rear wheel and putting it back on I don't think if, God forbid, I get a flat out on a ride I'll be changing it by the side of the road. Maybe it'll get easier over time but I'd rather just do it at home. Guess that all depends on where you're riding, sometimes on the Delaware canal I'm A little bit remote but if it's a slow leak I'd rather pump it up and take it home or call a buddy and throw it in the back of his truck and deal with it at my house. But I guess that's a subject for a different thread.
I got the suntour suspension seat post which helped but, even though it's aesthetically I don't like it as much, I bought a cloud 9 seat which has helped a lot on long rides. I'll admit I wasn't an avid biker before and I am 50 now but with the range of the bike I have gone on a few 4-hour rides and with the standard seat I would have been pretty sore.
 

Latitude

Well-Known Member
I would add a couple of quick links to repair the chain, and possibly a few extra links. Small chain breaker, could be part of a multi-tool. I have had to use them on the trail. Small needlenose pliers to remove something puncturing the tire or help with the chain links. Valve stem remover if using Stan’s no-tubes or similar. A couple of sizes of zip ties. A small towel to clean your hands. Face mask if you need to enter an establishment requiring one. If you have room, an ultralight rain jacket or poncho and helmet cover.
 
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Taylor57

Well-Known Member
I would add a couple of quick links to repair the chain, and possibly a few extra links. Small chain breaker, could be part of a multi-tool. I have had to use them on the trail. Small needlenose pliers to remove something puncturing the tire or help with the chain links. Valve stem remover if using Stan’s no-tubes or similar. A couple of sizes of zip ties. A small towel to clean your hands. Face mask if you need to enter an establishment requiring one.
Dont forget snips that can cut zip ties
 

Luto

Active Member
I put in some Band-Aids and sterile wipes for scrapes and a pair of latex gloves to handle the chain...
 

Adrian.s

Member
You ll be surprised what you think of lolll, torque kit,chain lube wet and dry, degreaser, pouch or saddle bags and a big plastic bag you cant take your electric xp out in rain your going to loose the warranty,happy trails good luck with your next bike lolll🚴
 

john peck

Well-Known Member
If you don't have them, padded bike shorts/pants. Your butt will thank you. ;)
I guess that´s okay if you want the baboon backside look, but too much padding generates a lot of heat;
you might cook yur cahones.🥵 On the plus side, it´s cheaper than a vasectomy.
 
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iabob

Member
I guess that´s okay if you want the baboon backside look, but too much padding generates a lot of heat;
you might cook yur cahones.🥵 On the plus side, it´s cheaper than a vasectomy.
Having returned to biking after a long hiatus I’m at a loss. Back in the day chamois lined shorts were the bomb. But today all I can find is synthetic and padded. I tried an pricey pair of shorts, but couldn’t get over the feeling I was wearing a diaper. I thought I would get used to them, but I haven’t.
 

MartsEbike

Active Member
Others have covered most bits, but following on Art Deco's post about carrying a first aid kit... I would add to that kit Pocket Tissues.

I once had a nasty fall at speed and fell badly, blood pouring out everywhere, my only saving grace was this passer-by who came to my rescue, and pulled out a brand new pack of pocket tissues and gave them to me. Luckily it was just what I needed, and I used the whole pack to stem the flow and clean up the mess afterwards... Anyways, since then I've always carried a new pack of Pocket Tissues. You never know, it maybe you, or a friend in the same position and I couldn't believe how grateful I was that gentleman had those tissues on him...

So yeah, if I can pass on a life lesson on what do you need its this one :D
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
Hi Stefan,
I'm using CO2 cartridges for my emergency air supply. My bike bag is too small to fit a minipump, however, the gauge on my Lezyne pump at home is most certainly a convenience.
I understand. The MTB mini-pump is meant for the rider to occasionally relieve tyre pressure for riding difficult trail segments and then to re-inflate the tyre :)
 

Mr. Coffee

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
A Demented Corner of the North Cascades
There are also a lot of accessories that you'll inevitably want at home even if you don't carry them:
  1. A really good floor pump.
  2. Chain lubricant.
  3. Brushes for cleaning the bike. Some people like automotive wheel brushes.
  4. A big tube of grease.
  5. A big tube of binding paste (do not confuse 4 with 5).
  6. Shop towels.
  7. A big toolbox for all of the tools and gadgets you will accumulate in the coming years.