What happens when your Ebike you ordered on the Internet breaks?

Taylor57

Well-Known Member
I called around to a local mobile bike repair and a bricks and mortar bike repair shop here in Palm Springs. What I found out from both is interesting. Both are hesitant bordering on refusing to work on Ebikes. The reason:

" You worked on my ebike to fix X, and now Y does not work". I wonder if it is the ebike shop screwing up or the customer being unrealistic? It sounds like more a function of the bike shops not being very well versed in Ebikes and not having the expertise to fix our electric beasts. I'm wondering how good they are at fixing their own brands they sell like Trek, Specialized etc. I'm an insurance agent, but if I was 20 years younger I would be an Ebike tech!

I guess my Ebike shop will continue to be a Youtube video!
 

MikeDD

Active Member
My local Specialized bike shop is well trained in servicing Specialized e-bikes and sell all they can get.
 

Taylor57

Well-Known Member
I can understand a shop not wanting to deal with the electronics but a tire?
I hear ya, but these days I am not surprised. Even my old mechanic was struggling with fixing my Audis. It got to where I would have to go on Youtube and find the video on how to fix my own car. Some shops and mechanics stay up with tech and it appears many elect to remain in the dark. I now just pay the money to the dealer...
 

legsofbeer

Active Member
I can understand a shop not wanting to deal with the electronics but a tire?
Removing and remounting a rear wheel on a rear hub drive bike is non-trivial work and the details may vary from model to model. The shop's concern that they would get blamed for any connector or motor problems post-fix are legit. The first time I fixed a rear flat it took nearly two hours, though a lot of that was watching videos. Now I have it down to half an hour, but don't bother carrying the tools to do it on the road. 40 bucks cash and "yo, taxi!" is my plan if it happens too far from home.

Still, if it's a non-motor wheel, or maybe even if it is, if you the customer bring just the wheel to the shop they'll likely do it.

ETA: a buddy broke a couple spokes far from home, limped to the nearest bike shop. They wouldn't fix the drive wheel themselves, but they sold him a couple new spokes and let him use their rack to install the spokes himself.
 

Taylor57

Well-Known Member
I think my Espin Sport rear wheel flat would be a fairly easy flat repair, but the Lectric XP rear flat looks like an ordeal. Im with you legs, if I get a rear flat, it;s hello AAA and then my next call would be to my son to come over and have a beer!
 

ruffruff

Well-Known Member
Removing and remounting a rear wheel on a rear hub drive bike is non-trivial work and the details may vary from model to model. The shop's concern that they would get blamed for any connector or motor problems post-fix are legit. The first time I fixed a rear flat it took nearly two hours, though a lot of that was watching videos. Now I have it down to half an hour, but don't bother carrying the tools to do it on the road. 40 bucks cash and "yo, taxi!" is my plan if it happens too far from home.

Still, if it's a non-motor wheel, or maybe even if it is, if you the customer bring just the wheel to the shop they'll likely do it.

ETA: a buddy broke a couple spokes far from home, limped to the nearest bike shop. They wouldn't fix the drive wheel themselves, but they sold him a couple new spokes and let him use their rack to install the spokes himself.
Ya, I suppose. I was thinking mid-drives.
 

ElevenAD

Well-Known Member
well you would contact the company, if the bike is still under warranty the manufacture should diagnose the problem,send out the replacement part and guide you through the repair or they may send you the part and suggest you have a LBS do the repair and they foot the bill,if the bike is no longer under warranty contact the manufacture anyway, they should still be able to help diagnose the issue and lead you to the parts needed they just will no longer foot the bill..
and please dont fear changing a tire on a Hub motor or any e-bike, taking your bike to an LBS for a flat is not even a reality,you get flats on the road/trails often far from home or any bike shops,its no big deal just like many other repairs lol,the wheel is a bit heavier than a normal wheel and you need to unplug a wire then plug it back in when your done, no biggy, you can find plenty of youtube vids to help with this and there are plenty of ways to reduce the chance of a flat like Slime/tire liners....small bottle of fixaflat in your trunk bag etc
and if your LBS wont work on a legal E-Bike its because they probably dont know how and fear breaking something so its best they dont get their paws on your bike lol, all LBS are not created equal.
 
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Latitude

Well-Known Member
My LBS Trek dealer is 1 1/2 hours away and they’re very busy just servicing Treks. So I would have to leave my bike there for service which might be as little as 24 hours, but likely longer if they needed to order any parts. For that reason I have obtained the tools and a Park manual to be able to service any parts likely to wear in day-to-day riding... tires, chain, cassette etc. I just totalled my derailleur and will be able to install one I ordered online myself.
I grew up on a farm, and if there’s one thing I learned from my dad it was creativity in keeping things running. Cattle had to be fed and crops harvested, and there was no way these things could wait for a missing part or the inability to do your own repairs if needed.
Interestingly, those early problem-solving lessons served me well in my career as a creative director in advertising too.
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
My LBS Trek dealer is 1 1/2 hours away and they’re very busy just servicing Treks. So I would have to leave my bike there for service which might be as little as 24 hours, but likely longer if they needed to order any parts. For that reason I have obtained the tools and a Park manual to be able to service any parts likely to wear in day-to-day riding... tires, chain, cassette etc. I just totalled my derailleur and will be able to install one I ordered online myself.
I grew up on a farm, and if there’s one thing I learned from my dad it was creativity in keeping things running. Cattle had to be fed and crops harvested, and there was no way these things could wait for a missing part or the inability to do your own repairs if needed.
Interestingly, those early problem-solving lessons served me well in my career as a creative director in advertising too.
So much of what I see is a truly disposable mindset these days. I’m a fixer too and hate to toss anything that can be repaired.
I bought Trek specifically because there is a Trek dealership right here in my town. I can fix many things that an analog bike has. Just wouldn’t want to take the chance messing with any electrical bits that could screw up the warranty.
 

Taylor57

Well-Known Member
Yeah, most are covered for 1 year. But I am referring to lets say a flat tire on a rear hub drive. The one year warranty would not come into play. What comes into play is the owners ability to fix a rear wheel flat or find a LBS willing to fix it. The 2 shops I called (1 mobile and 1 bricks and mortar) indicated they would not be willing to fix due to past customers claiming that they broke something else addressing and fixing the issue. Another shop that was willing to Slime my back tire on my XP quoted a week to 10 days to get a flat fixed. So moral to the story- you better learn how to fix your bike if you bought it DTC or have a back up bike to ride when you have to leave your Ebike with the LBS...
 

BigNerd

Well-Known Member
I have a local shop that would fix it regardless as long as the problem is mechanical.... or a normal bike issue.

I also know a buddy who can fix stuff as long as it stays within the normal non-electrical components. That's why I like a rear-hub ebike... don't have to worry about it being a problem with the drive train... something to think about with your Frey. :)
 

Taylor57

Well-Known Member
I have a local shop that would fix it regardless as long as the problem is mechanical.... or a normal bike issue.

I also know a buddy who can fix stuff as long as it stays within the normal non-electrical components. That's why I like a rear-hub ebike... don't have to worry about it being a problem with the drive train... something to think about with your Frey. :)

Now ya tell me! I ordered the Frey this am:oops:
 

BigNerd

Well-Known Member
Well... seems like Frey owners are satisfied with their purchases so I wish you the best of luck.

I'm already wary of Internet-only shops which is why I recommend only reputable places but at the $3k+ price point, I'd really look at something from an LBS. What was wrong with the Biktrix Juggernaut FS? Or that Evelo I linked to?