What happens when your Ebike you ordered on the Internet breaks?

Taylor57

Well-Known Member
Well... seems like Frey owners are satisfied with their purchases so I wish you the best of luck.

I'm already wary of Internet-only shops which is why I recommend only reputable places but at the $3k+ price point, I'd really look at something from an LBS. What was wrong with the Biktrix Juggernaut FS? Or that Evelo I linked to?

Evelo was interesting (did not like the visible battery look) but I really liked the look and design of the Frey CC. Seems like for the $$, you get some rock solid components and I even added a dropper seat! It seemed to me the best bike I could get for my needs that came with a throttle for under 4k. I love the look of the Bulls Iconic and Trek Powerfly, but no throttle. The throttle has already come in handy on several of my XP and Sport rides...
 

reed scott

Well-Known Member
Evelo was interesting (did not like the visible battery look) but I really liked the look and design of the Frey CC. Seems like for the $$, you get some rock solid components and I even added a dropper seat! It seemed to me the best bike I could get for my needs that came with a throttle for under 4k. I love the look of the Bulls Iconic and Trek Powerfly, but no throttle. The throttle has already come in handy on several of my XP and Sport rides...
I look forward fondly Taylor to hearing about your voluminous offerings for the next 4 or 5 ( hopeful for ya ) months waiting waiting waiting for your CC to arrive. You chose the wrong color though. o_O
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I hear ya, but these days I am not surprised. Even my old mechanic was struggling with fixing my Audis. It got to where I would have to go on Youtube and find the video on how to fix my own car. Some shops and mechanics stay up with tech and it appears many elect to remain in the dark. I now just pay the money to the dealer...
It's never been better for an intelligent mechanic. From the mid 70's to the end of the century there were leftovers of the old school. Some of those guys were good enough to work on high tech vehicles. It took continuing education and speciality electronic diagnostic equipment. Today a good mechanic needs traditional tools, a laptop and speciality software downloaded off the internet. Continuing education comes from the net.

I live outside of a very small town, one traffic signal and one barbershop. Think Mayberry only smaller. I've known the owner of the auto shop for 25 years. He was the 25 year old mechanic that eventually bought the business. When he took over he replaced all those Sun Systems diagnostic machines and modernized with what look like a few laptop work stations. The software isn't cheap, there are more than a few wire harnesses, but those are going wireless too. He gets the continuing education and support. From what looks like a typical small town country shop he can and does repair the high tech vehicles we have today. His prices are at least 25 to 40% cheaper than the dealer.

Bike shops will have to evolve, just like good auto shops had to. When there are enough of us ebikers wanting service, they'll come around or fail to survive. They have the computers and tools, they just need the support of education and diagnostic software. It'll be here eventually.
 

Taylor57

Well-Known Member
I look forward fondly Taylor to hearing about your voluminous offerings for the next 4 or 5 ( hopeful for ya ) months waiting waiting waiting for your CC to arrive. You chose the wrong color though. o_O
,
Reed, I was torn between the Red and the Cream with the Leather colored seat and grips. My original order went in as Red and I changed to the Cream. It's not like I dont have plenty of time to change it. Maybe we should do a poll. What color CC!!
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
Region
USA

What happens when your Ebike you ordered on the Internet breaks?​

I guess you’re SOL/on your own.🤨
 

reed scott

Well-Known Member
It's never been better for an intelligent mechanic. From the mid 70's to the end of the century there were leftovers of the old school. Some of those guys were good enough to work on high tech vehicles. It took continuing education and speciality electronic diagnostic equipment. Today a good mechanic needs traditional tools, a laptop and speciality software downloaded off the internet. Continuing education comes from the net.

I live outside of a very small town, one traffic signal and one barbershop. Think Mayberry only smaller. I've known the owner of the auto shop for 25 years. He was the 25 year old mechanic that eventually bought the business. When he took over he replaced all those Sun Systems diagnostic machines and modernized with what look like a few laptop work stations. The software isn't cheap, there are more than a few wire harnesses, but those are going wireless too. He gets the continuing education and support. From what looks like a typical small town country shop he can and does repair the high tech vehicles we have today. His prices are at least 25 to 40% cheaper than the dealer.

Bike shops will have to evolve, just like good auto shops had to. When there are enough of us ebikers wanting service, they'll come around or fail to survive. They have the computers and tools, they just need the support of education and diagnostic software. It'll be here eventually.
So so true. Revalatory actually. I like my lbs. ( two hours away ) They sell Treks and Specialized. I took my oldish Specialized XC in for new disc brakes, that I had purchased from them ten years ago. I mentioned I might convert the bike one day with a Bafang motor. They said they don't deal with those motors. I just casually said, " You will" and let it drop.
 

skunkman

New Member
If your bike is a Juiced you are screwed. I have one with 9 miles on it with a broken battery receptor and despite multiple calls and emails they simply ignore me.
 

theemartymac

Well-Known Member
May I suggest some strategies for folks who want to go the online purchase route. Just conversation here, but stuff that I find works for me in a few area.

1. Don't do it unless you can perform at least the simple services and repairs yourself. A couple hundred saved in purchase price will disappear if you can't keep it on the road and have to replace it early anyway, But if you're in that situation already (or for good reason);
2. Find out who does good e-bike work, and buy some stuff (accessories/schwag) from the store(s) you want to build a relationship with. Take the time to chat with the tech/staff/owner each visit, and build a relationship where they at least recognize you as a regular return customer and serious rider/enthusiast. Maybe post a review online after good sales and make sure it has your name on it.
3. Wear their logo wear (Ball cap/t-shirt/etc.) when you visit so you are clearly an ally (this one is a little pandering, but if you're desperate, lol).
4. As a follow up to #2; if you approach the tech/owner/manager for advice on your bike with a basket full of potential purchases, they are going to be more likely to engage you in the conversation and try and help you out to some extent than joe blow who walks up to the service desk and ask them to take on a job they simply don't need the hassle of. That is a great time to transition to asking for a basic service or minor repair, so you can get your foot in the door as a 'regular'.
5. If it comes right down to it, and you are stuck with an unreliable brick in the garage, have the conversation about a new bike with the shops, and see if someone will take pity and help you with a trade-in or resale to buy a new one from them. If you find a really good shop and build a good relationship, you won't ever look back or question the value again.
 

Taylor57

Well-Known Member
I made another call today to a bike shop in a neighboring city and he was very nice and didnt make me feel rushed on the phone. " We will certainly help you with brakes, flats etc, but when it comes to electrical, no can do"

I told him I appreciate that and explained a possible rear flat on a XP rear hub and he said "bring it on down"

So thats a little comforting. The electrical part is a bit concerning but I feel pretty good about the 1 year that Lectric and Espin have offered as their warranties.

I have taken the mindset that I bought an expensive bike off the internet and if it breaks, I gotta put on my big boy panties and figure it out and not let worry boss me around!
 

vincent

Well-Known Member
Over the years I have had 7 different analog bike shops around az fix/maintain things on my ebikes and no one has hesitated at all

maybe in some places this is an issue but it has not been here...
 

reed scott

Well-Known Member
If your bike is a Juiced you are screwed. I have one with 9 miles on it with a broken battery receptor and despite multiple calls and emails they simply ignore me.
Not counting dealers who sell the 'big 3 or 4' the only direct sales companies I would trust is Biktrix and Bolton seems to have an OK rep as well. Juiced seems to spend all their money on advertising. They don't have time or $ for customer support.
 

reed scott

Well-Known Member
,
Reed, I was torn between the Red and the Cream with the Leather colored seat and grips. My original order went in as Red and I changed to the Cream. It's not like I dont have plenty of time to change it. Maybe we should do a poll. What color CC!!
Just busting ya ______ Taylor. Nuffin wrong wit cream. I'm personally drawn to darker colors or some tan/brown shade that would match the dirt around here. ;)
 
D

Deleted member 4210

Guest
Guys, look. Its all downside and ZERO upside for any dealer to work on ebikes they don't sell, or carry as brands.

Let me just outline a very few of dozens of issues:

  • Liability - as soon as a dealer makes a repair, that dealer assumes ALL liability, even if something else breaks on an ebike, that was not related to the repair made. Try thinking about how a lawyer and judge would rake you across the coals, when for example, some ebike rider crashes, gets injured and blames the brakes that weren't repaired, but possibly over-looked during the last time the ebike was in the shop. Here are some examples "So you Mr. Dealer worked on this Victim's ebikes, did you not ?" Responds: yes I did, but.... (he gets cut). "Did you have training and authorization by the manufacturer and were you certified to work on brand X ebike ???". "What is your level of experience exactly with this brand of ebike ?" well you get the picture of where that is leading. Dont believe they are just going after deep pockets. the online folks barely have shells of operations, and going back to the manufacturer, 9 .5 times out of 10, is some entity in China that no lawyer is ever gonna chase down, let alone get them to appear in court. Their government would thwart your lawyers efforts in a heartbeat, if they got wind of it. So TAG YOU'RE IT ! And you as a dealer are about to be screwed, with costs of defending yourself, not likely baked into your annual budget. All downside people. And you can't possibly repair enough of other ebikes to make up for even one of these incidents. You already got enough liability of your own, without the sure fire headache, and Murphy's law kicking in, when you decide to 'help that poor fella' who wasn't thinking about any of this, when he hit the click button to buy his ebike on line at some other re-seller (not named you), and its neatly dropped at his door.
  • No standards - the industry has near zero standards on the most common electrical components, and things like wiring from controllers varies widely, with no rhyme or reason to wiring colors, and completely mixed use depending on the make of the controller, which is always sketchy at best for every on-line brand. Many times they dont use any waterproof connections, figuring the controller is 'protected' inside the frame, or the connections themselves are poorly designed, and risk developing shorts when you re-install them, because when these were put together, they often JUST JAM the wiring in packed very tightly, so getting it all back is a virtual nightmare. If you have not worked on that brand before, you are likely talking hours wasted, on a repair that could take you 15 minutes on the brands you sell, and know well. Very few brands are alike when it comes to controls, wiring harnesses, connections, programming logic, and on and on. Sensors in the motors vary widely too. The 'bike' stuff that is mechanical is eazy peazy and there are definitely standards in terms of derailleurs, brakes, calipers, stems, head sets, and much more. But its most often the electrical that is the core of why on-line brands are brought into shops, not the mechanical stuff that has been around for decades, and there are hundreds if not thousands of you tube videos on those bike items, that make DIY for that, fairly straightforward for anyone halfway handy.
  • "Love triangles" always end in disaster- you all know what I'm talking about. 2 girls, 1 guy. 2 guys, 1 girl. Those 'relationships' NEVER work. Well its the same thing when a dealer is asked by a customer to enter the picture when the dealer has no relationship with the ebike seller. There are 3 of you, and one of you is about to be screwed big time, and the customer is screaming 'I'll be damned if its me.' When a dealer services a brand he carries, he is backed up 100% by the Original Equipment Seller, who may or may not be the actual manufacturer, when something goes wrong, but at least the two are trying to determine if there is a defect, or just failure, etc TOGETHER as a team. And they usually DO come up with a solution together, as they both have a vested interest in each other succeeding. Well that just is not gonna be the case, when a dealer gets sucked into fixing a brand they don't carry. That dealer is odd man out. In fact, it can get real hostile, bc the on line seller, who may very likely be blindsided by their customer bringing the ebike to some third party dealer (you mr ebike shop owner), often doesn't want the dealer 'touching his stuff.' I've personally experienced this from basically the largest on line ebike seller in the US. (dont need to name them). Sure, there are some on-line players who will 'play nice' and even help their customer find some local dealer willing to do service, but that usually is only in a warranty situation. After that, its all in the buyers hands to figure it out. Basically this is a lose-lose proposition for any dealer. At least one that is reputable, and also rationally doesn't want to get burned.
  • Subsidizing the on-line players - maintaining mechanics, expertise, shop tools, equipment, the high overhead of such, is a major investment, and can take years to build up for a quality dealer. Accumulated knowledge in ebikes is particularly rare. Suddenly if you are one of those who have done this for 5 to 10 years, and you were to consider taking in other brands, you are not only subsidizing their operations and their very weaknesses for not being local, or those on line sellers often not being able to solve a customers problem, because primarily you have to be there in person to go through everything that could be happening, and see it and touch it, and even hear it (my brake makes a 'noise'... my motor makes this 'noise' etc), but you are also basically giving the consumer the best reason to keep buying on line- he gets best of both worlds, getting a potentially lower price, often avoiding state sales taxes, and then he has YOU as his local go to, with zero of his time or willingness to actually take ownership in the reliability of the ebike. If you are so naive as to believe because of great service, a customer will buy his ebike from you locally, you would be sorely mistaken. Their reasons havent changed for continuing to buy on -line, unless you as the dealer are willing to eat their sales tax, drop your price, and oh by the way you will be eating their shipping cost, as dealers have to pay to get the ebikes to their location, whereas the on-line resellers nearly always give away the shipping to the on line buyer. In the end, the dealer is totally subsidizing the on-line resellers service and support operation, as most of them are still very small, very naive, often with very little bike or ebike background, and mostly just are glorified importers, who just want to sell huge volumes of ebikes, with next to no investment in time to develop service protocols, manuals, wiring diagrams, or training because they have no dealers, and dont want them, and surely are only going to do the barest of bones for an end consumer.
There is a lot more than the above including consumers perceptions of what repair prices should be, and their recollection is often from when they had a bike back in their teen years or young adult, and they havent been in a bike shop in eons. and so they think their price should be X, when often the cost is 3 x of what they are thinking. You as the dealer become the 'bad guy' and it just re-enforces their reason for why they bought on line in the first place. Doesn't matter that they are clueless about what is involved in running a bike shop or ebike shop, cost of labor, overhead, and so on. In their mind that is not their problem. Its the shop owners problem, and they just expect it to be 'reasonable' whatever 'reasonable' means to them, which is often fantasy world. If you have been a business owner with any sort of repair operation, you'd completely understand where this is coming from.

So for any 'upside' you can fantasize about for a dealer willing to repair your ebike, or whatever you might conjure up that you think a dealer hasnt thought of, I (and most other dealers) can give you at least a half dozen downsides for each and every one upside. If you havent been in a dealers shoes then just dont even bother with this exercise. Just know what you are getting into when you buy on line. If you are DIY handy or have some 'Tim the Toolman' as your neighbor or buddy, then by all means go for it. But dont get all uppity snotty if a dealer tells you 'no can do' for your on-line bought ebike repair situation.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Taylor57

Well-Known Member
Guys, look. Its all downside and ZERO upside for any dealer to work on ebikes they don't sell, or carry as brands.

Let me just outline a very few of dozens of issues:

  • Liability - as soon as a dealer makes a repair, that dealer assumes ALL liability, even if something else breaks on an ebike, that was not related to the repair made. Try thinking about how a lawyer and judge would rake you across the coals, when for example, some ebike rider crashes, gets injured and blames the brakes that weren't repaired, but possibly over-looked during the last time the ebike was in the shop. Here are some examples "So you Mr. Dealer worked on this Victim's ebikes, did you not ?" Responds: yes I did, but.... (he gets cut). "Did you have training and authorization by the manufacturer and were you certified to work on brand X ebike ???". "What is your level of experience exactly with this brand of ebike ?" well you get the picture of where that is leading. Dont believe they are just going after deep pockets. the online folks barely have shells of operations, and going back to the manufacturer, 9 .5 times out of 10, is some entity in China that no lawyer is ever gonna chase down, let alone get them to appear in court. Their government would thwart your lawyers efforts in a heartbeat, if they got wind of it. So TAG YOU'RE IT ! And you as a dealer are about to be screwed, with costs of defending yourself, not likely baked into your annual budget. All downside people. And you can't possibly repair enough of other ebikes to make up for even one of these incidents. You already got enough liability of your own, without the sure fire headache, and Murphy's law kicking in, when you decide to 'help that poor fella' who wasn't thinking about any of this, when he hit the click button to buy his ebike on line at some other re-seller (not named you), and its neatly dropped at his door.
  • No standards - the industry has near zero standards on the most common electrical components, and things like wiring from controllers varies widely, with no rhyme or reason to wiring colors, and completely mixed use depending on the make of the controller, which is always sketchy at best for every on-line brand. Many times they dont use any waterproof connections, figuring the controller is 'protected' inside the frame, or the connections themselves are poorly designed, and risk developing shorts when you re-install them, because when these were put together, they often JUST JAM the wiring in packed very tightly, so getting it all back is a virtual nightmare. If you have not worked on that brand before, you are likely talking hours wasted, on a repair that could take you 15 minutes on the brands you sell, and know well. Very few brands are alike when it comes to controls, wiring harnesses, connections, programming logic, and on and on. Sensors in the motors vary widely too. The 'bike' stuff that is mechanical is eazy peazy and there are definitely standards in terms of derailleurs, brakes, calipers, stems, head sets, and much more. But its most often the electrical that is the core of why on-line brands are brought into shops, not the mechanical stuff that has been around for decades, and there are hundreds if not thousands of you tube videos on those bike items, that make DIY for that, fairly straightforward for anyone halfway handy.
  • "Love triangles" always end in disaster- you all know what I'm talking about. 2 girls, 1 guy. 2 guys, 1 girl. Those 'relationships' NEVER work. Well its the same thing when a dealer is asked by a customer to enter the picture when the dealer has no relationship with the ebike seller. There are 3 of you, and one of you is about to be screwed big time, and the customer is screaming 'I'll be damned if its me.' When a dealer services a brand he carries, he is backed up 100% by the Original Equipment Seller, who may or may not be the actual manufacturer, when something goes wrong, but at least the two are trying to determine if there is a defect, or just failure, etc TOGETHER as a team. And they usually DO come up with a solution together, as they both have a vested interest in each other succeeding. Well that just is not gonna be the case, when a dealer gets sucked into fixing a brand they don't carry. That dealer is odd man out. In fact, it can get real hostile, bc the on line seller, who may very likely be blindsided by their customer bringing the ebike to some third party dealer (you mr ebike shop owner), often doesn't want the dealer 'touching his stuff.' I've personally experienced this from basically the largest on line ebike seller in the US. (dont need to name them). Sure, there are some on-line players who will 'play nice' and even help their customer find some local dealer willing to do service, but that usually is only in a warranty situation. After that, its all in the buyers hands to figure it out. Basically this is a lose-lose proposition for any dealer. At least one that is reputable, and also rationally doesn't want to get burned.
  • Subsidizing the on-line players - maintaining mechanics, expertise, shop tools, equipment, the high overhead of such, is a major investment, and can take years to build up for a quality dealer. Accumulated knowledge in ebikes is particularly rare. Suddenly if you are one of those who have done this for 5 to 10 years, and you were to consider taking in other brands, you are not only subsidizing their operations and their very weaknesses for not being local, or those on line sellers often not being able to solve a customers problem, because primarily you have to be there in person to go through everything that could be happening, and see it and touch it, and even hear it (my brake makes a 'noise'... my motor makes this 'noise' etc), but you are also basically giving the consumer the best reason to keep buying on line- he gets best of both worlds, getting a potentially lower price, often avoiding state sales taxes, and then he has YOU as his local go to, with zero of his time or willingness to actually take ownership in the reliability of the ebike. If you are so naive as to believe because of great service, a customer will buy his ebike from you locally, you would be sorely mistaken. Their reasons havent changed for continuing to buy on -line, unless you as the dealer are willing to eat their sales tax, drop your price, and oh by the way you will be eating their shipping cost, as dealers have to pay to get the ebikes to their location, whereas the on-line resellers nearly always give away the shipping to the on line buyer. In the end, the dealer is totally subsidizing the on-line resellers service and support operation, as most of them are still very small, very naive, often with very little bike or ebike background, and mostly just are glorified importers, who just want to sell huge volumes of ebikes, with next to no investment in time to develop service protocols, manuals, wiring diagrams, or training because they have no dealers, and dont want them, and surely are only going to do the barest of bones for an end consumer.
There is a lot more than the above including consumers perceptions of what repair prices should be, and their recollection is often from when they had a bike back in their teen years or young adult, and they havent been in a bike shop in eons. and so they think their price should be X, when often the cost is 3 x of what they are thinking. You as the dealer become the 'bad guy' and it just re-enforces their reason for why they bought on line in the first place. Doesn't matter that they are clueless about what is involved in running a bike shop or ebike shop, cost of labor, overhead, and so on. In their mind that is not their problem. Its the shop owners problem, and they just expect it to be 'reasonable' whatever 'reasonable' means to them, which is often fantasy world. If you have been a business owner with any sort of repair operation, you'd completely understand where this is coming from.

So for any 'upside' you can fantasize about for a dealer willing to repair your ebike, or whatever you might conjure up that you think a dealer hasnt thought of, I (and most other dealers) can give you at least a half dozen downsides for each and every one upside. If you havent been in a dealers shoes then just dont even bother with this exercise. Just know what you are getting into when you buy on line. If you are DIY handy or have some 'Tim the Toolman' as your neighbor or buddy, then by all means go for it. But dont get all uppity snotty if a dealer tells you 'no can do' for your on-line bought ebike repair situation.

Love the Love Triangle reference, fortunately or unfortunately I haven't participated in one of those yet! But yes, Mike I get it. Bike shops are in a tricky sitch to work on my or Big Nerds Sport for example. On the other hand, by just getting us to walk in the door-we may fall in love with a Trek and convert over to LBS disciple. I do feel however, that there is room for a Generic Ebike shop in our town and many others. We work on all Ebikes. Customers have to hold harmless agreements or whatever legalese appropriate. Also, if the Generic Ebike Shop could carry a line of their own imported Chinese/Taiwanese Ebikes, they could probably also sell a fair amount.

Obviously you are the expert and I am an insurance agent but it just seems this market is ripe for picking with quite a bit of low lying fruit combined with an opportunity to solve DTC Ebike problems and be a hero. IMO, the reason it is not happening right now in front of your eyes is that most LBS's lack the knowledge and understanding on how to fix and repair mid or hub drive ebikes. Perhaps a little of the "this is way we have always done it" and no stinkin Amazon Ebike is going to get me to change...

I will now jump off of my box you can now put me on Ignore!

TGIF
 
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Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
@Deleted Member 4210 Back when everthing closed down, I think I remember you saying that service and repair work wasn't profitable enough by itself to cover the costs involved in operating a city bike shop ? If remember right, it's probably going to mean a lot of old ebikes going to charity or to the trash pile after the warranty is up or the battery is dead.
 

legsofbeer

Active Member
I told him I appreciate that and explained a possible rear flat on a XP rear hub and he said "bring it on down
I would assume "bring it on down" means bring the wheel in, not the whole bike and expect them to be responsible for disconnecting and reconnecting the power cable.
 

Taylor57

Well-Known Member
I would assume "bring it on down" means bring the wheel in, not the whole bike and expect them to be responsible for disconnecting and reconnecting the power cable.
No I disagree. I had a nice talk with the owner and we discussed my very bike. Lectric XP. He said bring the bike down if you have a flat and we will fix it. Claro?
 
D

Deleted member 4210

Guest
@Deleted Member 4210 Back when everthing closed down, I think I remember you saying that service and repair work wasn't profitable enough by itself to cover the costs involved in operating a city bike shop ? If remember right, it's probably going to mean a lot of old ebikes going to charity or to the trash pile after the warranty is up or the battery is dead.
Well first of all, DON'T confuse the above post with regular bikes. I was talking strictly ebikes. Regular bikes, MANY regular (i.e. not electric bike) shops repair all kinds of brands as they are using mostly standard components (as I mentioned) across the board. Second, dont take my comments about profitability out of context please. This season was abnormal, and shops kept of doing repairs, and had significant volume, and probably were easily able to charge a fully burdened rate across the board, so it not only was likely profitable but kept them flush with cash flow. If they had a hard time with getting bikes, it was a lifesaver for many. In normal times, with much lower volumes of business, repairs by themselves would not likely keep many shops afloat very well by itself. It all depends on geography and density of not only bikers, but also density of a number of shops, and size town or metro area you are serving. I don't think hardly anything this season went into any 'trash' as not only were used bikes being bid up, and selling super fast, but some dealers got into the business of buying used ones, who then reconditioned them, to have something on their floor to actually sell.

The above is purely my own observation, based on anecdotes, and what I experience at my shop and some who's books I looked at a few years before I started mine, and I was briefly considering buying an existing shop to then migrate to ebikes. The books i saw, convinced me, it was far better to start from scratch and to stay the heck away from regular bikes. But I also do not plan to have my service/repair business be any sort of meaningful 'profit' center. If that portion of my business holds its own, and doesn't bring front end sales down, then I am fine with it. Its going to grow no doubt, as both this industry and my own business is very early stages. I also reserve the right to change my tune about how service should be run of course. ;)

Who knows, there may be a time when mobile service makes really good sense. Thus far, we've seen a lot of evidence, the 'chain' model of mobile service is a big time money sink. If big guys cant make it work, then lord only knows how a small one man van could make it work. Beeline went under, and Velofix is struggling in most areas... at least up until this year. Who knows maybe after this year, the mobile service model may make sense for some metro areas. Working on any ebike at a customer's home in a 'Covid world', would in my opinion be NO picnic, and would royally stink doing it everyday having to wear a mask, sanitize more frequently, etc. In shops you could create clean areas, where the mechanic or mechanics can go without masks. And personally, doing ebikes at a home, for me would be a non-starter, as trouble-shooting electronics, is very time intensive. I dont see how on earth you could make those numbers work. Your mobile repairs, have to be limited to quick fixes, very repeatable steps, and in and out very expeditiously. Its really a numbers game. Ebikes dont fit that model. At least presently, until they get infinitely more bluetooth on board electronic diagnostics tools, available on most brands, and the ebike industry has barely begun to scratch the surface on that. some are at best 'dabbling' in it, but then suddenly you are talking the need for ebike price points well above $3k to justify having it on every model a brand offers. Doing it piecemeal on only certain models, wont work either. The biggest thing you have to deal with is minimizing skus to stay competitive and so if you start changing electronics , some models with bluetooth, some without, you have a nasty mess on your hands especially when model year changeovers come, and you have so much different legacy stuff being created. I see the industry being 10 years away from that, so that actually would be my bar for considering mobile service for ebikes. 10 years from now at least before it begins to make any sense, and technology is much further along than now, and consumers tastes also much further along, with an appreciation for paying up more for quality craftsmanship, not this on line j**k at $1k to $1.5k price points. We have to jump past 'early mainstream' in terms of industry ebike adoption before this can be seriously considered.
 
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Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
Well stated. I should have been more clear that it was only ebikes that maybe are "unfixable" at "reasonable cost" during more "normal" times. BC Before Covid.

I just remember pictures of fleet ebikes going to a crusher because of bad brakes or something easy to fix, and I could visualize that occuring with unsupported ebikes over a few years. Could be an ugly pile of bikes.