What I Learned from Buying and Riding My First Electric Bike

Alex M

Well-Known Member
$1,000-1,200 bikes that are worth buying today, often come without fenders, so you won't have to remove it :).
But I wish somebody could explain me why chain covers are missing on so many ebikes, even on $3K ones. I'm not talking about chain-guard on the side of the crank, but the chain cover extending from the crank to the rear axle.
 

maggiewu

New Member
$1,000-1,200 bikes that are worth buying today, often come without fenders, so you won't have to remove it :).
But I wish somebody could explain me why chain covers are missing on so many ebikes, even on $3K ones. I'm not talking about chain-guard on the side of the crank, but the chain cover extending from the crank to the rear axle.
Me too and It surprise me not seeing it even in commuter e-bikes. I can understand in more sporty bikes not to see it. But come on for a commuter ebike how come you are not having a chaincover ?
 

CityExplorer

Well-Known Member
Me too and It surprise me not seeing it even in commuter e-bikes. I can understand in more sporty bikes not to see it. But come on for a commuter ebike how come you are not having a chaincover ?
I've found with a decent Chain-Ring guard a regular full-length chain-guard does not really seem required. Still for a Commuter or wet weather bike, it seems it could have some benefits. I'd like to see a two piece system, use a standard chain-ring Guard and then a separate nice slim line chain-guard, rather than the old 1 piece style, that does not protect the chain-ring fully. I've found the chain-ring guards essential off road.
 

Rog

New Member
My wife and I recently bought an e-bike and thought it would be useful to share some tips and what factors to consider. Its really important that you think about your use case, whether you purchase an e-bike for off-roading, mountain biking, road cycling, commute or casual road rides to tour around and enjoy the outdoors. Here are my thoughts in our blog: https://ebikeexplorations.com and what bike to decide on
 
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Dallant

Well-Known Member
$1,000-1,200 bikes that are worth buying today, often come without fenders, so you won't have to remove it :).
But I wish somebody could explain me why chain covers are missing on so many ebikes, even on $3K ones. I'm not talking about chain-guard on the side of the crank, but the chain cover extending from the crank to the rear axle.
I’ll take fenders over a chain guard any day. I haven’t had a chain guard on a bike since 7th grade.
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
Well, what I’ve learned from my first electric bike buy/ride is that you don’t have to do a ton of research to find the (or a) right bike. You do need to ride a few first to see how they suit you.
Truth is there are just so many brands out there where you are essentially on your own. That fact automatically eliminated a whole bunch of bikes for me as I’m not going to go into an adventure/expenditure like this without major support from my local LBS.
 

Taylor57

Well-Known Member
I think if I spent 5-8 grand on an Ebike I would probably like to have an LBS on standby, but if I spend a grand I'm willing to roll the dice and become a Youtube warrior wrench jockey :)
 

Browneye

Well-Known Member
I’d like to find the elusive $1k bike where I don’t need to become a wrench jockey. :)

RadPower, Ride1Up, and Aventon, are very close. Perhaps closer to $1500. All seem to have happy owners.
Surely there are others.

I only paid $1900 and change for my Giant Explore, and I think it's one of the best out there. At least for the riding I do. 👍
Full dealer support as well, backed by the largest bike maker in the world, and arguably one of the best sporting and power sports companies in the world - Yamaha.
 

Taylor57

Well-Known Member
I’d like to find the elusive $1k bike where I don’t need to become a wrench jockey. :)

It's also my opinion that the typical LBS is going to be so slammed for awhile that you need to learn basic jockey skills. My first visit they quoted a week or 10 days to change a flat (needed to order tube, blah blah blah)
They only let one person in the store at a time. Line of 20 people waiting to go in. No thanks...
 

Browneye

Well-Known Member
It's also my opinion that the typical LBS is going to be so slammed for awhile that you need to learn basic jockey skills. My first visit they quoted a week or 10 days to change a flat (needed to order tube, blah blah blah)
They only let one person in the store at a time. Line of 20 people waiting to go in. No thanks...

Exactly.
I'm always floored with the number of peeps standing in line for a flat tire repair. Really? I think a bicycle rider needs to know the basics to keep their bike on the road. What if they get a flat 20 miles from home? Or from a bike shop? Must be the AAA people. ;)
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
It all depends on where you live and what LBS you go to. I had a flat last weekend (3 hours away) and took it to a local Trek service and they got me right in. Even they had a hard time getting the tire back on so I learned a lot watching them change the tube.
I changed/fixed flats all my adult life. Truth is that this bike is completely different from any other bike I’ve owned so yeah, I wasn’t ready to repair a flat on this bike but I am now. And I’ve never had AAA.🤓
 

Taylor57

Well-Known Member
Exactly.
I'm always floored with the number of peeps standing in line for a flat tire repair. Really? I think a bicycle rider needs to know the basics to keep their bike on the road. What if they get a flat 20 miles from home? Or from a bike shop? Must be the AAA people. ;)

I never thought about that. I wonder if my AAA will come pick me and my Lectric up on the road?
 

GenXrider

Active Member
I've been lucky, despite rides 50+ miles away, my flats have always been close to home or found when I went to ride again due to a slow leak. I added a liner on my back tire last time I had a flat. I have a patch kit and mini-pump, but I got out of the habit of carrying the pump, so I really need to start taking it again.
 

Bruce jespersen

New Member
Hi guys! I did this interview with Logan from CNET recently where we talk about buying your first electric bike. He had lots of great questions and really covered the process from start to finish, receiving the bike and building it... then using and maintaining it a bit. It was a lot of fun, and I think it could be useful here too, for anyone who is new to the space and considering buying an ebike. Enjoy!


Rock on :D and this is his full written article back at the official CNET website. If you're trying to figure out the different ebike categories, and figure out what some of the best options are in those categories... check out my best electric bikes page and some of the topic specific guides like best affordable electric bikes.
Hi guys! I did this interview with Logan from CNET recently where we talk about buying your first electric bike. He had lots of great questions and really covered the process from start to finish, receiving the bike and building it... then using and maintaining it a bit. It was a lot of fun, and I think it could be useful here too, for anyone who is new to the space and considering buying an ebike. Enjoy!


Rock on :D and this is his full written article back at the official CNET website. If you're trying to figure out the different ebike categories, and figure out what some of the best options are in those categories... check out my best electric bikes page and some of the topic specific guides like best affordable electric bikes.
Hi court can you give advice on a woman’s bike less than 50 pounds weight but yet class III with at least a 500 W motor
 

JoyRider

New Member
Originally I sought to replace my ancient CitiBug scooter with a modern version, but quickly realized I could get an ebike for around the same $. I have some disabilities to deal with (left sided weakness), but thought I could handle it better than I currently am able to.

I chose the Lectric XP for it's value and that the company was based here in the USA. Although I don't feel at ease on the XP yet, I don't regret my purchase. In retrospect should have gone with their Step Thru model, mainly for the lower center of gravity, but I'll also appreciate the lower height of the frame. Waiting for 2 months would have been difficult for it tho!

I Am so pleased with the quality and bang for the $ of the XP I decided to go ahead and purchase a step thru. I may sell the XP, or keep it for visitors to with with me. In the mean time I will ride the XP more and work on getting comfortable with it.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Hi court can you give advice on a woman’s bike less than 50 pounds weight but yet class III with at least a 500 W motor

Take a look at the Best Class 3 Electric Bikes of 2020 for some recommendations... ;)


Best Class 3 Electric Bikes of 2020

Class 3 Electric bikes are a specific regulatory classification of ebikes in the US and Europe. A class 3 electric bike provides motor assist while the rider pedals up to a speed of 28mph, which is close to the speed a fit cyclist can achieve without assistance. Class 3 electric bikes are increasing in popularity with riders who prefer a faster ride to keep up with traffic, reduce commuting time, and to expand their traveling range. Due to their increased speed, class 3 ebikes are restricted some bike trails and bike paths. They are sometimes referred to as speed pedelecs, because they rely on pedal assist to achieve the higher top speeds. See all the details and even more winners on our best Class 3 electric bikes page.

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