what is the most comfortable and safe helmut you've used

mutazoid

New Member
Im getting an ebike soon and the only helmut I have is pretty uncomfortable.
I have a smallish head so is there a measuring system I should be aware of.
Also safety is important, are there standards I should look for? Im in Canada.

Thanks for any advice.
 

David Berry

Well-Known Member
Region
Australia
City
Ipswich, QLD
Your local Trek store would be a good place to start. They have various styles available in their Bontrager WaveCel collection with prices ranging from 'That's a lot! to 'Oh gosh!'.

Trek has a thirty-day satisfaction guarantee.
 

e-boy

Well-Known Member
WaveCel has tested very high for safety but I find them heavy and uncomfortable .
POC Octal is the most comfortable I have tried .
it‘s very light , and well ventilated .
And feels like your not wearing a helmet at all .
POC Sports was founded in Sweden and the Octal looks a bit like your wearing a Volvo 240 on your head .
The Octal has also been highly rated for safety .
 
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Sierratim

Well-Known Member
For electric bikes there is also the newish Euro helmet standard. As I understand it this standard recognizes the increased speeds of ebikes. Lists of approved helmets are available, though I couldn't find one that wil fit my fat head.

I'm currently riding with a Specialized MIPS helmet that I do like for fit.
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
When riding alone, lately I've been using the Giro Chronicle MIPS
giro-chronicle-mips-dirt-helmet-matte-black-gloss-black-hero.jpg


I find it to be lightweight & comfortable with an extended brim which helps with low sun angle riding. It isn't cheap but then neither is my head.

When riding with my wife or friends, we use Sena helmets with Bluetooth helmet to helmet communication:

71xHW8jFvoL._AC_SL1500_.jpg


They are a bit heavy, the brim is too small and they are also pricey but the ability to communicate with other riders makes it worth the minor inconvenience.
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
None of the models listed have chin protection. I've been over the handlebars at least 6 times; hit my chin on ground or pavement 6 times. Never hit the back top or side of my head . 11/2018 I broke the chin at 25 mph. Real nuisance having jaw wired shut for Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Years.
I ride a Fox Rampage with chin protection, plus a lot of vents for bike riders. It comes in sizes; measure your head with a fabric tape measure. If your distributor doesn't carry your size, Fox sells direct. Mine has bright yellow lettering to look like a traffic warning sign.
Fox has a lighter model, that won't keep branches out of your face. Mine has grills over the holes.
Bell has a similar model. Their is grey I think.
If you have trouble holding up the weight, do more pushups with the helmet on. What you do regularly, you can do.
All those ratings people brag about, I've never in 63 years of riding hit the parts of the head those rated helmets protect. I've always hit the chin, that those ratings agencies totally ignore.
 
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J.R.

Well-Known Member
When I gave up drop bar road bikes I continued using helmet styles I had gotten used to. On a road bike, where you lean over you don't want a visor because it gets in the way of sight lines. Also sun isn't as much of an issue with a forward lean. As I got into MTB, hybrid and ebikes with a much more upright riding position I found I needed a sun visor. Especially commuting in winter where the sun is so low in the sky, both morning and afternoon. My eyes are fairly light sensitive though. I wouldn't own a helmet without a visor. My current comfortable helmets are Fox Flux (mtb) for warmer weather and a Bern Brentwood (multi-sport) for cooler weather.
 

Akrotiri

Well-Known Member
Im getting an ebike soon and the only helmut I have is pretty uncomfortable.
I have a smallish head so is there a measuring system I should be aware of.
Also safety is important, are there standards I should look for? Im in Canada.

Thanks for any advice.
Most comfortable and safest helmet I used is my current one the Bontrager Solstice.

It has a built in visor so if you have drop bars it wouldn’t be suitable. It’s for upright and active riding positions.

 

qcknezy

New Member
I have purchased 4 of these and I find they are adjustable, comfortable and priced fairly. I also like the fact they have a flashing light in the back.

I've owned that same helmet about 2 years. Last week when I was putting the helmet on, I managed to cut a 3/4" long gash on my hand. The upper left corner of the V in the logo had came loose and was sticking out. I'm not sure what the material is but it's sharp as a knife. The logos on both sides are now gone. YOU'VE BEEN WARNED!!!!!
 

Taylor57

Well-Known Member
I've owned that same helmet about 2 years. Last week when I was putting the helmet on, I managed to cut a 3/4" long gash on my hand. The upper left corner of the V in the logo had came loose and was sticking out. I'm not sure what the material is but it's sharp as a knife. The logos on both sides are now gone. YOU'VE BEEN WARNED!!!!!
Thanks for the warning but I just checked my helmet and could not find any part of the logo that could cause an injury. Maybe they changed the design?
 

Gibby

New Member
Region
USA
I have purchased 4 of these and I find they are adjustable, comfortable and priced fairly. I also like the fact they have a flashing light in the back.

Too bad these aren't MIPS. Might have been worth a try with the integrated magnetic goggles and removable visor.
 

goldconch

Active Member
@mutazoid they say the safest helmet is the one you actually want to wear.

For head, and neck protection, the Hövding 3 airbag looks pretty amazing. The 800g ring drapes onto shoulders not head. I very nearly chose this one. It may not be everyone's cup of tea as far as aesthetic. Not sure there is any distribution in Canada yet.
4e9b4f1f-2818-4aad-b002-f49b4ee38d50.jpg

If you're riding in low light, being seen easily by other road users (wrapped in steel cages) might a more optimal survival strategy for the whole body. I went that route with a Beyond Classon but there are others like that with position markers and turn signal lights, right up at driver eye level. Again, maybe not everyone's first aesthetic choice, but I quite like it.

In the realm of traditional skull buckets, the MIPS type are probably the safest and worth splurging for. Some of them have bluetooth connectivity to message a loved one (like OnStar) if you have a big incident. If fashion is your bag, then the Thousand helmets channel polo-player chic (with a pinch of the Great Gazoo). The Sahn helmets out of Vangroovy looked neat, but had a huge production recall, and I'm not sure they are still around.

The best choice for you will consider 1. which one you think you'll actually want to wear, 2. where, when, and how you ride. One day all of this stuff will be integrated into one device, but for now, it's a choice and a compromise.
 
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theemartymac

Active Member
I would agree that MIPS can be a good feature to have in a high speed ebike application, and many if not most of the best rated helmets happen to be MIPS helmets. Another factor to consider is whether you want EPS (One hit) or EPP (Multi-hit) foam. For street riding, EPS is fine as you don't expect to tumble and can replace it after a big bail. If you plan to ride off-road a lot, or certainly if you are interested in a little light downhill, EPP may be worth the money. It is designed to take many small tumbles without losing it's protection capacity, although if you are riding that hard you probably want to replace it every season or so anyway (and still after any major impacts). EPP helmets are becoming the norm for alpine skiing, because skiing is just repeatedly falling downhill and if you aren't bailing, you're not trying hard enough. lol

As for chin protection, it sure is a good idea if you plan to ride fast all the time, and some helmets have removeable chin guards if you are interested in that, but most don't ride on the street with chin protection as it's hot and heavy. At the end of the day, you just have to ask yourself how risk adverse you are. Some motorcycle riders will only wear the best SNELL full face helmets, and some are happy with salad bowl Harley specials.

I have three Bicycle helmets. One full-face Giro DH helmet for off-road, a Thousands Heritage for town riding, and a super light Bell EPS for backup/summer and guest use. The Giro is non-adjustable, non-vented, has full chin and ear coverage, double shell for exceptional puncture protection, and fits me just right ( I just wash the liner after a haircut and it fills in the difference nicely). But I can't add a beanie for the cold weather, and it's hot in the summer if you aren't moving fast. The Thousands fits quite well, and has enough adjustability that I can add a liner for cold days and adjust for best comfort between haircuts (I have very thick hair so it's a thing, lol). It has minimal venting, but that really helps keep me dry here on the Wet Coast, and provides basic puncture protection if you end up in the bushes along the ditch. It also looks the most casual and fashionable if that matters at all (it shouldn't, but hey....) The Bell is a super light skeletonized EPS with basic adjustability and a removeable visor. It is solely for super hot summer weather town cruising as it allows the most air flow by far, but the least puncture protection.

There is no magic all-in-one, so you have to make those riding style choices and decide where you fall on the risk/comfort/style spectrum. Whatever you do, don't buy anything off Ebay/Amazon/Ali-express if you don't know the name, can't guarantee it's legit (not a cheap clone), and can't thoroughly research the reputation. I've seen cheapo knock-off helmets split clean in half during a big fall.
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
Our librarian got into E-biking a few years ago and she was really enjoying her E-bike commute.
Today, she was a bit stupid and did not wear a helmet on a short 2-mile ride to the market and got into a nasty bike wreck because of icy conditions.
During the winter months, it's dark and it's hard to see icy patches on the road. It's a reminder to use good lights and ALWAYS wear a helmet.
I feel bad for her and I hope the rest of us don't make this mistake.

Linda_bikewreck.jpg
 

Jimbo08

Active Member
MIPS is an important feature for sure. Anything that gives you a better chance in an accident👍
Specialized, Lazer and Giro have all worked well for me. Some brands just don't fit well on my noggin, even if I really want to like them. Some models on the tested list are no longer available. Checkout www.bikeland.ca if you live in Canada.