what is the most comfortable and safe helmut you've used

Asher

Well-Known Member
I have purchased 4 of these and I find they are adjustable, comfortable and priced fairly. I also like the fact they have a flashing light in the back.


Buying a helmet from an Amazon Chinese NONAMEALLCAPSBRAND kinda defeats the purpose of protecting your head. Sort of like making condoms out of a wicker basket. It might work, but don't be surprised if it doesn't, and then you're truly well and f***ed.
 

Asher

Well-Known Member
None of the models listed have chin protection. I've been over the handlebars at least 6 times; hit my chin on ground or pavement 6 times. Never hit the back top or side of my head . 11/2018 I broke the chin at 25 mph. Real nuisance having jaw wired shut for Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Years.
I ride a Fox Rampage with chin protection, plus a lot of vents for bike riders. It comes in sizes; measure your head with a fabric tape measure. If your distributor doesn't carry your size, Fox sells direct. Mine has bright yellow lettering to look like a traffic warning sign.
Fox has a lighter model, that won't keep branches out of your face. Mine has grills over the holes.
Bell has a similar model. Their is grey I think.
If you have trouble holding up the weight, do more pushups with the helmet on. What you do regularly, you can do.
All those ratings people brag about, I've never in 63 years of riding hit the parts of the head those rated helmets protect. I've always hit the chin, that those ratings agencies totally ignore.
How are you going over the bars so much?

I have hit my head three times, though one just a grazing of the skin. A helmet covered the area concerned all times.
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
How are you going over the bars so much?
I hit a speed bump, a high pavement separator, a ridge of gravel, a stick. The handlebars rip out of my hands and the front tire twists sideways, grabbing the pavement. The seat kicks up and over I go. Diamondback MTB, Pacific Quantum MTB twice, Huffy Savannah cruiser, once.
Posters on roadbikereview.com suggested I hold on the the handlebars. Yeah, right. Modern bikes have quick steering, ie not much trail. My Mother's 1946 Firestone with the same 26"x2" tires as now had more trail & was stable even riding across rough railroad tracks. I checked >200 frames on a website, all 26" tire frames had exactly the same trail. I contacted a custom frame builder, he refused to "experiment" with more front fork trail. Thus I bought the cargo bike, that has the same trail but puts more of my weight on the front tire. 3 years, 6000 miles, no such accidents.
If I worked out more to build up my arm muscles, it would just tear up my joints. Already had a cyst on thumb joint just from thumb shifter. My upper body is lightened up to fall down on wet WVa rocks without damage. My bones are WVa native Am, not european.
 
B

BarryS

Guest
Im getting an ebike soon and the only helmut I have is pretty uncomfortable.
I have a smallish head so is there a measuring system I should be aware of.
Also safety is important, are there standards I should look for? Im in Canada.

Thanks for any advice.
You have to try them on . Personally I find MIP very annoying . There's also alot of mixed debate on needing it or not . If you have a credit card and don't have local access. Buy them thru Amazon where you have free returns . I also found the same helmet with MIPS vs without fit different size wise
 

goldconch

Active Member
I hit a speed bump, a high pavement separator, a ridge of gravel, a stick. The handlebars rip out of my hands and the front tire twists sideways, grabbing the pavement. The seat kicks up and over I go. Diamondback MTB, Pacific Quantum MTB twice, Huffy Savannah cruiser, once.
Posters on roadbikereview.com suggested I hold on the the handlebars. Yeah, right. Modern bikes have quick steering, ie not much trail. My Mother's 1946 Firestone with the same 26"x2" tires as now had more trail & was stable even riding across rough railroad tracks. I checked >200 frames on a website, all 26" tire frames had exactly the same trail. I contacted a custom frame builder, he refused to "experiment" with more front fork trail. Thus I bought the cargo bike, that has the same trail but puts more of my weight on the front tire. 3 years, 6000 miles, no such accidents.
If I worked out more to build up my arm muscles, it would just tear up my joints. Already had a cyst on thumb joint just from thumb shifter. My upper body is lightened up to fall down on wet WVa rocks without damage. My bones are WVa native Am, not european.
@indianajo, I hear you. I've gone over the bars my fair share of times, but thankfully never as badly as your reported chin experience. Ouch! I don't think anybody willingly designs their own wipeout, and that is why they are called accidents. I'm glad to see the geometry of the latest generation MTBs bears no resemblance to the earliest MTBs from the 1980s. The new normal includes buzzwords like "long", "reach", and "slack", that translate into longer wheelbase and fork trail, as you point out...and ofc the bigger tires help too. Riding on the road (even in designated cycle lanes) can have its own set of hazards as well. Some we can control, some we can't. The best we can do is keep our heads up, ears, and eyes open, reading the approaching terrain and hazards, as best we can. I had a recent reminder of that when I was very nearly taken out by a 5lb chicken at 25mph+ (insert chicken crossing joke).
 

Sifu Ben

Active Member
I would say that the safest helmet is the one that you will wear. There is the average intermediate oval head that majority of the US population falls under, with long oval and round heads being the endpoints. Helmet sizing is only a starting point. Only an in-store fitting could guarantee satisfaction. MIPS and Wavecell mean nothing if they are uncomfortable on your head.
 
B

BarryS

Guest
I would say that the safest helmet is the one that you will wear. There is the average intermediate oval head that majority of the US population falls under, with long oval and round heads being the endpoints. Helmet sizing is only a starting point. Only an in-store fitting could guarantee satisfaction. MIPS and Wavecell mean nothing if they are uncomfortable on your head.
Yeah I agree : I tried the same exact helmet on . Same size just different color. They fit my head different. Like Blue Jeans . The same make , model and size often fit differently.
 

Asher

Well-Known Member
I would say that the safest helmet is the one that you will wear. There is the average intermediate oval head that majority of the US population falls under, with long oval and round heads being the endpoints. Helmet sizing is only a starting point. Only an in-store fitting could guarantee satisfaction. MIPS and Wavecell mean nothing if they are uncomfortable on your head.

There isn't any relationship between MIPS and fit.

You don't need an in-store fitting either. Look up diagrams for how to wear a helmet. Non cheapo helmets often have a wire cage at the back that practically assures it's worn properly.

The only helmets I've had issues with were the cheap kind given out as a free promotion (eg Bird). And I have a large head.
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
There isn't any relationship between MIPS and fit.
I would agree there shouldn't be if it done right.

I've read many reports on MIPS slip plane technology and it can change the fit of a helmet if a manufacturer incorporates it into existing helmets. To do it right the manufacture needs to either enlarge the shell or reduce the thickness of the inner foam. If you take an existing helmet shell, one with MIPS incorporated and one without, the MIPS version will be tighter fitting.

The parent company of Bell Helmets and Giro Helmets purchased part of the MIPS company about 2+ years ago. Its just a brand of slip plane and not the only way to achieve a slip plane. MIPS was marketed well and people think it's better than helmets without it, but it isn't necessarily true. Not all scientists in the field agree that it is significantly safer than other quality helmets. Some actually say it's just a way to sell more expensive helmets. It is a private, for profit company, partly owned by Bell and Giro. I've spent hours reading about this over the past few years because I own and use a lot of helmets. I do believe the helmets with MIPS are good, but I don't believe they are the only safe helmets on the market. Brands wanting to display the MIPS name on their helmets have to pay Bell/Giro for the priviledge. Kind of like Gore Tex or Thinsulate users have to pay to label their insulated, waterproof garments.
 

Asher

Well-Known Member
I would agree there shouldn't be if it done right.

I've read many reports on MIPS slip plane technology and it can change the fit of a helmet if a manufacturer incorporates it into existing helmets. To do it right the manufacture needs to either enlarge the shell or reduce the thickness of the inner foam. If you take an existing helmet shell, one with MIPS incorporated and one without, the MIPS version will be tighter fitting.

The parent company of Bell Helmets and Giro Helmets purchased part of the MIPS company about 2+ years ago. Its just a brand of slip plane and not the only way to achieve a slip plane. MIPS was marketed well and people think it's better than helmets without it, but it isn't necessarily true. Not all scientists in the field agree that it is significantly safer than other quality helmets. Some actually say it's just a way to sell more expensive helmets. It is a private, for profit company, partly owned by Bell and Giro. I've spent hours reading about this over the past few years because I own and use a lot of helmets. I do believe the helmets with MIPS are good, but I don't believe they are the only safe helmets on the market. Brands wanting to display the MIPS name on their helmets have to pay Bell/Giro for the priviledge. Kind of like Gore Tex or Thinsulate users have to pay to label their insulated, waterproof garments.

When you compare MIPS* to non-MIPS helmets at a given price level, MIPS tends to earn higher safety ratings according to Virginia Tech's lab. So while you're technically right, in practical terms MIPS is safer, because everyone is shopping by a budget, and MIPS always rates safer. There are no other published quantitative ratings, and I'll take VT's over empty claims.

19 of the top 20 in VT's list are MIPS or Wavecel. The other one is a POC helmet with an alternative helmet liner technology. Given the dominance of MIPS or MIPS like alternatives, non-MIPS helmets are irrelevant if safety is a priority.

*Including Wavecel under MIPS here for simplicity.
 
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goldconch

Active Member
MIPS was marketed well and people think it's better than helmets without it, but it isn't necessarily true. Not all scientists in the field agree that it is significantly safer than other quality helmets.
There are many cycling settings, each with crash probabilities and scenarios. Aggressively ripping huge MTB aerials might call for a BMX-style full head and chin protection helmet. Winter commuting might favour a regular winter hat/toque with a Hövding full head and neck airbag, knowing that a black-ice skull-cracking wipeout was somewhat inevitable sooner or later. If, for the full length of my urban street journey, I had no weather, and a dedicated bicycle lane to enjoy, separated from other steel-wrapped, texting road-users, I might adopt a decidedly more Danish attitude towards bike helmets ["Why Danes Don't Need Bicycle Helmets"].

As it is, I do interact with other less-engaged vehicular traffic, and I feel that area is the greatest of concern for my safety. I therefore opted for a more assertive signal helmet that helps me to be seen, occupy my space, and hopefully forego any unscheduled testings of the helmet shell and interior foam.

I also have a decent bell and am signaling a "heads up" of where I am all the time. It's admittedly a little finger bell for analog bikes. I wish there was something in the middle of an airhorn and micro bell for ebikes doing 25mph. Anyone have one of those Toptrek or Hornit horns?
 
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J.R.

Well-Known Member
When you compare MIPS* to non-MIPS helmets at a given price level, MIPS tends to earn higher safety ratings according to Virginia Tech's lab. So while you're technically right, in practical terms MIPS is safer, because everyone is shopping by a budget, and MIPS always rates safer. There are no other published quantitative ratings, and I'll take VT's over empty claims.

19 of the top 20 in VT's list are MIPS or Wavecel. The other one is a POC helmet with an alternative helmet liner technology. Given the dominance of MIPS or MIPS like alternatives, non-MIPS helmets are irrelevant if safety is a priority.

*Including Wavecel under MIPS here for simplicity.
I try not to post all encompassing statements about this sort of safety issue and I didn't here. I believe the MIPS helmets are very good and the ones I've seen are quality helmets.

I started researching this probably 5 years ago. Wondered what this new MIPS was. I taught motorcycle safety, so the topic interests me. I read so many scientific papers from Europe and Scandinavia on it, I knew at the time it was something that was not a good forum discussion topic. If I posted the good AND the bad, I might be misconstrued as being a doubter (people say hater these days). I am not. I won't dig up all the links for this thread. The only points I am making is it can change the size of a helmet, it's not the only safe helmet technology and it's not the only way to achieve a slip plane. Slip planes have been known about for many years. Lastly MIPS is a brand and a for profit company. Bell and Giro can sell it cheaper because they own it.

Someone said it earlier and I've heard it for most my life that the safest helmet it the one you'll wear all the time. It's a catchy phrase, true, but not all encompassing either.
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Nevada City, CA & Paradise Valley, AZ
My youngest liked Nutcase helmets when he was in college.
Atlas172.JPG

Strapping in for an obstacle course run in their hand made aero-bike.
 

Asher

Well-Known Member
I bought a Nutcase brand helmet because I wanted the cats in space print. I heard of Nutcase and they've been in business awhile. It's comfy, has a visor and I feel safe wearing it.
My youngest liked Nutcase helmets when he was in college.
View attachment 76645
Strapping in for an obstacle course run in their hand made aero-bike.

Virginia Tech rated a Nutcase helmet. It scored 105th out of 113 helmets, and three out of five stars. Lol.

The 4th best helmet costs $20 less. Specialized Align II, $50.

If I'm only willing to wear a Santa hat, is that too the best helmet?
 

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steve mercier

Well-Known Member
We use the Bontrager Solstice ( cheap and comfortable ) or the Sena bluetooth .
 
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Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Nevada City, CA & Paradise Valley, AZ
Virginia Tech rated a Nutcase helmet. It scored 105th out of 113 helmets, and three out of five stars. Lol.

The 4th best helmet costs $20 less. Specialized Align II, $50.

If I'm only willing to wear a Santa hat, is that too the best helmet?
I will say that my son's college team chose Nutcase helmets as they had a clean, tight fit to the custom carbon fiber roll bar that was integrated into their aerobike design, not just the cool graphics! 🤣

Atlas472.JPG

Racing underway. My youngest son is 'piloting' the black aerobike with the yellow accent, Nutcase helmet and all!
 

sc00ter

Active Member
I was never aware anyone bothered to do independent safety reviews on bicycle helmets. I wear a Schuberth C3 on my motor scooter. Had a Nolan N-100 if I recall before that. But a helmet is better than no helmet.
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Nevada City, CA & Paradise Valley, AZ
I was never aware anyone bothered to do independent safety reviews on bicycle helmets. I wear a Schuberth C3 on my motor scooter. Had a Nolan N-100 if I recall before that. But a helmet is better than no helmet.
There's also a Euro standard for ebike helmets and a list of helmets certified to this standard. You can probably find this with the forum search function.