What is the REAL difference between a 9amp and 12amp battery?

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Deleted member 803

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I have an opportunity to pick up a Neo Carbon at a VERY good price or pay a little less and get a Neo Cross. The big difference between the two (other than frame and upgraded components) is that the new Cross has a 12A battery and the Carbon has a 9A. What is the real world difference between 9A and 12A batteries?
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
I have an opportunity to pick up a Neo Carbon at a VERY good price or pay a little less and get a Neo Cross. The big difference between the two (other than frame and upgraded components) is that the new Cross has a 12A battery and the Carbon has a 9A. What is the real world difference between 9A and 12A batteries?

Both weigh about the same but the 12Ah battery has higher density Samsung SDI cells at 3.1 mAh. This will hold ~discharge voltage at 35-36V for longer distances than the 9Ah battery. Here's some more info.
 
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Thanks for the info. I am leaning on pulling the trigger on a new 2014 NEO CROSS and changing out the cassette to a shimano 10-speed and installing XT derailleurs and shifters plus new Schwalbe Marathon Plus tires.
 

Vern

Active Member
The new larger battery will work in the Carbon. If you get the Carbon you will get many of the upgraded components and you can add the larger battery in a few years
 
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But I was told that BH is not making a 12A specifically for the Carbon so the outer case would not match the rest of the bike. Not sure if this is true???
 

Court

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But I was told that BH is not making a 12A specifically for the Carbon so the outer case would not match the rest of the bike. Not sure if this is true???
It's hard to say at this point, you're probably correct about not being able to get a matching battery exterior. My personal uninformed guess is that Easy Motion is going to focus more energy on their new EVO line of electric bikes like the EVO Eco Lite which has a different style battery pack (not backwards compatible) that lets you charge on or off the frame. With that said, there are tons of Neo bikes out there and lots of batteries floating around so you still get a solid deal with either the Cross or Carbon, it might come down to components and visual appeal. In my experience the 36 volt ~9 amp hour battery works pretty well but Ravi is correct about better range and probably more charge cycles with higher amp hours (and the pack might be newer since the 12ah design is new as of 2014 which could contribute to fresher Lithium-ion cells and a longer life).
 
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Court, thanks.......I have narrowed the choice down to either a 2014 Neo Cross or Neo Race. I am solely a city or street rider, and, having ridden the Race yesterday, was very impressed how freely it rolls and how quick it is to speed. If I felt I needed some comfort I could add a suspension seat post and perhaps fatter tires. I was ready to put my money down on a Cross and upgrade the entire groupset, but now I may be leaning towards the Race and adding disc brakes. I view the Race as a poor man's specialized turbo s.
 

Court

Administrator
Staff member
Court, thanks.......I have narrowed the choice down to either a 2014 Neo Cross or Neo Race. I am solely a city or street rider, and, having ridden the Race yesterday, was very impressed how freely it rolls and how quick it is to speed. If I felt I needed some comfort I could add a suspension seat post and perhaps fatter tires. I was ready to put my money down on a Cross and upgrade the entire groupset, but now I may be leaning towards the Race and adding disc brakes. I view the Race as a poor man's specialized turbo s.
I enjoyed the Race a lot and appreciate how light it is (just 42 pounds). It's a stiffer feel with the narrow tires and no suspension fork but that's typical of any road bike. You can still add front and rear racks thanks to the braze ons and frankly, the rim brakes work just fine (it's just like most road bikes in that sense).

I sometimes look at ebikes and thing... okay, maybe a regular bike weighs 20 pounds and this one weighs 50... but that's not a huge deal because it's like if I weighed 160 instead of 130. The bike can take it and since all of the bike's weight is mounted lower (than it would be if it was in my belly and rear end) then that's a good thing. Disc brakes are cool but I wouldn't waste my money adding them (and adding the shrieking noise they sometimes make) unless you're going off road a lot and need something that won't get dirty.
 
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As you know I pulled the trigger on a Neo Carbon which has pretty good stuff. One question though, I weigh 240lbs and trust that the carbon frame is strong enough for me.
 

flymeaway

Well-Known Member
I have an opportunity to pick up a Neo Carbon at a VERY good price or pay a little less and get a Neo Cross. The big difference between the two (other than frame and upgraded components) is that the new Cross has a 12A battery and the Carbon has a 9A. What is the real world difference between 9A and 12A batteries?

Hi 86,

I have both a Cross and Carbon. My wife rides the Cross and I ride the Carbon. Big difference in range. After a 20-24 mile ride she's showing 4 bars on her bike and I'm showing 3 and sometimes only 2. The Carbon is a fantastic bike......but.......I now value battery reserves as one of the major components of an electric bike. If your rides are less than 25 miles the Carbon will work. If you want to go over 30 miles and you ride in Standard it's a marginal proposition. Either bike is a great ride but the battery on the Cross is a big +.
 
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Deleted member 803

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Hi 86,

I have both a Cross and Carbon. My wife rides the Cross and I ride the Carbon. Big difference in range. After a 20-24 mile ride she's showing 4 bars on her bike and I'm showing 3 and sometimes only 2. The Carbon is a fantastic bike......but.......I now value battery reserves as one of the major components of an electric bike. If your rides are less than 25 miles the Carbon will work. If you want to go over 30 miles and you ride in Standard it's a marginal proposition. Either bike is a great ride but the battery on the Cross is a big +.
Thank you for your response. fortunately BH now has a 12V option for the Carbon (at least according to their customer service rep)
 

eDean

Active Member
I have a new 2014 Jet with 12A, its a step through Cross basically. This weekend I did a 50 mile trip to Old Town Alexandria on it and used 2 bars. For about 10 miles I had it on Boot mode which keeps the bike at 20 as long as you put some effort into peddeling. For the rest it was eco, or standard. Tire pressure was 70 psi. The bike is very efficient, carbon more so. If you ride it like a bike and don't have crazy hills (there are a few where I live in Bethesda) your range can be off the charts. The eco and standard modes are extremely efficient but require you to put in effort. In two weeks and 240 miles I have never used more then 2 bars. I'm ridding for fun and fitness so I don't mind sweating.
 
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Deleted member 803

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I have a new 2014 Jet with 12A, its a step through Cross basically. This weekend I did a 50 mile trip to Old Town Alexandria on it and used 2 bars. For about 10 miles I had it on Boot mode which keeps the bike at 20 as long as you put some effort into peddeling. For the rest it was eco, or standard. Tire pressure was 70 psi. The bike is very efficient, carbon more so. If you ride it like a bike and don't have crazy hills (there are a few where I live in Bethesda) your range can be off the charts. The eco and standard modes are extremely efficient but require you to put in effort. In two weeks and 240 miles I have never used more then 2 bars. I'm ridding for fun and fitness so I don't mind sweating.
Thanks and glad you are enjoying. I plan on using the bike for fitness (odd term for someone my age) and want to pedal as much as possible. I want the motor to compensate for my lack of stamina or weakness. I am now doing daily 5-10 mile rides but I still walk the bike up the steep hills.

BTW, I checked with the dealer and they have indeed received a 12A carbon battery......Yahoo...............
 

Peter

Active Member
Then wait till you here my rainge in eco on the Race.

135 miles.

On my Jumper I can only do 50 km in boost. The Race has much better Range.
I think the courses for my extreme range on the Race is: Tests done in backcountry where there are no stops and goes. No suspension on the bike. Thin tires. I am doing light pedalling. I change gear a lot. There are no big hills on the test route. Im a tiny guy at 70 kgs.

If you want to see how I max the range in eco then check my youtube video from Mont Ventoux elsewhere here on the forum.
 
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Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
Then wait till you here my rainge in eco.

135 miles.

In my Jumper I can only do 50 km in boost. The Race has much better Range.
I think the courses for my extreme range on the Race is: Tests done in backcountry where there are no stops and goes. No suspension on the bike. Thin tires. I am doing light pedalling. I change gear a lot. There are no big hills on the test route. Im a tiny guy at 70 kgs.

If you want to see how I max the range in eco then check my youtube video from Mont Ventoux elsewhere here on the forum.


You meant 135km right..! :)
There is no way one could to 135mi on a Jumper even with slick tires.
I lock out both suspensions and with constant pedaling, I get 55mi max in ECO.
Very nice video :) ... I know that Moustache samedi and Riese & Muller are pretty famous in France. How does BH fare against those bikes?
 

Peter

Active Member
Nope. I meant 135 miles. Though it is not on the Jumper. Thats impossible. Its on the Race. I know it might be a world record but never the less it is true :).
BH bikes sell OK but they are pretty expensive. Guess mid range and low range ebikes sell better.