What tire pressure for a fat bike?

dgroebl

New Member
I’ve just received my new super sweet Juggernaut Ultra FS fat tire bike and I’m not sure what kind of tire pressure to run. I realize the 26” x 4” fat tires will probably always seem squishy but I wonder what is a good pressure of them. I’ll just be riding on the street as a commuter.
 

Ian Moone

Active Member
I’ve just received my new super sweet Juggernaut Ultra FS fat tire bike and I’m not sure what kind of tire pressure to run. I realize the 26” x 4” fat tires will probably always seem squishy but I wonder what is a good pressure of them. I’ll just be riding on the street as a commuter.
Read the tire pressure recommendation on the Sidewall of your Tires !
 

dgroebl

New Member
Sorry, I'm new to the cycling world. In the automotive world at least we don't drive around with the max pressure as labeled on your tire sidewall. Your fuel mileage would be great but your ride would be terrible and wet and dry grip limits would be negatively affected as well.

That being said I was quite shocked to see that the max pressure was only 30 psi! I put them up at 28 after reading Ian's post, but now after seeing Tars post perhaps I'll try 25 and then 20 and see how she feels.
 

Tars Tarkas

Active Member
26x4 has a lot of square inches of rubber on the ground. Your bike mfgr ought to have something to say about this, but try and adjust until you get comfortable.

TT
 

JRA

Well-Known Member
The best way to find your personal psi is to air up above what you think necessary and ride on your typical surfaces while incrementally letting out pressure and noting the ride characteristics each time. Once the ride quality gets noticeably bad take a psi reading and then pump back in a few psi or until it feels good again. Note that psi on your gauge and use that. If you increase the load you might want to add a little to compensate.
 

Ian Moone

Active Member
I found tire pressure is really about the kind of terrain you're on, and what you're comfortable with. I don't even carry a tire gage in my bag, I just Fill and Chill ! ??
 

Tars Tarkas

Active Member
I like to ride on the beach so I air down and back up fairly often when I'm there. I find a tire gauge extremely useful. Depending on the sand, I'll air down to 8 pounds or so and back to 20 when I get back on pavement. Without a tire gauge the process would be a good bit more difficult.

And my tires lose about 5 lbs of air a week. I can tolerate that okay, but a gauge makes it easy to air up to 20. I could guess, which I do when I'm pumping air into the tire, but based on my gauge, my guesses can easily be 7 lbs off. That's not killer, but the gauge is so easy, why not use it and get the air where I want it?

TT
 

Chopperbill

Active Member
When I was in AZ for the winter the roads were horrible. I ran 11# in the tire and it smoothed things out a lot. Back home I went to 20#. Felt to hard after running so low before. I have them set at 14# now. I just got use to the smooth ride.
 

MechaNut

Active Member
Different tires handle differently at different pressures. The Kenda Krusades that came on my RCS were fine around 18-20 psi. The Vee Rubber Speedsters I put on my RCS are a lot quieter and roll easier on paved roads, but get really "squirmy" below 25 psi. I usually run the speedsters around 28-30 psi (2 bar) as a result. More or less the Krusades are loud and cushy. The Speedsters are more efficient and quiet at road riding but not as cushy because they are firmer.
 

Mike Burns

New Member
Fat tires don't act like road tires. More pressure in not always faster or easier to pedal. I have a non-e fatbike with 26 x 4.6 Terrene Cake Eater tires and am running 10 pounds on pavement and other hard-packed surfaces. I tried higher and it was not any faster, just harsher. I weigh 188 pounds and the bike is around 35. If you have 4" wide, maybe try 15 PSI. As MechaNut said, Different tires handle differently at different pressures. I run over 50 PSI in the 26 x 2.5 Hookworm tires on my 70-pound full-suspension ebike that I use mostly for errands, river shuttles, and commuting. Play around with it - experimentation is fun and free.
 

Scooteretti

Active Member
Depending on the surface being ridden on I have found that for myself with a 26 x 4.8 tires that the following pressures work well:

Asphalt / Hard Surfaces: 21-26PSI
Mountain / Offroad: 12-16PSI
Mud / Snow conditions: 7-9PSI

***NOTE: If you winter ride in colder climates you have to keep in mind that your tire pressure will decrease a few lbs due cold conditions.

hope this helps,


Will
shop.scooteretti.com
 

Dmitri

Active Member
I ride at 20psi. At 30psi (the recommended maximum), your tire turns into wood and you lose any cushioning. Lower pressures are best reserved for rough terrain, sand and snow.