What's in your repair pack?

folmonty

New Member
Region
USA
City
Nor CA
Just brought home couple of Trek Allants. Of course my wife wants to "get on and go!" Easy porkchop! We could be miles from home in nothing flat. Those big tires could pick up debris easily. Doing a test case of repairing a flat I found the Schwalbe G-One, 650Bx57c to be a royal PITA to bust the beads. OMG that bead had me thinking these things are tubeless, which they can be converted to. But these have tubes, and being home allowed for use of the bike stand for repairs. We all know flats happen in the worse of places. Looking at the Purion display would require laying the bike on it's side. NOT IDEAL! Would guess there's some creative ways to deal with this but my solution was to get these nifty little things called Handlebar Jacks Will have to find out if they're worth it under fire. If nothing else just removing the axles were worth the experience as they're not QR's and much different anything I've done in the past. Also picked up a Crank Brothers multi-tool with chain breaker. Tire levers, tubes, inflator and Co2 cartridges should about do it. Might convert to tubless but for now keeping things the way they are.

These ebikes are heavy and a bit different to work on. Suggest doing a dry run at home before something happens on the road. Will be interested in reading what others do?
 

dmourati

Member
Region
USA
City
Mountain View
Just bought this tire jack for the same reason:


I also bought a full set of hex wrenches from Wera that have been invaluable getting my new ebike dialed in.

The main thing I'd focus on is tubes/tires. I went with Tannus Armour and Schwalbe Big Ben tires for puncture resistance.

I'd also take a look at this article on the subject which I found super helpful:

 
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DaveMatthews

Well-Known Member
Some interesting ideas here...

 

Rickman1

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Aridzona
Just brought home couple of Trek Allants. Of course my wife wants to "get on and go!" Easy porkchop! We could be miles from home in nothing flat. Those big tires could pick up debris easily. Doing a test case of repairing a flat I found the Schwalbe G-One, 650Bx57c to be a royal PITA to bust the beads. OMG that bead had me thinking these things are tubeless, which they can be converted to. But these have tubes, and being home allowed for use of the bike stand for repairs. We all know flats happen in the worse of places. Looking at the Purion display would require laying the bike on it's side. NOT IDEAL! Would guess there's some creative ways to deal with this but my solution was to get these nifty little things called Handlebar Jacks Will have to find out if they're worth it under fire. If nothing else just removing the axles were worth the experience as they're not QR's and much different anything I've done in the past. Also picked up a Crank Brothers multi-tool with chain breaker. Tire levers, tubes, inflator and Co2 cartridges should about do it. Might convert to tubless but for now keeping things the way they are.

These ebikes are heavy and a bit different to work on. Suggest doing a dry run at home before something happens on the road. Will be interested in reading what others do?
I just received my Handlebar Jacks. Put them on my big cruiser to make sure it lifted the handlebars high enough. Worked fine. Just got my repair kit put together.
I will be "Desert Proofing" my tires once I get my first flat but in the meantime I want to have an emergency repair kit. I purchased the Fix It Sticks Mountain Kit and added additional Fix It Ratchet handle and better tire levers and patch kit. I'm going to add wrenches for removing the front and rear wheels if I have to. Also added a small rechargeable inflator along with the Handlebar Jacks. I bought some spare tubes and will carry one with my kit in case a patch won't work or if I have to remove the wheel, I'll just replace the tube. I see that you can patch a tube without removing the wheel but if I can't, I will have a tube. Handlebar Jacks appear to be a good addition.
 

john peck

Well-Known Member
Just brought home couple of Trek Allants. Of course my wife wants to "get on and go!" Easy porkchop! We could be miles from home in nothing flat. Those big tires could pick up debris easily. Doing a test case of repairing a flat I found the Schwalbe G-One, 650Bx57c to be a royal PITA to bust the beads. OMG that bead had me thinking these things are tubeless, which they can be converted to. But these have tubes, and being home allowed for use of the bike stand for repairs. We all know flats happen in the worse of places. Looking at the Purion display would require laying the bike on it's side. NOT IDEAL! Would guess there's some creative ways to deal with this but my solution was to get these nifty little things called Handlebar Jacks Will have to find out if they're worth it under fire. If nothing else just removing the axles were worth the experience as they're not QR's and much different anything I've done in the past. Also picked up a Crank Brothers multi-tool with chain breaker. Tire levers, tubes, inflator and Co2 cartridges should about do it. Might convert to tubless but for now keeping things the way they are.

These ebikes are heavy and a bit different to work on. Suggest doing a dry run at home before something happens on the road. Will be interested in reading what others do?
Everything but the tool i won´t have when I need it, murphy´s law
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
Was that spoke was one that required removing the brake disc to replace? Geez I hate that!
I´m bought a caliper for the rear wheel, but entails labor I´m too lazy to do. It´s one serious
down side to a rear hub motor.
No, luckily it was enough to remove the wheel. I was lucky to return with undamaged wheel from that trip!
 

TrailSeeker

Active Member
Region
USA
Was that spoke was one that required removing the brake disc to replace?
I watched a YouTube video on this recently, and the guy said you can loosen the spokes around the broken one, to help you get home without further damage. I don't know if it works though. Of course then you'd have to bring it straight to the shop for repairs...
 

Brockrock

Active Member
Region
USA
These ebikes are heavy and a bit different to work on. Suggest doing a dry run at home before something happens on the road.
The most common 'game over' mechanical situations on a bicycle are a flat tire or a broken chain. eBikes introduce a whole host of other possible issues such as an electronic or motor drive failures, but many eBikes can still be pedaled like a traditional bike, although with a lot more effort, so I will not consider those failures to be 'game over'.

Good tires are the first defense against flats. Quality eBike/Moped rated tires typically have a puncture resistant layer that protects against smaller thorns and the smaller pieces of worn down, automobile-tire steel-belts as they accumulate along the roadside, and with such a tire, you are unlikely to get a full blowout if inflated correctly. But flats happen, and even the above rated tires can go instantly flat in certain situations, and if you pack the tools and extra tube(s) for such an occurrence, it is probably best that you have done it once on each tire in your home or garage, just to know that you have all the proper tools, packed, and the CO2 pumps are the way to go for sure. They are lightweight and fairly instant.

A chain failure can typically be repaired by removing the broken link set, reconnecting the chain, and heading back with a slightly shorter chain, so if you have never done chain separation and re-connection with a chain tool, get one after checking out numerous vids on YouTube, and practice this too.

The best way to perform either a tire of chain repair on the road is with the bike upside down on a flat and level surface. As such, I suggest bar ends such as the ones that I have, allowing the bike to sit on them and the seat with no other contact upon the ground - like the monitor - and they also provide an alternative hand hold which is nice to switch up.

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Dallant

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Just brought home couple of Trek Allants. Of course my wife wants to "get on and go!" Easy porkchop! We could be miles from home in nothing flat. Those big tires could pick up debris easily. Doing a test case of repairing a flat I found the Schwalbe G-One, 650Bx57c to be a royal PITA to bust the beads. OMG that bead had me thinking these things are tubeless, which they can be converted to. But these have tubes, and being home allowed for use of the bike stand for repairs. We all know flats happen in the worse of places. Looking at the Purion display would require laying the bike on it's side. NOT IDEAL! Would guess there's some creative ways to deal with this but my solution was to get these nifty little things called Handlebar Jacks Will have to find out if they're worth it under fire. If nothing else just removing the axles were worth the experience as they're not QR's and much different anything I've done in the past. Also picked up a Crank Brothers multi-tool with chain breaker. Tire levers, tubes, inflator and Co2 cartridges should about do it. Might convert to tubless but for now keeping things the way they are.

These ebikes are heavy and a bit different to work on. Suggest doing a dry run at home before something happens on the road. Will be interested in reading what others do?
We have two Allants also. I had three flats in the first year (all rear tire) and was generally riding on paved trails. Called the wife to pick me up twice and walked a mile or so the third time. I got lots of practice breaking G-One beads, patching tubes, and eventually installing a new G-One with Tannus Armor. I also got plenty of sore fingers!
In my Racktime Odin trunk bag I carry really solid Park tire levers/patch kit, a Wotow 16 in 1 bike tool kit, a Pro Bike Tool mini floor pump. I carry an extra tube. Instead of handlebar jacks, I have bar ends and turn my Allant upside down when needed. Honestly haven’t had to change/patch a tube out in the countryside yet but I could. I do need to get a chain tool and extra links.
154907B2-BB55-4155-93CE-6D44FE2D443B.jpeg
 

AK99645

New Member
Region
USA
I have an Allant 7S after 2 flats in three days, I switched to tubeless. Trying to patch or replace a tube in the field was no fun.

Great bike over 400 miles in 6 weeks. The fenders get in the way on anything but roads, switched to tubeless MB tires. It's a lot more responsive on the trails.
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I have an Allant 7S after 2 flats in three days, I switched to tubeless. Trying to patch or replace a tube in the field was no fun.

Great bike over 400 miles in 6 weeks. The fenders get in the way on anything but roads, switched to tubeless MB tires. It's a lot more responsive on the trails.
What tires/size?
 

AK99645

New Member
Region
USA
Trimmed up the fender also, it got plugged up with mud once too often
 

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