What's your plan for a flat tire 10 miles from home?

xerxez

Active Member
I'm interested if you are

1) Optimistic - i'm not worried. There's no need to plan.
2) Realistic - I realize this could happen, this is how I've prepared. But, luckily, it's never happened.
3) Experienced - This happened to me, this is what I did.
4) Procrastinating - I realize this could happen, but I haven't found a great option and still have it on my to do list.


I'm #4. I'm hoping you can help me with a low-tech simple back-up plan.
 

BKing

Member
#2. I usually carry a tool bag on the seat and a pump strapped on the rear carrier. Rear wheel would be worst case. Wire cutters to get tyrap off motor cable and possibly pull something out of the tire, 18mm wrench, Allen wrench for torque arm, tire irons, Spare tyraps, patches, tube. We have total of both bikes 6000 miles with zero flats. If near home one of us would go get the truck or call my wife if she was not there.
I was by myself on a mtn bike about 10 miles from civilization and my chain came apart. It flew off and disappeared in fine red dirt. I found it and had a chain tool so sat in the weeds in 90 degree heat with bugs biting me while I fixed it. I was also out of water. Add bug spray to the list 😀
 
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Buckeye Biker

New Member
#4 for me. I only recently bought an ebike, and for the time being I'm not going that far from home. I have some of the necessary tools, but I have zero confidence I could get the tire off and patch the tube on the road unassisted. I'm thinking about getting AAA just as a precaution.
 

BKing

Member
Maybe someone will tell us how they ride with a flat because in a pinch I would sacrifice the tire to get somewhere.
 

Saratoga Dave

Well-Known Member
#3, on tires anyhow. While I carry a master link for the chain and have a chain break tool, I have never tried it. I have used a fiber fix spoke to keep a wheel from getting worse when a spoke let go after I had a few break on a bike I used to own.

I need to take my own advice re the chain: that advice as far as tires go is find an old bike somewhere and practice on it. Patching a tube is pretty easy once you get past the apprehension part of it. If you carry a spare tube, it’s downright simple.

The great thing these days is you can probably find 10 YouTube videos dealing with whatever the problem you are facing is, and get a little familiar with it right then and there. I did that with the spoke repair.

Nice going on the chain repair. Even with a YouTube primer I’m still a little intimidated by that one. That was always the big plus for a hub drive with a throttle... don’t need the chain, just drive the thing out to civilization on the throttle.
 

BKing

Member
Tyraps, cutters and Allen wrenches are the most overlooked items in tool cases. You can secure a broken spoke with a tyrap but need the cutters to trim it off.
I just remembered that we also carry a spare seat post clamp after one broke while putting a seat back on after hauling the bike.
 

JRA

Well-Known Member
Maybe someone will tell us how they ride with a flat because in a pinch I would sacrifice the tire to get somewhere.

I rode (gingerly) a 700c/45c front hub motor wheel flat for over 6 miles once, 5 on gravel road. Tire and tube were replaced but the wheel didn't need any attention. Was really happy to have the throttle that day for sure. Kind of slow going but beat walking for sure.

I only use tubeless systems now and have never been stranded by them. Got a 1 1/2" screw once and was able to continue on with some pumping and spinning the wheel which seems to help I have found.

OP, if you live in OR or ID AAA will come get you.
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
I carry a tool kit specific to each bike when we're on trips far from home. Hub nut wrenches, tire irons, patch kit, pump, multi-tool, spare tube, duct tape, etc. That sits on the shelf when we're at home.

Stands to reason that I've had three flats this summer, riding around the home, and had no way to fix them on the road. The first time, I walked it two miles, got exhausted, and finally rode the last two miles on the rim. Not hard because I had a throttle. The next time, I was with my wife and it was her bike. Called my daughter for a pickup. The third time was today. Not a flat, but a slow leak. Unpowered bike. I rode it home the last mile on hardly any air. Couldn't go much faster than 5 mph.
 

BET

Active Member
I am like OP. I carry tool kit, pump and tube. However I have not had a serious flat while riding. Considering getting some kind of tire liner like Mr. Tuffy. I talked to a bike mechanic about this and he said you can change the tire without taking the wheel all the way off. Just take one side of tire out, cut old tube, pull out, insert new tube partially inflated, put second side of tire in and inflate. I have not tried this. I did buy a special tube that is sealed at two ends You put it in and two ends meet and fit together. I have not tried it yet. I figure it can at least get me home.
 

linklemming

Well-Known Member
#3 Here, used to get flats due to goatheads until I started using stans in tubes over 10-15 years ago.

Only three flats since then. All were fixed by just adding more stans in the tube. One flat had three nail holes I got while riding over some boards used to fill in a wet section which had nails in then.

I also started riding on marathon plus mtb on a few bikes (not my real MTB, more of gravel bikes). I did this due to losing pressure on a ride on some continental race kings (probably had 30 goatheads in it). I came up on a gravel to wood bridge step at speed and almost had a nasty crash due to low tire pressure at speed (about 25mph).

I also have all the tools to fix a flat (2 2oz stan bottles...always used first, spare tube and tools to remove the rear tire and change the rear tube on my ccx (multitool, 18mm wrench, zip ties).

So far, just adding more stans has gotten me home
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
I'll go with #3. I help teach cycking skills to local youth groups. Flat repair is a skill they need to master. This is one of the sections I guide them through starting with removing their rear wheels and pulling their tubes. We move on to sample tubes with real holes in them. They practice their patching technique until their work holds air. Then they reassemble their wheels and bikes and off we ride.

I carry a flat kit with a spare tube, tire levers, patch kit, tire boot, pump, and a CO2 inflator (because it's just faster). So far I've been able able to fix all my flat issues trail side, 20+ years and counting!

I do use tire liners/thorn strips with generic tubes to minimize flats. Others have reported good results with tube sealant, puncture resistant tires, etc. YRMV. 😎
 

Johnny

Well-Known Member
Slime + tubes worked really well for me. Make sure that the tube is not small for the tire(if possiple you can even start with a slightly larger than recommended size), it makes it very hard to impossible for slime to work because the hole will stretch too much.
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
#3. Replaced the damaged tube with a Gaadi split tube without removing the rear wheel. Afterward, I replaced both tires & tubes with Schwalbe Marathon Plus tires and Schwalbe slime filled downhill tubes. No flats since.

I now carry spare Gaadi & standard type tubes, patch kit, compact tire pump, Co2 inflator, spare tube valves & tool, tire bead tools and a kit of chain & electrical repair parts.
 

Gordon71

Active Member
This just happened to me and I'm a 4. Called a friend,told her where my spare car keys were and asked her to get my car and meet me. I wasn't even sure I could get the bike (rad rover) in the back of a Kia Soul but I knew it wouldn't fit in her car. Turned out OK. Removed the battery,seat,and front wheel. The rear hatch had to stay up on the drive home but that was no problem. Talk about a 4,I wasn't even prepared to do anything when I got home so I'm out of action until all the stuff I ordered on Amazon gets here. So hopefully after I get my new tube and tuffy liner installed and slime both tires I'll be in good shape but will also now have a patch kit and small pump etc. in my rack bag for future problems. Just another learning the hard way experience for a new biker I guess.
 

cldlhd

Active Member
I'm interested if you are

1) Optimistic - i'm not worried. There's no need to plan.
2) Realistic - I realize this could happen, this is how I've prepared. But, luckily, it's never happened.
3) Experienced - This happened to me, this is what I did.
4) Procrastinating - I realize this could happen, but I haven't found a great option and still have it on my to do list.


I'm #4. I'm hoping you can help me with a low-tech simple back-up plan.
When you guys say tyraps do you mean zip ties? My e-bike isn't due to ship until September 15th but I'm looking into how I'm going to deal with this issue. On my current bike I'm usually not off road much and I'm not far from home so worst case if I get a flat I figure I can call Buddy with a pickup truck and throw it in back there. With my e-bike I figure I'll be going on farther rides so I do want to plan a little more.
 

RandallS

Well-Known Member
#3 I carry supplies and just get on with it. I must admit fixing a flat on the rear wheel of a hub drive bike can be daunting, but I typically don't ride that one anymore. But I had a rack with a pann to hold everything, so was usually prepared with supplies and tools for a!most everything.

Fast forward to 2 weeks ago, when I bought a new Hardtail eMTB, the Giant Fathom. Now it's a challenge to be able to carry all my "what if" supplies, so it's now a seat bag with a spare tube, levers, patching kit, CO2 inflator, multi-tool, tiewraps, electrical tape and whatever else I can jam in there. I also have a small toptube bag for supplies, but that usually has a snack, cell phone etc...

The repair scenarios are actually bassackwards, as the hub bike was generally path and road only, but mid drive MTB is out in the back and beyond.

Bottom line is if you ride a bike anywhere, something is going to break at some point Can you do basic field repairs to get to home (or safety)? If you don't think you can at present, get some training, choose your route carefully, or choose your riding companion sensibly, or be thoughtful on your footwear.

Ride safe!
 

Saratoga Dave

Well-Known Member
As noted above, that Gaadi tube is one of the best things a rear hub drive owner can carry with him or her... as long as you remember a knife so you can cut the leaking tube in half to get it out. Remember you still have to feel around inside the tire to make sure there’s nothing sharp in there to puncture the new tube, but this gets you back on the road quickly without having to take the wheel off at all. A real confidence builder. Google it if you’re not familiar with what it is.