Which batteries recharge as you pedal?

DragNLady

Member
Hi, I have heard that some batteries recharge as you pedal? Or recharge as you are cruising downhill? Can't find any info on this. Any info appreciated, thanks in advance.
 

christob

Well-Known Member
It isn't just swapping out a battery, but whether the bike in question (and its controller) was designed with regenerative capabilities built-in.
(And from what little I've read, the benefit is generally somewhat negligible, though I don't have first-hand experience with that in an ebike -- just in a car.)
 

DragNLady

Member
chrisob, thank you very much! You have been very helpful. I guess the reason I couldn't find any info on it, is because I did not know the terminology was called "degenerative braking." So kind of you to find this info for me, thanks again!!! :)
 

christob

Well-Known Member
There are some ebikes that have it... but be sure you're searching REgenerative, not DEgenerative ;)
 

DragNLady

Member
Thank you Amy, those responses were most helpful! I have people asking me all kinds of questions about my bike, (the one I am returning) and a recharging battery is one asked often. Now I know how to answer them. I am learning so much here! :) Now, if someone could just tell me which bike to buy, my life would be complete! ;)
 

AguassissiM

Well-Known Member
@DragNLady
I have an electric scooter that has the regeneration future capable of recharging the batteries, unfortunately the amount of recharge on a flat ground at 50 km/h coming to a full stop gives me 0.21volts recharge to the batteries, on along downhill say 3km long I managed to get 0.87volts.
Sadly the only good thing about the regenerative system I have is that it is great for solving me down when going downhill and not so good for recharging. Think of it as an engine break on a semi truck or a highway coach.
If I were you I would invest in a large capacity battery or a second battery instead of regenerative capability.
That is only my opinion.
Good luck with your choice of an ebike, I also ride one called the Teo Fat Bike and love it.
 

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DragNLady

Member
Thank you, AguassissiM for that info, greatly appreciated. I will definitely not be looking for regeneration capability. I didn't really want it for myself, but I have many people asking me about it, so I wanted to know how to answer them. Thanks again! That is a nice bike that you have there! I am looking for one that does not have the really fat tires though. :)
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
I wouldn't write the regen off my wants list because it doesn't do a very good job of charging the battery. It's a very good option/ability when riding in areas with long hills (coastal, foot hills, maybe slightly mountainous). Flat landers will have very little use for it.

It might be easier to understand if they called it something else, like a motor brake. Though it works by turning the motor into a generator with a huge load on it (the battery), it's primary function is more like an engine or diesel exhaust brake, which produce a lot of drag on a vehicle, but will not actually stop it.
 

Trail Cruiser

Well-Known Member
On the flats, you don't appreciate much on the gain in range. Regenerative braking is much more appreciated if you go to lots of hills since it does 2 things.

First, it has more recuperation of energy back to the battery when ever you are going downhill.

Second, it also acts as an "engine brake", preventing you from over speeding out of control, going down hill and saves you lots and lots of brake pads.
 

Alex M

Well-Known Member
Thank you chrisob. Am wondering which bikes have that regenerative capability?
Mostly, those with Direct Drive motors do. But it generates very little energy, not much effect on battery charge. This feature is more useful for breaking using the motor resistance instead of break pads.
 

slowguy

Member
It certainly works on my Bolt. Even on the Volt I think 65% of the energy used going uphill is regenerated going down. Check the Pike' Peak logs.
My PIM e-bike has two levels of regeneration. The -2 level really drags down the speed without the aid of disk braking. No idea the numbers but the company lists it as 100 watts ( seems there is a dimension missing)
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
It certainly works on my Bolt. Even on the Volt I think 65% of the energy used going uphill is regenerated going down. Check the Pike' Peak logs.
My PIM e-bike has two levels of regeneration. The -2 level really drags down the speed without the aid of disk braking. No idea the numbers but the company lists it as 100 watts ( seems there is a dimension missing)
Of course it works in your cars, there is slightly more mass in play! LOL
 

slowguy

Member
I am sure my math must be wrong but:
The BOLT has a 60 kWh battery and weighs about 3800 lbs versus 0.25 kW battery and 230 lbs for the PIM and passenger? Ratio is about the same. The bike jerks you back when going down hill and you activate regeneration.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
First thought is it would likely be a dood idea to keep a close eye on your axle bolts. With braking drag like that, you're going to need to keep them pretty tight to avoid having the axle tear up the slots it fit's into, even with torque arms. Not familiar with your set up, wondering also if you need that kind of braking, and if there a setting for it available in your set up?

I can feel ours engage, but it's nothing like you describe. It's set on the middle level of 5 available settings and does what I need it to do.