Why do the big bike brands (almost) never use hub motors?

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Silicon Valley
Just one exmple, but even in our small town over-powered ebikes have been pulled over;

I love the front-page photo of the Class 3 speed rider... absolutely no protective gear, just shorts, sandals, and t-shirt! :eek:

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McCorby

Well-Known Member
But no one's enforcing that, so the incentive is mostly imaginary.
I could have easily chosen a class 3, but I chose a class 1. I ride mainly on bike paths and MUPs that are limited to class 1. I chose class 1 so that I can enjoy my rides and not stress that I’m breaking laws. I’m guessing others may feel the same....
 

PassoGavia

New Member
Region
USA
City
Roswell, Georgia
I think that the concept behind the eBikemotion hub motor system was (and is) pretty straightforward: they wanted to make a system that bike manufacturers could integrate into their existing bike platforms (frames and components) fairly easily, with minimal engineering and manufacturing changes. From the bike manufacturer's perspective, this saved them time and money. This is especially important for smaller manufacturers, like Orbea, when trying to compete with the Treks and Specializeds of the world. They were also targeting higher end road bikes vs. commuter or utility bikes, so light weight was a goal.

Orbea clearly had a relationship with eBikemotion, as Orbea had an exclusive to use the X35 system for one year before it could be sold on any non-Orbea bike. Both are Spanish - eBikemotion was bought by Mahle in the Fall of 2018. My guess would be they did some joint engineering and development work, so it was a win-win for both companies. One of the reasons I purchased a Gain (in early 2019, here in the US) was because I felt that Orbea had the most experience with the X35 platform, and had probably worked out the kinks the best (and 5000 miles later, I'm very happy with my purchase).

Also, when Orbea came out with the Gain, and Bianchi at around the same time with the X35 Aria, it was a revelation. A true road bike that looked and performed like a road bike, weighed 26 pounds or so, and provided "Enough Power" to assist a rider. The photos of the Gain sold me - it was lovely, and other than the rear hub, looked like a regular carbon road bike. No swollen down tube, no bulky bottom bracket, no unusual frame designs.

I realize that's not what everyone wants - it's not a commuter bike or a mountain bike. And there are certainly some advantages to BB-mounted motors. But I've felt every day that I've owned my Gain that eBikemotion did a great job of engineering. It is quiet, reliable, and overall, it just works.
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Nevada City, CA & Paradise Valley, AZ
San Clemente, California, considering regulations for 'speeding' electric bikes.
As I've said before, stricter regulations will be our own fault. 😖
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
I could have easily chosen a class 3, but I chose a class 1. I ride mainly on bike paths and MUPs that are limited to class 1. I chose class 1 so that I can enjoy my rides and not stress that I’m breaking laws. I’m guessing others may feel the same....

I've said it a hundred times. I think the class laws are stupid. I spend a lot of time ridng in Florida, where they agree. A bike is a bike there. When not in Florida, I ride in Michigan, and from what I've experienced the last few years I've been riding there, they flat don't care about what the bike I'm on looks like. There's NO enforcement. Just don't be a jackass.... That's not going to end well no matter where you are, or what you are riding.

I don’t think this is “self absorbed twaddle”. They do feel more “bike like” in my experience and that’s what I and many others are looking for in an eBike.

Ride what you like for the reasons you want to. Just don't try to convince us that YOUR way is the only RIGHT way. There are pretty darn good reasons why all bikes don't look the same....
 

Asher

Well-Known Member
San Clemente, California, considering regulations for 'speeding' electric bikes.
As I've said before, stricter regulations will be our own fault. 😖
"raising concerns about safety and questions about how the fast-moving riders can co-exist with walkers and joggers....the beach trail, which was designed in 2003 as a multi-use trail that could accommodate walkers, runners and cyclists"

"Why is our shitty, lazy solution failing??"

I'm all for punishing people going too fast, but mixing walkers and cyclists was never going to work well if lots of cyclists appear. It also doesn't help when the surrounding streets are a lot more forbidding to bike on than a beach path.

Once they start handing out tickets, people will wise up.
 

reed scott

Well-Known Member
I love the front-page photo of the Class 3 speed rider... absolutely no protective gear, just shorts, sandals, and t-shirt! :eek:

View attachment 78202
I used to ride and skate down there for quite a few years. You just cannot in any way ride dangerously there if you have even two brain cells to rub together. Back then the problem was roadies. You couldn't even skate more than about 6 or 7 mph.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Silicon Valley
I used to ride and skate down there for quite a few years. You just cannot in any way ride dangerously there if you have even two brain cells to rub together.
Back then the problem was roadies. You couldn't even skate more than about 6 or 7 mph.
I hear you, but people still fall when riding without a helmet under 5 mph and sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) ... it happens.

PSA for EBR members - please wear protective gear and be careful out there.
 
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Asher

Well-Known Member
Even Giant hasn't really figured out their ish when it comes to mid drive commuters. Multiple reports of serial failure of motors from bumps and or moisture ingress, at least for the 2020 model. (There's oddly no promotion/reviews of the 2021 model from professional sources.)

 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
I shudder when I think my Trance E+ will suffer from motor failure or water ingress. It is miraculous it doesn't happen in the middle of harsh Winter.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
Ya, the motor will die, and the water ingress will make the battery burn :D
(McCorby, I wonder why I still am patient enough to suffer some Forum idiots who never even stood by a true e-bike) :D
 

StevenC56

Member
Region
USA
I think that the concept behind the eBikemotion hub motor system was (and is) pretty straightforward: they wanted to make a system that bike manufacturers could integrate into their existing bike platforms (frames and components) fairly easily, with minimal engineering and manufacturing changes. From the bike manufacturer's perspective, this saved them time and money. This is especially important for smaller manufacturers, like Orbea, when trying to compete with the Treks and Specializeds of the world. They were also targeting higher end road bikes vs. commuter or utility bikes, so light weight was a goal.

Orbea clearly had a relationship with eBikemotion, as Orbea had an exclusive to use the X35 system for one year before it could be sold on any non-Orbea bike. Both are Spanish - eBikemotion was bought by Mahle in the Fall of 2018. My guess would be they did some joint engineering and development work, so it was a win-win for both companies. One of the reasons I purchased a Gain (in early 2019, here in the US) was because I felt that Orbea had the most experience with the X35 platform, and had probably worked out the kinks the best (and 5000 miles later, I'm very happy with my purchase).

Also, when Orbea came out with the Gain, and Bianchi at around the same time with the X35 Aria, it was a revelation. A true road bike that looked and performed like a road bike, weighed 26 pounds or so, and provided "Enough Power" to assist a rider. The photos of the Gain sold me - it was lovely, and other than the rear hub, looked like a regular carbon road bike. No swollen down tube, no bulky bottom bracket, no unusual frame designs.

I realize that's not what everyone wants - it's not a commuter bike or a mountain bike. And there are certainly some advantages to BB-mounted motors. But I've felt every day that I've owned my Gain that eBikemotion did a great job of engineering. It is quiet, reliable, and overall, it just works.
Just finished assembly and setup on my 2020 Gain M20i. Hoping to take it out for a shake-down run today. I'm hoping I made the right choice. Your experience is certainly encouraging!