WI about to review laws re ebikes

irenewg13

Active Member
**For some current info, including some national:
http://www.bfw.org/for-your-community/share-be-aware/bicycle-laws/

I have been communicating with:

Dave Schlabowske
Deputy Director
Wisconsin Bike Fed
414-255-0369 (desk)
414-736-2209 (mobile)
3618 W. Pierce St., Milwaukee, WI 53215

He will let me know the date of any meetings, re the ebike.
I recommend that he visit and join EBR, and to contact Court for information.

Irene
 
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Chris Nolte

Well-Known Member
Looks like things are moving in the right direction. We have similar challenges ahead of us here in NY. Keep up the good work.
 

azamigo

New Member
Same problem up here in AK.. they want you to get a moped license to ride a electric bike.. bogus. Federal standards state the obvious, if only they could be made into a national standard that would set the trend..

However, most cops have much else to do then worry about a bike hooked up to a motor & battery. Hence the law is pretty toothless in terms of actual enforcement. It was originally meant for the gas powered bikes that got a bit out of control - some high speed and dangerous (no brakes for the speed). I've seen a number of e-bikes in AK and mostly nobody gives them much attention...

Our legislature here is deadlocked on so many other issues (like the budget) that I doubt they'd address this obviously not friendly law. Here's hoping.. and continued riding - at least off the beaten path.
 

dermbrian

New Member
Britain does it right.

http://www.pedelecs.co.uk/electric-bike-guides/uk-electric-bike-law/

Basically, ebikes that behave about the same as a standard bike ridden by a reasonably fit person keep bicycle status. You want more performance? Register it and insure it.

I just want an ebike that will get me to work in the same amount of time as pedaling my Diamondback, but with less sweat. I'm watching the ShareRoller device closely, and hoping it makes it into full manufacturing and availability without Indiegogo fundraisers.


Brian
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Britain does it right.

http://www.pedelecs.co.uk/electric-bike-guides/uk-electric-bike-law/

Basically, ebikes that behave about the same as a standard bike ridden by a reasonably fit person keep bicycle status. You want more performance? Register it and insure it.

I just want an ebike that will get me to work in the same amount of time as pedaling my Diamondback, but with less sweat. I'm watching the ShareRoller device closely, and hoping it makes it into full manufacturing and availability without Indiegogo fundraisers.


Brian
With that Share Roller, you'd be registering and insuring your DB as a moped, as with UK law you can't have throttle, more than 250 watts or speeds over 15.5 mph to be considered a bicycle.

With the typical distances Americans commute, limiting ebikes to 250 watts would destroy the fledgling ebike industry here.
 

dermbrian

New Member
With that Share Roller, you'd be registering and insuring your DB as a moped, as with UK law you can't have throttle, more than 250 watts or speeds over 15.5 mph to be considered a bicycle.

With the typical distances Americans commute, limiting ebikes to 250 watts would destroy the fledgling ebike industry here.

I've ridden a 150cc motor scooter...and been in an accident. I maintain my motorcycle license endorsement because I may end up needing it again, so I have experience with needing to have insurance and registration for what can be (unless you wreck...) economical transportation.

I see your point about a throttle on the ShareRoller. I guess that is a thorny issue, still. The thing I like about that device is that you still have a bicycle at the heart of it. If the device wears out, you can ship it off for repair or replacement and not have to rely on some shop to fix it.

I live in a northern suburb of Dallas, and to date I have seen ONE ebike. It was going down my street at what I'd estimate to be 30mph, and that was on an uphill grade. To me, there's no reason why bicycle rights should carry over to something like that. It really behaved as a motor vehicle, not as a bicycle. Maybe 15.5 mph isn't the right break point, but it does seem like there needs to be a very strong line as to what is an ebike and what is an emotorcycle, if we're interested in having ebikes treated as bicycles for insurance and registration and licensing purposes. I definitely think 28mph is ridiculously too high.

Brian
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
When you start by saying "Britain does it right" and it's pointed out that the ebike system you like and want would be illegal in speed, watts and actuation, you don't discount the system you want.

Most state laws limit ebikes to 20 mph and 750 watts. California passed 28 mph road only, still limiting watts. The vast majority of ebikers follow the law and most of us presently own 20 mph ebikes.
 

opimax

Well-Known Member
Yesterday my wife and I rode the C&O canal from mile 36 to 61 50 miles, avg 15.4 mph. It was a nice ride. Our bikes can do 28....No one asked how fast we could go, no one ran out of our way screaming at us, we were tired at the end ...a big nothing like the laws that said we shouldn't have done this
 

ayala kaufman

New Member
hey guys!

I have a question.

I going to visit on Philadelphia.

does anyone know if the philadelphia law allow a "momas e scooter"?