Will 20$/ barrel oil, 1$ /gallon stop people from buying an ebike ?

Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
I get all that, and I understand the internationality of this forum but when you're talking about USD the dollar sign goes in front. Has for hundreds of years.

As for a UK influence, where does the £ go for GBP? Or the € for EUR (in the UK), for that matter?

TT


Mostly accurate is your statement.
Only after 1680 it was agreed to have the sign before for US. Before it was always after.
It has a nice history the dollar symbol with the pillar sign and the crosses.

Depends also on the language/country , that is how i got to use it the way i did in an american forum. If we talk about USD from a Canadian or European perspective it goes after.


But if the servers and site owners are overseas , then it is not clear what are the rules , i see it as an international forum.

btw- cents do go after. Isn't that absurd ?

0.¢2 , $0. ¢2 ?? or 0.2¢ as commonly agreed.

And another one - we can't write $9.99¢ ? That looks more professional .

ex: $15.25¢, $1.99¢ . $0.99¢.
 
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GypsyTreker

Active Member
JR is well informed. Except for cheap gas if the price wars go on it will hurt the economy overall. Layoffs will have a ripple effect. Oil more than the virus is what is cause the current drama in stocks, bonds, precious metals. As far as eBikes vs cars for transportation, I doubt if eBike commuters are going to purchase used Hummers and ditch their eCommuter bikes lol
 
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Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
Is at 2.07$ or $2.07 in A few states. With cheap gas , people travel further , they visit places, spend more.

Is very easy to quantify what drives more

business- having cheaper gas yes it does hurt the

shale industry but it benefits tens of millions of

drivers and their families VS High prices that

puts the $ in the pockets of a very few (mostly

overseas families from the Middle east , families that have a very

expensive taste for luxury items, mansions) by taking it out from the majority of us. The only problem is the massive accumulated pollution from so many acoustic cars.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Gas might go cheap for a bit, but it's nothing I would plan on long term. I would still much prefer to SELL my Hummer than buy one....
 

GypsyTreker

Active Member
Is at 2.07$ or $2.07 in A few states. With cheap gas , people travel further , they visit places, spend more.

Is very easy to quantify what drives more

business- having cheaper gas yes it does hurt the

shale industry but it benefits tens of millions of

drivers and their families VS High prices that

puts the $ in the pockets of a very few (mostly

overseas families from the Middle east , families that have a very

expensive taste for luxury items, mansions) by taking it out from the majority of us. The only problem is the massive accumulated pollution from so many acoustic cars.
I think it's true that the common guy ( I consider myself one) does benefit from low fuel prices. But when it goes below the cost to produce, you get problems. Another added aspect of this particular oil war is people will soon stop traveling, as much, till we get a real handle on the virus.
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
I own several antique cars that got 14 mpg. I haven't driven one since 2009. I'm thinking of converting one to run on RFG while the $31/barrel party is going on. RFG is 40% butane, and if I don't empty the tank in a week, that evaporates and leaves a sludge that won't lift through the carburator. I don't drive enough to empty the tank in a week. I don't drive enough to justify buying a new car that would get check engine light disease at ~10 years even though it only has 20000 miles on it.
 

john peck

Well-Known Member
The only reason for oil to be that cheap is a decline in demand. I don't use 10% of what I did at the turn of the century.
I would use even less if I could get a bulk shopping expedition on the bus & from the bus home. I as senior here in WA
I can ride all day for a buck, $1.50 for those who aren't. It's much less stressful than fighting traffic, if not quite as convenient.
 

Bigal1463

Active Member
I wouldn’t care if gas prices dropped below $1.00 a gallon. Riding my e-bike is strictly for recreational purpose as I’m sure it is for most e-bikers.
 

john peck

Well-Known Member
I wouldn’t care if gas prices dropped below $1.00 a gallon. Riding my e-bike is strictly for recreational purpose as I’m sure it is for most e-bikers.
Actually, my bike is my daily driver for 90% of shopping & errands, recreational use is just a plus.
 

Geoffktm

New Member
In the uk fuel prices have dropped due to lack of demand through covid lockdown, they will go up in a month or so.
Over here the vast majority of ebike users are leisure riders, with early summer on us I imagine sales are stable.
 

Art Deco

Active Member
A lot price wars now in the oil industry and as a result we will very soon have very low prices for gas. More F-150's and SUV on the road. Good for the economy and very destructive for the climate ?
Unfortunately, many/most things that are good for our present economy are bad for our current climate, and the spread gets worse as time passes. But the economy is easier to repair.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
My biggest motive of buying an ebike was to save money.

I was getting tired of gas prices, so yes, it will affect people's decisions.

I would not have bought an ebike if it wasn't for high gas prices.
 

Art Deco

Active Member
JR is well informed. Except for cheap gas if the price wars go on it will hurt the economy overall. Layoffs will have a ripple effect. Oil more than the virus is what is cause the current drama in stocks, bonds, precious metals. As far as eBikes vs cars for transportation, I doubt if eBike commuters are going to purchase used Hummers and ditch their eCommuter bikes lol
Fracking firms like Chesapeake are lining up for bankruptcy protection as I type this. Big coal powered electricity plants already did so, along with other 100 year old tech. I won't bet on the past.
 

Alex M

Well-Known Member
Since mid-April crude oil has been going up as the world is reopening. Historically, gas price fluctuations were not causing people to switch between cars and bikes in masses. It takes a lot more than that - ex, gas shortages when you just can't get reliably any gas, or extremely high or extremely low prices, think >$20/gallon or <$1 gallon.

In $4-$2 range...When prices are higher, drivers plan their trips more carefully, trying to do more things on the way (to wherever they are heading to).
When prices are lower, drivers are more prone to go extra miles for something not much necessary at the moment or not necessary at all.

When prices are low like now and there are no jobs - both drivers and riders use their vehicles less, except for leisure riding that they now have more time for. Many steer away from public transit in favor of bikes, this I definitely noticed in the past several weeks.
 
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