Winter e-biking advices

steve mercier

Well-Known Member
I wouldn't go near my hybrid frame for winter riding if I couldn't get the seat low enough for flat footing. Flat foot means outrigger legs. Perfect for staying upright on ice. I'd never have studded tires if I coudn't swing their own set of wheels
Yes last year the weather toyed with me. It froze for a week or two and then as soon as I put the Spikers on it would warm up for weeks. So I took them off and it dropped below freezing again. Riding studded tires on bare asphalt sucks. After I fell my knee was so sore I could not ride for 3-4 weeks. You have convinced me to start looking for the wheels today.
 

Handlebars

Active Member
1/2 hour out in the cold. The inside of the downtube and the bottom of the battery were quite cold but the battery performed much better with the outside upper part covered by 1/2" of neoprene and then duct tape and the downtube covered by 3/16" neoprene and tape.
Heater obviously still required for longer trips.
 

Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
1/2 hour out in the cold. The inside of the downtube and the bottom of the battery were quite cold but the battery performed much better with the outside upper part covered by 1/2" of neoprene and then duct tape and the downtube covered by 3/16" neoprene and tape.
Heater obviously still required for longer trips.
Almost like my set up . I put a 2mm aluminum foil -1st layer, then 3mm neoprene 2nd layer and all covered with a 3mm zipped neoprene cover.
But that is not enough for 3-4hours of riding below 37 with or w/o wind.

Aerogel project is for this weekend.
 

Attachments

Handlebars

Active Member
Yes last year the weather toyed with me. It froze for a week or two and then as soon as I put the Spikers on it would warm up for weeks. So I took them off and it dropped below freezing again. Riding studded tires on bare asphalt sucks. After I fell my knee was so sore I could not ride for 3-4 weeks. You have convinced me to start looking for the wheels today.
I'm becoming convinced to not ride on city streets covered in snow or ice. The potholes will be murder. Just my luck that with my first ebike, this winter is possibly the beginning glimmer of the new glaciation period.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
I know I look weird here but the clothing allowed me a comfortable 45 km (28 mile) ride under 1 C (34 F) and wind exceeding 5 m/s (10 knots) :)
Besides, my return way occurred after the sunset. I had CatEye Volt 1700 headlight and Knog Blinder Road R70 rear light on all the times. I had to pass some woods in total darkness, so I switched the CatEye to the maximum power and felt like driving a car. Then I left the woods and got on a local street in a residential area but forgot to reduce the headlight power. There was a car approaching and the car stopped as the driver could probably not understand what he was seeing...Then I reduced the power instantly.
41938
41939
 
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Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
What material is the suit made of?
The top jacket is Softshell, the outer pants and overshoes are of Gore-tex. Inner layers are most probably made of Neoprene or I don't know of what...
I found the two outer layers are enough for 34 F. I had a 2x2 mile ride to the local LBS (to extend the stem in Vado and to install the registration plate); and to an insurance agent to finish the rest of matters following the registration of the S-Pedelec. I did not suffer at all. A longer ride might require three layers, as it was yesterday.
 

steve mercier

Well-Known Member
The top jacket is Softshell, the outer pants and overshoes are of Gore-tex. Inner layers are most probably made of Neoprene or I don't know of what...
I found the two outer layers are enough for 34 F. I had a 2x2 mile ride to the local LBS (to extend the stem in Vado and to install the registration plate); and to an insurance agent to finish the rest of matters following the registration of the S-Pedelec. I did not suffer at all. A longer ride might require three layers, as it was yesterday.
So do you get insurance coverage for theft when you register the bike?
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
So do you get insurance coverage for theft when you register the bike?
Nay, that's the Third Party Liability Insurance. You need to buy it if you want to ride the L1e-B (Class 3) e-bike in Europe.

There were quite funny things during both registration and insurance processes. The law clearly states that "A moped is an internal combustion engine vehicle that is limited to 50 cc and the maximum speed is 45 km/h or an electric vehicle with maximum assistance power of 4 kW in which assistance is gradually reduced to zero when the speed approaches 45 km/h", etc. Yet the Road Transportation Department officer had a hard time to skip the "cylinder capacity", find the "type of fuel" that was "Electric Energy EE", and so on. Finally, I got the registration plate and the registration itself.

Then, I went in local insurance agent office. The agent asked me what "fuel type" and "cylinder capacity" it was. The software was not capable to accept any electric moped. She had to write to the head office for an acceptance. Luckily enough, the acceptance came after a phone talk and 20 minutes of waiting... They are not prepared here in Poland yet.
41947


Meanwhile in Canada...
Where is your own photo, @Timpo?
 
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steve mercier

Well-Known Member
Nay, that's the Third Party Liability Insurance. You need to buy it if you want to ride the L1e-B (Class 3) e-bike in Europe.

There were quite funny things during both registration and insurance processes. The law clearly states that "A moped is an internal combustion engine vehicle that is limited to 50 cc and the maximum speed is 45 km/h or an electric vehicle with maximum assistance power of 4 kW in which assistance is gradually reduced to zero when the speed approaches 45 km/h", etc. Yet the Road Transportation Department officer had a hard time to skip the "cylinder capacity", find the "type of fuel" that was "Electric Energy EE", and so on. Finally, I got the registration plate and the registration itself.

Then, I went in local insurance agent office. The agent asked me what "fuel type" and "cylinder capacity" it was. The software was not capable to accept any electric moped. She had to write to the head office for an acceptance. Luckily enough, the acceptance came after a phone talk and 20 minutes of waiting... They are not prepared here in Poland yet.
View attachment 41947
Interesting. What happens to you if you do not register the bike? Possible fine ?
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
What happens to you if you so not register the bike? Possible fine ?
Fine is just some money. Worse if I bumped into somebody and injured them or crashed a car. The investigation would show it was an illegal fast e-bike. Just imagine what the compensation it might be.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Friends,
I strongly warn you against the Northwave Flash/Raptor Arctic GTX winter cycling shoes. The design is wrong and sizes are wrong. Note: Flash are for road bikes and Raptor are for SPD/MTB.

The shoe has an internal Gore-tex membrane, which serves as a sock. First of all, the sock cuff is far too tight and you'll be fighting to both pull on and pull off the shoe. Secondly and it is even worse, the sizing is completely wrong. As I do not know the US or British shoe sizes, I will only talk the EU sizes:

I normally wear EU size 46. When I bought Raptors size 47, those were totally too small. I returned them and ordered Flashes EU size 49 (the maximum size produced). Before I tried the shoes, I compared them with my leather winter boots size 46. The size 49 NW Arctic GTX were shorter than my size 46 boots! Then I pulled NWs on with a lot of effort and my foot exactly fitted the shoe, no allowance. Even worse, the heel of the Arctic GTX strongly projects behind the shoe top, making pulling the shoe on and off even more awkward.

The Raptors have their soles well made for the winter. The Flashes have a carbon sole which is extremely slippery even at home. BEWARE.

So if you are tempted to get a pair of NW Arctic GTX, start with ordering shoes of 4 sizes larger than you normally wear... Otherwise the Northwave winter shoes are very warm, breathable, waterproof, windproof and frost-proof (down to -10 C/14 F). I'm gonna keep them but I am not quite satisfied with them.

41976
 
You people are tougher than this Jersey guy. I use my bikes in winter but only off road in the sand. Slow speed less wind. I have ridden a few nights at 35 degrees or so lately but short rides to Shoprite or something within a mile of home. I am almost 58 and do not like the cold like i used to.
 

Handlebars

Active Member
Friends,
I strongly warn you against the Northwave Flash/Raptor Arctic GTX winter cycling shoes. The design is wrong and sizes are wrong. Note: Flash are for road bikes and Raptor are for SPD/MTB.

The shoe has an internal Gore-tex membrane, which serves as a sock. First of all, the sock cuff is far too tight and you'll be fighting to both pull on and pull off the shoe. Secondly and it is even worse, the sizing is completely wrong. As I do not know the US or British shoe sizes, I will only talk the EU sizes:

I normally wear EU size 46. When I bought Raptors size 47, those were totally too small. I returned them and ordered Flashes EU size 49 (the maximum size produced). Before I tried the shoes, I compared them with my leather winter boots size 46. The size 49 NW Arctic GTX were shorter than my size 46 boots! Then I pulled NWs on with a lot of effort and my foot exactly fitted the shoe, no allowance. Even worse, the heel of the Arctic GTX strongly projects behind the shoe top, making pulling the shoe on and off even more awkward.

The Raptors have their soles well made for the winter. The Flashes have a carbon sole which is extremely slippery even at home. BEWARE.

So if you are tempted to get a pair of NW Arctic GTX, start with ordering shoes of 4 sizes larger than you normally wear... Otherwise the Northwave winter shoes are very warm, breathable, waterproof, windproof and frost-proof (down to -10 C/14 F). I'm gonna keep them but I am not quite satisfied with them.

View attachment 41976
I never use footwear that isn't a comfortable fit...that means at least 1/2" to spare at the big toe. Also I do not wear any sock that is tight at the elastic. That's the problem with fancy stuff sometimes....it sucks!
I had a quite expensive pair of Italian-made shoes and they were so perfectly great except for when I got caught in the rain and suddenly due to the beautifully finished fine leather soles I was skiing down the sidewalk...which of course tilts sideways toward the road.
I'd just return such mal-produced items without a second thought. My Italian loafers lasted me years of super comfort, I just had to avoid using them uncovered in the wet sidewalk situation - which I would normally do anyway, so not to ruin them quickly.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
You people are tougher than this Jersey guy.
Just to make some excuse. Due to my illness, I can hardly walk but can ride e-bike easily. I need to exercise but the winter is unavoidable. So I take my rides. I wouldn't do that with a mechanical bike but riding e-bike gives so much fun!

That's the problem with fancy stuff sometimes....it sucks!
The Swiss designer at Northwave should be hanged by his own feet. A slippery sole for arctic winter shoes! When the rider steps off his bike, he'd slip even on a summer warm concrete! I'm going to a cobbler with these shoes; good there still are some cobblers around here.
 

sl_duck

Member
My winter ebike tip is: Don't over-complicate it. Dress like you are walking to your destination, but with a strong headwind. Add helmet and warmer gloves. If riding a non-electric bike, dress like you are cross country skiing (plus helmet, glasses and gloves).


Meanwhile in Canada...
Ha, I wish! Most of those pics are from Europe.

I see more of this (that's a Tim Horton's drive thru they are queued up at).
1574790187975.png
 

Handlebars

Active Member
My winter ebike tip is: Don't over-complicate it. Dress like you are walking to your destination, but with a strong headwind. Add helmet and warmer gloves. If riding a non-electric bike, dress like you are cross country skiing (plus helmet, glasses and gloves).




Ha, I wish! Most of those pics are from Europe.

I see more of this (that's a Tim Horton's drive thru they are queued up at).
View attachment 41985
Yeah, I thought those pics looked not of a Canadian city...I thought possibly Montreal.
Timmy's...they need signed exit lanes on the roadway.