Wobbly rear wheel

byunbee

Well-Known Member

byunbee

Well-Known Member
Check your local velofix dealer for their next availability. Mine had quick appointments (next morning) for minor service. Minimum charge is $99 but they can tune other things and answer any questions while they work on your bike. I had a very good experience and will not hesitate to use Velofix in the future vs. lugging my bike to LBS and taking a back seat to the customers that butter their bread paying a premium for bikes. The nice thing about velofix is you are their bread and butter. My velofix dealer gave me his email and is happy to answer questions at no charge.
Thanks. I'll keep them in mind.
 

byunbee

Well-Known Member
Isn't that Park Tool wrench for a single nipple size, 3.23mm? For the same $ the OP can get a generic spoke mutli-tool, just sayin'
Fits the three most popular spoke nipple sizes : .127" (3.23mm) , .130" (3.30mm) , .136" (3.45mm)
 

smorgasbord

Well-Known Member
If you're going to attempt it yourself, get a $40 spoke tension meter like this: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07WSSSVZ6

Then use Park Tool's wheel tension web app: https://www.parktool.com/wta

Do this first to see which spokes are loose and to get a feel for how even the tension is. If you're lucky, getting the wheel true would be tightening the spokes that are already loose. If you need to tighten the spokes that are already tight, bring it to an LBS.
 

byunbee

Well-Known Member
As always, Park Tool has a video on this topic!


It focuses on using a truing stand, but as others have noted you can do basic adjustments on the bike frame. Lacking a spoke tension meter getting the spoke tension correct is a bit of an art. I more or less use this technique, https://www.sheldonbrown.com/spoke-pitch.html . There's also an app for that;
. Who knew...
I just watched the Park Tools video. The process of truing the wheel seems simple enough BUT only if you have the necessary tools. I'm wondering whether the destressing the spokes step is absolutely necessary. If yes, that means that I have to remove the wheel, tire, cassette before I can even start. I also noticed that they didn't mention anything about measuring the spoke tension.

With the current tools that I will have at my disposal, which is just the spoke wrench that I ordered, I would just be tightening the loose spokes and eyeballing the lateral adjustments. I don't think I can do similar exercise for the radial adjustments without the jig.

If I rode the bike with several loose spokes about 5-10 miles, do you guys think that I've damaged the rims beyond repair?
 

byunbee

Well-Known Member
If you're going to attempt it yourself, get a $40 spoke tension meter like this: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07WSSSVZ6

Then use Park Tool's wheel tension web app: https://www.parktool.com/wta

Do this first to see which spokes are loose and to get a feel for how even the tension is. If you're lucky, getting the wheel true would be tightening the spokes that are already loose. If you need to tighten the spokes that are already tight, bring it to an LBS.
I don't need a tension meter to determine which spokes are loose.....it's THAT loose. 😑 The nipple are very loose and can easily be turned with one finger.
 

JRA

Well-Known Member
Ok, so you’ve selected a spoke wrench and watched the video so you should be equipped to true your wheel.

However your dilemma is due to a common problem in that machine built wheels as well as hand built wheels need to have their tension checked after riding for a bit as the spokes will lose some tension as they settle. It is important to go over them to check tension because they will continue to loosen once they start.

The reason that shop bought new bikes are recommended to be brought in for a checkup after some use is to check for this as well as cables that stretch and fasteners that settle in to be adjusted.

in this day and age of internet sale bikes and overly busy bike shops for a small investment in the proper tools and some how to videos it is not hard to perform a check up on your own.
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
If I rode the bike with several loose spokes about 5-10 miles, do you guys think that I've damaged the rims beyond repair?
With spoke nipples that can be turned by hand riding will eventually damage the rims. As long as none of the still tight nipples haven't started to pull through the rim material it's probably OK.

I think you should start turning up the wheel while it's on the bike, just deflate the tire. Use the 'tuning fork' method to get tensions about equal and give it a test ride. If it's not good enough then off to the LBS, or a trueing stand...
 

Chris C

New Member
I recently got a wobble on my rear wheel. I tapped each spoke to sound them and sure enough one of the spokes snapped off the nipple or fattened end at the hub. It only moved 1/8" out of place so was not immediately visible. Sent it to a bike shop to get a new spoke and have it trued and inspected for any other issues. Lucky I made it off of the steep trails last time out.
 

byunbee

Well-Known Member
My Park Tool TS-4.2 arrives today. Looking forward to trying it out. Since I've never tried truing a wheel, I will report back on my experience. If I fail, I'll probably return the stand, but I'm hoping for good results. 😌
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
My Park Tool TS-4.2 arrives today. Looking forward to trying it out. Since I've never tried truing a wheel, I will report back on my experience. If I fail, I'll probably return the stand, but I'm hoping for good results. 😌
I use a 6" crescent wrench to tighten/loosen spokes. A good one, made by crescent tool, not some ****ese toy.
In general spokes should ping about F4 on the piano for 14 ga, but if your rim has a kink in it some on the away side should go higher+tighter and some on the close side should go looser+lower. I set the bike on the seat and the handlebars, but I deleted the display to make sure I could change a tube on the road without a big hastle. Leaked & fogged up anyway, and the numbers were all wrong. Aa good display, you could make a mount that swings down with 2 screws loosened like I did originally.
I don't use a tie wrap for marker; I use the fender. My eyes are pretty experienced and very steady, but I do mark the rim with a sharpie, out in, on the maximum wrong points.
 
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byunbee

Well-Known Member
Well, I successfully trued both the front and rear wheels. Not perfect, but pretty close. Only took an hour to do. Now I have to wait for my tension meter to measure the relative tension of my spokes. Overall, a good investment in my book.
 

byunbee

Well-Known Member
Well, I successfully trued both the front and rear wheels. Not perfect, but pretty close. Only took an hour to do. Now I have to wait for my tension meter to measure the relative tension of my spokes. Overall, a good investment in my book.
Additional context with my experience. I was tired from long work day yesterday. 😑

When I did my truing, I did not follow fully recommended steps, of removing the tires. I removed the quick release, left the tires on, and did not deflate the tires. Call it laziness, but I wanted to see how easy it is to true it on the fly and the end result was good enough for me. As mentioned above, the process was surprisingly easy for lateral adjustments and the radial adjustment. After going through the process, I can see how the no stand work around methods can work since the concept is the same. However, I think the convenience and added accuracy more than makes up for the cost of the truing stand.

For any of you planning on trying it yourself, The following video was my guide.

My tension meter arrives today, so I'll try that later tonight. Planning on using the following video as a guide.