Wow! My Head Hurts. Feeling discouraged.

smary

New Member
Region
USA
I still a fairly recent member to this forum. First and foremost, thank you to all who have responded to my posts (Newbie Questions on Motor Size, Geared vs Single Speed) and subsequent (Anyone with info on Ariel Rider Rideal model ?) as your input is appreciated and informative. I am however discouraged that I will be able to find my first ebike with the overwhelming variations and things to consider and then narrowing it down to what is available within my price range ($1,400) if anything.

Based on the input from first "Newbie" post, it appears I am able to eliminate the single speed and look for geared, opt for a higher wattage motor (I took that to mean 350w +) and higher voltage battery (I took that to mean 48v rather than 36v) to meet my needs based on the hilly terrain I may encounter in my area. New question based on recent input to my "Rideal" post is how many gears will meet my needs. Other new questions based on reading through other posts and forums is Throttle Vs No Throttle, Cadence Sensor Vs Torque Sensor, Rear Hub Drive Vs Mid Drive and whether or not those items are major concerns for my needs. Other posts also appear to have a consensus that it is highly recommended to test drive and purchase from a LBS Vs Online.

With the exception of one LBS, all others carry brands that are out of my price range (Trek, Yamaha Core, etc.) or fat tire mountain bikes that are too heavy and not needed for what will be 99% paved riding. Even with what I have look at online, I end up with only a few that may or may not meet my needs. The one LBS I found that has an ebike for consideration (I will detail that below) is also accepting bikes for assembly, tuning and servicing for users who purchase other brands from other vendors so I did keep online ordering open as an option as most appear to offer Free Shipping but the cost of assembly at my LBS will need to be taken in to consideration as far as the price range for any online purchase. I am trying to stay with a thinner tire rather than the mountain/fat tire simply to try and keep the weight of the bike down since I will need to load onto a bike carrier and aesthetically prefer a straight lined step through, mid-step or high-step.

Here is what I have found in my price range and eliminated based on one or more of the following: price + assembly + add ons that may be needed (i.e., head light, tail light, kickstand) exceed my $1,400 budget, or the motor is less than 500w, the battery is less than 48v or it was a Single Speed:

Populo Sport V3, Populo Lift V2, Populo Scout, Juiced, Rad Power Mission 1, Propella V 4.0, Hilltopper Cross Current S2, Schwinn Monroe, Easy Motion, EG Barcelona, Biktrix Swift Lite Customizer, Magnum Ui5, Espin 21 Sport, Aventon Pace 350.

Here is what I found found in my price range that appear to meet all of my criteria except for a few items that may or may not be major issues:

Arieal Rider Rideal - This is a recent release and as a result not much in terms of information and no reviews available. The price is $999 with Free Shopping and they are taking orders stating a May 25th ship date. This is a high step or mid step, stating a 750w Geared Hub Motor but a 48v 500w Controller. A user on my "Rideal" post questioned if it was really a 500w motor with 750w max. The battery is 48v 14Ah, has a 6 speed drive train (same user concerned that 6 speeds might not be sufficient), Throttle on Demand, Cadence Sensor, Thumb Sensor, Headlight, Tail Light, Kickstand, 27.5 x 1.95 anti puncture tires with reflective side walls and weighs in at 52 lbs. With the price on this one - I would make the sacrifice at waiting for a May 25th ship date if all other items check out since I will only need to add the assembly cost from my LBS to the $999 price. With the recent comments questioning the motor wattage and 6 speeds, I think if it is in fact a 500w instead of a 750w that the 500w should still be sufficient? But now I question if a 6 speed will meet my needs.

Aventon 2021 Pace 500 - This appears to be the recent upgraded version where Aventon has made modifications to eliminate the "launching" issue that many forum users discuss. This is a bike that is available at my LBS and their description does not list it as a Throttle On Demand but does indicate it comes with a Thumb Throttle. The price is $1,399 (as opposed to $1,499 on Aventon website for the Throttle on Demand version). So, the $1,399 is the top of my range and I would need to add Headlight, Tail Light and Kickstand and I'm not too nuts about the winged handle bars and would want to replace them down the road. I can get the high step version in Small to accommodate my height as I don't care for the looks of their step through version. It is a 500w Rear Hub Motor, the batter is 48v/11Ah, has a 8 speed drive train, Cadence Sensor, 27.5 x 2.2 Kenda tires and weighs in at 49 lbs. I would be able to get this right away and I could come up with enough extra to add a kickstand and wait until next year to add head light, tail light and swap out the handle bars. Assuming this is the upgraded Throttle on Demand version, the 500w motor should be sufficient and the question is if the 8 speed will meet my needs.

If you are still reading this post, bless your heart. For those of you who have been at this for a while, these may seem like simple simon redundant questions you get tired of reading and/or responding to over and over again. To the newbies, the excitement and the abundance of variations to ensure we get what we need is confusing and overwhelming to say the least. There is so much that goes into making the correct choice that I wish I had the tech skills to build a database where the user could go in and enter data on themselves, the terrain they will be regularly be riding, a price range, etc., and it would magically produce a list of the suggested bikes that meets all of the needs. I also wish I would win the lottery but ................

If budget wasn't an issue for some if us, we probably wouldn't be bothering you or posting on the forum except to rave about how much fun we are having on our new ebikes. Would I rather be out riding around on a new Trek or Yamaha Core, yes. Could I put blinders on and go out on Amazon and get what I need in or well under my price range, yes. I came here because I didn't want to do that and end up with a bike that fell apart a week after I road it and then money down the tubes and I'm without a bike. I did question one of those bikes (Ancheer) in my first "Newbie" post (see the very bottom of that post) and the silence in terms of responses was very telling. That's okay and understandable.

So - having said all that, if you can offer any opinions on the two options I was able to find and am considering OR any adjustments I can make in my criteria (motor wattage, battery wattage, number of gears) that would provide with with a few more ebikes to choose from yet still meet my needs, either from the list of those I've eliminated or any others you are aware of that I could look into. I would be greatful beyond words.

Smary
 

smary

New Member
Region
USA
ok so just by looking at those two bikes, Aventon is winner. (except the battery, of course)
I think the biggest selling point is hydraulic brakes on Aventon, I'm not a fan of cable brakes.

That said, only by looking at the spec sheet, I don't think you can go wrong with either of them.
I suspect they're similar in terms of quality, and they look easy to upgrade (if needed).

Their parts look fairy generic.
Could you clarify what you mean by Aventon is winner (except the battery, of course).

They both spec the battery at 48v where the Rideal shows 14Ah and Aventon shows 11Ah. How significant is the variation in the Ah?

Also the Rideal specs as a 6 speed and the Aventon is an 8 speed. While I realize the 8 speed is the better option in comparison of the two, due to the comment on my Rideal post by a forum member expressing concern about whether the 6 speed of the Rideal would be enough, do you have a recommendation on the minimum number of gears I should be looking and whether or not a 6 or 8 speed is sufficient.
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
Read the known problems thread. Many posters complain aventon power comes on suddenly, too fast, and too much acceleration, for many situations. These parameters were not programmable at the time of complaint.
The difference between 11 AH and 14 AH is the range between recharges. More AH equals more distance.
I believe your price limitation is going to lead yourself to disappointment. My unpowered kiddie MTB's required constant adjustments of shifter & brake cables, broke axles or dropped the balls, had cranks wear out in 5000 miles that I couldn't pull off for replacement. I paid $1500 for an unpowered bike with premium cables & shifters that requires brake pad adjustment every 1000 miles (organic pads), no cable stretch adjustments, and no shifter adjustment after 6000 miles. Then I added a hub motor & battery to it.
You are not discussing ride position, or size of frame. Ride position is very much a matter of preference, and many people are not flexible about it. Size became fixed at age 18 to 20, and a frame that is the wrong size is a miserable experience. Also possibly dangerous.
Hydraulic brakes are IMHO a luxury that must be paid for when the pads wear out. Many require difficult disassembly or adjustment at pad replacement time, and some leak. All require propritary expensive brake fluids.
I can stop 330 lb gross quite quickly with 160 mm cable pull disk brakes, and the ability doesn't deteriorate in the rain as much as rim brakes do. My hands are not strong at all. I can change pads with 1 allen wrench and 1 slip joint plier, and most of the time is taking off & replacing the pannier. Adjustment takes 1/6 turn with the allen wrench.
I find 2" tires at 45 psi more comfortable on actual pavement, but people that never sit down may not find that important. The road bikers certainly ride a lot of miles on 25-30 mm tires. But they never sit. I also find knobby tires get a lot fewer flats than street tread tires, but our roads are not swept of broken glass & tire shards with metal sticking out. You may live In London or West Germany with perfect glass smooth pavement.
All these kiddie grade bikes tend to have the 7 speed shimano freewheel, which came unscrewed and left me pushing the bike home at about 2000 miles. The cheesy design is for kids that ride a bike 500 miles in their life. No lock nut on the race, which comes unscrewed. The 8 speed cluster on my current bike has been reliable for 6000 miles. Shimano can make a good product, but not for $10 in the kiddie bike price range.
The bike shops tend to carry brands that will not end up in the back requiring warrenty work. these are more expensive. Depends on whether you want to ride or brag about what a bargain your purchase was. The bike shops do not stock different sizes of frame, at least in my town. I had to order a small from 2500 miles away and hope I would be happy. (I was).
If I were you I would get a job or cut expenses & save your money for 6 months or so, then buy a better bike. Its a bad time to be buying an ebike anyway, with the factory shutdowns of 2019 and the huge market surge for 2020. I got by with $75 used kiddie MTBs for 60 years, but they required constant adjustment & replacement, and threw me on my chin 5 times. Kiddie bikes were sort of okay when I drove a car, but not now without one. This $2000 (with panniers, bread basket, double leg stand) bodaboda has been a revelation of what a pleasure a good bike that lasts can be. The $1000 in motor & battery I added is just the icing on the cake.
Happy shopping.
 
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Marci jo

Well-Known Member
Region
Other
City
Central Mn
Smary, congrats on your search for an ebike.
I read your entire post, which is unusual for me as I am not a patient person. At this point, after your exhaustive analysis, I truly believe you have enough knowledge to make a decision.
Which of the ebikes you are considering were you able to test ride? Even if that particular bike is not an option, a test helps to eliminate certain criteria.
Modifying a bike after purchase is extremely common. It seems we love to add this item, switch out another item, and the list of accessories goes on & on. Of course I include myself in this process.
 

Scarlet/Fire

Active Member
Region
USA
Really sounds like $2-500 more spent will drastically improve your enjoyment level-
$1400 any day now (stimuli check) and tax refund of 30%? (Don’t quote me) for Ebikes purchased after 4/15 (Again -Please look for any solid updates on that tax info)
- You said Hills,I say hydraulic-You say BIG hills,750 hub minimum for a good push and your leg muscle input/or Mid drive if the cash infusion can get you there (mid drives + gear choice will flatten more hills with less effort (typically) Peace - Roll in Health
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
The thumb shifter is no big deal. I had one that lasted three years (3200 miles) and then got too stiff. Bought the trigger shifter for $24 last summer. I'd prefer all my ebikes have trigger shifters, but it makes economic sense to let them wear out.

The Textro MD300's cable disk brakes are a ubiquitous brake, I've had them on two commercial ebikes and have no complaints. It's true I can buy them on ebay for 30 bucks (both wheels), so they're not expensive. It means you can replace them for 30 bucks if they ever fall apart. How fast will you ride anyway?

If I only had one ebike, I'd want the 48V14AH battery over the 11AH model, Again, how fast will you ride? Above 20 mph, the range on either battery really goes down.

AVenton really has some owners angry about too much power in PAS 1 and no throttle unless you've pedalled the bike, but if you can get one with those issues fixed, it should be nice, .

The Rideal will probably be too fast in PAS 1, most inexpensive ebikes are that way, but if the throttle is on-demand, you can get used to it. Start out in PAS 0. As you gain more experience, you will ride faster, It's only a problem if you ride with slower bikers.

I cannot address the LBS vs mail order. That's up to the skills of the buyer. I'm always price conscious. I like the Rideal,
 

GenXrider

Well-Known Member
I just went through this myself. Aventon was one of the bikes I looked at, but I ultimately went with Ride1Up for the higher top gear, wider 2.4" tires, and better PAS system that uses current/power based assist rather than speed based assist, and it has granular control of power levels. You can configure your PAS 1 very low if you want - no problem with too much power so that you can still get a good workout if you want at lower speeds while still having some assist. Throttle works from a dead stop. They raised their prices $100 per bike due to tariffs that started up this year, but you can still get a Core-5 or 500 series within your budget. I stepped up to the 700 series and paid $1455 shipped (before the price increase, and using the $40 pledge discount).
 
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indianajo

Well-Known Member
- You said Hills,I say hydraulic-You say BIG hills,750 hub minimum for a good push and your leg muscle input/or Mid drive if the cash infusion can get you there (mid drives + gear choice will flatten more hills with less effort (typically) Peace - Roll in Health
I climb hills up to 15% grade with 100 lb tools, accessories, groceries, and a 72 lb bike, with a 500W geared hub drive. 330 lb gross. No pedaling is required at all if I don't want to. My cable pull brakes will stop me from 30 mph in < 30' if a deer jumps out at the stream crossing. What my geared hub motor will not do is climb from Huntington Beach to Lake Arrowhead in one trip. It would overheat on steep quick climbs of 1000'.
 

smary

New Member
Region
USA
Smary, congrats on your search for an ebike.
I read your entire post, which is unusual for me as I am not a patient person. At this point, after your exhaustive analysis, I truly believe you have enough knowledge to make a decision.
Which of the ebikes you are considering were you able to test ride? Even if that particular bike is not an option, a test helps to eliminate certain criteria.
Modifying a bike after purchase is extremely common. It seems we love to add this item, switch out another item, and the list of accessories goes on & on. Of course I include myself in this process.Thank
 

smary

New Member
Region
USA
Thank you for your kind words of support. I am not able to test ride the Ariel Rideal as Ariel brand is not available in my particular area and would have to be an online purchase. The Aventon is available at my LBS although it is the step through version. They do have the small size step over at an affiliated shop about an hour away from my house that I would be willing to make the drive in order to purchase if this bike is what I settle on. My plan was to go to the LBS and ride the step through version to check out the functionality but the issue with doing this at any of the LBS in my area is that it is not going to provide me with any hilly terrain to see if it is going to meet my needs what will be the area that I will be primarily be riding. Both reasons why I'm trying to rely on the experience and input from the forum members

Again, thank you for your comments.
 

smary

New Member
Region
USA
I just went through this myself. Aventon was one of the bikes I looked at, but I ultimately went with Ride1Up for the higher top gear, wider 2.4" tires, and better PAS system that uses current/power based assist rather than speed based assist, and it has granular control of power levels. You can configure your PAS 1 very low if you want - no problem with too much power so that you can still get a good workout if you want at lower speeds while still having some assist. Throttle works from a dead stop. They raised their prices $100 per bike due to tariffs that started up this year, but you can still get a Core-5 or 500 series within your budget. I stepped up to the 700 series and paid $1455 shipped (before the price increase, and using the $40 pledge discount).
I did look at the Ride1Up bikes for consideration. The one I really liked an eliminated up front was the Roadster V2 as it appears to be a belt drive single speed. Also, the battery is 36V 7.0Ah, 350W motor so I assumed it wouldn't have enough oomph for my hilly terrain and considering it doesn't have any gears for shifting - so took it off my list. The other one I liked but not so much aesthetically, is the Core-5. I couldn't tell whether or not it comes with a 750W motor as stated or is a 500W motor with 750w peak. It's a 7 speed vs Aventon 8 speed with same voltage on the battery but a little less on the AH at 10.4 vs the Aventon 11Ah. It cost less and weighs less than the Aventon but again it comes back to my confusion in trying to take all of the forum input into consideration. In comparing the two, in my opinion, they are fairly close in comparison but I would in fact think the 750w motor and the lighter weight of the bike is an advantage but is the one gear in a 7 speed vs 8 speed and the 10.4Ah vs 11Ah a big enough difference specific to my needs. I ended up opting to take Ride1Up off the list and pursue the Aventon since they are pretty close in specs and is available at my LBS. I can certainly add it back to to my list if the Core-5 is in fact a 750w motor and the one off in Amp Hours and 7 speed vs 8 speed is not going to be a deal breaker for my situation and my terrain.

To clarify, I live in a rural area. I'm 5ft 4" at 150 pounds. About 50% of my riding is going to be on a paved bike path that is fairly flat. My concern with motor wattage, battery voltage and the number of gears come for the other 50% of my riding that will be on paved roads primarily flat but with some rolling hills since it is out in farm country (example picture attached). Not trying to climb hills in San Fran or ride the mountains in the Tour de France. Not using it for off roading hilly trails back in the woods. Not looking to see how fast I can go down the road. Not looking to load up on groceries or carry a bunch of gear. Simply looking for the pedal assist when I get tired or pooped out on a hill or if I'm riding into a head wind on a breezy day. I want to mostly pedal under my own power. Because I'm a newbie, I don't know what it takes to meet my needs in terms of motor size, battery wattage and the number of gears I need. And if Amp Hours relate to how far I can go on a charge, I would think I could adjust my ride accordingly based on how much or how little I'm using assist. Once I get a better understanding of that with the understanding that there a zillion variables that "could" apply, I can feel better about making an informed choice on what will best meet my needs.

Thank you.
 

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smary

New Member
Region
USA
I climb hills up to 15% grade with 100 lb tools, accessories, groceries, and a 72 lb bike, with a 500W geared hub drive. 330 lb gross. No pedaling is required at all if I don't want to. My cable pull brakes will stop me from 30 mph in < 30' if a deer jumps out at the stream crossing. What my geared hub motor will not do is climb from Huntington Beach to Lake Arrowhead in one trip. It would overheat on steep quick climbs of 1000'.
Thank you IndianaJo. This is the type of information I'm looking for. Users like you with similar terrain, what your currently using and whether or not it meets your needs.

What type of bike do you have?
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
Thank you IndianaJo. This is the type of information I'm looking for. Users like you with similar terrain, what your currently using and whether or not it meets your needs.

What type of bike do you have?
The bike in the picture is a 72 lb yubabike bodaboda cargo bike, that I added a motor & battery to. The motor is a 500 W Mac12t geared hub motor. With bags battery motor tools water seat converter the bike rides @ 94 lb. I weigh 170 winter, 163 summer. I carry 60 lb groceries or ag supplies weekly, & sometimes 80 lb. Your picture of your hill looks typical, only I cross about 80 of them in my 30 mile commute to my summer camp. I have a 17.5 ah 840 wh battery, that goes from 52 v (90% charge on 48 v battery) to 45 v with me pedaling unpowered about 2/3 the distance. 41 v is 10% charge & minimum. My motor doesn't drag unpowered. I bought the motor for headwinds >12 mph, that can make my ride take 6 hours, waaay too much exercise. I have the motor & battery installed on the front, to allow the rear to deal with the cargo.
If you can test ride the aventon, you can check to see if it accelerates too fast this year, or has a minimum PAS1 speed that is too fast for you. Software updates every year.
Actually 350 W geared hub bikes like magnum can deal with terrain as you showed unless there is a really heavy rider. Be sure to get the small frame. My legs are only 28", although my back is rather long, so I'm 68" tall. I had to order this short person's frame from California. I can touch the ground with both toes stopped, and almost straighten my leg at the bottom of the crank. Proper fit.
The issue with shimano 6 speed rear axle is that it is 5/16", and I broke one @ 180 lb. If the axle is in a hub motor, that problem is solved. Shimano 7 speed axle is 3/8", but lacks a locknut on the race, which comes unscrewed & drops balls on the road. Shimano 8 speed axle is apparently a better designed product, because I haven't had any trouble with it in 6000 miles with 240 lb me+cargo. Again, you're not going to break an axle through a hub motor, they are 12 mm. However, the cover screws do have to be tightened 2 or 3 times a year. Mid drives may have actual OEM shimano rear axles, which perform as I've stated.
 
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GenXrider

Well-Known Member
I did look at the Ride1Up bikes for consideration. The one I really liked an eliminated up front was the Roadster V2 as it appears to be a belt drive single speed. Also, the battery is 36V 7.0Ah, 350W motor so I assumed it wouldn't have enough oomph for my hilly terrain and considering it doesn't have any gears for shifting - so took it off my list.
You hadn't listed Ride1Up among those that you eliminated. But the Roadster is not one I suggested and doesn't sound fitting at all to your situation.
The other one I liked but not so much aesthetically, is the Core-5. I couldn't tell whether or not it comes with a 750W motor as stated or is a 500W motor with 750w peak. It's a 7 speed vs Aventon 8 speed with same voltage on the battery but a little less on the AH at 10.4 vs the Aventon 11Ah. It cost less and weighs less than the Aventon but again it comes back to my confusion in trying to take all of the forum input into consideration. In comparing the two, in my opinion, they are fairly close in comparison but I would in fact think the 750w motor and the lighter weight of the bike is an advantage but is the one gear in a 7 speed vs 8 speed and the 10.4Ah vs 11Ah a big enough difference specific to my needs. I ended up opting to take Ride1Up off the list and pursue the Aventon since they are pretty close in specs and is available at my LBS. I can certainly add it back to to my list if the Core-5 is in fact a 750w motor and the one off in Amp Hours and 7 speed vs 8 speed is not going to be a deal breaker for my situation and my terrain.
Well, that's a head scratcher. The Aventon Pace 500 is one of the bikes you're interested in, yet the bikes you looked at for Ride1Up were the Core-5 and a completely different Roadster (poor choice), when the Ride1Up bike that compares most closely is the Ride1Up 500 series. But the R1U 500 has a better PAS system, larger 13 aHr battery, and a bit higher top gear, same power of motor, same number of gears, same look, for about $245 less with the pledge vs. the PACE 500 with throttle on demand, $145 less than the PACE 500 you mentioned that doesn't have it (the R1U 500 does). The PACE has hydraulic brakes, multiple sizes, and LBS availability in your case. So, for you that makes it a closer decision. It would have been a no-brainer for me since there is no LBS in my region that has Aventon, and the one size R1U fits me well at about 6' 190 lb. for now.

To clarify, I live in a rural area. I'm 5ft 4" at 150 pounds. About 50% of my riding is going to be on a paved bike path that is fairly flat. My concern with motor wattage, battery voltage and the number of gears come for the other 50% of my riding that will be on paved roads primarily flat but with some rolling hills since it is out in farm country (example picture attached). Not trying to climb hills in San Fran or ride the mountains in the Tour de France. Not using it for off roading hilly trails back in the woods. Not looking to see how fast I can go down the road. Not looking to load up on groceries or carry a bunch of gear. Simply looking for the pedal assist when I get tired or pooped out on a hill or if I'm riding into a head wind on a breezy day. I want to mostly pedal under my own power. Because I'm a newbie, I don't know what it takes to meet my needs in terms of motor size, battery wattage and the number of gears I need. And if Amp Hours relate to how far I can go on a charge, I would think I could adjust my ride accordingly based on how much or how little I'm using assist. Once I get a better understanding of that with the understanding that there a zillion variables that "could" apply, I can feel better about making an informed choice on what will best meet my needs.

Thank you.
I ride 99% on rural roads, and I have some big hills on my routes, especially on my longer rides. I've tested the steepest one with my R1U 700, and I can climb it by shifting into 3rd gear and using 300 to 400 watts of assistance while pedaling fairly hard as well but not moving that fast. During my riding, I've yet to shift down into 1st or 2nd gear. My motor was listed as 500W sustained and 800W peak. I've actually tested it at over 900W temporarily with a 70%+ charge, but during actual normal use, I haven't topped out over around 400W climbing a hill. And I haven't tried climbing a hill without putting considerable muscle power into the equation. Now their website says, "750W Shengyi Geared Hub-Motor (500W nominal, 880W peak) for the CORE-5, 500 Series, 700 Series". So, that's 3 separate wattage ratings for one motor, and the peak is listed at 880W vs. 800W or 1000W as had been lised before, for the same motor.

Edit: Yes, you can increase your range with a given amount of battery power by using lower or no assist and using more muscle power. I do that quite a bit. My battery came charged to 51.5V, and I got 75 miles on my bike before it dropped to about 44V, when I charged it for the first time. I was riding into some very strong winds earlier this week with 60W of assistance, and it was still a chore. I think I'll bump it up a little more next time.
 
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smary

New Member
Region
USA
You hadn't listed Ride1Up among those that you eliminated. But the Roadster is not one I suggested and doesn't sound fitting at all to your situation.

Well, that's a head scratcher. The Aventon Pace 500 is one of the bikes you're interested in, yet the bikes you looked at for Ride1Up were the Core-5 and a completely different Roadster (poor choice), when the Ride1Up bike that compares most closely is the Ride1Up 500 series. But the R1U 500 has a better PAS system, larger 13 aHr battery, and a bit higher top gear, same power of motor, same number of gears, same look, for about $245 less with the pledge vs. the PACE 500 with throttle on demand, $145 less than the PACE 500 you mentioned that doesn't have it (the R1U 500 does). The PACE has hydraulic brakes, multiple sizes, and LBS availability in your case. So, for you that makes it a closer decision. It would have been a no-brainer for me since there is no LBS in my region that has Aventon, and the one size R1U fits me well at about 6' 190 lb. for now.


I ride 99% on rural roads, and I have some big hills on my routes, especially on my longer rides. I've tested the steepest one with my R1U 700, and I can climb it by shifting into 3rd gear and using 300 to 400 watts of assistance while pedaling fairly hard as well but not moving that fast. During my riding, I've yet to shift down into 1st or 2nd gear. My motor was listed as 500W sustained and 800W peak. I've actually tested it at over 900W temporarily with a 70%+ charge, but during actual normal use, I haven't topped out over around 400W climbing a hill. And I haven't tried climbing a hill without putting considerable muscle power into the equation. Now their website says, "750W Shengyi Geared Hub-Motor (500W nominal, 880W peak) for the CORE-5, 500 Series, 700 Series". So, that's 3 separate wattage ratings for one motor, and the peak is listed at 880W vs. 800W or 1000W as had been lised before, for the same motor.

Edit: Yes, you can increase your range with a given amount of battery power by using lower or no assist and using more muscle power. I do that quite a bit. My battery came charged to 51.5V, and I got 75 miles on my bike before it dropped to about 44V, when I charged it for the first time. I was riding into some very strong winds earlier this week with 60W of assistance, and it was still a chore. I think I'll bump it up a little more next time.
Well, that's a head scratcher. The Aventon Pace 500 is one of the bikes you're interested in, yet the bikes you looked at for Ride1Up were the Core-5 and a completely different Roadster (poor choice), when the Ride1Up bike that compares most closely is the Ride1Up 500 series. But the R1U 500 has a better PAS system, larger 13 aHr battery, and a bit higher top gear, same power of motor, same number of gears, same look, for about $245 less with the pledge vs. the PACE 500 with throttle on demand, $145 less than the PACE 500 you mentioned that doesn't have it (the R1U 500 does). The PACE has hydraulic brakes, multiple sizes, and LBS availability in your case. So, for you that makes it a closer decision. It would have been a no-brainer for me since there is no LBS in my region that has Aventon, and the one size R1U fits me well at about 6' 190 lb. for now.

To clarify, and as stated in my post, I looked Ride1Up in my early searches and really liked the Roadster but eliminated that "up front" for the reasons stated. That left me with the Ride1Up 500 and the Ride1UP Core-5 to consider. Any Ride1Up bike I purchase would be online shipped. While there would be no cost for shipping, I would need to pay for assembly and adjustment at my LBS that I am estimating to be around $200 (my LBS couldn't give me an exact price until they know what bike I'm buying and the level of assembly required). In my newbie eyes, the Ride1Up 500 and Core-5 were pretty close in comparision with a variation on the down bar step over and the battery Ahs. The website page shows the price for the Ride1Up 500 as $1,295 but when you select the frame and the page changes, the price then displays as $1,395. If I add $200 assembly cost to that it brings the cost to $1,595 (my budget is 1,399) so I eliminated Ride1Up 500. That left me with the Ride1Up Core-5. The price on the Core-5 is $1,195 and with the $200 assembly cost that brings it to $1,395 - my budget. That resulted in my remaining comparison of the Ride1Up Core-5 to the Aventon PACE 500 that is available at my LBS for $1,399 and price includes assembly. The Aventon PACE 500 is now Throttle on Demand due to the controller modifications (released by Aventon as of March 1st) and also includes modifications to how PAS 1 and 2 for smoother acceleration.

Is the $200 difference between the Ride1Up 500 the the R1U Core-5/Aventon 500 a significant amount? Maybe not to everyone. But, like I said in the post at the beginning of the thread, if budget wasn't an issue, I wouldn't be bothering with all of the questions - I'd be out riding around on my high end bike. I've been dreaming of an ebike for a long time and I've worked hard to be able to have the extra cash for what to me is going to be a luxury item to help get my health back. I do sincerely appreciate the patience and wealth of knowledge from everyone who has posted back.
 

GenXrider

Well-Known Member
Well, that's a head scratcher. The Aventon Pace 500 is one of the bikes you're interested in, yet the bikes you looked at for Ride1Up were the Core-5 and a completely different Roadster (poor choice), when the Ride1Up bike that compares most closely is the Ride1Up 500 series. But the R1U 500 has a better PAS system, larger 13 aHr battery, and a bit higher top gear, same power of motor, same number of gears, same look, for about $245 less with the pledge vs. the PACE 500 with throttle on demand, $145 less than the PACE 500 you mentioned that doesn't have it (the R1U 500 does). The PACE has hydraulic brakes, multiple sizes, and LBS availability in your case. So, for you that makes it a closer decision. It would have been a no-brainer for me since there is no LBS in my region that has Aventon, and the one size R1U fits me well at about 6' 190 lb. for now.

To clarify, and as stated in my post, I looked Ride1Up in my early searches and really liked the Roadster but eliminated that "up front" for the reasons stated. That left me with the Ride1Up 500 and the Ride1UP Core-5 to consider. Any Ride1Up bike I purchase would be online shipped. While there would be no cost for shipping, I would need to pay for assembly and adjustment at my LBS that I am estimating to be around $200 (my LBS couldn't give me an exact price until they know what bike I'm buying and the level of assembly required). In my newbie eyes, the Ride1Up 500 and Core-5 were pretty close in comparision with a variation on the down bar step over and the battery Ahs. The website page shows the price for the Ride1Up 500 as $1,295 but when you select the frame and the page changes, the price then displays as $1,395. If I add $200 assembly cost to that it brings the cost to $1,595 (my budget is 1,399) so I eliminated Ride1Up 500. That left me with the Ride1Up Core-5. The price on the Core-5 is $1,195 and with the $200 assembly cost that brings it to $1,395 - my budget. That resulted in my remaining comparison of the Ride1Up Core-5 to the Aventon PACE 500 that is available at my LBS for $1,399 and price includes assembly. The Aventon PACE 500 is now Throttle on Demand due to the controller modifications (released by Aventon as of March 1st) and also includes modifications to how PAS 1 and 2 for smoother acceleration.

Is the $200 difference between the Ride1Up 500 the the R1U Core-5/Aventon 500 a significant amount? Maybe not to everyone. But, like I said in the post at the beginning of the thread, if budget wasn't an issue, I wouldn't be bothering with all of the questions - I'd be out riding around on my high end bike. I've been dreaming of an ebike for a long time and I've worked hard to be able to have the extra cash for what to me is going to be a luxury item to help get my health back. I do sincerely appreciate the patience and wealth of knowledge from everyone who has posted back.
Like I said, LBS support might make a difference for you. When I made my choice, I didn't add any assembly charges, because I assembled it myself - that appears to be what most of the buyers are doing. Their bikes come with instructions, and there are youtube videos on how to do it. It's not difficult. Plus Ride1Up offers a $40 pledge discount https://ride1up.com/about-us/. And depending on where you live, you won't have to pay any sales tax ordering from Ride1Up but will from the LBS. You start figuring all that in, and the Ride1Up looks like a much better deal for some people. Oh yeah, the prices did go up because of the Chinese tariffs since I bought mine: https://electricbikereview.com/forums/threads/price-increase-2021-25-chinese-tariff.36874/ I beat the price increase, but that's why you are seeing the $100 change on the website.
 

geysir

Member
I would test ride the bikes that are available to give yourself some idea if you would like a particular bike. Testing also shows the differences in bikes. Yes, the test ride probably is in a small paved parking lot but it is helpful. You may want to keep bikes with wide tires on your list. Wider tires may decrease your battery life slightly but absorb shock for a nicer ride. They won't slow down an e-bike. You can always change to narrower tires next year. The Aventon Pace handlebars only sweep back 15 degrees (per website). With that sweep your hands, wrists, and shoulders will be stressed less while still allowing you to pull on the bars for climbing and accelerating. I use bars with 25 degree sweep with no issues. As mentioned by others, one way to save is to do your own assembly.
 

Catalyzt

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I would test ride the bikes that are available to give yourself some idea if you would like a particular bike. Testing also shows the differences in bikes. Yes, the test ride probably is in a small paved parking lot but it is helpful. You may want to keep bikes with wide tires on your list. Wider tires may decrease your battery life slightly but absorb shock for a nicer ride. They won't slow down an e-bike. You can always change to narrower tires next year. The Aventon Pace handlebars only sweep back 15 degrees (per website). With that sweep your hands, wrists, and shoulders will be stressed less while still allowing you to pull on the bars for climbing and accelerating. I use bars with 25 degree sweep with no issues. As mentioned by others, one way to save is to do your own assembly.
Still very new here, but so is the OP, so my perspective may be useful.

The hydraulic brakes and LBS assembly issues are related, IMHO. I respectfully disagree about hydraulic brakes-- my hands are bad and getting worse, there are many 15% hills where I live. I had the center-pull brakes on my 40 pound 250 Watt kit bike replaced and serviced three months ago, and it made ZERO difference, I found that my hands were just painful after about 8 or 9 miles. One of the reasons I got a second bike was because I wanted more stopping power, and with less wear and tear on my hands. BTW, all the things Indianjo said about maintenance, proprietary fluid for hydraulic brakes-- yeah, all true, and I dread all that! Six months ago, I swore I'd never go hydraulic, just seemed silly to me. But at the end of the day, I do like to have some downhill runs at over 30 MPH, my hands hurt, and this was not a fixable issue with old school bike brakes. I'm also on blood thinners, and a crash that would send someone else to the ER could send me to the morgue. For my second bike, hydraulic was mandatory.

What I hadn't figured out was, hydraulic brakes were also the reason why I had to have my bike assembled at the LBS! I planned to put it together myself, but... I have no experience with hydraulics. Maybe it's easy, but would I know if I screwed up? Maybe not. I'm hoping the $150 I spent for assembly will earn me a lot of good will, and good advice, from my LBS. Folks here on the EBR forum encouraged me to shell out the cash and try not to worry about it, . (If they're charging more than that, I would want to know why. Maybe there's a good reason, but tell them you know a guy in LA who had a mid-drive EMTB with hydraulic brakes assembled for $150!)

I understand about budget. I could have had a bike with a more powerful motor if I'd been willing to shell out another $900-- but I wasn't. My business is very volatile, I have no idea what kind of year I'm going to have. That was the compromise I was comfortable making... even if it means I'm less comfortable going uphill!
 

ElevenAD

Well-Known Member
personally i could never take bikes like the Aventon Pace or R1up Core very seriously because the batteries are so small, 10/11ah batteries with 500/700motors are a no no for me! the Ride one up 500 is on sale for $1300 and it does have front suspension and a 13ah battery! not a huge battery but better than 10AH
 

GenXrider

Well-Known Member
personally i could never take bikes like the Aventon Pace or R1up Core very seriously because the batteries are so small, 10/11ah batteries with 500/700motors are a no no for me! the Ride one up 500 is on sale for $1300 and it does have front suspension and a 13ah battery! not a huge battery but better than 10AH
Ride1Up 500 is on sale for $1245 right now. Take the pledge to save an additional $40.

Ride1Up does sell higher capacity batteries that you can purchase for the Core-5 and 500, but they are an additional purchase at regular price, so the bike is always sold with the low Ahr batteries. And, there was a big $100+ price jump in their batteries lately. I went with the 700 series bike that has a 14 aH battery, which gives me amazing range since I use a lot of muscle power to boot while keeping PAS assistance on the low end.

Since my earlier post in this thread, the 700 was raised another $100, so it's selling for $200 more now than it did at the beginning of March.