Wow! My Head Hurts. Feeling discouraged.

GenXrider

Active Member
I did look at the Ride1Up bikes for consideration. The one I really liked an eliminated up front was the Roadster V2 as it appears to be a belt drive single speed. Also, the battery is 36V 7.0Ah, 350W motor so I assumed it wouldn't have enough oomph for my hilly terrain and considering it doesn't have any gears for shifting - so took it off my list.
You hadn't listed Ride1Up among those that you eliminated. But the Roadster is not one I suggested and doesn't sound fitting at all to your situation.
The other one I liked but not so much aesthetically, is the Core-5. I couldn't tell whether or not it comes with a 750W motor as stated or is a 500W motor with 750w peak. It's a 7 speed vs Aventon 8 speed with same voltage on the battery but a little less on the AH at 10.4 vs the Aventon 11Ah. It cost less and weighs less than the Aventon but again it comes back to my confusion in trying to take all of the forum input into consideration. In comparing the two, in my opinion, they are fairly close in comparison but I would in fact think the 750w motor and the lighter weight of the bike is an advantage but is the one gear in a 7 speed vs 8 speed and the 10.4Ah vs 11Ah a big enough difference specific to my needs. I ended up opting to take Ride1Up off the list and pursue the Aventon since they are pretty close in specs and is available at my LBS. I can certainly add it back to to my list if the Core-5 is in fact a 750w motor and the one off in Amp Hours and 7 speed vs 8 speed is not going to be a deal breaker for my situation and my terrain.
Well, that's a head scratcher. The Aventon Pace 500 is one of the bikes you're interested in, yet the bikes you looked at for Ride1Up were the Core-5 and a completely different Roadster (poor choice), when the Ride1Up bike that compares most closely is the Ride1Up 500 series. But the R1U 500 has a better PAS system, larger 13 aHr battery, and a bit higher top gear, same power of motor, same number of gears, same look, for about $245 less with the pledge vs. the PACE 500 with throttle on demand, $145 less than the PACE 500 you mentioned that doesn't have it (the R1U 500 does). The PACE has hydraulic brakes, multiple sizes, and LBS availability in your case. So, for you that makes it a closer decision. It would have been a no-brainer for me since there is no LBS in my region that has Aventon, and the one size R1U fits me well at about 6' 190 lb. for now.

To clarify, I live in a rural area. I'm 5ft 4" at 150 pounds. About 50% of my riding is going to be on a paved bike path that is fairly flat. My concern with motor wattage, battery voltage and the number of gears come for the other 50% of my riding that will be on paved roads primarily flat but with some rolling hills since it is out in farm country (example picture attached). Not trying to climb hills in San Fran or ride the mountains in the Tour de France. Not using it for off roading hilly trails back in the woods. Not looking to see how fast I can go down the road. Not looking to load up on groceries or carry a bunch of gear. Simply looking for the pedal assist when I get tired or pooped out on a hill or if I'm riding into a head wind on a breezy day. I want to mostly pedal under my own power. Because I'm a newbie, I don't know what it takes to meet my needs in terms of motor size, battery wattage and the number of gears I need. And if Amp Hours relate to how far I can go on a charge, I would think I could adjust my ride accordingly based on how much or how little I'm using assist. Once I get a better understanding of that with the understanding that there a zillion variables that "could" apply, I can feel better about making an informed choice on what will best meet my needs.

Thank you.
I ride 99% on rural roads, and I have some big hills on my routes, especially on my longer rides. I've tested the steepest one with my R1U 700, and I can climb it by shifting into 3rd gear and using 300 to 400 watts of assistance while pedaling fairly hard as well but not moving that fast. During my riding, I've yet to shift down into 1st or 2nd gear. My motor was listed as 500W sustained and 800W peak. I've actually tested it at over 900W temporarily with a 70%+ charge, but during actual normal use, I haven't topped out over around 400W climbing a hill. And I haven't tried climbing a hill without putting considerable muscle power into the equation. Now their website says, "750W Shengyi Geared Hub-Motor (500W nominal, 880W peak) for the CORE-5, 500 Series, 700 Series". So, that's 3 separate wattage ratings for one motor, and the peak is listed at 880W vs. 800W or 1000W as had been lised before, for the same motor.

Edit: Yes, you can increase your range with a given amount of battery power by using lower or no assist and using more muscle power. I do that quite a bit. My battery came charged to 51.5V, and I got 75 miles on my bike before it dropped to about 44V, when I charged it for the first time. I was riding into some very strong winds earlier this week with 60W of assistance, and it was still a chore. I think I'll bump it up a little more next time.
 
Last edited:

smary

New Member
Region
USA
You hadn't listed Ride1Up among those that you eliminated. But the Roadster is not one I suggested and doesn't sound fitting at all to your situation.

Well, that's a head scratcher. The Aventon Pace 500 is one of the bikes you're interested in, yet the bikes you looked at for Ride1Up were the Core-5 and a completely different Roadster (poor choice), when the Ride1Up bike that compares most closely is the Ride1Up 500 series. But the R1U 500 has a better PAS system, larger 13 aHr battery, and a bit higher top gear, same power of motor, same number of gears, same look, for about $245 less with the pledge vs. the PACE 500 with throttle on demand, $145 less than the PACE 500 you mentioned that doesn't have it (the R1U 500 does). The PACE has hydraulic brakes, multiple sizes, and LBS availability in your case. So, for you that makes it a closer decision. It would have been a no-brainer for me since there is no LBS in my region that has Aventon, and the one size R1U fits me well at about 6' 190 lb. for now.


I ride 99% on rural roads, and I have some big hills on my routes, especially on my longer rides. I've tested the steepest one with my R1U 700, and I can climb it by shifting into 3rd gear and using 300 to 400 watts of assistance while pedaling fairly hard as well but not moving that fast. During my riding, I've yet to shift down into 1st or 2nd gear. My motor was listed as 500W sustained and 800W peak. I've actually tested it at over 900W temporarily with a 70%+ charge, but during actual normal use, I haven't topped out over around 400W climbing a hill. And I haven't tried climbing a hill without putting considerable muscle power into the equation. Now their website says, "750W Shengyi Geared Hub-Motor (500W nominal, 880W peak) for the CORE-5, 500 Series, 700 Series". So, that's 3 separate wattage ratings for one motor, and the peak is listed at 880W vs. 800W or 1000W as had been lised before, for the same motor.

Edit: Yes, you can increase your range with a given amount of battery power by using lower or no assist and using more muscle power. I do that quite a bit. My battery came charged to 51.5V, and I got 75 miles on my bike before it dropped to about 44V, when I charged it for the first time. I was riding into some very strong winds earlier this week with 60W of assistance, and it was still a chore. I think I'll bump it up a little more next time.
Well, that's a head scratcher. The Aventon Pace 500 is one of the bikes you're interested in, yet the bikes you looked at for Ride1Up were the Core-5 and a completely different Roadster (poor choice), when the Ride1Up bike that compares most closely is the Ride1Up 500 series. But the R1U 500 has a better PAS system, larger 13 aHr battery, and a bit higher top gear, same power of motor, same number of gears, same look, for about $245 less with the pledge vs. the PACE 500 with throttle on demand, $145 less than the PACE 500 you mentioned that doesn't have it (the R1U 500 does). The PACE has hydraulic brakes, multiple sizes, and LBS availability in your case. So, for you that makes it a closer decision. It would have been a no-brainer for me since there is no LBS in my region that has Aventon, and the one size R1U fits me well at about 6' 190 lb. for now.

To clarify, and as stated in my post, I looked Ride1Up in my early searches and really liked the Roadster but eliminated that "up front" for the reasons stated. That left me with the Ride1Up 500 and the Ride1UP Core-5 to consider. Any Ride1Up bike I purchase would be online shipped. While there would be no cost for shipping, I would need to pay for assembly and adjustment at my LBS that I am estimating to be around $200 (my LBS couldn't give me an exact price until they know what bike I'm buying and the level of assembly required). In my newbie eyes, the Ride1Up 500 and Core-5 were pretty close in comparision with a variation on the down bar step over and the battery Ahs. The website page shows the price for the Ride1Up 500 as $1,295 but when you select the frame and the page changes, the price then displays as $1,395. If I add $200 assembly cost to that it brings the cost to $1,595 (my budget is 1,399) so I eliminated Ride1Up 500. That left me with the Ride1Up Core-5. The price on the Core-5 is $1,195 and with the $200 assembly cost that brings it to $1,395 - my budget. That resulted in my remaining comparison of the Ride1Up Core-5 to the Aventon PACE 500 that is available at my LBS for $1,399 and price includes assembly. The Aventon PACE 500 is now Throttle on Demand due to the controller modifications (released by Aventon as of March 1st) and also includes modifications to how PAS 1 and 2 for smoother acceleration.

Is the $200 difference between the Ride1Up 500 the the R1U Core-5/Aventon 500 a significant amount? Maybe not to everyone. But, like I said in the post at the beginning of the thread, if budget wasn't an issue, I wouldn't be bothering with all of the questions - I'd be out riding around on my high end bike. I've been dreaming of an ebike for a long time and I've worked hard to be able to have the extra cash for what to me is going to be a luxury item to help get my health back. I do sincerely appreciate the patience and wealth of knowledge from everyone who has posted back.
 

GenXrider

Active Member
Well, that's a head scratcher. The Aventon Pace 500 is one of the bikes you're interested in, yet the bikes you looked at for Ride1Up were the Core-5 and a completely different Roadster (poor choice), when the Ride1Up bike that compares most closely is the Ride1Up 500 series. But the R1U 500 has a better PAS system, larger 13 aHr battery, and a bit higher top gear, same power of motor, same number of gears, same look, for about $245 less with the pledge vs. the PACE 500 with throttle on demand, $145 less than the PACE 500 you mentioned that doesn't have it (the R1U 500 does). The PACE has hydraulic brakes, multiple sizes, and LBS availability in your case. So, for you that makes it a closer decision. It would have been a no-brainer for me since there is no LBS in my region that has Aventon, and the one size R1U fits me well at about 6' 190 lb. for now.

To clarify, and as stated in my post, I looked Ride1Up in my early searches and really liked the Roadster but eliminated that "up front" for the reasons stated. That left me with the Ride1Up 500 and the Ride1UP Core-5 to consider. Any Ride1Up bike I purchase would be online shipped. While there would be no cost for shipping, I would need to pay for assembly and adjustment at my LBS that I am estimating to be around $200 (my LBS couldn't give me an exact price until they know what bike I'm buying and the level of assembly required). In my newbie eyes, the Ride1Up 500 and Core-5 were pretty close in comparision with a variation on the down bar step over and the battery Ahs. The website page shows the price for the Ride1Up 500 as $1,295 but when you select the frame and the page changes, the price then displays as $1,395. If I add $200 assembly cost to that it brings the cost to $1,595 (my budget is 1,399) so I eliminated Ride1Up 500. That left me with the Ride1Up Core-5. The price on the Core-5 is $1,195 and with the $200 assembly cost that brings it to $1,395 - my budget. That resulted in my remaining comparison of the Ride1Up Core-5 to the Aventon PACE 500 that is available at my LBS for $1,399 and price includes assembly. The Aventon PACE 500 is now Throttle on Demand due to the controller modifications (released by Aventon as of March 1st) and also includes modifications to how PAS 1 and 2 for smoother acceleration.

Is the $200 difference between the Ride1Up 500 the the R1U Core-5/Aventon 500 a significant amount? Maybe not to everyone. But, like I said in the post at the beginning of the thread, if budget wasn't an issue, I wouldn't be bothering with all of the questions - I'd be out riding around on my high end bike. I've been dreaming of an ebike for a long time and I've worked hard to be able to have the extra cash for what to me is going to be a luxury item to help get my health back. I do sincerely appreciate the patience and wealth of knowledge from everyone who has posted back.
Like I said, LBS support might make a difference for you. When I made my choice, I didn't add any assembly charges, because I assembled it myself - that appears to be what most of the buyers are doing. Their bikes come with instructions, and there are youtube videos on how to do it. It's not difficult. Plus Ride1Up offers a $40 pledge discount https://ride1up.com/about-us/. And depending on where you live, you won't have to pay any sales tax ordering from Ride1Up but will from the LBS. You start figuring all that in, and the Ride1Up looks like a much better deal for some people. Oh yeah, the prices did go up because of the Chinese tariffs since I bought mine: https://electricbikereview.com/forums/threads/price-increase-2021-25-chinese-tariff.36874/ I beat the price increase, but that's why you are seeing the $100 change on the website.
 

geysir

New Member
I would test ride the bikes that are available to give yourself some idea if you would like a particular bike. Testing also shows the differences in bikes. Yes, the test ride probably is in a small paved parking lot but it is helpful. You may want to keep bikes with wide tires on your list. Wider tires may decrease your battery life slightly but absorb shock for a nicer ride. They won't slow down an e-bike. You can always change to narrower tires next year. The Aventon Pace handlebars only sweep back 15 degrees (per website). With that sweep your hands, wrists, and shoulders will be stressed less while still allowing you to pull on the bars for climbing and accelerating. I use bars with 25 degree sweep with no issues. As mentioned by others, one way to save is to do your own assembly.
 

Catalyzt

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I would test ride the bikes that are available to give yourself some idea if you would like a particular bike. Testing also shows the differences in bikes. Yes, the test ride probably is in a small paved parking lot but it is helpful. You may want to keep bikes with wide tires on your list. Wider tires may decrease your battery life slightly but absorb shock for a nicer ride. They won't slow down an e-bike. You can always change to narrower tires next year. The Aventon Pace handlebars only sweep back 15 degrees (per website). With that sweep your hands, wrists, and shoulders will be stressed less while still allowing you to pull on the bars for climbing and accelerating. I use bars with 25 degree sweep with no issues. As mentioned by others, one way to save is to do your own assembly.
Still very new here, but so is the OP, so my perspective may be useful.

The hydraulic brakes and LBS assembly issues are related, IMHO. I respectfully disagree about hydraulic brakes-- my hands are bad and getting worse, there are many 15% hills where I live. I had the center-pull brakes on my 40 pound 250 Watt kit bike replaced and serviced three months ago, and it made ZERO difference, I found that my hands were just painful after about 8 or 9 miles. One of the reasons I got a second bike was because I wanted more stopping power, and with less wear and tear on my hands. BTW, all the things Indianjo said about maintenance, proprietary fluid for hydraulic brakes-- yeah, all true, and I dread all that! Six months ago, I swore I'd never go hydraulic, just seemed silly to me. But at the end of the day, I do like to have some downhill runs at over 30 MPH, my hands hurt, and this was not a fixable issue with old school bike brakes. I'm also on blood thinners, and a crash that would send someone else to the ER could send me to the morgue. For my second bike, hydraulic was mandatory.

What I hadn't figured out was, hydraulic brakes were also the reason why I had to have my bike assembled at the LBS! I planned to put it together myself, but... I have no experience with hydraulics. Maybe it's easy, but would I know if I screwed up? Maybe not. I'm hoping the $150 I spent for assembly will earn me a lot of good will, and good advice, from my LBS. Folks here on the EBR forum encouraged me to shell out the cash and try not to worry about it, . (If they're charging more than that, I would want to know why. Maybe there's a good reason, but tell them you know a guy in LA who had a mid-drive EMTB with hydraulic brakes assembled for $150!)

I understand about budget. I could have had a bike with a more powerful motor if I'd been willing to shell out another $900-- but I wasn't. My business is very volatile, I have no idea what kind of year I'm going to have. That was the compromise I was comfortable making... even if it means I'm less comfortable going uphill!