Wrong Bike is Right Bike

Bufatutu

Member
Two thousand bucks means something to me. Its also a great distraction from an election I care very much about. So, I'm an older guy, a regular bike commuter back in the day on a dual bike/ped way alongside the T; now I retired to the mountains and actually enjoy grinding up hills--the only way to get the ticker moving and a great way to see the scenery and wildflowers. I mostly rode road bikes, though used an early mtn bike to commute and when I traveled out west and to Alaska. Been riding a fine 29er for eight or nine years. I have arthritis now, particularly problems with my feet and knees. And it ain't gettin' any better. But I ride my bike four or five days a week, up and down hilly terrain, 70% road, 15% cinder bike paths, 15% gravel. So I was looking at quality riding step throughs and midframes, mostly with midframe motors and decent components. I thought about step throughs not only for today but as I get older and even more physically limited. Only fall in two years was getting off my road bike. I've droolled at 29er ebikes on bikesdirect, right in my price range. And I've given ebikes brief but decent tryouts at two shops. But turns out a local xc ski resort had some nice rental machines for sale. Great Glen in Pinkham Notch, a place I've skiied and part of the Mt. Wash AutoRoad. Didn't even know they had a few ebikes--that they know not too much about. And I bought one today, first ebike. Just figured out how to get the gritty battery out of its frame slot. Yeah!

Only after I purchased, did I discover how right this type of ebike is for me. The Shimano manuals online, owner and dealer, are enlightening. They should be either printed and included with each and every bike or very prominently referred to in the little info packets for each component. I live in the heart of the mountains, north of NH's White Mtns--I see Madison, Adams, and Boote Spur from here. My other little place is in northern Newfoundland, where there is little flat and the wind is serious and unceasing. I've had to give up hiking and have been biking more, though getting less far with each additional year. So starting a couple of months ago, i started looking at, reading about, researching, becoming interested in owning an ebike. I'm a rider and I want something I can ride and enjoy in all sorts of dry weather--I no longer enjoy or have to be in the rain or worrying about ice on the road. So after a few trials, I'd quickly decided on a mid-drive, just more fun to drive for a regular bike rider, at least compared to the few wheel drives I checked out. So I'd focus on an ebike having the things I thought I wanted and needed to feel safe and have fun. First it was the step through from SLZ, but there was some feature that kept me from going. Then it was a Giant Explore. Wonderful bike in every way for me, until several of you mentioned the smaller battery, which could quickly be an issue in this sort of terrain.

Then someone mentioned that Great Glen ski resort had a few rentals for sale from a brand, Rossignol, I'd never heard of viz. ebikes. The ebikes for sale were in a style I really wasn't looking at, a fairly serious mtn ebike, with strong dedicated motor, Shimano e8000, which was much more powerful than most of the ebikes I'd looked at in any way, in part because of price, other than bikesdirect. The e8000 is much stronger than the e5000 which is on way too many bikes including all those I like on bd and which is fine for riding around on flats/most cities/elder communities. I've looked at the Bosch Active Line and Plus version of the same, both of which, I believe would struggle on the hills around here. So I looked at one of the resort's ebikes a few days go. But its been cold and wet and snowing and salty and freezing on the road, not great for a tryout. Today I did try it out. Quickly zipped up the steep little hill beside the historic property to the historic manager's house and then went up one of the steeper sections of the road to Pinkham Notch, and then turned around. I worked up a sweat...but I was still smiling. I ended up with a powerful bike probably right for where I am and the other place I especially and most devotedly hang out and explore from, at least when the border isn't closed to any but essential. The MSRP was $3,700 and the used rental bikes were advertized for $2300, but this last Medium had an issue with the derailleur so I walked away paying $2000 for an awful lot of bike.

Once I got my new-to-me hardtail home, I started reading about and finding manuals for the e8000 Shimano Steps motor and system. I'm so glad I got this rather than something with a less torquey motor. I will pay a penalty in significantly lower distances on one battery, though still not bad at 35 or 40. But it seems I'm always in hilly windy places and the last stretch to my place here is up a steep hill. I've been here eight years, I ride quite a lot, and I've never ridden from home, because I never wanted to try riding up this hill. I'll try tomorrow.
 
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Bufatutu

Member
That's it. Yup, $3700 bike, way overkill as a machine for me, very capable machine with the super brakes and everything. I like the minimal display. It all makes me feel safe. Its used and it has an issue, that I already had my local bike guy look at. I'm gonna get Schwalbe Super Moto Xs put on and ergonomic hand grips and maybe a rack. I'm so glad we're about to have our Indian summer here so I can play, after hard frost more than a month ago and already two snow storms.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Silicon Valley
Is it this model? https://www.rossignol.com/us/rmi5024-000.html it looks similar if not the same as the 2019 Felt Surplus-E 50, two grand sounds a good deal on this bike.
Nice ride... ;)
1605308766119.png
 

Bufatutu

Member
Can you picture a 72-year old dude still with muscle--and a fine ale and Ben and Jerry's belly--riding this? Yesterday I did the beautiful unpaved 16-mile hilly woods road loop near me. I've tried from either end: It's still hard work on heading uphill without relief for 45 minutes or longer, even with this baby. So I didn't realize how long the mid-section was and I hadn't reset my Distance. Yow. Got back almost exactly two hours later, with maybe fifteen minutes at most not actively pedaling or going downhill. Only saw two guys in pickups the whole time. Wish I'd had a light, as I got back down after sunset to the secondary road, though right before dark. In my desire to get back before dark, not having lights, I pushed myself and the bike hard, up and down. Thought I would have a heart attack, it being the hardest I've made my body work in a while. Love the brakes too! What fun.

Then I left it with the local bike shop, still in my ridin' duds. This afternoon I picked it up. For $25 he fixed my little problems and adjusted the derailleur. We've had such unusual wonderful weather here. I've ridden every day to get used to the bike and to stay healthy. Yesterday's ride was the most physically challenging thing I've done since I don't know when. Gotta say, for me, the motor power makes the work more fun so I work harder and explore further. I like that. Loved going up and down dirt roads I've ridden by for years and thought either too challenging or whatever. Never would have had this much fun with narrower tires or a less capable motor. I live on a hill in the heart of mountains: Better a more energetic bike. This ebike has energy and quality and a good price. And a helpful community!
 
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FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Silicon Valley
Can you picture a 72-year old dude still with muscle--and a fine ale and Ben and Jerry's belly--riding this? Yesterday I did the beautiful unpaved 16-mile woods road loop near me. I've tried from either end: It's still work on heading up without relief for 45 minutes or longer, even with this baby. So I didn't realize how long the mid-section was and I hadn't reset my Distance. Yow. Got back almost exactly two hours later, with maybe fifteen minutes at most not actively pedaling or going downhill. Only saw two guys in pickups the whole time. Wish I'd had a light, as I got back down after sunset to the secondary road, though right before dark. In my desire to get back before dark, not having lights, I pushed myself and the bike hard, up and down. Thought I would have a heart attack, it being the hardest I've made my body work in a while. Love the brakes too! What fun.

Then I left it with the local bike shop, still in my ridin' duds. This afternoon I picked it up. For $25 he fixed my little problems and adjusted the derailleur. We've had such unusual wonderful weather here. I've ridden every day to get used to the bike and to stay healthy. Yesterday's ride was the most physically challenging thing I've done since I don't know when. Gotta say, for me, the motor power makes the work more fun so I work harder and explore further. I like that. Loved going up and down dirt roads I've ridden by for years and thought either too challenging or whatever. Never would have had this much fun with narrower tires or a less capable motor. I live on a hill in the heart of mountains: Better a more energetic bike. This ebike has energy and quality and a good price. And a helpful community!
Congratulations on your new EBike... long may you ride!
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
Wish I'd had a light, as I got back down after sunset to the secondary road, though right before dark. In my desire to get back before dark, not having lights, I pushed myself and the bike hard, up and down.

Worth picking up a front & back light, you never know when a flat or other problem will throw you off your schedule.
I find a 100 lumens is enough, although I have pretty good night vision. Rechargeable through a micro usb port (c) is handy, since those chargers are available at any dollar store. Flashing red on the back is traditional. Lights can be bought with a rubber band to wrap around the handlebar or seat post, not difficult to install or take in to the electricity at all. I shop at modernbike.com although thebikeshopstore.com is closer to you in NY.
 

Bufatutu

Member
I've always had handlebar packs for assorted gear, and always had a backpack too. Too bad that handlebar packs really don't work on this bike. I have great battery lights, just got to rig em up. I'm usually careful and don't use the lights, so they sit in the draw by the year though I ride every week more days than not in decent weather.

I just ordered a pair of Super Moto Xs in a slightly narrower width, 2.4in. rather than 2.8. I don't need the mtn bike tire. I ride alone. I need the comfort of puncture protection.
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
My lights stay on the bike at all times except when charging. When the sun angle is low and I am riding into the sun, I turn the back light on just for visibility. At dusk both go on. Some people drive without really seeing in those conditions.
 

pmcdonald

Well-Known Member
Great choice of bike.. good torquey motor for your neck of the country. Would love to see some pics! I meant to make the trip over to the White Mountains on a NE trip last year but just that bit too far, so looking for excuses to live vicariously!
 

Bufatutu

Member
Do you intend to ride on roads only?
I'm guessing 50% paved roads, 40% gravel and cinder roads and bike paths, 10% off road. I ride my non-e bike hardtail 29er 4-6 days a week in all the hilly and windy conditions I describe from May thru mid-Nov. in that ratio. Its got Big Bens, which I love and which do great and are similar in style to the Super Moto Xs. The Xs have much more tread than the regular SMs.

Here's the view from where I'm sitting right now, pic taken last week: From right Mt. Adams, second highest mtn in the Northeast, Mt. Madison(5th highest), and on the far left Boott Spur on Mt. Washington.



adams madison 10.30.20.jpg
 
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