Yamaha unveils new full-suspension electric mountain bike

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
A beautiful new Yamaha EMTB with a frame design that integrates the rear shock in the top tube.

Looking forward to seeing the detailed specs released next week along with the 170 RPM PW-X2 motor. 😉


Yamaha has finally pulled the veil off its new Yamaha YDX MORO electric mountain bike line. The new models feature Yamaha’s latest mid-drive e-bike motor and a brand new frame design, unlike anything we’ve seen before. The Yamaha YDX MORO electric mountain bike line show off Yamaha’s new patent-pending dual-twin frame design that features a split frame setup on both the top tube and the down tube. The split top tube allows the saddle to rest lower by making more room for the rear shock. That offers lower standover height at rest and helps get the saddle lower on tough, technical terrain where riders will be standing on the pedals, no saddle needed.

The split downtube cradles the bike’s 500 Wh battery and protects it in a cage-like structure. That not only helps prevent damage during drops or from twisting during a crash, but it also makes battery swaps easier than on other frames that conceal the battery inside the downtube. The design of the Yamaha YDX MORO also uses a steeper-than-typical downtube angle resulting in moving the battery further rearward and better centering the weight of the bike.

Together, the split top tube and down tube give a funky new look that only marks the beginning of the list of innovations in the Yamaha YDX MORO e-bike line. Next, the new electric mountain bikes feature Yamaha’s latest mid-drive motor, the Yamaha PW-X2. The PW-X2 mid-drive motor system uses a unique quad-sensor setup that detects pedal speed, pedal-torque, bike speed and incline angle to more precisely calculate the required pedal-assist output. The motor also has a new EXPW mode that adds assist up to a pedal cadence of 170 RPM.




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TMH

Well-Known Member
Yamaha seems to be hitting it out of the park with their new e-bikes. Hope they price the Moro reasonably like they did with the Civante, but both are looking really nice.
 

Tantalus

Member
I would like to know how easy/hard it is to remove the battery. One of the pictures looks like it is a side mount battery, however It probably drops down from between the downtube(s). Is there a latch? Is there a key or do you use a tool to release it?
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
I would like to know how easy/hard it is to remove the battery. One of the pictures looks like it is a side mount battery, however It probably drops down from between the downtube(s).
Is there a latch? Is there a key or do you use a tool to release it?

Here's what we know so far... ;)

As Yamaha has had full control of the frame configuration, the YDX-MORO has some interesting modifications to the conventional e-MTB setups. Yamaha uses what it's calling a Dual Twin Frame, rather than building a frame around conventional tubing, Yamaha has used a cage design. Cradling the shock, battery and motor has allowed Yamaha to position the drive and suspension components in a more optimal arrangement.

The motor has been rotated to mount in a way that Yamaha claims to be better aligned with the axle path, this position also increases bottom bracket clearance and helps to reduce flex. The downtube meets the top tube behind the headtube which steepens the angle to help bring the weight of the battery into the centre of the bike for more balanced handling. As the battery is not captured within the frame's tubes and instead housed between two struts, removal for charging is a lot easier and the battery is protected from vertical twisting. Lastly, by mounting the shock within the Dual Twin frame design's top tube, Yamaha has been able to give the YDX-MORO a very low standover.


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Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
Here's what we know so far... ;)

As Yamaha has had full control of the frame configuration, the YDX-MORO has some interesting modifications to the conventional e-MTB setups. Yamaha uses what it's calling a Dual Twin Frame, rather than building a frame around conventional tubing, Yamaha has used a cage design. Cradling the shock, battery and motor has allowed Yamaha to position the drive and suspension components in a more optimal arrangement.

The motor has been rotated to mount in a way that Yamaha claims to be better aligned with the axle path, this position also increases bottom bracket clearance and helps to reduce flex. The downtube meets the top tube behind the headtube which steepens the angle to help bring the weight of the battery into the centre of the bike for more balanced handling. As the battery is not captured within the frame's tubes and instead housed between two struts, removal for charging is a lot easier and the battery is protected from vertical twisting. Lastly, by mounting the shock within the Dual Twin frame design's top tube, Yamaha has been able to give the YDX-MORO a very low standover.

The engineering reasoning behind such design is that, the more compact your front triangle is, stiffer the frame, low polar moment of inertia (read better agility). A stiff frame + quality suspension components make the bike highly predictable in technical conditions.
Yamaha has made it compact and I suspect the bike would ride like a true MTB. I am expecting the bike to be priced at $4999 ... we shall see ...(There is a saying in Russia ... "the blind said, we'll see ..;))
 
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GypsyTreker

Well-Known Member
What a beautiful bike! If they can bring that in at $5k there will be alot of folk ,who think eBikes are cheating , changing their mind. I live in the Asheville area and it is, without a doubt, the most elitist bunch of bicycle enthusiasts on the planet. That was not meant to be a compliment 😂
 

Marci jo

Well-Known Member
What a beautiful bike! If they can bring that in at $5k there will be alot of folk ,who think eBikes are cheating , changing their mind. I live in the Asheville area and it is, without a doubt, the most elitist bunch of bicycle enthusiasts on the planet. That was not meant to be a compliment 😂

Asheville is beautiful area. Had a sister who lived there and I’ve visited there often. Fabulous for ebikes!
 

Mike TowpathTraveler

Well-Known Member
Very nice bike, glad to see Yamaha up their game to compete with the likes of Giant, Haibike, Bulls and Specialized. If I should find fault in anything, it's not having something more powerful than a 500 wh battery.

And I hope Yamaha has something in the way of upgraded external batteries over their 500wh models for us external battery owners; somewhere in their product development meetings. Please don't forget about us!
 

GypsyTreker

Well-Known Member
Asheville is beautiful area. Had a sister who lived there and I’ve visited there often. Fabulous for ebikes!

There are some great eBike places to ride but unless roads in the Pisgah Forrest are designated as motorized access roads eBikes are banned from the numerous single tracks available to horses and mtb'ers (a
 

Brooks

Member
Looks good but... where is the 2 plate crank? I am not sold on 1x.
What I find completely ridiculous is:
The motor also has a new EXPW mode that adds assist up to a pedal cadence of 170 RPM.
Since when do MTBrs spin out there cranks to 170 rpm?
Do you? I say you do not!
I prefer the regular PW motor.... power falls off at 90 rpm... spin 90 rpm and you are saving battery, plus if you are spinning up that much you don't need motor assistance.
That's my opinion... now have it it!
 

Tantalus

Member
Is 170rpm only available in EXPW? If so, what is the reasoning in that? I think higher cadence would be useful in all modes ( I am an old roadie too ha ha)
 

Brooks

Member
170 crank RPM assist only in the highest setting. When do roadies even pull 170 RPM?
I spinout on a road bike at 120-130rpm.... on a downhill.... on asphalt.
I'm guessing this bike is about $6,000 USD.
You can get a new Royal Enfield 650 interceptor for that.
 

Tantalus

Member
I think high rpm would help me clean those unexpected steep and rocky trail sections - when there is no time to downshift or even change your assist level. It would save a HAB and make riding more fun. In my case, my Haibike does not have walk assist enabled, so I can really dig this new spec.