VoltBike Elegant Review

2017 Voltbike Elegant Electric Bike Review
2017 Voltbike Elegant
2017 Voltbike Elegant Basic 7 Speed Shimano Tourney With Derailleur Guard
2017 Voltbike Elegant Downtube Mounted 48 Volt Lithium Ion Ebike Battery
2017 Voltbike Elegant Intelligent 800s Electric Bike Display Lcd
2017 Voltbike Elegant Sr Suntour Xct Coil Spring Suspension Fork With Led Light
2017 Voltbike Elegant Tektro Novela Mechanical Cs Disc Brakes 160 Mm
2017 Voltbike Elegant Plastic Fenders With Mud Flaps Rear Kickstand
2017 Voltbike Elegant Welded On Rear Rack With Integrated Led Light
2017 Voltbike Elegant Lightweight 2 Amp Ebike Battery Charger
2017 Voltbike Elegant Shipping Packaging
2017 Voltbike Elegant Electric Bike Review
2017 Voltbike Elegant
2017 Voltbike Elegant Basic 7 Speed Shimano Tourney With Derailleur Guard
2017 Voltbike Elegant Downtube Mounted 48 Volt Lithium Ion Ebike Battery
2017 Voltbike Elegant Intelligent 800s Electric Bike Display Lcd
2017 Voltbike Elegant Sr Suntour Xct Coil Spring Suspension Fork With Led Light
2017 Voltbike Elegant Tektro Novela Mechanical Cs Disc Brakes 160 Mm
2017 Voltbike Elegant Plastic Fenders With Mud Flaps Rear Kickstand
2017 Voltbike Elegant Welded On Rear Rack With Integrated Led Light
2017 Voltbike Elegant Lightweight 2 Amp Ebike Battery Charger
2017 Voltbike Elegant Shipping Packaging

Summary

  • An exceptionally affordable, feature rich electric bike, built around an approachable frame that's easier to mount and stand over, offers pedal assist and throttle override operation
  • The battery pack is protected by the top tube, positioned low and center along the frame for balance, can be charged on or off the bike, and has a USB charging port for accessories
  • Fairly comfortable thanks to a basic suspension fork, adjustable angle stem, and ergonomic grips, the Kenda tires are basic (no reflective paint or puncture protection) but offer a good PSI range and hybrid tread
  • Entry-level derailleur with a bulky shifter, basic mechanical disc brakes that require more hand strength to actuate than hydraulic, bouncy and somewhat noisy fenders, only one frame size

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

VoltBike

Model:

Elegant

Price:

$1,299 ($70 Flat Rate Shipping)

Body Position:

Upright, Upright Relaxed

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Urban, Commuting

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States, Canada

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

55.6 lbs (25.21 kg)

Battery Weight:

7 lbs (3.17 kg)

Motor Weight:

5 lbs (2.26 kg)

Frame Material:

Aluminum

Frame Sizes:

19 in (48.26 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

19.25" Seat Tube, 23.5" Reach, 22" Stand Over Height, 25.5" Width, 74.5" Length

Frame Types:

Mid-Step

Frame Colors:

Matte Black with White Accents

Frame Fork Details:

SR Suntour XCT Coil Spring Suspension, 100 mm Travel, Individual Stanchion Preload Adjust, 100 mm Hub Width, 10 mm Axle with Bolts

Frame Rear Details:

135 mm Hub Length, 10 mm Axle with Bolts

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses

Gearing Details:

7 Speed 1x7 Shimano Tourney Derailleur, MF-TZ21 Cassette 14-28T

Shifter Details:

Shimano SiS Index Thumb Shifter on Right

Cranks:

Aluminum Alloy Crank Arms, 170 mm Length, Square Taper Bottom Bracket 38T Chainring

Pedals:

Wellgo LU-C25 Alloy Cage Style Platform

Headset:

1-1/8" Threadless, Internal Cups

Stem:

Promax MA-579, Tool-Free Adjustable Angle 0° to 70°, 110 mm Length, 25.4 mm Clamp

Handlebar:

Promax Alloy, Low-Rise, 630 mm Length

Brake Details:

Tektro Novela CS Mechanical Disc with 160 mm Rotors, 5 Star Levers with Motor Inhibitors and Rubberized Edge

Grips:

Generic, Rubber, Ergonomic, Black

Saddle:

Selle Royal Freccia

Seat Post:

Promax, Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

350 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

27.2 mm

Rims:

Samson Champion, 6061 T6 Alloy, Double Walled, 36 Hole

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 13 Gauge, Silver with Nipples

Tire Brand:

Kenda Small Block Eight, 26" x 2.1" (54-559) (650x52B)

Wheel Sizes:

26 in (66.04cm)

Tire Details:

30TPI Casing, Wire Bead, 30 to 80 PSI

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Plastic Fenders with Rubber Flaps, Plastic Chain Cover with Reflector, Integrated Blaze-Lite LED Headlight with Reflector, Integrated Generic LED Backlight with Reflector, Flick Bell, Adjustable Length Kickstand Rear-Mount, Free DOT Approved Helmet

Other:

Locking Removable Downtube Mounted Battery Pack with LED Charge Indicator, 5 Volt Full Sized USB Charging Port on Right Side of Battery, 1.1 lb 2 Amp Charger, KMC Rust Resistant Z Chain, Steel Derailleur Guard

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Bafang, BFSWX02

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Motor Peak Output:

750 watts

Battery Brand:

Samsung 18650

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

10.4 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

499.2 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

4 hours

Estimated Min Range:

20 miles (32 km)

Estimated Max Range:

45 miles (72 km)

Display Type:

Voltbike Branded, Intelligent 800S, Fixed, Grayscale, Backlit, LCD

Readouts:

Speed, Avg Speed, Max Speed, Battery (5 Bars), Assist Level (0-9), Trip, Odometer, Timer

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad (+, -, Power), Double Press Power Button for Settings Menu, Hold + for Backlight and Integrated Lights, Hold - for Walk Mode

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist (12 Magnet Disc)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph) (Adjustable Top Speed)

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Written Review

The VoltBike Elegant was massively updated for 2017, the price rose by $200 over the original but this is still one of the most affordable, feature-rich electric bikes I have tested. And now, the rear rack is quieter, stronger and better looking. It no longer has to support the battery box, which has been integrated into the downtube for improved frame balance. The motor is twice as powerful and has been spoked into the rear wheel vs. the front which improves steering and traction. The bike still has integrated LED lights for safety but the tires are not reflective like they used to be. You can get the Elegant in two colors however, including a matte white which is more reflective. But the matte paint has a funky look to it, in my opinion, and the white could show more dirt and become an off-white or yellow with use over time. Even though this upgraded VoltBike Elegant model does not offer the super low-step wave frame design, I feel that it’s very approachable, easy to stand over and handle, and is a lot stiffer and stronger. The wheels offer 36 holes vs. 32 and use a 13 gauge spoke thickness for improved strength which could accommodate larger riders or heavy rear-rack loads. The rear rack is rated up to 55 lbs and is setup with pannier guards and a loop towards the base of the support arms for use with a bungee cord. There’s a whole lot to cover with this e-bike and I want to praise the inclusion of a derailleur guard, which also protects the motor power cable, and integrated USB charging port on the battery pack. These are little things that can sometimes get overlooked. Areas that I feel are average or below average in terms of build and performance are the square tapered spindle vs. splined which isn’t as strong, the entry-level Shimano Tourney derailleur and thumb shifter which might require more tuneups and don’t shift as quickly, the loose chain and lack of chain guide and slap guard, the limited adjust suspension fork which can dive or bob (especially for heavy riders), the plastic fenders with basic support mounts which rattle quite bit on bumpy terrain and may even rub on the tires, and the basic mechanical 160 mm disc brake hardware vs. hydraulic. That said, the brakes work well enough and the levers are comfortable and smart, with integrated motor inhibitors that cut power to the motor when pulled.

Driving this bike is a 500 watt nominally rated, Bafang hub motor. It’s a planetary geared hub motor, which is more compact and zippy feeling than competing gearless models. VoltBike may have adjusted the Amp flow in the controller however, because it accelerates smoothly and does not feel as surprising and on/off as some of the other Bafang hub motors I have tested. You can still get a strong burst of energy by using the trigger throttle to override assist, but the 12 magnet cadence sensor works very well on its own and I actually like how smooth it feels. Hub motors operate independently from the chain and cassette that you power as a rider. This means that you won’t have to worry about shifting gears to maximize power, and you won’t encounter as much mashing as you might with a mid-drive. But, the downside is that the hub motor dosn’t benefit from the shifting either, and likely will not achieve the same range or climbing strength. I only weigh ~135 lbs but was very impressed with the climbing strength that the motor did offer when testing up an incline in a grassy section of a park in downtown Vancouver Canada. The bike was able to move me from near standstill and accelerate up a small hill. I didn’t have to worry about pedaling and was instead, able to focus on balancing and steering. This is exactly the kind of setup I prefer on an ebike, full control and power at anytime. The trigger throttle does offer variable-speed activation, so if you push it just a bit, you will only get a little bit of power. It isn’t active at the zero level of assist, but 1-9 can be overridden with full power which is handy for a last minute boost when climbing or a quick zip up to catch some friends or pass another cyclist. Be careful not to bump the trigger when mounting or dismounting the bike, it’s a good idea to arrow down to level zero or simply turn it off, especially when loading the bike on a rack or putting it away in your garage. Thankfully, the trigger throttle is small and mostly out of the way. Given the very basic seven speed drivetrain on this bike (that you pedal with), I love how versatile the motor operation is. You can basically leave the bike in assist level three, the drivetrain in gear four, and just use the throttle to start and then pedal without ever changing gears or switching levels. And again, that’s nice because nine levels of assist is a bit excessive and can be tedious to click through.

Powering the Volt Bike Elegant is a very capable 48 volt 10.4 amp hour battery pack that uses Samsung cells. Weighing in at roughly seven pounds, it’s about average in terms of size and is very easy to click on or remove from the frame. This battery is the biggest upgrade and improvement over the earlier Elegant model because it positions weight where it should be, low and center on the frame. I like that it can be charged when mounted or removed, because that’s useful for commuting situations where the bike might be locked up at a rack outside. The charging port is a bit vulnerable, situated low and near the left crank arm, and the charger is a bit average, putting out 2 Amps vs. 3 or 4, but it gets the job done. I do wonder if it would have been possible to put the battery even lower on the downtube, near the bottom bracket vs. the head tube, to further maximize stability, but perhaps they had to put the controller there in the downtube where the wiring would be easier to run to the motor? In any case, many of the shifting, braking, and power cables are internally routed through the frame for an improved aesthetic and reduced snag potential. They practically disappear on the black frame, because they have black plastic covers. One final highlight about the battery is the integrated full-sized USB charging port positioned near the top of the right side. This could be useful for keeping a mobile phone charged when using GPS or playing music on the way to work. I would recommend the use of a right angle USB adapter to keep your wires from getting kicked however. And again, you don’t have to use this port for add-on lights because the battery is already powering the two included lights. They aren’t the fanciest, and in fact the headlight may bounce as you ride because it’s positioned on the moving part of the suspension fork vs. the head tube or handlebar, but they are way better than no lights.

Operating the VoltBike Elegant is straightforward, in fact, it’s using the exact same display system and button pad as before. The LCD is large, backlit (if you hold the up arrow), and adjustable angle to reduce glare. It is not removable, but there does appear to be a disconnect spot for easy replacement if you experience damage at some point down the line. All of the standard readouts about current speed, battery capacity, and assist level are shown, and if you tap the power button (the little rubber button on the remote pad) it will cycle through advanced readouts like average speed and max speed. Holding down on the button pad activates walk mode, and double tapping the power button opens a menu where you can adjust the maximum speed of the bike, though you’ll need a password from VoltBike to do so. This cold be handy for people who want to ride slower for safety reasons… but you can always just arrow down on assist for less power. The real consideration is how fast the throttle will get you going, because it’s always offering up full power when pushed all the way down. I was able to reach just over 20 miles per hour in the highest assist level during my tests. I would have been happy with a five level assist vs. nine because I don’t love clicking through so many levels when trying to focus on riding. At least the display is within reach and easy to learn (there are only three buttons). After a bit of practice, it’s easy to click up or down without even looking at the display for feedback. The one thing I have noticed about this particular button pad is that if you snag the buttons with fabric or somehow bump them when parking, the plastic cover can get bent up and become vulnerable to breaking off. I have only seen this once, but I have never seen the rubberized buttons get broken, so I consider it a point of consideration and extra care. A secondary four-LED display is built into the top of the battery box, and this allows you to get a quick idea of how full the pack is, even when it’s not mounted to the bike.

I went extra long on the video review above and have included a very detailed list of pros and cons below because I feel like this ebike would be a great fit, at the right price, for a large audience of people. It’s not perfect, but it delivers a lot of value and is more than good enough for the majority of use cases. I’d love to see a matte/gloss mix, maybe a satin paint job in the future to reduce fingerprints, and maybe some reflective tires like the original VoltBike Elegant had. You don’t get quick release here, so consider bringing along a tool and some flat-fix supplies. There’s also no bottle cage and I have listed a few bag options in the pro/con section below to help address this with a holster or a bar mount cup holder like this if you can fit it on. It’s neat to see a well thought out electric bicycle that comes with a basic warranty that is sold online. There are these extremes with kits and super cheap bikes that have zero support… and I find that they usually require extra time and effort that can cost more in the long run. I have seen some very cheap electric bikes being sold on Kickstarter and Indiegogo that only have one gear or require hundreds of dollars of shipping and make you buy an LCD display separately. The VoltBike Elegant comes with everything you need and is being sold by a company that I have been reviewing for several years now, I trust them to stick around and uphold their product more than a lot of others. Big thanks to VoltBike and the founder George for partnering with me on this post and showing me the free helmet that comes with the bike and the big box that that they use to ship it in. It’s nice to get a deeper look, even though I did not unpack the bike myself as an end-customer might. I welcome your feedback and comments as always.

Pros:

  • VoltBike has a shipping facility in the US and Canada, the price for shipping one of their electric bikes is only $70 USD (possibly even less in Canada ~$50) and that’s very low compared to most other manufactures that sell online
  • The VoltBike Elegant is one of the most affordable e-bikes I have seen, and it comes with a full set of accessories for commuting such as fenders, a chain cover, and stand-alone LED lights
  • I would call this a mid-step frame, it’s approachable, easy to stand-over, and the battery is well protected between the top tube and downtube, weight is also well balanced front to rear and kept fairly low
  • Great positioning and hardware choice on the kickstand, it supports the rear-end of the bike and stays out of the way of the left crank arm vs. a bottom-bracket mount design, if you load the cargo rack it should support the weight securely
  • Comfort is a bit consideration for me with electric bikes because I tend to ride further and at higher average speeds… so I really appreciate the ergonomic grips, adjustable-angle stem, and suspension fork… though the fork is very basic with only preload adjust (that has to be adjusted on each stanchion independently), lockout can be nice for solid paved surfaces to reduce bobbing and dive when stopping, it’s especially nice to have compression adjust with lockout if you’re a heavier rider
  • An integrated USB port on the right side of the battery pack allows you to charge phones, music players, and other portable electronic devices on the go or at home with the battery off the bike, it’s a useful feature but I’d recommend using a 90 degree adapter like this to keep the wire clean and safe from being kicked or bumped
  • Weighing in at about 55.6 lbs, this isn’t the heaviest nor lightest weight electric bike, but at least you can take the battery pack off for charging or transporting the bike, it locks securely with a key and slides in from the left vs. clicking down, this enables the lower top tube design
  • Since the derailleur and motor power cable are both positioned on the right side of the bike, near the right axle, it’s cool that VoltBike has added a derailleur guard to keep them from getting bumped in shipping and if the bike tips or is parked at a crowded rack where people might kick it accidentally
  • Even though the mechanical disc brakes are a little basic, the brake levers look and feel good because they are black and have a rubberized edge, they also have motor inhibitors built in to cut power to the bike when you make an emergency stop
  • When you purchase an electric bike from VoltBike, they throw in a DOT approved helmet for free, it’s a neat policy and the helmets come in a few different colors, as someone who cares about safety, I like this
  • I have a sensitive back and neck so the front suspension and possible upright bar position helps, but I might also swap the seat post with a 27.2 mm diameter suspension post like the Suntour NCX or Thudbuster ST but keep in mind, this raises the minimum saddle height by a few inches so it might not be the best plan for people who want to keep that saddle super low
  • I was really impressed that the LED lights are both integrated! This makes them less of a target for theft and reduces the time you have to spend when starting and stopping (turning them on and off)

Cons:

  • The matte black and matte white color schemes look unique and maybe trendy but they seem to show fingerprints and dirt more (especially the white), but I like that the white will be more visible at night vs. black
  • I like that the side of the chain cover has a section of reflective material (like a sticker) but wish that the tires also had some reflective accents, especially for the black frame, it’s a minor gripe but consider upgrading to the affordable Schwalbe Marathon GG RLX or the Schwalbe Marathon Plus which also has some puncture protection qualities
  • Minor consideration here, both wheels use bolts vs. a quick release system and this means that changing flats and performing maintenance requires more tools and time, consider using a small trunk bag like this for the charger and a multi-tool, and consider upgrading the tubes to pre-Slimed ones like this if you get flats frequently and bring a mini pump like this
  • There are no bottle cage bosses, so consider using a trunk bag with a bottle holster like this so you can stay hydrated… it’s not as easy to reach your water with a bag or pannier setup but there are drink holders like this to consider as well which might fit on the handlebar
  • The Elegant only comes in one frame size but I was able to raise the seat and use the adjustable stem to get full leg extension and a comfortable body position, I’m 5’9″ tall
  • The display panel is large and the control pad is easy to reach and use while riding but you cannot remove the display when parking so it could get scratched and faded over time, also, I have seen this specific button pad get messed up with clothing snagging the underside of the button cover and bending it up, just be delicate with it because it just doesn’t seem as tough as a fully rubberized pad or a different plastic design
  • Minor considerations here but worth mentioning, the Shimano Tourney drivetrain is the most basic low-end derailleur and cassette package and the shifting mechanism is pretty big and bulky on the handlebar, I also feel that the disc brakes are very basic and don’t allow for reach adjust or the same power as hydraulic brakes would, they are however, an upgrade from mechanical rim brakes and should stay cleaner, avoid touching the rotors so they don’t squeak
  • The plastic fenders produce a bit more noise when riding on rough terrain, the rear fender seemed a bit high above the wheel and did not connect to the rack hardware for extra support like some higher-quality solutions I have seen, some shops have told me that this type of fender can come loose or rub on the tires a bit more over time
  • Because of the more entry-level derailleur, the chain seemed a bit loose and bouncy, I also noticed that the chainstay did not have a plastic slap guard sticker on it and may chip (but the frame is Aluminum so it won’t rust, and it probably won’t be visible because of the chain cover)
  • Some of the electrical cables and wires were exposed at the bottom bracket (which isn’t uncommon, but one was a bit longer and seemed vulnerable), there’s not chain guide so the chain could still bounce off and would be tricky to re-seat because of the chain cover
  • Since the headlight is mounted on the sliding lowers of the suspension fork vs. the head tube or handlebar, it will bounce up and down on rough terrain which could create a bit of distraction or flashing view vs. steady and consistent, it might also bounce out of place or change the aim over time
  • The bike offers nine levers of assist by default… which is more than I prefer, especially with a basic urban bike like this with a 20 mph cap, the nine levels just mean you need to click more frequently which can be tedious, I love how the throttle overrides assist with full power at any level however

Resources:

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Gerard
1 month ago

I noticed this bike replaced the Crosscurrent Air in the ‘Best Affordable Electric Bikes for 2016/2017’ category. Two questions: why? And how do you think they compare with one another, given the base model Crosscurrent Air is cheaper?

Reply
Court Rye
1 month ago

For me, the lights, fenders, approachable frame, and still relatively low price point made this a standout. Also, I swap bikes in and out as the year progresses based on what’s new. As we get into 2018 I will continue to make adjustments and am always open to feedback and input! You could make your own list of standouts and post it in the forums. I feel like both companies are growing and doing a good job with customer support. Also, I had heard about some hardware issues with some Juiced Bikes this year but had not heard that about Voltbike.

Reply
Brendan
1 month ago

So is the Cross current still a good bike?

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Rodney
3 weeks ago

I've had the Nevo NuVinci for a little over a month. I'm not a prolific rider, but I've put a little over 100 miles on it (almost all of it on my 4-miles-each-way commute). In a word, I think the bike is fantastic. By way of background, I weigh 200 lbs and bought the larger frame with the Performance CX motor (20 mph top speed, 75 N•m of torque). The bike is built like a tank-- there's no flex of any sort that I can detect. The road to work is not in the best shape, lots of dimples, mini-potholes, uneven pavement, etc. I feel very secure going over it even at speed. There are a couple of downhill stretches where I've gotten it up to ~28 mph for several blocks and the thing is stable as can be. Additionally, I take my front wheel off every day at work (it's a Suntour quick release which, as far as I can tell, would require changing out the entire fork, etc. to change to a non-quick release) and it fits true every time I put it back on. No wobble or anything. The only minor gripe I have is that the front fender can scrape against the ground with the wheel removed-- I think mine has gotten very slightly misaligned as a result.

Things to watch out for: nothing, really. I bought it sight unseen, based on the video reviews here and at Citrus Cycles. In fact, I had never ridden any sort of electric bike before I received my bike, not even a test ride. It's a bit of an unusual sensation the first time you pedal with this thing as there's a very slight delay between your pedaling and the motor response. I notice it most at stop signs in Turbo mode when I start to pedal but have to stop for whatever reason, and the motor pulls me along for a split second before it cuts out. I don't think that' unique to this model, I'm sure every Bosch motor has the same issue. Anyway, it's really only noticeable in max assist-- anything less and it's not a problem. If you can stomach the cost, I highly recommend this bike. As best I can tell, it is one of the few bikes out there with: low-step frame; mid-drive motor; battery placed mid-frame. Those three were non-negotiable for me, which is how I came to this bike in the first place.

The one real consideration is how best to lock the bike. Because it's lacking a top tube, that eliminates a lot of options. Of course I use the built-in frame lock every time which should secure the rear wheel, and after a lot of time spent at thebestbikelock.com I decided I wanted the Kryptonite New York Fahgettaboudit Mini (link). However, with no top tube and a very thick down tube, the only place to use that lock is the seat tube. So that's one thing to keep in mind. The other issue is one I mentioned above, the difficult-to-replace quick release front wheel. You can bring it with you, and in fairness it is VERY easy to take off, but who wants to do that all the time? So I also picked up the Abus Bordo 6500 folding lock (link) that I use to lock the front wheel to the frame. With the battery removed, this lock will pass through the front wheel and the down tube; with the battery in place, it's not long enough so you have to fit the lock through the wheel and the gap between the head tube and the suspension fork. It's not the most elegant solution, but it works. In this way, you can secure your front & rear wheels and the bike itself. That's a lot of money to spend on locks, but as a percentage of the cost of the bike, not really.

If it seems like I dwelled on the locks, it's because that's the most important concern about this bike-- making sure I keep it in my possession! Everything else about it just works, and works beautifully. I'd be happy to answer any specific questions you might have.

Rom
4 weeks ago

I've had the Nevo NuVinci for a little over a month. I'm not a prolific rider, but I've put a little over 100 miles on it (almost all of it on my 4-miles-each-way commute). In a word, I think the bike is fantastic. By way of background, I weigh 200 lbs and bought the larger frame with the Performance CX motor (20 mph top speed, 75 N•m of torque). The bike is built like a tank-- there's no flex of any sort that I can detect. The road to work is not in the best shape, lots of dimples, mini-potholes, uneven pavement, etc. I feel very secure going over it even at speed. There are a couple of downhill stretches where I've gotten it up to ~28 mph for several blocks and the thing is stable as can be. Additionally, I take my front wheel off every day at work (it's a Suntour quick release which, as far as I can tell, would require changing out the entire fork, etc. to change to a non-quick release) and it fits true every time I put it back on. No wobble or anything. The only minor gripe I have is that the front fender can scrape against the ground with the wheel removed-- I think mine has gotten very slightly misaligned as a result.

Things to watch out for: nothing, really. I bought it sight unseen, based on the video reviews here and at Citrus Cycles. In fact, I had never ridden any sort of electric bike before I received my bike, not even a test ride. It's a bit of an unusual sensation the first time you pedal with this thing as there's a very slight delay between your pedaling and the motor response. I notice it most at stop signs in Turbo mode when I start to pedal but have to stop for whatever reason, and the motor pulls me along for a split second before it cuts out. I don't think that' unique to this model, I'm sure every Bosch motor has the same issue. Anyway, it's really only noticeable in max assist-- anything less and it's not a problem. If you can stomach the cost, I highly recommend this bike. As best I can tell, it is one of the few bikes out there with: low-step frame; mid-drive motor; battery placed mid-frame. Those three were non-negotiable for me, which is how I came to this bike in the first place.

The one real consideration is how best to lock the bike. Because it's lacking a top tube, that eliminates a lot of options. Of course I use the built-in frame lock every time which should secure the rear wheel, and after a lot of time spent at thebestbikelock.com I decided I wanted the Kryptonite New York Fahgettaboudit Mini (link). However, with no top tube and a very thick down tube, the only place to use that lock is the seat tube. So that's one thing to keep in mind. The other issue is one I mentioned above, the difficult-to-replace quick release front wheel. You can bring it with you, and in fairness it is VERY easy to take off, but who wants to do that all the time? So I also picked up the Abus Bordo 6500 folding lock (link) that I use to lock the front wheel to the frame. With the battery removed, this lock will pass through the front wheel and the down tube; with the battery in place, it's not long enough so you have to fit the lock through the wheel and the gap between the head tube and the suspension fork. It's not the most elegant solution, but it works. In this way, you can secure your front & rear wheels and the bike itself. That's a lot of money to spend on locks, but as a percentage of the cost of the bike, not really.

If it seems like I dwelled on the locks, it's because that's the most important concern about this bike-- making sure I keep it in my possession! Everything else about it just works, and works beautifully. I'd be happy to answer any specific questions you might have.

PCDoctorUSA
1 month ago

Hi, I just wanted to write a little non professional review of the E-Glide ST. This is my first E-bike and my decision was based on price, components compared to comparable priced E-bikes, and the two reviews done by EBR. One on the ST and also one on Dave and the E-Glide outfit in Santa Monica.

I received the bike overnight Fedex and it was pretty simple putting it together as long as you have some allen wrenches and a crescent wrench. I paid an additional 75.00 for the Schwable Marathon Mondial tires and I also received the Maxi Ardent off road tires that where originally on the bike. I wanted a more street orientated tire and I love the highly reflective sidewalls on the Mondials.

Since I received the ST on May 9th I've gone on 4 rides, all of them rides I could not have done on my Giant 15 speed bike due to distance, elevation, and today, heat. I'm 57 years old and I just don't have the endurance I once had. The bike is 52 lbs which is not that heavy for an E-bike and with the electric pedaling assist the additional weight just disappears. I also have a bag I hang on the rack that I keep a igloo cooler full of ice and drinks and don't even think of having to carry the extra weight.

The bike is a joy to ride. I can drive farther now then I could if I was 15 years younger on a standard bike. The cadence assisted power is great but since I never drove a torque assist bike or a mid-drive motor I don't have anything to compare it to. The rear hub drive with the cadence sensor works very well.

Now my three little nitpicks.

(1) The controller speedometer is exaggerated and so then is the odometer. I added my Garmin E-Trex to determine the actual speed. This is something I have run across on both my Suzuki motorcycle and Honda scooter. I don’t know why manufacturers of vehicles do that accept maybe due to liability issues. Today I changed the wheel size on the controller to 26 inch and that brought it closer to the actual speed. Next time I ride I’ll try to reset it to 24 inches and see what happens.

(2) The steering stem is not adjustable. The bike is comfortable right out of the box but being a little older I would like a little more relax position with the handlebars. The ST is designed to handle dirt roads so the riding position is a little more aggressive then a comfort bike. I would like the ability to move the bars a little up and back for my taste. The problem with the control cables are you do not have a lot of extra length to work with. Same as regular bicycles and motorcycles. I think if I could move the bars and inch up and inch back it would work for me. Something you might want to consider on your purchase is what type of riding you will be doing. I also want to point out I purchased the 21 inch frame since I’m 6’ 1” and have a 32 inch inseam.

(3) The gear ratio seems like it should be higher to me. The power assist has 5 levels and I have kept it in normal which there are also eco and power modes. Most of my riding I seem to be in 9th and 10th gear. With the power assist even set on level 1 I don’t seem to use the lower gears. I have to say in level 3 in 10th gear I’m pedaling at 18 mph. Sometime I get to the point where I’m cruising and I wish I had another gear or an overdrive. I have to pedal very fast when I’m going like 24 mph. Yes, depending on the road elevation decline you can go a good clip! Once again it may be a safety thing so you are limited on how fast you can get the bike up to. The lower gears would come in handy if you all of a sudden did not have the electric assist to get you home. I seem to feel I would like to pedal a little more leisurely at 18-20 mph.

So my early impression is I got a great bike for the price and it has opened up a whole new world of riding abilities. I'm just starting out on E-bikes but now I got my foot in the door and can start my learning curve. I was also looking at the Rad City by Rad Power as my 2nd choice and if you check out this EBR site there are a lot of great bikes out there to fit your budget. I did not have to pay any sales tax on the bike being out of state so the bike was 1700.00, tire upgrade 75.00 and overnight shipping 175.00 for a total purchase of 1950.00. I have two E-bike stores in my city and a comparable bike out the door would have been 3000.00.
Thanks for the great review. I'm looking for my first ebike, but am limited with my budget ceiling of $2k and a delivery disadvantage of being in Honolulu. Had planned on going with Juiced Bikes CrossCurrent S, but the local ebike shop that was carrying Juiced Bikes has since stopped due to issues with getting replacement parts and poor communication with JB. I've also been following the JB forums, and JB seems to be experiencing some quality control issues that can accompany popular products in high demand. I figured it may be best to look elsewhere while they work out their issues. I also looked at Biktrix and Rad Bikes, but they want $400 to ship their bikes. That left 2 models from Voltbike on my list: Elegant and Yukon 750.

Both models fit comfortably within my budget, but I'm not a fan of Elegant's step-thru design. The Yukon 750 looks awesome, but some have commented it's not the best option for a commuter while others love it. If I go with the Yukon, I know that the first thing I need to change are those aggressive tires. Definitely not a good choice for 100% asphalt riding. I've also had my share of flats along my route, and changing out the tube on a fat tire bike sounds like a bear. Still, I've had good communication with Voltbike, they're a well-respected outfit, and they'll only charge me $120 to ship either bike to Honolulu.

The E-Glide ST definitely meets all my requirements and with only $175 for shipping I'm just under $2k. I just sent an email to E-Glide to confirm the shipping charge along with a couple of other questions. For 100% asphalt travels, I'm thinking of going with the Schwalbe Big Ben Plus tire upgrade. Your thoughts?

Ian in Alberta
1 month ago

I bought a Mariner. It's a fun bike, and I love riding it. It's more versatile than the Elegant, perhaps, because of the fat tires and foldability.

PCDoctorUSA
2 months ago

Hello forum members. I apologize in advance if this thread is annoying or repetitive. I recently got a new job 8 miles from home in a very urban city. Flat terrain. I want to continue to bike to work but often work erratic hours and feel that perhaps an electric bike could alleviate some of the stress of the commute and work I do. I weigh 180lbs, am 5ft6in and appreciate visually appealing bikes. Budget is under 2k. Also, i like to haul cargo sometimes. Like a random trip tp grocery store or whatever. Can you recommend anything? Thank you for reading.
Your commute distance is the same as mine, but I've got a few rises in the road to deal with. The fact that your commute is flat terrain gives you a lot more options since you won't need a powerful motor. You can do a search on EBR and filter it by price to start. Once you've got a short list of contenders, check out their full review on EBR as well as user comments here on this forum and from YT posters.

I too am shopping for my first ebike and need to keep it under $2k. Since I need power for hill climbing, I looked at bikes with no less than a 500w "geared" hub. My short list came down to models offered by Juiced Bikes and Voltbike. For JB, it's there new CrossCurrent S. For Voltbike, it's between their Elegant and the really cool Yukon 750 Limited. Voltbike is an online vendor, and living in Hawaii, a trip to their store in Canada is a little out of the neighborhood for me to do a test drive. One of the local bike shops here used to carry Juiced Bikes but after having difficulty getting replacement parts from them he stopped. So, going with either bike will be based on my research and the reviews of others.

Have fun shopping and just ask the Forum if you have any questions.

CoachDennisGreen
2 months ago

It gives it a motocross type handlebar position that I like. Just had to punch a small hole in the end of the grip and you can't tell at all, it was aftermarket. I had a problem with mounting the fender with the fitting on the bottom of the right shock tube. I think I'll just attach it with a self treading screw. Not the most elegant solution , but it will work.

I like the bags a lot. And the seat looks comfy. I couldn’t get the front fender installed correctly either and I like the look without it even better. I could get both brackets installed under the forks but the bracket that went under the non-allen bolt was flush up against the side of the tire. Instead of bending the bracket out (and probably mangling it in the process), I just removed it. I’m not taking her off road as of now so I’ll be OK without the front fender. However, I am looking for some sort of guard to put over the mid drive to keep debris from front tire off it.

TForan
2 months ago

I had my handlebar backwards in error and fixed it, but now that it is OK to do it, I might switch it backward again for better reach as suggested. I also moved the included rear light to the back of the rack so it is more visible when stuff is on the rack. Did you have to cut the grip for the mirror? Are you going to put on the front fender? Rear basket looks good! Thanks for sharing.

It gives it a motocross type handlebar position that I like. Just had to punch a small hole in the end of the grip and you can't tell at all, it was aftermarket. I had a problem with mounting the fender with the fitting on the bottom of the right shock tube. I think I'll just attach it with a self treading screw. Not the most elegant solution , but it will work.

PCDoctorUSA
2 months ago

Check out Voltbike. Online ordering only and they ship out of Canada and the US. The Elegant is currently $1299 and Court was impressed with its performance during his recent test ride. It's got a step-thru design so it will be easy for both you and your wife.

As others have suggested a DIY build is another option to stay at $1k but make sure you thoroughly check out the manufacturer's product reputation before buying. The mid-drive kits look like the easiest to install, but I've never done one and my opinion is solely based from watching YT videos.

You could also look at buying a used ebike, but I would only do so from a reputable LBS (local bike shop) that offers some sort of limited warranty on your purchase. The last thing you want is to have something major go wrong a week after rolling out the door. Definitely ask how well the battery holds a charge because that would be the weakest link IMO. Like with a used laptop, it's the one component most sellers will make a point not to warranty. A local ebike shop I recently visited offered to let me rent the bike for a few days to help me decide. Unfortunately, the bike looked heavily abused and didn't impress me during my test ride so I passed.

Good luck and let us know what you end up with.

PCDoctorUSA
2 months ago

@IWantABike I'm in the hunt for my first ebike for commuting and since you mentioned the Surface 604 Rook you may want to consider the Voltbike Elegant for $1299, which looks nearly identical. Court Rye with EBR did a recent review on the Elegant, and though Court criticizes Voltbike's selection of entry level components from Shimano and Tektro, if you watch the video long enough into the actual test ride he becomes very impressed with the bike's performance. I've even asked Voltbike riders if they've had issues with these components and they've said, "no."

Like you, I was also considering the CrossCurrent S, but after speaking with a local ebike dealer here in Honolulu a few days ago I decided to move it further down my short list. He told me that he's experienced long delays in getting parts from them and communication has been poor. Being on an island out in the Pacific, and depending on my bike for commuting, I can't be waiting and wondering when a replacement part is coming. His experience may be isolated, but I take it into consideration nonetheless. As for the performance or quality of the bikes from JuicedBikes, he had nothing negative to say. The CrossCurrent S is definitely a feature-rich bike with a great look.

If you have any questions about the Elegant or anything else at Voltbikes, George Krastev is extremely prompt in responding. As far as I know, they only sell online although I think you can pick one up in person if you're near the distribution center in Burnaby, Canada or Blaine, WA. Otherwise, shipping is $70. Good luck!

indianajo
2 months ago

I see the voltbike elegant has a single frame, a 19". That is too big for me, and may be for you. The geared rear hub fits my riding style fine, spinning up grades or riding 15-20 mph in traffic. Gear hubs are not amazing at higher speeds, IMHO.
This company has electric bikes that can fit normal sized (1950 era, my size) people, with special features for kids: Like a wheel skirt to keep fingers out of spokes. http://yubabikes.com/product-category/electric-cargo-bikes
I would prefer the 26" wheel models to cut the shock of hitting potholes, but perhaps the pavement is perfect in your area. The tiny wheel tern would knock me off the saddle if I didn't stop and push it some places around here.
The extra room behind the seat could be useful for carrying both children at once, or child plus backpack for school, or maybe some groceries. I've got a huge set of steel baskets for my mountain bike, and that is not enough even for my weekly grocery shopping. Loading up the baskets lightens up the front wheel to 15-20 lb, and I've had trouble with dogs knocking me over when hitting the front wheel. A stretch rear evens up the load distribution somewhat. Search cargo bikes for other models & geometries. A bbcnews.com article yesterday (10/14) reviewed the use of cargo bikes with a wooden box in front in Cambridge UK to haul children around.

1/1
ancequay
2 months ago

Our second car is slowly dying, and we'd like to put off replacing it by buying an e-bike. (Not so much for financial reasons as because we're hoping there will be more all-electric SUV offerings in a few years.)

My husband and I would both be riding it. We're both 5'8", 120/140 lbs, and our commutes are <15 miles round trip with mild hills, all urban. We have two young kids, so need a rear rack for a for a child's seat. I often wear a skirt to work, so step through or mid-step. He doesn't want it to look like a girl's bike.

No fixed budget which is part of the difficulty. Willing to pay extra for features that will substantially improve the ride, but I don't know what those are. Current front-runner is the Voltbike Elegant. Thoughts?

PCDoctorUSA
2 months ago

@Mike Burns Your points are spot on about the impression of the step-thru Elegant vs the Yukon. I definitely think Voltbike could sweep the entry-level commuter market by designing a commuter bike with a more aggressive look with the same quality build as their other bikes and keep the selling price under $1500. Take the look of Prodecotech's Phantom XR and outfit it with a removable rear rack, fenders, and the rest of the Voltbike component package and I'll buy one today.

Regarding tires, I thought I had to stay with a 4" tire on such a wide rim. I guess that shows how much I know. If I go with the Yukon (hope to make a decision within the next few weeks), my plans were to have my LBS swap out the Kenda's for something quieter like the Origin8 Supercell tires. As for the Elegant, I wish Voltbike had made the rear rack removable instead of a weld-on. And while I don't have a problem with the step-thru frame, it does prevent me from putting it on my car's hanging bike rack if I need to transport it due to a roadside emergency or scheduled maintenance at my LBS. I thought maybe I could get around it by using one of those adapter bars that are made specifically for women's and kids' bikes, but most of them have a weight limit of under 40#.

Mike Burns
2 months ago

@Mike Burns Thank you for your insight. I love how cool the Yukon looks, but the Elegant is probably the more practical choice for my commute.

Everybody says the same thing. The Elegant is the right design mechanically but doesn't have the "attitude" or look that they want. Lots of people feel "dweeby" riding anything with a step-thru frame. I personally have no issue with the look and have never had a negative comment riding the flat-black Elegants.
No one makes a moderatly-priced, agressive-looking ebike with 2.5-3" tires. I will suggest such a mid-fat tire option on the Yukon/step-over Elegant to Voltbike. You could always put 26x2.5 Hookworms on the Yukon. I am using them on a 6000-watt full-suspension enduro bike conversion. Great traction on anything but snow, mud, sand, and deep loose gravel. Handle wonderfully on pavement even at 50 MPH. My daily driver ebike for 4 years.

PCDoctorUSA
2 months ago

@Mike Burns Thank you for your insight. I love how cool the Yukon looks, but the Elegant is probably the more practical choice for my commute.

Mike Burns
2 months ago

@Mike Burns I'm looking for my first ebike and Voltbike's offerings are definitely in my price range. I stumbled across Voltbike after seeing EBR's review of their Elegant model, but then got really interested in the Yukon. However, after reading some feedback on my recent post ("Any Yukon Commuters") I'm revisiting the Elegant. My biggest concern is how well the bike will hold up on the terrible roads over here. An elevated rail system is being built along my route so the roadway underneath is taking a beating from the heavy equipment. Riding on the sidewalk is illegal through business districts, which only encompasses a small portion of my route but that short time on the road can take a toll on a bike. Do you think the Elegant would hold up as a daily commuter?

Regarding the fenders, can they be removed? Is it possible to outfit it with better fitting fenders or modify the existing one enough so it's not an issue? In the EBR review of the Elegant, Court highlighted the flimsy fenders and their clearance.

If you have any experience with the Yukon 750, I'd love to hear your feedback on that post.

The Elegant should hold up fine. The frame is quite robust and the rack in welded on. The tires are wide enough to deal with rough roads without being so wide as to limit range. The battery and controller are identical to the Yukon. I can't comment on the long-term durability of the front fork but I haven't heard of any broken ones. As with any bicycle, check every single bolt when you buy it and every so often after that. Inspect your spokes regularly and keep them tensioned properly. If you have loose spokes, you will end up with bent wheels and broken spokes. Also, when you are about to hit a pothole or bump, get your butt off the saddle. Your legs are probably the best suspension out there! I see people and their bikes take jarring hits all the time that could have been avoided by rising off the saddle.

Fenders can easily be removed in less than 5 minutes. The front one is the problem. It is way too close to the tire. The back one visibly shakes (as do all bicycle fenders), but does not rattle or rub. Enlarging the slot on the front fender did not provide enough additional clearance. Reversing the metal bracket and positioning the fender above the fork brace instead of below works. You don't have road salt in Hawaii, so I would just remove it. I have ridden a bunch of fat bikes and owned one for a bit. If I was riding on the snow or sand, they are amazing. Might even consider a full-suspension one as my next normal off-road bike. Don't think they make great commuters because of the tires weird handling on pavement handling and their effect on range. I think 2-2.5" tires are the sweet spot for commuters with variable road conditions.

SuperGoop
2 months ago

No, I don’t have the Elegant. Looks like good value.

PCDoctorUSA
2 months ago

@SuperGoop Did you ever get an Elegant? I haven't crossed the Yukon 750 off my list as a commuter, but your comments and others did get me to revisit my short list and the Elegant was on it. Any thoughts on the Elegant as my commuter? I don't mind spending a $100 - $200 to change out a few components to get it right. I do wish the top tube was more of a conventional slope so I could haul it on my hanging rack when necessary.

PCDoctorUSA
2 months ago

@Mike Burns I'm looking for my first ebike and Voltbike's offerings are definitely in my price range. I stumbled across Voltbike after seeing EBR's review of their Elegant model, but then got really interested in the Yukon. However, after reading some feedback on my recent post ("Any Yukon Commuters") I'm revisiting the Elegant. My biggest concern is how well the bike will hold up on the terrible roads over here. An elevated rail system is being built along my route so the roadway underneath is taking a beating from the heavy equipment. Riding on the sidewalk is illegal through business districts, which only encompasses a small portion of my route but that short time on the road can take a toll on a bike. Do you think the Elegant would hold up as a daily commuter?

Regarding the fenders, can they be removed? Is it possible to outfit it with better fitting fenders or modify the existing one enough so it's not an issue? In the EBR review of the Elegant, Court highlighted the flimsy fenders and their clearance.

If you have any experience with the Yukon 750, I'd love to hear your feedback on that post.

PCDoctorUSA
2 months ago

@SuperGoop Thanks for the feedback. Locking the bike up will not be an issue because anyone that locks their bike outdoors in Honolulu may as well leave the key in the lock because it will be gone before the saddle cools off. The high cost of living in "Paradise" results in a very high property crime rate. My current bike is parked indoors at home and then inside my company's secure first-floor IT office at work. I looked at the Urban, but I'm not confident that it's small frame would hold up on our roads and it didn't look comfortable to ride 16 miles a day. Do you think the Urban would do better than the Elegant?

jharlow77
3 months ago

After a week at the shop and new battery mounts installed from Juiced, my power drop issues have vanished and loving the bike. My wife just got a Faraday, however, and even though my Air is more powerful and better range the Faraday is SO much more elegant and light and just feels tight and high quality but of course you pay for that!

harryS
3 months ago

I like the Cross Current line because (a) it is affordable (b) can be upgraded and (c) has more tech features. They also have different frame sizes, but you'll probably want the largest one at 17".

I also hear that Voltbike customers are happy too. The Elegant only has one frame size, but it's also 17".

I believe they perform the same. A bike is a bike. Get what you think will fit the best. Brakes, shifters, and derailleurs are easily adjusted or replaced for little money if they are junk. Ditto for tires. You can replace a seat if it's uncomfortable. My GT Transeo came with sandpaper like handlebar grips. I suffered for a year. Then I spent $8 to replace them.

The other criteria is you want that bike delivered by his birthday next month, so maybe delivery time is most important.

jml
3 months ago

Hey!

My dad will be celebrating his 70th birthday next month and my siblings and I are looking to get him an electric bike for a birthday/retirement gift. He's about 6'2" and he definitely prefers an upright ride and really values comfort.

Our budget is around $1,500 (which I know doesn't go too far in this arena), but we're looking for suggestions on what might be the best fit for him. I've done some research, but I'm having a tough time pulling the trigger on anything since I'm brand new to electric bikes and I've never really heard anything of the available brands in that price range.

Some we're considering:

Populo Lift
Crosscurrent Air (replacing the stem wth an adjustable stem to make it more upright)
VoltBike Elegant

Any suggestions would be awesome! Thanks!

Mike Burns
3 months ago

EBR just posted a review today. There is a link to it on the Voltbike website. I just unpacked and assembled three black ones this afternoon that will be part of a rental/tour fleet. The frame is strong and nicely finished. The battery is solidly mounted and east to charge and remove. The rack is extremely sturdy. The display is nice and its control pad is responsive. Backlight comes on then the lights are turned on. I changed the settings from km/hour to MPH and the pedal-assist from 1-9 to 0-9 to provide a no assist with display plus throttle setting. Only rode one for a half mile before it started to rain but the bike went to 20 MPH easily (I am 6'/188 pounds) and climbed a reasonably steep hill without pedaling. Throttle was smooth. Brakes seem fine for this type of bike and the brakes and gears were well adjusted out of the box on the one I rode. My initial impression is that motor performance and sound is in the same league with the current Pedegos. I cannot envision doing any assembly or repair with the tools that come with this or most any other bike (Except one Northrock that came with acceptable tools). Carry a hex tool and wrenches for the wheels. I think that the only area of concern will be the fenders. They are of nice quality with breakaway safety stays and a cool mudflap but the clearance on the front is extremely tight and may require frequent adjusting to avoid rubbing. At the advice of Voltbike, I enlarged the slot on the fender where it contacts the suspension fork to get a bit more clearance. I have never seem any bicycle fenders that are non irritating in some way. I will add more comments when they have been ridden more and I get to play with the advanced settings.

Update: Took one out today for a shakedown cruise. Running the battery to empty took exactly 35 miles mostly in top gear on pedal-assist level 7 in very hilly terrain including about 2 miles rolling terrain throttle only and a few 0-20 full-throttle runs. I was also impressed by the brakes. Tektro has several different brake-pad compounds and I suspect that this bike has the high-friction ones. I was never wishing for better brakes on the Elegant and I have 203 mm multi-piston hydraulics on my 60 MPH bike. Handles well as a bike. Decent balance between stability and maneuverability.
No issues except a rubbing front fender.

dermbrian
3 months ago

The ShareRoller, if it's ever available, is still the type of answer I'm looking for. Like you, I want a bicycle that is extremely rideable without the assist and has the assist when I want it (hot days, on my way to work). But I want to be able to remove the power plant and bring it inside when I park the bike at the supermarket or work. That's where something like the ShareRoller comes into play. Rubbee is keeping their next add-on motor/battery system under wraps, but I expect it will be an elegant solution. The questions are when and how much......

Brian

Smurdle450
4 weeks ago

Quick note; the pedal assist levels can be adjusted. You can program it for 3,5, or 9 levels of assist, in that little setup menu you talked about.

David Macdonald
1 month ago

To be honest court I think you were a bit critical of this bike it seems to be a lot a very reasonable price very nice frame and quite frankly you are pretty nit picky.

med B Y
1 month ago

how much does it run on throttle only and can you buy a new battery in case the original one breaks down ?

Jacques Gravelle
2 months ago

geez, cort , i cant find any specs on the battery, volts, amperage.

fromkentucky
2 months ago

A narrow-wide chainring would keep it secure.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 months ago

Great point

xyrenx
3 months ago

Hello, I'd like to start off by saying thank you for all your videos! I'm on the verge of buying my first electric bike and your vids are helping to narrow down my choices, but before I take the leap I was curious how well this bike fairs in rain? I live in Seattle and unfortunately being the rainy city it's almost guarenteed I'll be stuck in a wet spot at some point.

Smurdle450
2 months ago

No prob. VoltBike was very good, and responded to my question within the hour of asking. These guys seem to care about their customers.(Or, even people like me: Soon-to-be customers.)

xyrenx
2 months ago

Smurdle450 Dude really appreciate you finding that info! I'm getting this on my next paycheck and a little nervous about dropping the bills, but this brings some reassurance.

Smurdle450
2 months ago

I reached out to Voltbike with the same question, and this is my response, quoted. "VoltBike Elegant is using waterproof components and is fine to ride in rain. The battery is partially build inside the frame.
I would not recommend however to store under the rain. Always store your bike under cover. Otherwise it will be fine to ride in the rain."

So it looks like that it can be ridden in the rain!

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

Great question, I cannot say for sure because I only tested a new model, but sometimes the cheaper bottom brackets and headsets aren't sealed and can start to squeak after getting wet. If you use some lubricants it could help, I think there are sprays and also just some cleaners... at least this model is a bit more affordable so as it wears down naturally you can afford to fix parts or maybe even replace it sooner. Maybe people in the forums would know if they own it: https://electricbikereview.com/forum/forums/voltbike/

Raj Singh
3 months ago

how many price in indian price, & how can get i

Raj Singh
3 months ago

and automatice recharge systam it

Raj Singh
3 months ago

and accessories

Mexica, Eagle Warrior
3 months ago

Nice bike, with a few upgrades this will still be Way under name brand bikes

daMacroGuy
3 months ago

Good review as always. That rear fender was all over the place when traveling on uneven surfaces. With the crappy asphalt roads here in Hawaii, I'd have to re-engineer that fender before it drove me nuts. Front fenders are a non-starter for me since the bike carriers on Honolulu's transit buses clamp down on the front wheel. I'm sure Volt could have done a better job on the fenders and still kept their $1299 price point. Still, I'd consider this Volt before spending nearly a $1k on a DIY with a Golden Motor Edge rear hub conversion kit on my existing Trek FX 7.2. I think I'll hold out a little longer until I see the Cross Current S at the local dealership. Got to get it right for my first ebike!

daMacroGuy
3 months ago

Hawaii residents definitely get screwed on shipping fees. The good news is I emailed VoltBike and George Krastev in Sales and Technical Support informed me they would ship to Hawaii for an additional $50 on top of their usual shipping fee of $70. In comparison, I was looking at the RadRover ebike and Rad Power Bikes wants $400 because they ship by UPS Air. The "Ship To Hawaii" freight forwarding service is not an option because they won't ship ebikes with Lithium Ion batteries.

Jon Neet
3 months ago

daMacroGuy, since you live on Oahu, and I live on the big Island near Hilo, we both deal with very wonky shipping fees. Some ebike makers DON"T SHIP TO HAWAII period. And probably not to Alaska either. More and more Amazon stuff won't ship to me in Hawaii too. I'm also looking at bikes like 3-4 Vilano ebikes from Walmart. But Walmart doesn't do the ship to store on Hawaii Island (maybe the whole state).

daMacroGuy
3 months ago

Any plans on updating your reviews on the bikes from Prodecotech? The Phantom XR was another one I was strongly considering.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

I'll be reviewing the CrossCurrent S soon (filmed, but holding since they are low on inventory), it's a great ebike :)

William Aung Leyraud
3 months ago

Thanks for your review Court, I ended up ordering their urban folding bike. Can't wait to receive it. Have you seen the Loud Bycicle Horn? It's like a car horn for bycicles. Looks good stuff. Keep on making great reviews!

Jon Neet
3 months ago

One consideration when you live in the states of Hawaii and 'or Alaska is shipping. In my case, I don't have mail delivery to my house, and use a Post Office box. The Post Office has limits on size and weight that they will deal with. If I order something from Amazon, and it's too large to put in my little PO box, they hold tha package at the post office and i pick it up. Here is what I'm getting at. If I tried to order, say an Everly 202 non-folding bike, the size of the package would probably be too large for the Post Office to deal with. BUT, some of these more compact folding bikes, I bet could be ordered to my Post Office box, and they would hold it for me to pick up. The Everly would have to be shipped UPS or Fedex, and the cost would probably be much higher for the shipping. Just one other consideration.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

Hey William, I heard about those horns! Be careful not to blow your own ears out XD and yeah, I hope the folding VoltBike works great for you once it arrives, feel free to post about it in the EBR forums, I think I reviewed the fat folding model from them and liked it

Lynn Recker
3 months ago

Court, you mentioned that the software controller allows a person to lower the speed for the bike (in all or select?) levels of pedal assist. May I suggest a reason why that might be desirable. You often mention often that you enjoy the idea of using the throttle to get that 'push' off of a stop (stop sign/light, etc). There could be people for whom an electric bike in a level of pedal assist (as chosen by the user) offers that same boost to their cycling experience. Such a person might be able (and happy) to move their ebike at 10-15mph without any pedal assist in a commute or well-travelled circuit and only desire any motor pedal assist from standstills or on the occasional hill at a lower speed. It's sort of more to the human side of the human/electric hybid idea in using an ebike. The only thing I would hope that the bike would allow would be that one could lower that top speed in just one (any one) selected pedal assist level. And with 9 this bike would allow for a good selection in which one could tailor your commute/circuit (or multiple circuits) to the pedal assist level and if a higher speed is neccessary one could simply change the pedal assist level (if changing the speed doesn't do it in all). Just an idea about lowering that speed.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

Interesting, thanks for the feedback, I think that each control setup has a different strength (like safety, full power, instant control) but there's always a trade-off. I try to communicate consistently from my own point of view, and it's okay if that is different from what someone else wants, maybe seeing or hearing "my way" helps to establish what different is and why something else might be better. Anyway, thanks for sharing Lynn :)

NFmangatoo
3 months ago

This bike has a lot of features. I think it’s a nice bike. Nice video.

Jon Neet
3 months ago

Do you ship to Hawaii 96749?

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

Thanks! I do my best to be thorough and fair when reviewing :)

VoltBike
3 months ago

Yes, Voltbike Elegant is great commuter. It comes with large LCD screen, Badang motor, Tektro Disc brakes...all well recognized components.

Olivier Sourie
3 months ago

Will you be visiting Chris in NY again this autumn? Have you seen the new Delite and Supercharger form R&M? It would be nice to see a review of these bikes form you!

Olivier Sourie
3 months ago

Hi Court, yes I did see that episode with Heiko Müller. Very nice to see him and his wife visiting NY and talking about the philosophy and future of R&M!! You really should come to Europe and see how all these ebike brands do in our region.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

Hi Olivier! Yeah, I'm pretty sure we'll be hanging out again soon, filming the latest and greatest. R&M has been easy to work with and I enjoyed meeting Heiko at the event in Brooklyn that Chris put on. Did you see that video?

vernon gordon
3 months ago

I thought this was a Surface 604 Rook at first glance, however the differences are quite obvious.Great review again. Keep up the good work.

VoltBike
3 months ago

Yes, the frame is the same as on the Rook model which is using down-tube battery. However our main purpose was to build more affordable bike while still using brand name components like Tektro, Shimano, Bafang and Samsung. Customers can always upgrade those down the road if required without spending twice as much.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

Yeah... the build quality is different, I still think Surface 604 offers great value and has a beautiful product (I like their paint jobs better) but it's nice to see a cheap alternative as well

Dave's Outdoors Adventures
3 months ago

Hi Court,Nice buget class 2 bike for the newbie in to the electric bike community .The tires are cheap but you can get schwable tires 26x2.0 with k guard from £12-£16 / $15-$20 each (not a deal breaker ) from ebay/amazon.Nice head unit/motor,many standard parts from any bicycle outlet.cheap as chip = many happy miles......... :) ATB,Dave

Dave's Outdoors Adventures
3 months ago

Hi Court,Yes.true.The last pair of Maxxis tires I had was back in the day,about in 2002 when I was 32yrs old(yes,32yrs old) was 26x 3.00.. on a kind of predecessor to 4" fat tire of modern day.
I bought a alloy "custom" plain yellow frame and built a custom bike with rear flaired chain stay,16" hard tail,ridge 1" black forks(not 1/8"),Wide flat 1/8" handlebars,2 finger V brakes with 1"to 1/8" quill,32 "ish" tooth front single cog,a rear 7 speed std free wheel,a tiny selle royal seat at the lowest setting (being only a 5f 4" power lifter,then) ,all black accessories, shimano sis gears,26" all black alloy wheels.
Not electric,mmmm..... Electric,that was just a dream back then,a very expensive idea.Carrying lead acid batteries ,NO thanks.
I suppose compared to today's bikes it was a slimmed down version of a fat bike/ jump bike/ beach cruiser style ,15 years ago.costing me about £500/$650+ from just a frame,a 1 off build.
I built my first frankenstein bike in the late 1970's,I was about 8 years old with my dad's help out of 3 or 4 other bikes.
my latest creation is on my youtube page,my electric bike class 1 conversion kit
ATB,Dave

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

Thanks Dave, yeah! I think reflective tires and those with K-Guard would be worth considering but the Maxxis tires here have Silkworm protection, so at least it's not super basic hardware

Daniel S.
3 months ago

Yeah price is really nice in this one. For commuting only seems a very nice option. I like it. Nice

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

Yeah, the price is excellent... still not as cheap as Ebay or some DIY stuff but you get support and a longstanding company vs. an unknown. I feel like this product would be great for college students, or just neighborhood riding. I was very impressed that the lights are integrated

G Abesames
3 months ago

Thank you for all your e bike reviews. I watched them all in trying to decide which to purchase and learn about them. I initially had a Hype from Juiced bikes already in my cart, but they upped the price that went over my budget just before I hit the buy button. lol.... I actually ended up, ironically enough, with an e bike you haven't yet reviewed, an M2S All Terrain Kush. I'm now awaiting for delivery ETA the 15th of Sept. 2017. I based my decision mostly on your insights and discussions to formulate my choice. I hope I chose well, and again thank you very much for your reviews. Cheers, Greg

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

Ahh, yeah I'm getting a lot of feedback about M2S and hope to review them eventually. The founder was in contact with me earlier this year but unfortunately I was too busy to fly out. I hope it arrives in great shape and works well for you. Glad to hear my reviews helped paint a picture that you could use to make an educated purchase. That's my real goal. Rock on Greg :D

Bruce Ballad
3 months ago

wow. This is a really nice package for the price.
I have some interest in bafang kits. They are easy to fix and find parts of them. They are modular and inter changeable too. You can change the screen with a colour one or smaller one and you can change the motor with a bigger or smaller one.

Normally you use a bafang as a conversion kit. So you have exposed battery, cables and ugly look. But this bike has the purpose build frame and the parts on it also offer every thing in a level. I can't think a part that you need to buy to complete this bike. It has even a charging port and adjustable stem. Those are exactly my taste of quality of life touches.

Of course, you can always change the parts with their better variations. It is a complete starter bike. I am really impressed. Man, I want one.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

Yeah, I'll be covering the CrossCurrent S soonish

HulkGTR
3 months ago

Bruce Ballad for a little bit more you can get a juiced cross current s..www.juicedbikes.com

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

Yeah, I think they offered a good blend here, kept it affordable but still made it look nice and work well

Yes Yes
3 months ago

Is this a female bike? I read somewhere the reason the frame above pedals is dropped like that because in 1900s ladies wore skirts and that made it easy for them to ride bikes. It made frame less durable but manufacturers still kept this style even though skirts aren't in fashion anymore.

Jon Neet
3 months ago

In my case, I blew out my right knee about a year ago. I then sold my single speed bike to my daughter. Been considering an ebike. If I use it on pedal assist all the time, hopefully it might even help my knee over time. But, also, throwing that right leg with the bad knee over a motorcycle or bicycle could be a problem for me. So, maybe a "girls" bike/lowered top frame member would be best for me.

Robert Harrigan
3 months ago

Bikes don't reproduce. Therefore, there's no such thing as a female bike. If you like having to throw your leg over the rear wheel, and you don't mind having a BAR right under your balls, then, by all means, buy a bike with a high cross bar. But as for me, knowing that at some point I might have to stop my bike, I like being able to simply stand like a normal human being, and not have to lean-fall the bike to one side, for fear of having my aforementioned balls squished by the aforementioned high cross bar. Europeans invented bicycles. They invented them with what we now call "Step through" framing. Le Tour de France popularized the high crossbar look, but everyone in Europe knows that this is inconvenient, dangerous and only for racing, so it is absurd to buy one with a crossbar.

daMacroGuy
3 months ago

Buy what works for you and not what looks cool to others. For example, I bought a $25 rear basket for my Trek to hold my cheap backpack instead of spending $150 on some cool looking fancy pannier backpack. I may not be accepted by the Team Lycra bunch, but I saved $125 and the basket works great.

Jon Neet
3 months ago

And dudes like me with a gimpy right knee.

Jacoby Dakota
3 months ago

not female anymore , think of dads , childseat is the Keyword here :)

Yes Yes
3 months ago

Bro can you please review one of those generic Ancheer or whatever they go by now on Amazon. Wal-Mart sells them too. Mountain bike and folding one. I know it's cheap parts but I'm still waiting on that review.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

Noted, the reason I haven't covered them yet is that I have like 35 other bikes that were filmed during a trip... and Interbike is just around the corner, so I'm overloaded and just haven't seen Ancheer in person either. I'm trying to save money for the trip vs. spending on a bike to review and then resell. I appreciate you following up and asking about this though!