Ridekick Power Trailer Review

2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Review
2015 Ridekick Electric Bike Trailer
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Brushed Chain Drive Motor
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer 3 Digit Combination Lock
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Velcro Throttle Attachment
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Back
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Hitch Mount From Above
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Electric Ride
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Easy Connect Hitch
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Disassembled
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Chain Drive System
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Cast Aluminum Rims
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Cable Lock Example
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Hitch Plate And Leash
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Trigger Throttle
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Usb Charger Display Panel
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Inside Empty
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Integrated Led Light
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Vertical Parking And Locking
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Loaded With Bags
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Parked Upright
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer View From Above
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer With Catrike Recumbent
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Side View
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer With Groceries
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Top
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Recumbent Ebike
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer At Rocky Mountain Recumbent In Fort Collins Co
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Review
2015 Ridekick Electric Bike Trailer
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Brushed Chain Drive Motor
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer 3 Digit Combination Lock
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Velcro Throttle Attachment
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Back
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Hitch Mount From Above
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Electric Ride
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Easy Connect Hitch
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Disassembled
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Chain Drive System
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Cast Aluminum Rims
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Cable Lock Example
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Hitch Plate And Leash
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Trigger Throttle
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Usb Charger Display Panel
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Inside Empty
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Integrated Led Light
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Vertical Parking And Locking
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Loaded With Bags
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Parked Upright
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer View From Above
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer With Catrike Recumbent
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Side View
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer With Groceries
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Top
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer Recumbent Ebike
2015 Ridekick Power Trailer At Rocky Mountain Recumbent In Fort Collins Co

Summary

  • An affordable, electric powered bike pushing trailer with integrated LED light, USB charger and locking lid for hauling groceries or other items around town
  • Keeps weight low and separate from the bicycle which improves handling, easy and fast to disconnect for storage or transport, integrated metal loop locking point, quick and easy to swap between different bikes (optional extra mounts)
  • Excellent choice for recumbent bikes, solid year long warranty, several battery options for extended rangeor reduced weight, louder than most purpose-built electric bikes

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Ridekick

Model:

Power Trailer

Price:

$699 USD ($1,365 with Lithium Battery Option)

Suggested Use:

Urban, Commuting, Neighborhood

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

2015

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

42.5 lbs ( 19.27 kg ) (38 lbs with LiFePO4 Battery)

Battery Weight:

18.5 lbs ( 8.39 kg ) (13 lbs for LiFePO4 Battery)

Geometry Measurements:

Dimensions: 16" High x 24" Wide x 36" Long

Frame Colors:

Orange Tubing with Gray Plastic Shell

Rims:

APSE Cast Aluminum Alloy

Tire Brand:

Extra Thick, 12.5" x 3", Recommended 35 PSI

Wheel Sizes:

12 in ( 30.48 cm )

Tire Details:

Recommended 35 PSI

Accessories:

Extra Quick Release Hitch Plate and Throttle $50, Replacement SLA Battery $125 (Estimated 400 Charge Cycles), Replacement LiFePO4 Battery $795 (Estimated 1,500 Charge Cycles), Built-in UL Certified 1.5 Amp Smart Charger with LED Status and USB Port for Charging Electronics and Upgrading Firmware, Removable Locking Lid (3 Digit Combination), Optional Additional Hitch Plates (For Use with Multiple Bikes), Integrated LED Rear Light

Other:

Cargo Volume: 41.8 Liters Up to 75 lbs, 300 RPM Motor, Scrolling Diagnostic Display, 15 Minute Automatic Power Off

Electronic Details

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Gearless Motor (1" Brushed Design, Drives the Left Axle/ Wheel with a Short Chain)
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Battery Brand:

Elite Power Systems from Arizona for LiFePO4 Prismatic Cells

Battery Voltage:

24 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

12 ah (Optional 20 ah LiFePO4)

Battery Watt Hours:

288 wh (Optional 480 wh LiFePO4)

Battery Chemistry:

Sealed Lead Acid (Optional Lithium Iron Phosphate)

Charge Time:

5.5 hours (3.5 for LiFePO4)

Estimated Min Range:

10 miles ( 16 km )

Estimated Max Range:

15 miles ( 24 km )

Display Type:

LED Console and Readout

Readouts:

On/Off, Alert, Scrolling Diagnostic Display

Display Accessories:

Fuse, USB Power Outlet

Drive Mode:

Trigger Throttle (Mounts with Velcro Straps to Either Bar, Variable Speed Digital Throttle that Stops on Release)

Top Speed:

19 mph ( 31 kph )

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Written Review

The first time I saw a Ridekick Power Trailer was at Interbike 2012 but the company has actually been in business since 2010. The founding team, Dee and Mark Wanger, wanted to built an alternative ebike system that could be shared easily between the different bikes in their family, from parents to kids or even friends. They purchased the rights to an existing ebike trailer design called the Bidwell Pusher and engineered something truly unique and professional of their own. the Pusher was basically an instructions kit for converting an electric kick scooter into a platform that could “push” a bike with the option of adding a simple plastic storage tub on top. What Ridekick has done with the Power Trailer design is leverage Mark’s mechanical, electrical and software engineering skill set (forged at CSU, UCSB and MIT) to deliver a ready-made, great looking and affordable machine. The Ridekick will work with nearly any bicycle (road, mountain, tandem or recumbent), offers a three-combination lock for securing cargo and an integrated USB charger and LED safety light. You get all of this for well under $1,000 plus a one year warranty. It’s not as quiet as most purpose-built electric bikes I’ve tested, due in part to the plastic shell and chain-drive motor system, but it’s surprisingly strong and effective with a top speed of ~19 mph and 10+ mile range depending on the battery option you choose. For those who have been following the company, in 2014 they paused manufacturing to improve supply chain logistics and refine the controller board which had failed for some users on previous generations. All faulty controllers were replaced free of charge by Ridekick, even those out of warranty :)

Driving this unique electric bike pusher “trailer thing” is a 500 watt brushed DC motor. Many people recoil with the mention of “brushed” motors but Mark assured me that the motor they chose has long, durable brushes and is an ideal choice for powering the unit. He and Dee both have original Ridekicks with over 2,000 miles each… The motor is inset along the bottom of the plastic shell for protection and one end protrudes just enough to turn a chain that connects directly to a sprocket on left axle. The gearing is designed to “step down” RPM so the motor can spin quickly (which is more efficient) and generate power for zippy starts and hill climbing. It’s simple but well executed and seems to be very durable, even in wet conditions (which we saw in while filming the video review above). Over time, the left tire will wear more quickly because that’s where all of the power is being applied to the concrete but it’s fairly easy to swap with the right wheel, just like rotating the tires on cars.

Powering the Ridekick is a 24 volt battery system that comes in 12 amp hours or 20 amp hours depending on the chemistry you go with. The smaller Sealed Lead Acid option comes standard and is much less expensive, the MSRP of the Ridekick with this battery is $699 and replacement packs are just $125! Weighing in at ~18 pounds, the SLA pack is much heavier than other electric bike batteries I’ve tested but the additional weight serves to increase traction and “pushing power” through the wheel. With this basic pack you get about 10 miles of range and if you add a second pack in parallel it just about doubles. With 75 pounds of cargo hauling capacity to work with, even if you bought two extra batteries for a ~30 mile range you’d still have 35 pounds to work with for groceries, books or a laptop in the cargo hold area. The alternative premium battery option uses Lithium Iron Phosphate cells and offers a ~20 mile range. This pack is physically larger than a single SLA but weighs just 13 pounds. This pack sounds awesome in terms of performance but at $799 (or $1,365 with the unit) it may not be worth it for some. Frankly, the SLA works great and even though it will get fewer charge cycles (estimated 400 vs. 1,500) you could still buy four of these and come out ahead on charges and cost savings. The one caveat here is in cold weather environments where SLA will only output ~40% capacity while LiFePO4 will offer more like 60%+ just based on how the different chemistry performs. Sealed Lead Acid batteries are very recyclable, often made from 60%+ recycled material to begin with, and use materials that are not mined and shipped from politically sensitive areas of the world like Lithium often is. I really like the custom fabric bags (with carry straps) that Ridekick uses for their packs to make them easier to transport and charge separately from the main unit. When you take the battery out of the Ridekick, the trailer itself only weighs ~20 pounds and is modular so you can take the hitch arm and lid completely off for easy storage or transport. Another little extra from Ridekick is that the LiFePO4 batteries are designed with an integrated fuse to reduce premature failure. Both batteries are designed to have zero draw when unplugged from the unit which helps them maintain a high state of charge during long periods of disuse.

Operating the Ridekick electric bike trailer is very simple but the feedback you get while riding is extremely limited. Basically, one wire runs from the controller inside the trailer to your handle bars where the throttle is mounted. There’s a quick disconnect point where the trailer mates with the hitch plate at the bike axle which is nice. to secure the wire and variable speed trigger system you get several velcro straps that are pretty sturdy. Once it’s all plugged in and the unit is powered on (in the rear by the battery) the spring loaded throttle must be compressed and held to make the bike go. While it doesn’t take much effort to pull, it may require some adjustment in hand positioning and some good thought in how you mount it can really pay off. Most thumb throttles on traditional ebikes are little paddles that must be pushed along a semi-circular mounting plate with your thumb. The Ridekick throttle by comparison is more of a little squeeze system that could be activated with a thumb, forefingers or even your palm. It’s about the size of a large paperclip. The downside, as alluded to earlier, is that there aren’t any LED battery indicators or a speedometer or trip distance readout on the throttle, it’s just a black piece of plastic. To get any sort of feedback from the battery and electronics systems you need to open up the Ridekick and look at the display panel inside. Here you’ll find a fuse and an LED readout that reports any errors. There’s an on/off button, a battery light, charging port and a USB port that can be used with portable electronics devices! I actually used this while filming (because the video went very long) and it worked great. Another neat feature here is a 15 minute timer that automatically beeps and shuts the Ridekick down to conserve batteries if the throttle has gone inactive.

The Ridekick product and company are unique and special to me. The Power Trailer itself, much like other electric bikes, is not suited to every application and probably not ideal for most. It’s a compromise of utility, convenience and affordability. You can build a quieter, more powerful recumbent electric bike with an aftermarket BionX kit like this one and enjoy throttle mode, four levels of assist and regeneration with greater range while still carrying a Burly trailer (or similar) loaded with more gear… but you won’t be able to swap it as easily between bikes and it will cost a fortune by comparison.

I love how easily this thing connects, the tilt-up parking feature and integrated lock loop. A full year warranty is solid for any electric bike but seeing how well the team has supported this thing and how happy customers has been inspiring. If you’re a recumbent cyclist who needs to carry along some gear or maybe just a regular cyclist who wants to use their existing bike and still take it out un-electrified at times, then this could be an excellent option. It’s full of possibilities and that’s why the video I shot went so long. It’s over-engineered for strength, handsome and sleek in terms of design and surprisingly zippy and fun to ride with.

Pros:

  • Thick rubber tires should resist flats and the cast aluminum rims won’t go out of true like spoked wheels often do over time, they can support a lot of weight (as shown in the video)
  • Convenient locking storage space offers enough room for two medium sized grocery bags, the weight of stored items is kept separate from the bike which improves handling for riders and doesn’t introduce the same back and neck stresses of wearing a backpack
  • Impressive control unit (updated for improved reliability for 2015) features scrolling diagnostic readout, replaceable fuse and a USB charging port
  • Very affordable, less expensive than many electric bike kits which don’t look as good, aren’t as easy to switch between bicycles and don’t offer integrated storage features
  • May different battery options for extending range (one additional SLA for just $125) or reducing weight and saving space (one additional LiFePO4 for $799)
  • Responsive customer service, Ridekick is a family owned and operated business in Colorado that has been around since 2012 and has often delivered beyond their stated warranty
  • Decent power and speed for an untraditional setup, range goes from 10 miles up and the top speed of 19 mph is easy to reach with the 500 watt motor
  • Hitch system takes under one minute to connect or disconnect and has a nice metal spring for easy flex when turning, the added safety leash is a quality touch
  • Very easy to transport and store, the battery comes in a fabric bag that can be taken out on its own, the unit itself can be tipped upright for vertical storage or to keep out of the way at bike racks
  • Surprisingly durable, holds up well and keeps the internal systems (and your gear) safe and dry even in snowy and wet conditions
  • Variable speed trigger throttle is intuitive and simple to use, can be mounted nearly anywhere on any type of bike for optimal comfort (standard flat bars, cruiser bars, vertical bars on recumbents, drop bars etc.)
  • Works with most electric bikes including hybrid, mountain or recumbent and can even be used with some kick scooters
  • Two of the SLA or two of the LiFePO4 batteries can be connected in parallel for increased range
  • Impressive 75 pound cargo weight capacity, ~42 Liters of space inside the shell (with the standard SLA battery)
  • Handy 15 minute “auto shutoff” feature keeps the Ridekick from running out of batteries or being activated accidentally
  • Very stealthy design, if you aren’t activating the throttle most people probably wouldn’t know you were on an electric assist bike

Cons:

  • At the time of this review the Ridekick was only available in a standard gray and orange color scheme, some riders paint them by hands
  • The integrated LED light is a nice extra but isn’t super visible because it’s mounted so low on the unit which is already very low to the ground
  • Whether the unit is powered on or not, it rattles and creates more noise than some trailers due to the smaller wheels and plastic lid system
  • Only the left wheel receives power which means the left tire wears down faster than the right, it’s pretty easy to swap or “rotate” the wheels by hand and Ridekick does sell replacements
  • Wires have to be run across the frame and look a bit tackier than a purpose built solution (often routed through tubing) but the included velcro strips are strong
  • May be more difficult to ride your bike up or off curbs, across trails or through narrow gates and corners when using the Ridekick as compared with a stand alone ebike with no trailer
  • Delta style recumbent trikes (one wheel in front, two in the back) may require an adapter to use the Ridekick
  • No integrated LCD display or battery readout on the throttle, you will need to add your own after market cycle computer and you can check battery level inside the Ridekick

Resources:

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More Ridekick Reviews

2013 Ridekick Power Trailer Review

  • MSRP: $699
  • MODEL YEAR: 2012, 2013

Electric powered bike trailer that connects to rear axle and pushes rider with a trigger throttle. Less expensive and more portable than buying a complete electric bike...

James Hendrix
2 years ago

Brilliant. I am really impressed with the package and preformance.

Chris Nolte
2 years ago

Me too, the Ridekick folks are genuine but also very smart and business savvy. They offer a product that's affordable, versatile and effective and even though it isn't perfect, it really does a good job for what it is in my opinion :D

James Hendrix
2 years ago

Brilliant. I am really impressed with the package and preformance.

Court Rye
2 years ago

Me too, the Ridekick folks are genuine but also very smart and business savvy. They offer a product that's affordable, versatile and effective and even though it isn't perfect, it really does a good job for what it is in my opinion :D

Ron
2 years ago

I've ordered one. Was waiting to make sure I could complete the repairs on my bike first. Bad move. Now they are sold out. I thought one purpose of the long shutdown was to sort out the supply situation.

Chris Nolte
2 years ago

Bummer! They're a smaller operation and you get quality and good support but sometimes volume must be difficult : if you've placed an order did they say how long it will be to ship? Are you on a waiting list now?

Skymax
8 months ago

They did notify constantly since Feb 2015 about the need to pre-order.

Ron
2 years ago

I've ordered one. Was waiting to make sure I could complete the repairs on my bike first. Bad move. Now they are sold out. I thought one purpose of the long shutdown was to sort out the supply situation.

Court Rye
2 years ago

Bummer! They're a smaller operation and you get quality and good support but sometimes volume must be difficult : if you've placed an order did they say how long it will be to ship? Are you on a waiting list now?

Ron
2 years ago

I just heard back from Dee and she says they are not quite sold out, so maybe I will get the unit in June. Was supposed to be April but the West Coast dock strike screwed things up. My record of bad luck with ebikes is still intact.

Chris Nolte
2 years ago

Nice, hopefully it will arrive in short time. The dock strikes in California have been a mess... I've been traveling out here and lots of smaller companies are suffering. It's a bummer just seeing the boats parked out there. I'm sure you'll love the unit once it arrives and I know Ridekick will take good care of you :D

Ron
2 years ago

I just heard back from Dee and she says they are not quite sold out, so maybe I will get the unit in June. Was supposed to be April but the West Coast dock strike screwed things up. My record of bad luck with ebikes is still intact.

Court Rye
2 years ago

Nice, hopefully it will arrive in short time. The dock strikes in California have been a mess... I've been traveling out here and lots of smaller companies are suffering. It's a bummer just seeing the boats parked out there. I'm sure you'll love the unit once it arrives and I know Ridekick will take good care of you :D

Mark DT
2 years ago

How would this compare or to which bike would the Ride Kick be comparable in terms of performance? For example, does Ride Kick make your regular bike feel like a bike with a 250W 36V rear hub motor or something like that?

Court Rye
2 years ago

That is a great question Mark... it rides different than most of the other purpose built or converted electric bikes I've tried because hardly any of the motor or battery weight is on the frame. There's definitely start/stop feeling because the trailer is pushing the bike and adding weight or momentum horizontally. The noise is a bit greater but different... you can hear the zippy sound in the video and sometimes that makes me feel self conscious but on the other hand, the trailer is so stealth that it almost doesn't seem like an electric bike and people seem to put their guard down and become interested instead. I guess if I had to compare the feeling of power and speed on the Ridekick to another ebike I've tested recently I'd go with the Blix Komfort Plus (you can skip to ~6:50 for the ride test there). In the video you can see that the geared motor on this ebike produces a bit more noise but that it's also zippy and gets me up the hill. The Blix has a claimed top speed of ~15 mph but it felt faster and this is similar to the Ridekick which has a top speed of ~19 mph :)

Mark DT
2 years ago

How would this compare or to which bike would the Ride Kick be comparable in terms of performance? For example, does Ride Kick make your regular bike feel like a bike with a 250W 36V rear hub motor or something like that?

Chris Nolte
2 years ago

That is a great question Mark... it rides different than most of the other purpose built or converted electric bikes I've tried because hardly any of the motor or battery weight is on the frame. There's definitely start/stop feeling because the trailer is pushing the bike and adding weight or momentum horizontally. The noise is a bit greater but different... you can hear the zippy sound in the video and sometimes that makes me feel self conscious but on the other hand, the trailer is so stealth that it almost doesn't seem like an electric bike and people seem to put their guard down and become interested instead. I guess if I had to compare the feeling of power and speed on the Ridekick to another ebike I've tested recently I'd go with the Blix Komfort Plus (you can skip to ~6:50 for the ride test there). In the video you can see that the geared motor on this ebike produces a bit more noise but that it's also zippy and gets me up the hill. The Blix has a claimed top speed of ~15 mph but it felt faster and this is similar to the Ridekick which has a top speed of ~19 mph :)

Kevin
2 years ago

Thanks for all the great reviews. So professional yet simple! Have you ever reviewed the electric bike solutions products and if not, why? I've been considering Doug's kit and would like to have any feedback. Thanks, Kevin

Court Rye
2 years ago

Hi Kevin! I try to review every kit and bike that I come across. Some of this is random and other times I drive to company headquarters and meet with the founders or management and get the "inside scoop" before taking bikes out to ride. I'll keep an eye out for the Electric Bike Solutions company you're referencing here, could you share a URL or some more info on where you've seen them?

Kevin
2 years ago

Thanks for all the great reviews. So professional yet simple! Have you ever reviewed the electric bike solutions products and if not, why? I've been considering Doug's kit and would like to have any feedback. Thanks, Kevin

Chris Nolte
2 years ago

Hi Kevin! I try to review every kit and bike that I come across. Some of this is random and other times I drive to company headquarters and meet with the founders or management and get the "inside scoop" before taking bikes out to ride. I'll keep an eye out for the Electric Bike Solutions company you're referencing here, could you share a URL or some more info on where you've seen them?

Ron
2 years ago

Latest update on my order from Ridekick: they are no longer even projecting a ship date. (My e-bike jinx is growing in power.) Their re-design is still in progress and they are still seeking component suppliers! I feel bad for them, but I feel worse for me! By the time this arrives, I may be too old and decrepit to even ride an e-bike.

Court Rye
2 years ago

Hi Ron! That's such a bummer... I'm so sorry to hear that Ridekick hasn't been able to deliver. I like the folks who work there and admire the creative product they've built but the position you're in obviously isn't any fun. Thanks for the update... hang in there :(

Ron
2 years ago

Latest update on my order from Ridekick: they are no longer even projecting a ship date. (My e-bike jinx is growing in power.) Their re-design is still in progress and they are still seeking component suppliers! I feel bad for them, but I feel worse for me! By the time this arrives, I may be too old and decrepit to even ride an e-bike.

Court Rye
2 years ago

Hi Ron! That's such a bummer... I'm so sorry to hear that Ridekick hasn't been able to deliver. I like the folks who work there and admire the creative product they've built but the position you're in obviously isn't any fun. Thanks for the update... hang in there :(

Ron
1 year ago

Update: Still patiently waiting for mine (since March).

Court Rye
1 year ago

Ouch... Such a bummer! I was really excited for Ridekick in 2015 because they updated their supply chain and refined the design a bit. It was awesome meeting with Dee and Mark and hearing their updates but I'm sorry that this content has lead you to the current position... of waiting forever. Thanks for checking in, it will help others and I'd love to hear if/when you finally do get it. So sorry :(

Ron
1 year ago

Update: Still patiently waiting for mine (since March).

Court Rye
1 year ago

Ouch... Such a bummer! I was really excited for Ridekick in 2015 because they updated their supply chain and refined the design a bit. It was awesome meeting with Dee and Mark and hearing their updates but I'm sorry that this content has lead you to the current position... of waiting forever. Thanks for checking in, it will help others and I'd love to hear if/when you finally do get it. So sorry :(

Jack
1 year ago

I hadn't even had a passing thought to a 'powered trailer' approach but was drawn to this review because of the excellent electrical discussions Court & Mark had on Youtube. (You'll find the one on motors here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vgWzGdg1POk) I've had to develop a strong understanding of battery technology for off-grid living, and Mark's at the top of that game IMO.

For folks like me, who are new to ebikes and sorting options, Court's written review didn't mention two benefits of a Ridekick I think can really matter to ebike shoppers who are motivated by environmental concerns and have a limited budget. First is Ridekick's principle goal: Get folks out of their cars when doing shorter drives to local stores, cross-town visits and such. Gas engines are least efficient providing that kind of transportation, that's when they produce the highest pollution per mile, and such trips are hard on gas engines, too. Second, if you're just not sure the ebike option is for you - or are hesitant about this method of electrifying bike transportation - the entry price point is amazingly low. Go with a SLA battery and, for a low cost by ebike standards, you'll have more than a year to see how well it works and how well it works for you. If it wins on both accounts, you can then opt for the LiFePO4 battery pack, knowing the higher cost is justified.

I can't help but be impressed with Mark's & Dee's infectious, positive style and practical design approach. They offer a real-time conversation option at ridekick.com. For those (like me) who want a production update, that's probably the simplest, quickest way to get one.

Court Rye
1 year ago

Thanks for sharing your thoughts Jack! Mark and Dee are wonderful and I've enjoyed meeting with them and testing out their product during visits to Colorado. Do you have a Ridekick? I'd love to hear more about your off-grid lifestyle, are you in Colorado?

Jack
1 year ago

Court, no Ridekick...but it's an interesting option I hadn't considered. I'm the guy moving to Bozeman, MT where both the city and the surrounding USFS lands offer lots of bike paths & trails. So picking the best compromise of those diverse types of riding - and especially wanting to have the bike replace a car - is a challenge. (That's why I appreciated your interview with Greg so much. Similar circumstances). About your off-grid Q: We've spent many years sailing the oceans, where one's battery bank is the local power company and sole source of one's electrons. The evolving battery technology we see infiltrating the ebike choices really is the invisible but significant element in making the right choice, as you already know. That's why, at some point as time permits, you would do a great service if you offered a review of BMS choices that go beyond the inexpensive chargers offered with ebikes. There's great potential there for increasing owner satisfaction and lowering long-term ebike costs by avoiding more frequent battery replacements.

Court Rye
1 year ago

I agree that batteries and BMS are playing a greater role in differentiating models and was impressed with the Satiator from Grin in Canada, it's a charger that provides deeper feedback and control. Here's a video I did with Justin where we geek out about all of this stuff, you might enjoy it! Your boating trips sound fun, I lived on an island off the coast of Bermuda for a summer and spent time sailing and swimming, getting an appreciation for that self sufficiency and exposure to the elements.

Jack
1 year ago

Fascinating, Court! You're like peeling an onion. A new topic surfaces in one's mind and - Voila! - there's already a video about it, either within the All Bike Update youtube channel, the EBR channel, or on the EBR website. Obviously bright, Justin 'downloads' at a pace that's hard to keep up with...but listening to things twice is worth the effort. Grin Tech, yet another amazing resource for those willing to dig deep on the learning curve. Thanks, Court. Now...when will we see you review one of those e-Unicycles?

Court Rye
1 year ago

Ha! That's one product I don't have a video for... I did practice riding unicycles when I was working downtown in Austin and that experience gave me a lot of respect for people who can do it without the aid of a shopping cart or wall. Outside of ebikes and such I'm also a fan of virtual reality as jokingly mentioned with Justin. If that sort of thing strikes you, here's one more channel and playlist you might enjoy ;)

Rettig
10 months ago

Bitte um ein Angebot MoreTraler Model 2015 in Deutsch

Court Rye
10 months ago

Grüße , ich bin nicht sicher, dass dieses Produkt in Deutschland verfügbar ist? Sie könnten auf der offiziellen Website hier kontaktieren.

Jeff
9 months ago

Hey Court, love your sight and have read so many of your reviews and videos I am more confused then ever. Being new to the ebike world I just don't know what to buy. I thought I was close to fat tire or maybe one I don't think you really like the Prodeco outlaw. They I came across your review on this very cool thing called a ridekick and everything changed. I love my trek pure. What do do you think about just adding a ridekick to my trek pure? And should I go with the larger battery? Thank you for the great reviews. Jeff

Court Rye
9 months ago

Hi Jeff! I really love the Ridekick as a concept but it does produce more noise than a lot of ebikes. There's a definite trade-off in that sense but it hauls cargo, keeps weight low and is quick and easy to install/uninstall... For all of those reason's it's unique and worth considering :)

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Rick Imby
2 days ago
This is an interesting challenge. Charging while camping would be my question. Also with the commitment to an electric bike you will have a very tough time pedaling it with dead batteries.

The advantages of a mid drive --simpler flat fixes--easier mounting the trailer to the back wheel.
Hub drive---wider ratio drive train---however loaded you will not need a very high gear

Here is how I would build up for you---

I would go with a good quality mountain type bike that accepts at least 2.2 in wide tires. Wheel size does not matter.--20", 26", 27.5"

Any good bike shop can set up a bike for you---handlebars changed and seat changed to your liking.

Standard 9mm quick release wheels. You must have Disc brakes on your bike.

Buy a good bike that fits you well first.---It is critical that it has very low gearing.

I would go with a trailer. A loaded ebike with camping gear gets very top heavy. Bob trailers are awesome.

Now you have two options for converting your bike. Either hub motor or mid drive.

Hub motor---I would put on the front wheel in this case because you aren't after big horsepower and flats are much simpler to fix and gears are much simpler with front hub motor.

Mid Drive--The Bafang bbso2 is a great motor. I would go with a very small chainring so you could ride the bike without power if you need to.

I would probably go with a front wheel motor which will leave you with much better pedaling options.

Always start your bike by pedaling, using the electric motor to start uses huge amounts of battery power. Up to 40% of battery drain comes from just starting. Especially on steep hills or with a load.

Cargo bikes
I would also look at a Bike Friday cargo bike. They are an awesome bike with the ability to easily adjust in many ways to fit you. There is a lot of room on them to mount your electric bike accessories and carry your stuff. Low center of gravity and super strong 20" wheels---20" wheels are stronger than bigger wheels.
With the Bike Friday Haul a Day I would go with a mid drive.

A craigslist add for bike repair help in setting up an ebike with Luna parts will probably get you all the help you need. If he/she shows up to your house on a converted e-bike you are probably in good hands.

Anything that is known can be learned. You have time and there is a ton of knowledge out there you can learn about your new hobby.

This is exciting---you have a great adventure in mind.

I've had fun writing about this.---Now I'm thinking about an Ebike adventure.
Steve Plattner
2 days ago
Wanderlust
Good morning,

I recently left my job and so I figure there's no better time than now to fulfill my bucket list item of completing a long distance bicycle tour. I've done a 6 day trip on my non-electric bike, and decided that if I were to do a long tour, I would need to do it on an ebike. My route would be from Mississippi to Florida to Maine. I'll start heading east from Mississippi and then from Florida north similar to the proposed East Coast Greenway with some modifications - such as visiting friends/family along the Delmarva peninsula instead of DC/Baltimore, and heading to the Poconos instead of NYC.

I'd like to do the trip slowly, I would plan on averaging about 30 miles per day, mostly road, but some gravel/dirt paths may also be necessary. The ECG sections are mostly flat, but my detours will bring me into more mountainous terrain. My budget will be very tight, so I intend on camping as much as possible, which means I would like to get as long a distance as possible on a charge, I plan to buy a spare battery to extend my distance. Disc brakes and a good range of gears are on my list of requirements. I am also looking for an ebike that will be reliable, because my mechanical skills are limited. Also, to make things more challenging, I am 5'4", weigh 220lbs (+~40 lbs in gear), and need a step-through design due to some extra metal bits I have in my body. I figure I can spend up to $4000 on the bike + spare battery, but spending less will enable me to purchase better/lighter camping equipment.

Can you suggest an ebike that would be suitable for my tour? I'm also open to any other related advice.

Thanks!
Wanderlust, I love what you intend to do. Like everything else in life, the devil is often in the details, so thinking about everything and planning now can make your journey much more enjoyable.

I have a Stromer ST-1. They aren't cheap, but you can find good deals on them. I had the Elite, but it had issues and Stromer replaced it with the Platinum model. I am 6'2, 205 lbs. and in many ways I preferred the Elite--while it has a top assisted speed of 20 mph, it has better torque for hill-climbing and consumes slightly less power, give you better range. But the Platinum is fine too.

I have done trips up to 350 miles, from a few hours to six days. I have three batteries, and when on a long trip, carry a fair amount of stuff. On three batteries, riding 14-15 mph on average on mostly level or slight incline routes, stopping here and there, I can cover 85-90 miles before I am out of power. I do a lot of rails to trails, and while I would like to spend a lot less and camp much more, the issue comes down to recharging your batteries. You don't want to miscalculate and get stuck in the middle of no where without a functioning battery. I have done shorter out and back overnight trips and have camped on those, but didn't go further than my three batteries combined would allow. You can sometimes pull over and charge your battery(yes) if you think you're going to run out of juice before you arrive at your destination--I've gotten pretty good at find 120V outlets along my routes.

Besides power, I would say there are two other major concerns--getting really comfortable on whatever bike you choose, and figuring out how to carry your belongings.

Adding a Cane Creek Thudbuster with a broken-in Brooks B-67 seat and a good pair of padded biking pants will make you much happier and more willing and able to go the distance day after day. If your shoulders and arms get sore from the road, I would also recommend the Redshift Sports Shockstop replacement stem for your handlebars--it provides shock absorption taking the wear and tear off your upper body while still giving you good road feel and complete control.

As far as carrying your stuff--I've gone two routes: pulling a BOB Trailer (Ibex model) vs. two Ortlieb waterproof panniers on an Axiom rack with a third rack (Ortlieb, waterproof) top bag for camera, keys, maps, phone or whatever.

The BOB makes the bike a little less top heavy, but it can be difficult to turn around, and unless you lean everything carefully up against a tree, fence or bench when you stop or you have a really good, strong kickstand, the whole rig has a tendency to fall over and it isn't fun to get it back up in a vertical position. It's also quite long--probably 9' or so--sometimes feels like you are riding a semi, not just a bike with trailer. But it can carry up to 70 lbs. and pulling stuff in a trailer supported by a rear wheel takes a lot of the weight off the bike. The BOB yellow duffel style bag is a great thing--you can put everything in it and it will stay dry during even the worst downpours. The Ortliebs are expensive, but strong and durable. I have a matched pair and I have taken everything I needed--clothing, computer, two spare batteries, charger, a tool or two, Marmot Starlight 2 tent with fly and footprint, and a 30 degree rated sleeping bag and some food and other assorted stuff on rides using just the two bags. The Ortliebs clip on to your rack securely and mine have held up on over 1500 miles of smooth to pretty rough bike paths. I bought mine cheap 2 years ago on-line for about $110/pair--they are normally about $180. There is a store in Tucson specializing in bike bags--good people and a good resource I've used on several occasions.

Last of all, if you have a cell phone Strava can be fun to use. It documents every foot of your trip, tells you have much elevation and distance you've gained, and you can share the data on line.

Sounds like your on the right track and going to have a great trip.
George S.
1 month ago
@Chris Head mentioned there is voltage conditioning on their new line of manufactured bikes. Somewhere in the long interview with Court.

You see these modules on Ebay that can convert any voltage to another voltage. You need two elements to reduce up and down to a voltage, I guess. Switching power modules.

The sags in the high capacity cells are way too much. Can you just use these power modules to cut the top of the pack down to 50v, and then raise the last half of the battery to 50v? Just always have the pack at 50v. I've used these modules, built some in the early 90's. I have a converter that sends my 52 volt pack down to 12 volts. I can run my travel trailer off my ebike battery.

Buck and boost, I think, is the technical name. They are a class of DC-DC converter. They get complicated if you want to handle huge currents, heat and efficiency issues, but Lectric is apparently doing something like this, I speculate.

View attachment 12527
LI-ghtcycle
2 months ago
Court
That would be fun! Where's your shop at? I'm preparing a massive road trip for 2017 but planning to start in the Southern parts of the US where it will be warmer in the winter months

I am currently working to build my first hand built Stretch Cruiser much like the one you see in my signature, I believe that E-Bikes are something more than just electrically assisted bicycles, along the lines of California's creating different classes of E-Bikes for different needs, but a new more accessible form of transportation, particularly for those unable to travel as well on pedaling alone.

In my case, I much prefer an E-Bike that will help haul my mobile repair trailer (about 150 lbs) up a 10% grade and allow my reaching customers up to 5 miles away. Here in Oregon City, a steep 2 mile long hill separates the city, and we have the US's only outdoor municipal elevator to help connect down-town to up-town.

I have been building E-Bike from kits for some time after my father had a nasty bicycle accident in 2007, and upon his recovery, was unable to get back on a bicycle with out the electric assist, my own health issues have been tremendously improved with an E-Bike, you might say I am a bit of a E-Bike Evangelist.
James Kohls
4 months ago
Coming up on 500 miles; today I had my first flat. Big hard piece of metal wire, about 6 inches long, skewered the rear tire. Thankfully, I always carry a flat repair kit with me (attached to down-tube in water bottle holder in top photo).



I was a bit worried that an electric bike might make noticing flats more difficult with the motor giving so much assistance. But it was blatantly obvious as the big 47c tires make a very loud flapping noise. I was glad I had prior experience removing the rear axle, so i knew what to expect. I really recommend everyone try it at least once instead of learning during your first flat. Especially if you've never owned a bike with a thru axle before.

Here is a little trick some may not know about their SRAM X7 Rear Derailleur for loosening the chain.



Once the rear axle was removed from the non-drive-side, I laid the bike down on the non-drive-side to remove the rear wheel. If you can find a place with grass, this would be idea to keep from scraping up parts on your bike. The wheel had some heft to it, but it didn't really hinder the process.

I will say the trigger sport tires are fairly easy to remove and replace without tire levers. I had them, but really didn't need them. Overall, saving time using CO2 to fill the tire (vs a mini pump), it only took me about 10 minutes to change the tube with my spare. I'm really happy with how my Park Tool IB-2 performed. It is super small, but never felt like I was lacking leverage.

500 Mile Update

I've really been happy with how my Turbo X has performed. It is just a really fun bicycle. I think my favorite part about it is that it really feels like a bicycle...not some bike/moped hybrid. I don't miss having a throttle at all. The bike does just fine providing the power I need when I need it.

The longest trip I've taken so far is about 33 miles. In Eco 50 with 42% remaining on my return. 99% of the place I ride are within a 10 mile radius. Anything longer is usually a trip for pleasure. My worst range so far was during a very windy day. 20-30MPH gusts put me in Turbo mode the entire way. It was windy enough that when it hit me as a cross wind, I was actually leaning about 10 degrees to the side while I rode. A 10 mile bike trip ate up almost 50% of my battery. I passed a number of other bicyclists who were barely moving forward.

I did my own tune-up today—checking for loose bolts/screws/spokes, etc. Overall, things are still pretty tight. A few tweaks on some of the rear spokes is really all I needed.

Since I got my bike, my car has sat mostly idle. This bodes well for my eventual plans to not replace my car when it finally dies. I haven't had to put gas in my car since I bought the bike (and it has been several months now—still 1/3 of a tank left). With a cargo trailer, I can easily grab 3 full size grocery bags of food an bring it home with me. While it is over-priced—I would like to get a Burley Travoy some day for over-sized items.

The trailer is rated for 70 pounds, but I've used it to take home two 50lb bags of rock salt for my water softener. The Turbo X pulled it like a champ. I hardly knew it was there. Even up hills.

The Turbo X already has plenty of battle scars. I store my bike inside and have banged the pedals on my concrete steps more times that I care to admit.



I also used the kick stand on somewhat uneven ground and watched how quickly and hard a 50 pound bike can fall.



No matter. Battle scars build character.

Overall I am very happy with my purchase. The price of admission was steep, but it is paying off well. I have no regrets with the route I've taken and I am even more confident in sustaining a bike-only future for my transportation.

Accessories

Here are a list of some of the accessories I've gotten for my bike:

- Cateye Rapid X2 Front Light
- Cateye Rapid X3 Rear Light
- Ibera PakRak IB-RA5 Touring Plus Bicycle Carrier
- Topeak Modula II Bottle Cage Mount
- Flat Repair Kit:
--- Specialized KEG Storage Vessel
--- Park Tool IB-2 multi-tool
--- Park Tool GP-2 Pre-Glued patches
--- Genuine Innovations CO2 Kit
--- Generic tire levers and glue patch kit
- 12x135 1.0mm Thread Pitch RobertAxleProject Threaded Hitch Mount (ONE005)
--- Stock Axle says 12x142, but if you replace your axle you need a 1.0mm thread pitch axle with a length of ~160mm. You can see my video here on replacing the axle.
- Allen Sports ACT200 Cargo Trailer
- Phone Mount
- Kool Stop Organic Brake Pads
- Two Wheel Gear convertable pannier/backpack

Berniejockjr
5 months ago
No I'm alone. I have the DoggyRide Novel 10 anniversary dog trailer coming tomorrow. My best friend Robin will be tagging along behind, lol
I think you are doing the right thing, the Rover is full of power and pretty beastly (in a great way). It may feel intimidating for a 5' 2" woman. I just can't believe the bike you get from them for just $1,499, still trying to figure out how they can do it. I'm glad I could help. I wondered the same things you did while researching and just rolled the dice. I would recommend this bike to any one of my friends.
Kit!
tcb
5 months ago
Avao
I have owned a 2015 Specialized Turbo X for one month and use it for commuting (under 15 miles daily) on bike paths/city streets and for pulling a child in a bike trailer on the weekends. It makes commuting pleasant rather than something I would find excuses to avoid on my regular bike. The Stromer ST2 I test rode was more powerful especially uphill - what an amazing bike! I didn't try out the 2016 Turbo X or S. Mostly economics limited me to the older Turbo X but I also had concerns about theft. I park the bike on the street all day outside a guarded office building. One always worries about having a nice bike stolen. For me, the worry is greater with a $7000 bike vs. a $2600 one. I would want insurance on a top end e-bike, which can be costly.

The 2015 Turbo X is on sale for around $2600. I believe a replacement battery is around $800-1000, so $3400 seems right, just make sure the extra one is a new Specialized 468 wh battery. The black satin coloration is low profile/stealthy.

The 2016 Stromer ST1 and 2016 Specialized Turbo X are in the $4000-4500 range.

How far do you want to travel on a single charge and do you really need an extra battery? In Eco mode, say at 60% you can go a long way on a relatively flat ride. The range is reported as 25-55 miles depending on how much assist you use. At $7000, the 2016 Stromer ST2 is more powerful (500 watt vs, 200 watt motor), though less of a workout using full power assist and has a longer lasting battery (814 wh vs. 468 wh). The range is reported as 60-120 miles. The Stromer has anti-theft technology (nice) and the bluetooth workout stuff (I wouldn't use). Will you have have to carry it up stairs? Turbo is 49.5 lbs. Stromer is over 60 lbs. The depreciation on the Stromer will be worse by net $. There are many more Specialized than Stromer dealers in the U.S. so it should be easier to have a Turbo repaired.

If you decide on an ST2, make sure you are getting a 2016 model. The shop I went to test ride the Stromers was selling the 2015s at $0 discount and didn't mention they were last year's models.

I decided that the 2015 Turbo X would more than suffice for now and that if circumstances change in the future, I can upgrade to a top of the line model.

We are fortunate to have such choices to make!
Hello Avao, can you share some more information on how to get the 2015 Turbo X for $2600? That seems to be a great deal. Thanks.
Avao
6 months ago
I have owned a 2015 Specialized Turbo X for one month and use it for commuting (under 15 miles daily) on bike paths/city streets and for pulling a child in a bike trailer on the weekends. It makes commuting pleasant rather than something I would find excuses to avoid on my regular bike. The Stromer ST2 I test rode was more powerful especially uphill - what an amazing bike! I didn't try out the 2016 Turbo X or S. Mostly economics limited me to the older Turbo X but I also had concerns about theft. I park the bike on the street all day outside a guarded office building. One always worries about having a nice bike stolen. For me, the worry is greater with a $7000 bike vs. a $2600 one. I would want insurance on a top end e-bike, which can be costly.

The 2015 Turbo X is on sale for around $2600. I believe a replacement battery is around $800-1000, so $3400 seems right, just make sure the extra one is a new Specialized 468 wh battery. The black satin coloration is low profile/stealthy.

The 2016 Stromer ST1 and 2016 Specialized Turbo X are in the $4000-4500 range.

How far do you want to travel on a single charge and do you really need an extra battery? In Eco mode, say at 60% you can go a long way on a relatively flat ride. The range is reported as 25-55 miles depending on how much assist you use. At $7000, the 2016 Stromer ST2 is more powerful (500 watt vs, 200 watt motor), though less of a workout using full power assist and has a longer lasting battery (814 wh vs. 468 wh). The range is reported as 60-120 miles. The Stromer has anti-theft technology (nice) and the bluetooth workout stuff (I wouldn't use). Will you have have to carry it up stairs? Turbo is 49.5 lbs. Stromer is over 60 lbs. The depreciation on the Stromer will be worse by net $. There are many more Specialized than Stromer dealers in the U.S. so it should be easier to have a Turbo repaired.

If you decide on an ST2, make sure you are getting a 2016 model. The shop I went to test ride the Stromers was selling the 2015s at $0 discount and didn't mention they were last year's models.

I decided that the 2015 Turbo X would more than suffice for now and that if circumstances change in the future, I can upgrade to a top of the line model.

We are fortunate to have such choices to make!
Fred
7 months ago
Neal
I finally finished my new fat bike build I've been working on for a month now! I started with a Motobecane Boris the Brut Sprung. I then installed a BBSHD motor with the new color display, a 30 tooth chain ring, and a Panasonic 52 volt, 13.5 A/hr "GA" cell battery. I installed fenders, a rack, did a tubeless conversion, and even made a custom trailer hitch to pull my game cart with it. I've got an unboxxing/assembly video, a video of the conversion kit install, a video showing the tubeless conversion, a video showing my game cart trailer set up and a video of its first ride all up on YouTube for anyone interested in checking it out. With the BBSHD, 52 volt battery and the 30 tooth chain ring, this thing has power to spare. I can climb a hill that I can barely walk up (steep and gravel covered) and it's got power to spare. I'm amazed at the result.
This is the best video I have seen on how to install the BBSHD. Thanks for posting it.
Donny
7 months ago
vincent
all of the below comments are coming from someone who thinks 15mph on their e bike is FAST, i am scared to go much faster

but i can see how more experienced riders that commute might want to go faster or need more range, hill power etc

imo unsafe is unsafe
my sedan will do 130mph and get there pretty quickly but obviously i dont drive that fast

used to ride horses a lot and have heard a lot of bad stories about the mountain bikers being very rude, fast and dangerous on the trails around the horses and this was long before electric ones were out there, they hate anyone on the trails with them, hikers included

people seem to hate change but reading some threads from mtn bikers etc it sounds like they half or more of them are rabid about electric bikes and the rest dont care much

personally i never ran into any mtn bikers except very nice ones when riding horses but have had experienced with rude and obnoxious road bikers - non ebikes

in fact and know i will get slammed for this here but i really do not like any type of bike on the road with cars, bike lanes or no
from someone who drives 50,000-60,000 miles a year for work i can tell you they make me nervous and they slow traffic down very bad

the exhaust/fuel savings of one bicycle does not negate the fact 15 cars had to brake to 5-10 miles an hour and then accelerate again to 35-40mph over and over going through town trying to get around you etc
being a somewhat hypermiler i can tell you that doesnt help the environment at all

occasionally i see a fast road biker who can actually keep up with traffic and it makes things so much smoother, amazed at how fast some of those guys are
if electric bikes helped achieve that think it would be great

even though i will never go that fast and will probably never need a 750 watt motor it just seems maybe someone living in a hilly city etc might
and i hate to see that taken away from them

what if you have a 30 mile hilly commute and dont want to get sweaty etc headed to work, so use throttle on the way there and then pedal assist only on the way home for exercise
just think there is a time and place for everything

agree with tenblinkers, we should be able to govern ourselves but people are not great at doing that

yes people tend to think bigger is better in a lot of things
but there are times when that is true

having a little too much truck for hauling your trailer is always a good thing, being a little underpowered/underweighted is never a good thing

i feel safer having a little bit quicker car for merging in traffic etc than being underpowered

if i was buying ebikes and the weight limit on one was 215 and the other 250 i would feel better buying the heavier rated bike to handle my weight even if i weight 215
same goes for the motor, even if i lose 75lbs in the future having the more powerful motor makes good sense to me
I agree with some of that - I'm lucky that in my area, there are enough trails/sidewalks around that I can get pretty much anywhere I want to go without getting on a road. The few roads that I have used are sleepy residential streets that have no traffic. I will not, repeat, will NOT get on a main road and play around with cars that outweigh me by thousands of pounds. I am also annoyed when "that guy" is pedaling around in the middle of the road slowing down traffic or even worse, that pack of bicyclists. It may be legal, I just don't think it's smart from a personal safety standpoint. The real answer to that would be dedicated bicycle lanes or networks like they have in Europe, but I don't think that will happen here in the U.S.
vincent
7 months ago
all of the below comments are coming from someone who thinks 15mph on their e bike is FAST, i am scared to go much faster

but i can see how more experienced riders that commute might want to go faster or need more range, hill power etc

imo unsafe is unsafe
my sedan will do 130mph and get there pretty quickly but obviously i dont drive that fast

used to ride horses a lot and have heard a lot of bad stories about the mountain bikers being very rude, fast and dangerous on the trails around the horses and this was long before electric ones were out there, they hate anyone on the trails with them, hikers included

people seem to hate change but reading some threads from mtn bikers etc it sounds like they half or more of them are rabid about electric bikes and the rest dont care much

personally i never ran into any mtn bikers except very nice ones when riding horses but have had experienced with rude and obnoxious road bikers - non ebikes

in fact and know i will get slammed for this here but i really do not like any type of bike on the road with cars, bike lanes or no
from someone who drives 50,000-60,000 miles a year for work i can tell you they make me nervous and they slow traffic down very bad

the exhaust/fuel savings of one bicycle does not negate the fact 15 cars had to brake to 5-10 miles an hour and then accelerate again to 35-40mph over and over going through town trying to get around you etc
being a somewhat hypermiler i can tell you that doesnt help the environment at all

occasionally i see a fast road biker who can actually keep up with traffic and it makes things so much smoother, amazed at how fast some of those guys are
if electric bikes helped achieve that think it would be great

even though i will never go that fast and will probably never need a 750 watt motor it just seems maybe someone living in a hilly city etc might
and i hate to see that taken away from them

what if you have a 30 mile hilly commute and dont want to get sweaty etc headed to work, so use throttle on the way there and then pedal assist only on the way home for exercise
just think there is a time and place for everything

agree with tenblinkers, we should be able to govern ourselves but people are not great at doing that

yes people tend to think bigger is better in a lot of things
but there are times when that is true

having a little too much truck for hauling your trailer is always a good thing, being a little underpowered/underweighted is never a good thing

i feel safer having a little bit quicker car for merging in traffic etc than being underpowered

if i was buying ebikes and the weight limit on one was 215 and the other 250 i would feel better buying the heavier rated bike to handle my weight even if i weight 215
same goes for the motor, even if i lose 75lbs in the future having the more powerful motor makes good sense to me
KidWok
8 months ago
I purchased one a month ago and have been putting a lot of miles on it commuting around Seattle. Some thoughts:

- Overall a great way to get around. I bought an extra gold battery and it's been nice being able to swap it out without worrying about any downtime. The blue looks really sharp. I'm a sucker for this shade of blue.
- I had to swap out the stem and seatpost. I'm 6'2". The 11cm stem was way too short and I threw on a 13cm. The seatpost is a piece of junk. Clamp head slips so the saddle keeps angling back no matter how hard you tighten it.
- The 74 degree seat tube angle just doesn't work for me. I got a Truvativ Stylo with 25mm setback and jammed my saddle all the way back as well. Fits perfect now.
- I also replaced the seatpost clamp. For something I lock up outside from time to time, having a quick-release seatpost clamp is begging to come back to a stolen seatpost. Hope makes a 38.5 mm clamp, which was the only non-quick release version I could find. The seatpost still slips down badly, even when using assembly paste. I'm now using the hitch clamp from my Burley Travoy trailer to prevent slipping.
- The default setting for regenerative braking is pretty puny. I found the code (1011) and cranked it up to 99, which makes the regenerative braking quite powerful.
- I'm running tire pressure at 35 on the front and 45 on the rear.
- This thing puts a smile on my face every time I ride it. I mostly ride it in Eco and City mode, but do occasionally turn it up to Power mode and have some fun.

Tai
Cameron Newland
9 months ago
Toynut
Just a thought....if you get a bike with a thumb throttle ( or walk mode), couldn't you use the bikes own power to help you (slowly and carefully ) walk it up the stairs?
Same way I run a dirt bike up a ramp onto a trailer.
Only if it's a full-suspension bike or a fatbike. Otherwise, I think you might rattle the frame and rear wheel too much for comfort. I guess it's a subjective thing, though. I'm sure there are a lot of folks who wouldn't mind throttling their ebike up the stairs in a very bumpy fashion, but people who really want to treat their bike well would want to avoid that kind of thing.
Toynut
9 months ago
Just a thought....if you get a bike with a thumb throttle ( or walk mode), couldn't you use the bikes own power to help you (slowly and carefully ) walk it up the stairs?
Same way I run a dirt bike up a ramp onto a trailer.
Jack Tyler
10 months ago
here. FWIW I'm not keen on the idea of the pooch being high up in a basket, for its sake and the rider's. Raised CG, chance of real injury in a spill, and so forth. Good luck on the Hunt!

Jack
Tora Harris
10 months ago
Fensus
I'm currently considering the Crosscurrent for this commuting route: https://goo.gl/maps/VuKbkiUxSL82 (just so you can see the distance and elevation change) but my issue is I will also be towing a child trailer with a 25 lb dog in it (I'm already 210 lbs). Do you think this bike with its 350w motor be able to handle that load?
A much better bike for this kind of job would be our ODK U500 Utility E-bike. Its has much more pulling power and larger payload capacity. On top of this the battery capacity is up to 4x greater.
Fensus
10 months ago
pxpaulx
People seem to love the juiced bikes, the cross current would be my choice here. Rad bikes are a good build, I have the rad rover myself. I'd skip the urban rider and volt bikes, those are just kinda off the shelf Chinese builds.
Thanks, I appreciate your opinion. I also like the Rad wagon as its specifically designed for hauling, but I feel its counter intuitive to get an already heavy bike and then add a trailer to it (I guess if went the wagon route I'd probably put a dog basket or something on the back instead of a trailer)

As far as the Juiced Cross current, do you feel the power provided (350w geared hub motor) would be sufficient for towing a trailer on the hills along my route? My first impression was that its a bit underpowered for my needs.

Also, did you have any opinion of the Montecapro? Seems like a wicked deal with early bird pricing, but not sure if a mid-drive is overkill for my purposes and just asking for unwanted maintenance. Also not sure if rear suspension is a bad idea for towing.
Sina
10 months ago
I use power level 3 At least 75% of the time, but my average remains at only 17.1 mph for three reasons:
One, I am usually pulling a considerable load either on one of our 3 cargo trailers (Burley D'Lite child trailer since the ST2's are effectively our car replacement vehicles.
Two, my wife doesn't like to go fast when we are on the bike paths with her average remaining at 14.3 so when we ride as a family, I ride slower too.
Three, I ride through the Wisconsin winter with studded tires.
Dave S
1 year ago
I just bought a Helio with the 48v bbs02 motor. I absolutely love it! I weight 260 lbs and pull my two kids in a trailer up hills with no problem at all. I don't miss the motor inhibitors on the brakes at all, you adapt to it after 10 minutes. I have no issues shifting gears going up hill either. I just let off of my own strength slightly and shift, no issues. You really don't shift that frequently with this much power either. I really love the bike and I loved dealing with BMEbikes and Tim over there.
Keithava
3 months ago

Nice review. Told me what I wanted to know.

NUNYA BIDNEZ
4 months ago

thanks Court. I have been wondering about this product for years. I have 6
bikes and i love that i love that I can use it on all of them quickly. The
best review yet.

Ben
5 months ago

Oh my god, please stop talking and go for a ride! It's happening! It's
finally happening! Oh no, you stopped and now you're talking more. Please
do both at the same time. It's useful info but I just want to see you ride
around. Get a tripod, not just angles within arms reach. Oh good, you're
riding and talking at the same time now. Thank you

ThingsDemystified
9 months ago

18650 batteries are lighter, and they're safe too. My concern with lipo is
not a fiery accident, but a fiery mess if the charger malfunctions.

Benjamin Ward
11 months ago

I have had one of these for about three years and its worked flawlessly.

ROBERT CAMMARATA
1 year ago

It all looks good and seem to be very nice to have!!!! But it cost more
then a fare price if it was about $300.00 to $500.00 then you will have a
good seller. As of now it is not a good thing to buy do to the cost.

Andres Chapero
1 year ago

I can´t believe they are not selling them by the thousands right now. and
the added plus of this trailer is the fact that as batteries improve in
performance the trailer can get better with minor, tiny adjustments. I pre
ordered one and will wait until I get one. I own several expensive e bikes
but this idea is just way too smart I have all my faith in it and in the
owners skills and attitude towards their creation.

ThingsDemystified
9 months ago

+Andres Chapero I'd rather not have to pull a trailer. That's why I have a
mid drive.

ROBERT CAMMARATA
1 year ago

+Andres Chapero They cost to much...

Leonard Kubwimana
1 year ago

how well does it work in snow and ice

ThingsDemystified
9 months ago

+Leonard Kubwimana Well, imagine a relatively light trailer driven by one
wheel.

joseph valenzuela
1 year ago

I concur, I called the number on the website to place an order and the
phone number is out of service. Now I want one so bad!!

ajd91711
1 year ago

+joseph valenzuela the correct telephone number is (877)974-4440

Ron Warrick
1 year ago

The question is, when, if ever, are they going to actually deliver any more
units?

Tim Parziale
9 months ago

I modified some Ridekick trailers for people because they weren't happy
with them. I changed the whole Power system to 1500 watt motor and
controller because their power system cheap garbage. Heavier duty chain and
sprocket too.

Tim Parziale
9 months ago

I make better ones.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+Ron Warrick Yeah, I wish I knew... was surprised to hear people commenting
about not getting theirs this year. I was under the impression that they
had solved issues and were going to deliver in bulk and grow the company!

adrianTNT
1 year ago

13:38 needs some kind of suspension maybe ?

TheAegisClaw
1 year ago

Brushed motors are not worse because they're less reliable, they're worse
because they're less efficient AND less reliable. Brushes and commutators
are two parts that just don't exist in brushless. Brushed motors produce
less torque and less RPM in general too. The only reason these guys are
using them is because they're cheaper as they don't require a 3 phase
controller. 

wordreet
1 year ago

Such a good idea. Looks like a great product! I loved the additional USB
connector port.

Fayez Patel
1 year ago

When can we expect the bigger wheeled gearless hub child trailer version to
be in production? They announced a prototype in 2013. I would be much more
comfortable cycling with a child carrier than the regular ridekick, just
because a child carrier is common nowadays.

Terry Brightwater
1 year ago

Great review ;0) Great product :0) Thanks for making and posting :0)

wevenhuis
1 year ago

wow, sounds like a wonderful versatile product! So if I place two Li-iron
batteries what would be my range? And how much room would it consume in the
casing? And do they sell outside of the USA?

wordreet
1 year ago

+wevenhuis With two matching batteries in paralell, you have the same
voltage and get double the amps, so theoretically you could go twice as far
at the same speed.