Benno Boost E 10D Review

Benno Boost E 10d Electric Bike Review
Benno Boost E 10d
Benno Boost E 10d Bosch Performance Line 350 Watt Mid Drive
Benno Boost E 10d Bosch Powerpack Downtube Battery
Benno Boost E 10d Rubber Ergonomic Grips Bosch Intuvia Display
Benno Boost E 10d Supernova E3 E Bike V6s Headlight
Benno Boost E 10d Alloy Fenders 24 Wheels
Benno Boost E 10d Extra Long Cargo Rack With Pannier Rails
Benno Boost E 10d Shimano Deore Lx Components
Benno Boost E 10d Electric Bike Review
Benno Boost E 10d
Benno Boost E 10d Bosch Performance Line 350 Watt Mid Drive
Benno Boost E 10d Bosch Powerpack Downtube Battery
Benno Boost E 10d Rubber Ergonomic Grips Bosch Intuvia Display
Benno Boost E 10d Supernova E3 E Bike V6s Headlight
Benno Boost E 10d Alloy Fenders 24 Wheels
Benno Boost E 10d Extra Long Cargo Rack With Pannier Rails
Benno Boost E 10d Shimano Deore Lx Components

Summary

  • A compact cargo-style electric bike with sturdy 24" wheels, comfortable 2.6" diameter tires and a premium drive system from Bosch
  • Low balanced weight distribution, removable battery and display panel, premium integrated lights by Supernova, Micro USB charging ports and three color choices
  • Solid 10-speed drivetrain from Shimano, the motor offers shift detection for reduced wear on the chain and sprockets, powerful hydraulic disc brakes also from Shimano
  • No suspension elements, currently only available in one frame size, new to the US and possibly harder to locate at dealers for test rides, solid one year warranty

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Benno

Model:

Boost E 10D

Price:

$4,299

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Urban, Cargo

Electric Bike Class:

Pedal Assist (Class 1)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Yeaer Components, 2 Year Motor Battery and Control System

Availability:

United States, Europe

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

57 lbs (25.85 kg)

Battery Weight:

5.7 lbs (2.58 kg)

Motor Weight:

8.8 lbs (3.99 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

19 in (48.26 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

19" Seat Tube, 23.5" Reach, 28" Stand Over Height, 74" Length

Frame Types:

Mid-Step

Frame Colors:

Neon Yellow, Matte Anthracite Gray, Putty Gray

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid CRMO Steel, 9 mm Quick Release Skewer

Frame Rear Details:

9 mm Quick Release Skewer, Replaceable Derailleur Hanger

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Front Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses

Gearing Details:

10 Speed 1x10 Shimano Deore LX, 11-34T

Shifter Details:

Shimano Deore XT Triggers on Right

Cranks:

FSA Alloy 170 mm Crank Arms, 20T Chainring with Plastic Guard

Pedals:

VP Aluminum Alloy Wide Platform

Headset:

FSA 1-1/8" with Two 20 mm Risers and One 10 mm Riser

Stem:

Custom Alloy 50 mm Length

Handlebar:

Alloy, High Rise, 140 mm Rise, 27" Length

Brake Details:

Shimano Deore Hydraulic Disc with 180 mm Front Rotor and 160 mm Rear Rotor, Shimano Deore Levers with Adjustable Reach

Grips:

Benno Branded Rubber, Ergonomic, Locking

Saddle:

Benno Wide Faux Leather Saddle with Handle

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

350 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

31.2 mm

Rims:

Double Wall Alloy, Stainless Reinforcement Eyelets and Nipples, 36 Hole

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 14 Gauge, Black

Tire Brand:

Benno Dual Sport, 24" x 2.6"

Wheel Sizes:

24 in (60.96cm)

Tire Details:

35 to 45 PSI, 60 TPI

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Extra Wide Alloy Fenders, Extra Long Cargo Rack with Pannier Rails 50 kg (110 lb) Max Weight, Supernova 3 LED Integrated Rear Light, Supernova E3 E-Bike V6s Integrated Headlight, Adjustable Length Center Mount Kickstand, Optional Utility Pannier Bags, Optional Utility Front Tray, Optional Utility Front Tray Bag, Optional Baby Seat Adapter

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, 1.7 lb 4 Amp Charger

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Bosch

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Geared Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

350 watts

Motor Peak Output:

570 watts

Motor Torque:

63 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Samsung

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

11 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

396 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

3.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

30 miles (48 km)

Estimated Max Range:

70 miles (113 km)

Display Type:

Intuvia, Removable, Adjustable Angle, Grayscale, Backlit LCD

Readouts:

Speed, Assist Level (Eco, Tour, Sport, Turbo), Battery Level (1-5), Odometer, Trip Distance, Estimated Range, Clock, Max Speed, Average Speed, Trip Time, Shift Assist Recommendation

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad with Tactile Feedback on Left, 6 Volt Micro USB Port on Display

Drive Mode:

Advanced Pedal Assist (Measures Wheel Speed, Pedal Cadence and Pedal Torque, Power Output Relative to Pedal Input: Eco 50%, Tour 120%, Sport 190%, Turbo 275%)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph) (15 mph in Some Markets)

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Written Review

Benno was a new company to me, I heard about it through my friend Chris who owns and runs Propel Bikes in Brooklyn NY. He’s an early adopter and I always learn a lot during visits to his shop. As it turns out, the founder of Benno Bikes is actually Benno Baenziger who co-founded Electra Bicycles. I’m very familiar with them and their recent acquisition by Trek. Elektra has an awesome ebike called the Townie Go! which switched over to the Bosch system in 2016. That’s the same system the Benno Boost E is using and it’s one of my favorites. As a compact cargo ebike, the Boost E 10D is short enough to fit in some tight spaces while still delivering utility with a longer rear rack. They also sell a tray that attaches to the head tube and provides even more space. I’m being specific about how it attaches because some cargo bikes have a bar and fork mounted basket which turns as you do. These baskets (when loaded) tend to sway side to side and I’m glad that the Benno Boost E is delivering more than just looks and a promise of usefulness. The rear rack can handle up to 110 lbs of weight and has an extra long standard-gauge tube fixed to both sides for the clip-on style panniers. The fenders are another highlight on the utility front and I was impressed with their great coverage and strength… no rattling! You get integrated front and rear lights by Supernova (the front is mounted with an adjustable angle clamp so you can use it to see, not just be seen). In short, this is a nimble bike that’s easier to handle and lighter weight than a lot of full sized models. You may not be able to fit two Yepp seats on the back but they do sell an adapter for one and you may not have running boards to start but the 24″ wheels match so tires and tubes are easier to replace together. They keep weight low and improve wheel strength but aren’t so small that the derailleur hits curbs or have you dragging pedals during leaning turns.

Powering the bike is a Bosch Powerpack 400 downtube battery. It’s easy to charge on the bike but also has a plastic carry-loop on top so you can bring it inside. The mounting interface is forward compatible to work with the larger Powerpack 500 released in the United States in 2017 and in my experience, the charger for these batteries is fast and easy to use. It’s also light weight and compact so tossing it into a pannier or trunk bag is easy. Note that Benno sells their own extra-long bags that work perfectly with the Boost models. I’m a big proponent of bicycle safety and noticed that their bags have reflective stripes woven in. This is key, and something I wish they had considered for their branded tires as well. I’ve seen reflective tape on tires that helps you stand out even more and I’m not sure how easy it is to add at the consumer level. In any case, the lights are nice but the headlight doesn’t shine out to the sides and if you’re a messenger or someone who is just focused on a child or big load of groceries please be safe and consider additional lights and reflective gear. I do like that the frame comes in multiple color choices; the putty white and neon yellow would probably stand out best but the black does look cool.

Driving the bike is a Bosch Performance Line 350 watt mid-drive motor. It peaks at 63 Newton meters of torque and is super responsive. In addition to being powerful and efficient (with great range) it delivers shift sensing which will help your chain, sprockets and derailleur last. It’s still up to you to ease off when shifting gears, it’s a software driven sensor and imperfect, but the sensing technology is better than nothing. The motor measures your pedal cadence, force and rear wheel speed so the bike won’t start if you just rest a foot on the pedal. It’s capable of assisting you up to 20 mph and I appreciate the range of RPM output it delivers. Some motors have more of a sweet spot while the Bosch Centerdrive performs well at a range and allows you to pedal at higher RPMs without dropping out (which is my personal preference due to knee sensitivity). The motor is balanced by excellent hydraulic disc brakes from Shimano. They aren’t the largest or fanciest as you’d see on a downhill ebike but they are larger than average and from a name-brand manufacturer. The Shimano levers are easy to use with just a finger or two and the levers can be adjusted for reach which is great if you’re wearing work gloves or lending the bike to different employees or family members.

Once the battery is charged and mounted, turning the bike on is very simple. You press the power button on the Intuvia display near the lower left corner. It blinks on and delivers battery capacity, current speed, assist level and ride stats. You can change these readouts without taking your hands off the grip which is huge if you’re trying to balance a large load. One thing this cargo bike does not have stock is a super wide double-leg kickstand. Instead, it features a single side adjustable length stand that’s positioned far enough back to clear the left crank arm and pedal but not so far that a front basket add-on would tip the bike. Not everyone needs the huge stands but they do come in handy for large loads… they add cost and weight but the Benno Boost E 10D is already fairly light in comparison to full sized cargo bikes. It weighs about 57 lbs and the removable battery shaves off nearly 6 lbs. Both wheels are also easy to take off with quick release but depending on your environment it could be worth replacing with security skewers. Anyway, the display panel is also removable for convenience and to keep it protected in the rain, direct sun or rowdy bike racks. At the top right edge of the Intuvia display there’s a Micro USB port so you can charge portable electronics like a phone GPS. I love how easy it is to reach vs. some ebikes with a battery-mounted USB charging port.

For now, this is the only e-bike from Benno but I appreciate the unique qualities it offers and can see that they put a lot of time and energy into getting it right. I’m a big fan of the Bosch drive system and noticed that they went with a larger chainring here (which confused me at first), designed to balance out the smaller wheel diameter for a more natural cadence range. You get 10 gears here with a solid Shimano Deore LX derailleur. To me, this is a sweet spot where you don’t drop the chain as frequently and don’t have the complexity of two derailleurs… the Bosch system only works with one sprocket up front for now and the chainring has a nice plastic cover to keep your pant leg or dress clear and clean. I suppose I’d like a bell added for friendly signaling but that’s cheap and easy to add yourself later. The ergonomic grips felt great and used lockers so they won’t twist around if you’re really bearing down while transporting a heavy load. It’s a great bike and I’m excited about how it might empower people who couldn’t fit the full sized cargo ebikes into their garages, elevators, sheds and other storage spots.

Pros:

  • Unique tire size… they’re basically 24″ diameter plus sized tires (like you’d find on a mountain bike or fancy speed pedelec), the extra air provides traction and comfort and the smaller wheel diameter improves strength and lowers weight for stability (technically I think plus sized is 2.8″ to 3″ but 2.6 is still large for something like t his)
  • Cool rack options, there’s a longer cargo-style rack in the rear that can handle up to 110 lbs along with an extra set of braze-ons for bags, up front there are threaded eyelets setup for a porter style tray (the kind that mounts directly to the head tube and offers better handling), they also sell a Yepp child seat adapter
  • Nice fenders, you get matching Aluminum front and rear fenders that are extra wide for the plus sized tires… and given the smaller wheel size you probably won’t clip your toe on them as much when turning! During my ride tests the fenders didn’t rattle at all
  • Heavy duty Shimano hydraulic disc brakes, you get 180 mm up front and 160 mm in the rear, it’s enough to stop you and larger loads (and again, the smaller wheel diameter improves your mechanical advantage here with braking)
  • Premium drive system from Bosch, this is the same motor used for e-mountain bikes and full sized cargo models like the Xtracycle Edgerunner, it’s responsive and very efficient but still plenty powerful
  • Given the shorter frame length of the Benno Boost, you can fit it into more compact places (like some elevators, sheds and car racks)
  • Well positioned kickstand… sometimes they mount these things to the bottom bracket which gets in the way of your crank arms and pedals, in this case it’s set back a little bit and positioned under the cargo rack
  • Comfortable and accessible frame with an angled top tube… I’d call this a mid-step because it’s not as high as a traditional diamond frame but not as low as a step-thru, one advantage of still using the high top-tube is improved strength and stiffness
  • Battery and motor weight are kept low and central (if not a bit forward) on the frame, this keeps the rack completely open and allows for more weight to be added (compared with frame mounted batteries), you can charge on or off the bike easily and the battery can be upgraded to 500 watt hours for maximum range
  • In addition to having a removable battery, the display is also easy to take off and that’s really handy if you’re parking in a city or bike rack where vandalism or accidental bumps and tips can happen
  • The display panel has an integrated Micro USB charging port so you can tap into the main battery for additional power for your cell phone, GPS or other device and it’s right there easy to reach vs. down at the battery
  • You get two awesome LED Lights from Supernova and both are run off the main battery pack, this saves time and materials compared with add-on lights that can be easily stolen and require separate charging or replacement cells
  • I like the cockpit, they went with a riser bar and ergonomic grips to increase comfort and position the rider upright (to help spot traffic and fellow pedestrians)
  • It’s nice that you get several colors to choose from and the putty color and yellow struck me as being high visibility for increased safety and visual footprint
  • I like the oversized saddle with integrated handle at the back, this comes in handy to lift and position the bike but might be hard on a suspension seat post (if you swapped one in) so be careful ;)
  • The brake levers offer adjustable reach so you can fit your hand size and account for wearing work gloves or winter gloves
  • I like the pedals they chose, they seemed sturdy and had a larger surface area with good contact points so you won’t slip off easily
  • Quick release wheels make maintenance and transport easier but you might want to swap them with security hardware to prevent tampering and theft depending on your locale
  • Internally routed shifting, brake and motor cables help to reduce snags and keep the bike looking good
  • Reinforced spokes and rim eyelets reduce breaking and cracking under load
  • The control pad is very easy to reach while riding, you don’t have to take your left hand off the grip in order to arrow up or down in assist power level or change the display readout and that’s extra important if you’re carrying heavy/unstable cargo and need power instantly

Cons:

  • Despite having large tires, this bike can feel a little stiff (especially if they’re fully inflated for a full load), there’s no suspension so if you’re sensitive like me, consider adding a 31.2 mm Thudbuster seat post suspension (you might need a shim to fit this size properly)
  • The frame is only available in one size at this time and while it works okay (and actually pretty well for shorter riders) some taller people might feel scrunched, consider tipping the bars forward to extend reach and really raising that seat
  • Minor gripe here but it would be nice if the tires had reflective sidewall stripes (especially since they were already customized to say Benno on the side)… the LED lights are great but the Supernova headlight doesn’t shine through the sides at all, keep in mind that a brighter colored frame will help increase your visual footprint
  • I’m glad they included a slap guard to protect your right chainstay but wish it was a little longer… just given the stretched out tubing here it might get nicked in places that aren’t fully covered if you ride on very bumpy terrain
  • Benno Bikes are new to the US and may not be available to test ride and purchase in as many locations, on the upside however, Benno was the co-founder of Electra which made great bicycles and was well respected in the space
  • I wouldn’t want to compromise the frame strength but it would be nice to have bottle cage bosses, perhaps under the top tube? Seems like there’s room for a cage, min-pump or lock there
  • The Bosch motor is super quick to start and stop but it rotates at roughly two times your normal pedal cadence and I’ve noticed that there is a little whine sound that is produced which is slightly more audible than some other systems
  • depending on your cargo needs, it would be nice to have a double-side kickstand for added stability when loading, I do like that the single side stand that it comes with has adjustable length

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TForan
6 days ago

Just got the new pack yesterday, will share some initial impressions:

This pack is awesome! barely larger than the stock sized packs, 100% compatible on any of their bikes with the inframe style battery (in 48V). No problem fitting it on my Stunner LT, weight difference is very minor and the pack is not particularly any taller, just a bit wider out the left side (about 7/8"). Cell gain would be about 50% more (78 cells versus 52, rough guess)

Peak voltage off the charger seems to be the same as my smaller pack, 55.0V (equating to 13S), so there's no cheating for amp-hour gains with voltage sacrifice. This pack will all around perform better, and based on that voltage it should have around 1,100 Watt-hour peak!!!

Will provide some further dimensional/weight/range test details next week (and snap a pic), for now I'm extremely glad Roshan got these produced... Great upgrade for anybody looking to get a big range boost!

I really like those Stunner LTs. I almost bought one but decided on the Juggernaut Ultra.

Deafcat
13 hours ago

Just got the new pack yesterday, will share some initial impressions:

This pack is awesome! barely larger than the stock sized packs, 100% compatible on any of their bikes with the inframe style battery (in 48V). No problem fitting it on my Stunner LT, weight difference is very minor and the pack is not particularly any taller, just a bit wider out the left side (about 7/8").

Peak voltage off the charger seems to be the same as my smaller pack, 55.0V (equating to 13S), so there's no cheating for amp-hour gains with voltage sacrifice. This pack will all around perform better, and based on that voltage it should have around 1,100 Watt-hour peak!!!

Will provide some further dimensional/weight/range test details next week (and snap a pic), for now I'm extremely glad Roshan got these produced... Great upgrade for anybody looking to get a big range boost!

edit, pics as promised:

https://i.imgur.com/zfCEEHr.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/lMXGjHf.jpg

weight is 10.27lbs (4.66 Kilos)

Still working on range figures from experience, but wow... looks like I can definitely do several days commute without a charge :eek:

Saratoga Dave
1 week ago

I had this happen. It was dirt on the contacts in the button pad that controls the level of boost. There are two small screws on the bottom that you can unscrew, the thing pops open, and clean those little contacts. You can also just try to shoot some compressed air in the sides of that pad from a tire inflating canister. Only happened once so far in 2500 miles, but that was once too often.

This on my Trek xm700

Stromer Bomber
1 week ago

how do you use the boost ?
You need to be in the power mode and going over 3 mph - then you hold the + button on the right of your display and hang on. It will take you to around 12 mph with the stock setting. Just make sure you have the boost enabled before you try this.

emco5
1 week ago

.... haven't found a single one that can manage a 50 mile range......

Would there be a reason to ride powered all the time? If you are sensible with the e-assistance and use leg power when boost isn't necessary, you should be able to travel beyond 50 miles per charge. Gearless hubs tend to cog/drag when the power is off, so focus your search on geared-hub and mid-drive setups. Read up on regenerative charging, there are conflicting opinions about whether it is worthwhile.

Julia S
1 week ago

The steep hills to our house had finally defeated me over the years. I accepted that I was done dealing with hills. I hadn't been on my bike for a few years and yet I still missed the joys of riding. I read a lot of Court's reviews and tried out about a dozen e-bikes. Being a mere 5'1", I wanted something small. Court, your review sold me.

I've been riding my Vektron all summer long and have yet to meet a hill I can't easily climb and I've got some long and steep challenging hills here in Oregon. I breeze up my mile-long hill from one direction or climb up another mile-long roller coaster hill that looks like something you'd encounter in San Francisco which is even steeper. No problem. Most of the time, I drive in the lowest Eco power setting or turn it off altogether. I no longer fear hills. I can gauge how much effort I want to work that day between the 4 power assist levels and the 10 speeds.

One of my favorite features is the WALK - ASSIST feature; it gives me a generous boost while I walk my bike up the 30 yard hill to our back yard entrance from the street.

The Vektron is super quiet, and the motor matches my efforts beautifully - no lurching.

A 6'4" friend of mine tried it out - raised the seat, made a quick & simple adjustment to the handlebars and was out having as much fun as me.

I've folded it up for a few trips, and although it's a heavier for me than their videos show with a strong young guy lifting it effortlessly into the car, it's not a deal-breaker at all. It fits kind of awkwardly in my Prius, but it fits. When I arrived at night, it was nice to know the bike would be safe in my car.

I put the Tern basket on the back - you have to make sure it clicks in 100%; it came off in a good bump and my contents including my laptop went sprawling on the ground. All was okay, but I cringe when I hit a big bump.

I'm going to start a savings account for the day that the battery needs to be replaced; those are NOT cheap! Still, this bike is an absolute BLAST to ride! It's been an interesting conversation starter too chatting with other bicyclists at bike racks.

It's so good to be out riding again in the fresh air! This bike has given back to me a precious form of exercise and enjoyment.

emco5
7 days ago

To the OP and others ready to jump into the eBike game…..

Roads generally aren’t all flat and straight. Earlier in this thread I stated that “You will work harder riding a 500 watt hub bike than a 350 watt mid-drive.”

Electric motors need to spin, laboring a motor at low rpm will generate heat. An extended work load, and especially lugging, can create enough heat to burn the windings which will lead to internal shorting. To ease the burden of the motor, manufacturers created geared hubs with an internal planetary reduction. By itself, though, that ratio is not enough to keep the motor happy under load. Because the hub is a fixed part of the wheel, to keep motor rpm in the safe no-heat zone a rider needs to keep the wheel rotating at a minimum speed. Under load, if a hub is rotated at less than 50% of its rated top speed, it will heat up. In spite of a hill's steepness, the rider still needs to maintain that minimum safe hub/wheel rotation speed. As the grade angle increases the rider’s only option is to shift to larger cogs in the rear cluster to reduce the work. That does lower the leg load but it also increases the crank’s rotational speed. Up a long and/or steep hill a continuous rapid spin can be quite arduous. Essentially, with a hub system you are there to 'assist the motor' while climbing, or it won’t assist you. The common work-around is to get a higher watt hub for more power. That will make a noticeable difference in boost, but bigger hubs have larger windings which contain more copper and add more weight. Larger windings are hungry and need large batteries which also add weight. Bigger motors also draw more current which will reduce the range per charge.

Similar to geared hubs, mid-drives also have primary internal gear reduction. Unlike hub-drives, though, a mid’s primary power is then routed to the bike’s rear cluster. That secondary reduction substantially reduces motor load so within normal riding parameters it never lugs or overheats. The mid rider isn’t enslaved to maintain a minimum road speed to keep the motor cool. Instead, a comfortable pedal cadence at any road speed is workable. The wider gearing range also allows the use of a smaller and lighter motor which can function with a lighter weight battery. Manufacturers don’t fit larger batteries to mid-drive bikes to feed hungry windings, it’s done to extend range.

Most of the pros and cons for both designs have been mentioned, so it’s up to the OP to choose a bike that fits his environment and preferred riding style. The routes I ride are quite hilly so my best choice was a mid-drive which lets me arrive at a destination without sweat-soaked clothing.

MLB
2 weeks ago

You don't like working harder, but you're doing it. As YOU get stronger, the bike will too. At least in terms of giving you more boost. What you are experiencing is what I like about mid drives with good torque sensors, you have to work for the boost. Mid drives are the smallest motors used for ebikes. Good torque but the smallest hp (hp is speed, torque is climbing ability)
Yes my hub motored bikes are faster and give more boost easier. (all brands)
But I spend 90% of my rides on the mid drive because it's much more like riding a bike. ;)
My Haibike (and all others I've heard discussed that aren't speed pedalec) cuts out at 19mph and that's annoying, so I feel you on the 18mph and I don't know WHY that is when it's all digital....

To add to this, I have had an e-motion 650b for 2 years (30 speed), and love it, but off road the rear hub motor just can't cut it. So I just bought a 2016 Bulls E-Stream EVO FS 3 29er (22 speed) with Brose for $3,099 (big sale!). I've seen tons of reviews about how good the Brose motor is. I road it on a 20 mile bike ride with some hills and was not impressed. A little background, I have an ICD, and heart disease (from a virus), but I'm not too much of a slouch for a 52 year old. Anyway, on the 650B I cruise around usually on eco mode with my son at 12-15, or solo on boost and cruse at 20-23. I get a good workout, but it doesn't kill me.

With the Brose (updated) 4 power levels, on high, or any level, the basic work I have to put in to just trigger any assistance is very high for me, on top of that power cuts out at 18 MPH, that is a big difference compared with 21 MPH. So I go slower and work harder, alot harder. My average BPM was about 130 on the 650B at 20 MPH, where the Brose is more like 140-150 at 18 MPH. Be aware it didn't matter if I was going 18, or 14, the effort appeared the same. It's not all is bad with the Brose, I peddled up a very steep canal embankment in the lowest gear that I would never make with the 650B.

I thought I would sell the 650B, but I guess not. The Brose seem good for only tight off road in low gears. So I can re-live my youth on trails I use to do with my 1995 IBOC (no shocks at all). I plan on doing everything I can to modify the Brose top speed, not happy it's cutting out 2 MPH before 20.

Larry Ganz
2 weeks ago

To add to this, I have had an e-motion 650b for 2 years (30 speed), and love it, but off road the rear hub motor just can't cut it. So I just bought a 2016 Bulls E-Stream EVO FS 3 29er (22 speed) with Brose for $3,099 (big sale!). I've seen tons of reviews about how good the Brose motor is. I road it on a 20 mile bike ride with some hills and was not impressed. A little background, I have an ICD, and heart disease (from a virus), but I'm not too much of a slouch for a 52 year old. Anyway, on the 650B I cruise around usually on eco mode with my son at 12-15, or solo on boost and cruse at 20-23. I get a good workout, but it doesn't kill me.

With the Brose (updated) 4 power levels, on high, or any level, the basic work I have to put in to just trigger any assistance is very high for me, on top of that power cuts out at 18 MPH, that is a big difference compared with 21 MPH. So I go slower and work harder, alot harder. My average BPM was about 130 on the 650B at 20 MPH, where the Brose is more like 140-150 at 18 MPH. Be aware it didn't matter if I was going 18, or 14, the effort appeared the same. It's not all is bad with the Brose, I peddled up a very steep canal embankment in the lowest gear that I would never make with the 650B.

I thought I would sell the 650B, but I guess not. The Brose seem good for only tight off road in low gears. So I can re-live my youth on trails I use to do with my 1995 IBOC (no shocks at all). I plan on doing everything I can to modify the Brose top speed, not happy it's cutting out 2 MPH before 20.

Check and see if you can have the bike shop reprogram the computer? Also, check if there is a setting for changing the wheel diameter or the tire circumference, and if it has that then changing it could let you travel a little faster, even if the programming thinks it's cutting out at 18mph you'd really be doing 20.

FooDoDaddy
2 weeks ago

To add to this, I have had an e-motion 650b for 2 years (30 speed), and love it, but off road the rear hub motor just can't cut it. So I just bought a 2016 Bulls E-Stream EVO FS 3 29er (22 speed) with Brose for $3,099 (big sale!). I've seen tons of reviews about how good the Brose motor is. I road it on a 20 mile bike ride with some hills and was not impressed. A little background, I have an ICD, and heart disease (from a virus), but I'm not too much of a slouch for a 52 year old. Anyway, on the 650B I cruise around usually on eco mode with my son at 12-15, or solo on boost and cruse at 20-23. I get a good workout, but it doesn't kill me.

With the Brose (updated) 4 power levels, on high, or any level, the basic work I have to put in to just trigger any assistance is very high for me, on top of that power cuts out at 18 MPH, that is a big difference compared with 21 MPH. So I go slower and work harder, alot harder. My average BPM was about 130 on the 650B at 20 MPH, where the Brose is more like 140-150 at 18 MPH. Be aware it didn't matter if I was going 18, or 14, the effort appeared the same. It's not all is bad with the Brose, I peddled up a very steep canal embankment in the lowest gear that I would never make with the 650B.

I thought I would sell the 650B, but I guess not. The Brose seem good for only tight off road in low gears. So I can re-live my youth on trails I use to do with my 1995 IBOC (no shocks at all). I plan on doing everything I can to modify the Brose top speed, not happy it's cutting out 2 MPH before 20.

SKhor
2 weeks ago

I really appreciate the responses. As someone just starting out I think I will fork over for the extra suspension, but stick to the rear hub drive. I'd like to be fit, but not there yet. What intimidates me at this time are the hills around where I live so having the extra throttle may boost my confidence a bit (I realize that even then, I may not be able to get over those hills just because of the steepness). I guess I will prioritize getting to places over exercise. I want this to be a fun experience and with that will mean I do more outdoors related stuff and hopefully = more exercise as a result.

Also, I'd like to give a shoutout to Eric from M2S as he was able to explain and clarify a few things about suspension/motor that I had when I called him earlier.

Douglas Ruby
2 weeks ago

Is there a way to remove the limiter on the turbo S? It runs into 27mph too easy and then bogs the pedal assist abruptly :/
Essentially the answer is no. the wheel diameter hack used on the Levo doesn't do much except make the speedo/odo inaccurate. You feel the "speed cutoff" on the Turbo family more than some other e-bikes due to the direct drive. The resistance created by the permanent magnets when no boost is being applied is very noticeable. This would not be true on many mid-drives which have free-wheeling between the motor and crank built in. I know of no so0lution.

Doug

rede
3 weeks ago

I have a 2016 turbo levo fsr 6fattie, purchased 12 months ago. The first bike was soon completely replaced under warranty because of various control issues. The new bike did make noises in the lower bracket, clicking and rattling. Not sure why, but I discovered that if you back pedal a little, the noise would go away. After maybe a 100 miles or so of rides, the noise disappeared. I assumed it was something in the belt drive. I continue to have some quirks in motor performance, which over time I have decided is related to motor temperature rise. Specialized Mission Control says that the motor will start cutting power when you reach 85-90C (185-194F), but I find it often starts as you approach 160F. I have repeatedly tried to get recommendations on tuning parameters, but can't get any answers. The dealer I bought it from, a large locally owned sporting goods store in NJ, when out of business. Specialized leaves a lot of warranty responsibility with the dealer, and so here I am with a $5500 bike, and no service support. The Mission Control people no longer respond to emails, as they had last fall, and Specialized says they have little control over that. I recently learned independently that there are firmware updates for the battery and motor, "required" by Specialized, but it's not covered under the factory warranty. The other dealers in the area have never sold a levo fsr, and only do warranty work on bikes they've sold. So much for customer support from Specialized. I found a shop that's a little farther away that is willing to do the updates, once they have the correct apparatus, but it looks like I'll be paying for it. If you bought a bike from Walmart, you wouldn't expect much support. Buying a $5500 bike from Specialized should have PLATINUM support. Very disappointed on service. Very happy with the ride and handling, and general quality, except for motor control issues on long ascents, which is the only I can get back home! Perhaps firmware updates will improve that. Thanks, rede.

Here's my 9-25-17 update. With a suggestion from a Specialized rep, I was able to find a dealer not too far away who actually has a trained tech on e-bikes. He was able to "borrow" the needed parts and installed new firmware for the battery and motor, and also got my Mission Control app working. Specialized must have changed the app software, because it has one different display than before, and, of course, there was no notification of a change. The firmware updates have made a remarkable difference in control performance. The overall motor control is now quite smooth over a wide range of conditions, which was never the case before. There is virtually no loss of boost when pedaling, except when you downshift, and one has to continue to anticipate a downshift, and do it earlier. If you shift a little early, the boost recovery is smooth. On upshifts there is no change. The motor cutoff approaching the 20 mph speed limit is now above 19 mph, much better than before when it started at lower speeds. Another change is that for the same rides, the battery drain is reduced, thereby suggesting a better overall range capability. The shop charged me $50 for the firmware update, which I think is a bargain, though Specialized should really cover it. So I now have a competent shop to take care of service. Specialized online service contacts are either unresponsive, or just tell you to go find a dealer.

ArmyHokie
3 weeks ago

I bit the bullet and removed the back panel of the display. Maybe 20 wires going through the cable, each with a plastic connection into the display. Nothing looked out of place, but I pushed each one in a bit. Reassembled and now the power assists works as it should, but boost button is still inop.

john peck
3 weeks ago

Fat ebikes are perfect for off road and trails. I love mine on trails because it is so smooth and feels solid. Without power though they are hard to peddle because they are so heavy and large to maneuver. However, on low assist, it is fine. I usually run mine on assist 1 or 2 and use throttle if I need a boost to get up an incline.

The original Hyperfat's were priced around $1000 and $1600 for the upgraded model. That was the early pricing, but now Tora has included a few extras like standard larger battery and the price has definitely spiked. I would say even at the new price, it is a decent deal but now it puts it in the realm of other ebikes that may be as good if not better like the Luna Fusion 500 and 1000 fat ebikes.

I'll have to look into the Luna Fusion; i'm not at all familiar with their bikes.

jazz
3 weeks ago

Fat ebikes are perfect for off road and trails. I love mine on trails because it is so smooth and feels solid. Without power though they are hard to peddle because they are so heavy and large to maneuver. However, on low assist, it is fine. I usually run mine on assist 1 or 2 and use throttle if I need a boost to get up an incline.

The original Hyperfat's were priced around $1000 and $1600 for the upgraded model. That was the early pricing, but now Tora has included a few extras like standard larger battery and the price has definitely spiked. I would say even at the new price, it is a decent deal but now it puts it in the realm of other ebikes that may be as good if not better like the Luna Fusion 500 and 1000 fat ebikes.

Dewey
4 weeks ago

I'd like to spend as little as necessary but would like something nice. Any recommendations?

Crazy Lenny's are selling Stromer ST1 Elite for $2k in large 20" size. It is a pedal assist but the display can be unlocked to increase the speed limit of the boost function to 20mph pressing the + button as a throttle. Here's a review, it says you might need to replace the squeaky brake pads.

Tom Meara
4 weeks ago

I've had the bike all of three days and it has exceeded expectations. Yes, it is heavy and yes, the components are low-end but the bike balances value and function quite well.

I live in far western New York state about 1 hour south of Buffalo. It is a small town where just about everything is reachable in a 10 mile round trip but it is very hilly. I've been riding non-powered bikes since I was a kid and until recently rode about 3000 miles per year, mostly in club rides and long distance touring. Now that I'm retired I should be riding more but have found myself riding less and gaining weight. The purpose of this bike is to use it for all of those short trips where I had to carry things so I was not too concerned about range. It is to be a cargo bike with power assist for the hills. My question was, "How far could I go if I wanted to?"

The route used for the test was about as flat as I can find around here with a total of 600 feet of elevation change over 19.6 miles.

The conditions were stock components (my Schwalbles come today), little wind, a PAS level set to 1 and never use the throttle. My tires were inflated to 55 psi. I had to work but found that under most conditions the level one assist compensated for the extra weight and drag of the motor while providing a little boost. On flat to rolling roads I maintained an average speed of 15-16 which is what I would normally do on my non-powered road bikes. At that level of assist and speed I would draw 70 watts as indicated by the photo.

Notice the battery level is still showing 5 bars after 12.6 miles. This is why the Radwagon has exceeded my expectations. Since I had gone farther on less power than I was expecting I resolved to take a photo at every mile starting at 13 and continuing till the end. For safety reasons I stopped for the mile 13 photo.

At this point I started to do some math wondering if I could do 13 miles on one bar could I really do 65 miles on a single charge? Unfortunately, soon after taking this photo I started to fiddle with the computer to display average speed and held the mode button too long, resetting the trip mileage. I didn't time myself but I estimate the average speed to be 12-14 mph since there is only one stoplight on this route and the only thing that really slowed my down was the hills with PAS 1.

The first bar disappeared at the 14.5 mile mark and the battery meter stayed at 4 bars until just before I got home. The last 1/4 mile is downhill and the regen brought the battery back to 5 bars as I pulled into the yard as you can see in the last photo. Google maps has this route at 19.6 and I think I reset the computer at 13.3 or 13.4 so my wheel circumference setting for mileage, speed, etc. is pretty good.

I think I can safely say that I traveled at 14-16 mph on a flat to slightly rolling route for 20 miles and use only 20% of my battery. I will have to try for 60 miles on a single charge, if I can find a flat 60 miles around here. Stay tuned.

1/4
mrgold35
1 month ago

I work commute and trail ride with my rovers with over 3500 miles between them in a year. It is usually 85-100 degrees for more than 6 months out of the year. I'm also +270lbs with about 25lbs of commuter gear (rack, backpack, accessories, spare battery). My understanding is the 500 watt limit on steep inclines is because of potential overheating and shortening motor life over time. I have to factor in my extra weight, high daily temps, and sometimes strong head winds of +15 mph and gust +20 mph. A strong steady headwind with a lot of gusts can feel just like a 10%-15% incline that suck battery power and strains the motor exactly the same way.

I have one spot during my work commute with fairly steep incline on the way home (my entire ride home is just one long incline up 550 feet over 6 miles). Probably 50-60% of regular pedal bike folks walk their bikes during this part. I have the newer controller programming with the watts are set for each PAS level (PAS 3: 375w, PAS 4: 550w). I can still pedal up those parts in PAS 3 or 4 depending on the mph I want to maintain between 8-17 mph. I'm also pretty tired, breathing hard, breaking a good sweat, and feel the lactic acid buildup in my legs when I'm trying to maintain the +17 mph up this section.

My goals is not to have sustained hub motor engagement above the 550w level for extended periods of time because of wind, heat, and/or inclines. Very easy to do with the newer "watts per PAS" controller programming compared when I had the old "mph per PAS" controller programming. I still use the throttle at full 750 watts power near the top of the hills for short runs if I start to slow down too much and just need a little boost. I've always set my PAS to 4 on this section with occasional bumps of full throttle as needed. Then back down to PAS 3 for the rest of the ride home.

The hub motor can provide enough assist if you adjust your gears and mph. You might have to check into changing the gearing to make your ebike into a better hill climber? My Radrover is not a hill climber with only 7 gears without the aid of motor assist.

Craig Crowder
1 month ago

Just returned from 10 days mountain biking in NC with new MTBE upgrade. I really like it. I put it in mtbe mode and leave it there. It is much smoother than manually shifting the boost level. It also reduces the need to shift gears as the torque changes via mtbe accomplish the same result. I have a Bulls Monster EFS and still don't have walk assist capability. I see from an earlier post from a Bulls owner that it works, so wonder what I am doing wrong. Suggestions?

How to enable walk assist; 1) Select a speed (Eco,tour,sport/emtb,turbo). 2) press the walk assist button. 3) within 2 seconds of pressing the walk button press the + button and the bike will start walking. Let me know if that works for you :)

Tim Reilly
1 month ago

I was in accident on my St1 so ended up buying the ST1-x as a replacement out of the insurance money. I must say, I was a little underwhelmed by everyone always comparing the ST1-x with the ST2... I realise those 2 bikes are "similar", but price points, they are world's apart, and I would imagine a lot of people entertaining purchasing an ST1x are coming from an ST1 not an ST2! I personally find it very hard to justify buying a bike like the ST2 that costs $3,000 more and the ST1-x is already twice as expensive as the first e-bike I bought 5 years ago.... So, I'd prefer more reviews comparing the St1 to the ST1-x!

On that front, I use my bike for commuting and I was probably most concerned about the ST1x having Aluminum forks - particularly as they ST1 had originally been sold to me as a bike that absorbs the road bumps more because of the carbon-fiber forks! So, I personally do not understand why Stromer regressed on the forks for the ST1-x. My commute is typically urban and feels half way to off road owing to the utilities workers utter inability to rip up a road to check the gas/water/sewer/cable etc and then reseal it perfectly flat and inline with the original road. Add in a few winters and freezing temps and you've got one pot-holed bumpy ride on bitumen!That said, at the end of the day, I didn't notice much difference. I guess on either bike, the bumps are absorbed for the most part with the Big Ben tires, and the harder those are pumped up, the more bumpy the front end ride is.

With respect to the back wheel and bounce... I originally had a fully sprung Brooks saddle which absorbed most of the road shock. My Stromer dealer talked me into getting a thudbuster seatpost and all I can say is... no difference. Unless you are heavily invested in racing cycle seats, I'd recommend getting a decent seat with springs as its cheaper than the seatposts, and much more portable across different bikes! But, no doubt as everyone with Stomer notes, something is needed on the back end because that is one harsh ride without springs there somehow. Seatposts do transport across from ST1 to ST1-x.

As to the ride of the ST1-x vs the ST1 - now in that regard, they are UTTERLY different beasts! The ST1 rides like the older models... Its slow to start, picks up speed like crazy by the third crank of the peddles and just zips along! I had no problems going up hills, adding more power to never break speed on the uphills bits of my ride (unless it started to get steep...). The St1-x... Seems to be MUCH more dependent on your cadence (which I suck at). If you are peddling strongly, the ST1-x is punchy! No other word for it - you feel that power helping you along! But woe betide you if you slow down your cadence - then it suddenly seems to lurch and slows down (particularly when going up hills). I am gathering from the forums (mainly having to read the ST2 forums as the ST1 forums are useless for understanding the mechanics of this bike), it is to do with the torque sensor and settings. I have just noticed on the app I can adjust the torque/speed/agility of the bike to a variety of setting (e.g. urban, snow, tour) and am hoping that by tinkering with these, I can stop the bike lurching on the hills as my cadence wanes. I just haven't done a ride yet with the my phone with me... You can adjust on the screen in the cross bar as well, but the fine tuning is easier from the app.
[Update - I have added comments later in this thread revising the ride - once customised it is better!]

The ST1-x also only has 3 levels of power. I am finding in Level 1, it is actually much more like riding an ordinary bike. Whereas in the ST1, the eco mode felt like you were getting a decent workout with a bit of boost, Level 1 on the ST1-x seems to literally just cancel out the weight of the bike so you feel like you are on an ordinary cycle ride. You are still going faster... but it takes more effort to sustain speed (yes, you actually use more than the 3 smallest rear cogs!). Level 2 (which seems to be where most people end up) feels more like half way between eco and city mode on the ST1. Level 3 is like a turbo boost - ZOOM! But, I have got to get the torque thing sorted out because at the moment, I am lurching up hills when in Level 3... It might be a miscalibrated torque sensor or it might be I just haven't got the torque in the right mode for my type of erratic cadence - but I look forward to getting that sorted out because Level 2 and 3 are very nice when its not lurching! Overall, I suspect I might end up getting a bit more of a workout on the ST1-x, but its nice to know that I have the power when I need it!

The St1-x does have some nice additional features - the regen is MUCH better when going downhill! I go down a couple of steep hills and on the ST1, the regen would cut out once I got past 40km/hr which led to me riding the brakes hard. In addition, you had to keep tapping it into regen, and then when at the bottom of the hill, tap it back to a boost mode. On the ST1-x, when you apply the brakes, the regen automatically cuts out and goes back to whatever level you were in - nice!!! And the highest level of regen is slowing me down a lot on even very steep hills. The ST1-x also has a boost mode. I haven't got that sorted out yet - its lurching like when I am in Level 3... when it works, its fine, but its erratic application right now is not impressing me. Again, I am hoping this just a torque sensor issue. However, I wouldn't say the boost was a lot... Maybe half way betweeen whatever modes you are in. Maybe its the cadence/torque thing again...

The light is good - I was told the front light made me look like a motor bike coming head on in the day, but wasn't quite so visible from the side. The panier rack is as pathetic as it was on the ST1. Anti-theft all looks interesting... I do know the bike rolls when you have it lock mode... I read somewhere that it rolls for about 60ft before the back wheel seizes up. Would be nice if it seized up earlier - 60ft is enough to get my bike from a bike rack to a car... That said, as long as there is a GSM signal, it is nice to know I can lock and arm the anti-theft from my phone - and see where the bike is! Nice add-ons...

Those are my first impressions!
I agree with your comparing the torque between the ST1 and X. I have tried different setting on my X to add more torque to the "top of the cadence",when the pedal/crank is at 6 and 12.Stromer advertises the X has more torque than the ST1,but when riding the X on any type of road it does not have the torque the ST1 has!

Richard Giambruno
1 month ago

Is the BionX the only system that has torque-sensing technology which gives you a boost of electric assist when you need it? I see so many systems that give you the 20%,40%,60%,80%,100% option to choose from but is that the same thing? I am a para with some small strength in my legs so I need assist and wonder what would work for me?

Nicknick
4 weeks ago

Received mine (standard battery, Schwalbe tire upgrade). These are my first impressions.

Building the bike

Putting it together was relatively easy using the videos on the juiced site. It's a heavy bike so having someone help while you put on the front tire is nice. Anyone who is comfortable with some basic tools can do this. Don’t forget to tighten the steering.
The front fender and headlight will be added later when Juiced ships the missing parts (in a few days). UPDATE: I put these on, was doable. Headlight is super bright, but does not have any "to the side" visibility like some other headlights do.
I expected this to have a battery operated rear light, but it seems to be a reflector. UPDATE: It has a tiny light in the box. I ordered the Sweethome rec instead which is about 500x more bright.

The good

First of all: this bike looks AWESOME. It is sooo cool. And it looks like a cool bike, not an eBike. The battery design and not having a mid-drive motor helps with that.
All parts you touch feel like high quality. Saddle, shifter, handles, rear rack, bike standard, it's super solid.
Size is perfect for me, so the Juiced size guide seems spot on.
Tires are super wide compared to my regular hybrid bike. They are comfortable, but not as "precise". Great for dealing with potholes, but it'd make me hesitant to get something like the Hyperfat which must have zero “cornering feel".
The brakes are INSANE. So powerful. I've never had disc brakes before, so maybe that's why, but it's easy to skid the tire even though the combined weight of me+bike is like 250lbs.
There is a lot of power. On a straight road I really doubt I’d go above level 2 (levels are ECO,1,2,3,sport). In sport mode I’m flying by everyone at 28mph before I know it. However, I went to find a super steep San Francisco hill (like 25%+) and even in sport mode I’m pedaling hard to help it get up to 10mph, and the throttle does nothing. These are kind of rare hills and on my regular bike I’d have to get off and walk, so I sort of doubt any eBike could do much there. Even electric scooters seem powerless against these hills. UPDATE: I took it up to Twin Peaks (SF tallest point), was doable, though I was still pretty sweaty when I got up there.
The throttle+pedal combo to get a boost when leaving a stoplight is nice. But generally I end up not using the throttle on its own, it just doesn’t give you enough to get that “wheeeeeeee!” feeling, its more fun to pedal and get the boost from that.
No regen, which is awesome. Regenerative braking ruins easy coasting, which the most fun part of biking. :)
You can easily ride this bike with a dead battery. I rode it for a bit while it was turned off, and even though its heavy it would be fine to ride this home for a few miles.

Things Juiced could do in future CrossCurrent S models to make it even better

Putting the battery in is kind of hard. You really need to push it hard while holding the key in "open" position and it feels like more of a hassle than it should be, especially since I’ll be having to do this multiple times a week to charge it. I might try to find a way to make this easier (maybe WD40?).

UPDATE: I think I was doing this wrong. I checked out the EBR review video which has come out since I wrote this review and it actually clicks in without using the key. It needs a bit of muscle but it's no longer a hassle.

I used “walk mode” to get my bike up the stairs. You have to hold the minus button for a while to enable it, which means you just have to stand there for a few seconds with the brakes on so it doesn’t roll back. You also have to hold that button to keep it active, which means that if you let it go, you need to wait a few seconds again to get going. It would have been better if walk mode just put a 5pmh limit on the throttle (which gives you direct power).
AFAIK there is no way to have the light (screen backlight+headlight) on by default. I wish it was “always on” when the bike is on, because there is only upside to more visibility, even during the day. Most new cars are this way too.
There is a short jerky feel in the pedals when you go from peddling to coasting and you move the pedals a bit backwards. It’s like the motor isn’t sure whether to help you or not. Not super bothersome though.
Bell, chain guard, integrated rear light would be nice.

Nice-to-have’s I’d pay extra for:

Frame lock (euro style) for quick stops at the store.
Rear rack strong enough to carry a person.
An anti-theft security code to turn on the bike (maybe have the motor lock the rear wheel without it).
For juiced to put on the Schwalbe tires for me (they did for me as I ordered early, but no longer do this, so you'll have to take it to a LBS to get them put on).

Summary

I'm no expert, so I don’t have a ton to compare this to, but I’ve tried a bunch of other eBikes. Short rides on a Haibike, Gazelle, Stromer ST1 and a longer ride on a Bulls Lacuba Evo 8. The Bulls is the only bike I would consider a similarly great commuting alternative (though its not a speed pedelec), which feels a bit more smooth and has some higher quality parts, but it is $4000, which makes this Juiced CCS a fantastic deal at well under 2k. It would still be a great deal at $2500+ actually.

This bike is great and I'd for Juiced to do well. Looking at the forum comments here they could probably do a bit more “underpromise and overdeliver”, i.e., tell your customers to expect the bike in October, so September comes as a nice surprise. But even then, some people will never be pleased. :)

I’ll update this review in a month or so when I get some more miles on it. But in the meanwhile I’ve ordered one for my wife as well.

UPDATE after 100+ miles: definitely love this bike. I'm excited to ride it every day on my commute. I'm surprised how often I go over 20mph. I didn't expect to care this much, but at this point I'd definitely not buy anything that is not a 28mph speed pedelec. I'm also totally happy with the amount of power. It's rare (few super steep hills) that I wish it had more.
The only thing that is bothersome to me at this point is the weight. With the added u-lock I mounted on, I'm guessing we're at 60lbs+. It's no problem at all when biking, but using any ceiling hook style bike racks, or hauling it up stairs, is a hassle. That said, I'm not sure how much less of a hassle it would be at 50lbs or even 40lbs. And with bikes below that weight you're getting into the Faraday style, which is super entry-level on power and battery. So maybe this is just part of eBike life. :)

TLDR: I love this thing. Would buy again in a heartbeat.

Blueflash
1 month ago

Too smokey to ride this week in the Northwest. Made some observations on the bike. Glad to see the chain is a KMC E-bike approved design for higher strength. Disappointed to find out that only the rear hub is Boost sized. The front is the standard 100mm spacing. In all my research I could only find claims in reviews, and Bulls or dealer info, that this model had boost. They didn't say it was only on the rear. I imagine the newer Plus sized model has both.

qqq uiop
2 months ago

I don't understand why they sell this w/the Bosch Performance 350 w motor, but restrict pedal assist to 20 mph rather than the 28 mph it was designed for. This is one of a couple of small cargo bikes I'd buy today IF it had 28 mph pedal assist AND offered it with the dual 500 Wh battery pack for a reasonable battery range as a car replacement. I guess I have to build my own (I don't have the skills) to get what I want. That's really disappointing, as Bosch offers these systems, and I bet if I wait a year even these will be superseded by batteries with better range and motors with more torque. I'm serious that I want to get rid of my car, but not with an expensive bike that I'm not quite happy with.

Bob Smith
6 months ago

How many water bottle cage braze ons?

D C
8 months ago

Hi Court, great review as always. Can you shed any light on the claimed range? I know this depends upon rider weight, max speed, amount of pedaling, wind, flatness etc, along with BMS etc, but have heard that a useful rule of thumb is around 20 miles per wH. On that basis, one would expect a range more like 20, against the claimed 30 (minimum). What's your take on this? Also since the guys from Propel seem to be responding here, if they have any real world experience with battery life that would be great to hear about. I know you are probably limited in amount of time you can spend with each bike, but if there's a way you could ride them for an hour, or 20-30 miles, that would start to give us a terrific baseline to compare bikes!

D C
7 months ago

Propel Electric Bikes Thanks

Propel Electric Bikes
7 months ago

Most people see between 20-40 miles on the 400Wh battery. The Bosch display will tell you how much range you have in a given mode, for example Eco will get you 60 miles and Turbo will get you about 20 miles. For the 500Wh you should see a 25% increase so 75-25 or for most people 25-50 miles. I hope that helps - Chris

riceburner68
8 months ago

Would be nice if you could carry a passenger but the 110lb (50kg) rating limits who you can carry. Extra mount points on the frame so looks like you might be able to fit a stronger rack though.

Propel Electric Bikes
7 months ago

It's my understanding that Benno is working on a rack with foot rests for this purpose. It's build to be modular so I guess we'll just have to wait and see what they come up with. It sure seems like the stock rack can hold more than 110lbs, but that is indeed what it's rated for.

TheSimplecanadian
8 months ago

Wow you really know your stuff! Great video, great channel and great guy!

kustomweb
9 months ago

Court, get a follow-me drone, I'm sure you find a spot in the Prius

Benjamin Müller
9 months ago

how about this one:

https://www.rosebikes.de/bike/rose-xtra-watt-3-herren-bike-now/aid:783282

NovaColonel
9 months ago

Very nice bike and review, Chris always looks a little tense, although he's probably a very cool guy.
Also, what's up with that weird german-swiss hybrid flag right above the chainrings?

Propel Electric Bikes
7 months ago

Thanks! I'm still getting comfortable in front of the camera. I think the flag on the frame is a nod to Benno's roots since he was born and raised in Berlin.

Alex NC
9 months ago

add their official panniers in the back and their front basket, and this looks like the perfect bike for me. too bad I'm a cheapskate and that price is looking pretty high :-( Great bike though

philodygmn
9 months ago

What I'd like is an actual Electra FlatFoot version of this bike with weather treated frame and _trigger_ throttle from standstill with walk mode, and also good brakes like this one's. Sealed chain might be nice, def. at least a proper guard, slap guard notwithstanding. Even keeping its less robust FatFrank tires, Townie's FlatFoot still wins out over this bike for me, even without an extra-long rack or stationary front basket mounts either. That handled seat is a great idea that also makes it easier to lock up, FWIW. Townie's hubbed gears make it neater and lower maintenance as well.

Florida Scot
9 months ago

Great cargo city bike, nice quality, looks

Mark Elford
9 months ago

Sleek cargo bike, i like it. they really should have sold it with front rack and bags installed, looks half done.

Propel Electric Bikes
9 months ago

This was an early shipment. It is available with those accessories now.

Darren Brown
9 months ago

what about reviewing some of the riese - muller bikes

Propel Electric Bikes
9 months ago

We're trying to coordinate something next month to get Court out here to review the Riese & Muller bikes. They were supposed to be here for the last trip, but the shipment was a little delayed. We have most bikes here now and it's just a matter of coordinating with Court.

Seb K
9 months ago

I'm tired . Just had a loooooong debate/argument with some guys on another site about Ebikes . So many people have no damn clue about these bikes yet still feel the need to judge others who use them . I was negative about them at first but never posted vile crap about them . Amongst my traditional bikes I now have three Ebikes . Presently building up my electric fat bike (or Efatbike) and it is fast .

grantspassage
9 months ago

YOU REALLY SHOULD START WITH THE PRICE.

cresshead
8 months ago

price $3,999 and a full review here
https://electricbikereview.com/benno/boost-e-10d/

David Macdonald
9 months ago

I wish you would point out Cadence and torque sensing bikes and the differences between them because it matters a lot to someone buying a torque sensor bike by accident not realising they have to work a lot harder than a cadence sensor bike bike court

David Macdonald
9 months ago

Yes I had the bosch system but it mite say it uses cadence as well as torque but if you have poor legs you will definitely have to work a lot harder and yes the battery lasts longer but the reason for that is because you are working a lot harder my cadence sensor bike I don't have to work hard at it with my legs ,but I can put in the effort I can manage, that's where the difference comes in with the torque sensing Bosch system you have to work hard with your legs remember (your) legs might very well be quite fit some people who get an electric bike have very very poor legs that's why often they get a E bike , and the cadence sensor definitely makes the difference the point is for people that don't have a E bike and never have had they mite very well think o good it's electric and no problem, only to find they have as i did paid for a bike like the bosch type torque sensing cube (they still can't use )

Propel Electric Bikes
9 months ago

That really depends on the motor system and the gearing though. The Bosch system uses torque sensing and cadence sensing so you can use the bike in a low gear with a higher cadence if you don't want to work too hard. Just cadence sensing on it's own is almost obsolete in my eyes. It's not very safe as it can be unpredictable. That's just my opinion though.

FRANK ROBY
9 months ago

V good bike.

Tom Thumb
9 months ago

Nice looking bike. I like the black and white. I also like the rack.

Pat Shala
9 months ago

I really love this bike , it looks so good .

Dave Caldwell
9 months ago

Very nice looking bike! Big fan of the Bosch system, it really is as good as you say Court :)