Benno Boost E 10D Review

Benno Boost E 10d Electric Bike Review
Benno Boost E 10d
Benno Boost E 10d Bosch Performance Line 350 Watt Mid Drive
Benno Boost E 10d Bosch Powerpack Downtube Battery
Benno Boost E 10d Rubber Ergonomic Grips Bosch Intuvia Display
Benno Boost E 10d Supernova E3 E Bike V6s Headlight
Benno Boost E 10d Alloy Fenders 24 Wheels
Benno Boost E 10d Extra Long Cargo Rack With Pannier Rails
Benno Boost E 10d Shimano Deore Lx Components
Benno Boost E 10d Electric Bike Review
Benno Boost E 10d
Benno Boost E 10d Bosch Performance Line 350 Watt Mid Drive
Benno Boost E 10d Bosch Powerpack Downtube Battery
Benno Boost E 10d Rubber Ergonomic Grips Bosch Intuvia Display
Benno Boost E 10d Supernova E3 E Bike V6s Headlight
Benno Boost E 10d Alloy Fenders 24 Wheels
Benno Boost E 10d Extra Long Cargo Rack With Pannier Rails
Benno Boost E 10d Shimano Deore Lx Components

Summary

  • A compact cargo-style electric bike with sturdy 24" wheels, comfortable 2.6" diameter tires and a premium drive system from Bosch
  • Low balanced weight distribution, removable battery and display panel, premium integrated lights by Supernova, Micro USB charging ports and three color choices
  • Solid 10-speed drivetrain from Shimano, the motor offers shift detection for reduced wear on the chain and sprockets, powerful hydraulic disc brakes also from Shimano
  • No suspension elements, currently only available in one frame size, new to the US and possibly harder to locate at dealers for test rides, solid one year warranty

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Benno

Model:

Boost E 10D

Price:

$4,299

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Urban, Cargo

Electric Bike Class:

Pedal Assist (Class 1)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Yeaer Components, 2 Year Motor Battery and Control System

Availability:

United States, Europe

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

57 lbs (25.85 kg)

Battery Weight:

5.7 lbs (2.58 kg)

Motor Weight:

8.8 lbs (3.99 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

19 in (48.26 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

19" Seat Tube, 23.5" Reach, 28" Stand Over Height, 74" Length

Frame Types:

Mid-Step

Frame Colors:

Neon Yellow, Matte Anthracite Gray, Putty Gray

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid CRMO Steel, 9 mm Quick Release Skewer

Frame Rear Details:

9 mm Quick Release Skewer, Replaceable Derailleur Hanger

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Front Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses

Gearing Details:

10 Speed 1x10 Shimano Deore LX, 11-34T

Shifter Details:

Shimano Deore XT Triggers on Right

Cranks:

FSA Alloy 170 mm Crank Arms, 20T Chainring with Plastic Guard

Pedals:

VP Aluminum Alloy Wide Platform

Headset:

FSA 1-1/8" with Two 20 mm Risers and One 10 mm Riser

Stem:

Custom Alloy 50 mm Length

Handlebar:

Alloy, High Rise, 140 mm Rise, 27" Length

Brake Details:

Shimano Deore Hydraulic Disc with 180 mm Front Rotor and 160 mm Rear Rotor, Shimano Deore Levers with Adjustable Reach

Grips:

Benno Branded Rubber, Ergonomic, Locking

Saddle:

Benno Wide Faux Leather Saddle with Handle

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

350 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

31.2 mm

Rims:

Double Wall Alloy, Stainless Reinforcement Eyelets and Nipples, 36 Hole

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 14 Gauge, Black

Tire Brand:

Benno Dual Sport, 24" x 2.6"

Wheel Sizes:

24 in (60.96cm)

Tire Details:

35 to 45 PSI, 60 TPI

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Extra Wide Alloy Fenders, Extra Long Cargo Rack with Pannier Rails 50 kg (110 lb) Max Weight, Supernova 3 LED Integrated Rear Light, Supernova E3 E-Bike V6s Integrated Headlight, Adjustable Length Center Mount Kickstand, Optional Utility Pannier Bags, Optional Utility Front Tray, Optional Utility Front Tray Bag, Optional Baby Seat Adapter

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, 1.7 lb 4 Amp Charger

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Bosch

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Geared Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

350 watts

Motor Peak Output:

570 watts

Motor Torque:

63 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Samsung

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

11 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

396 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

3.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

30 miles (48 km)

Estimated Max Range:

70 miles (113 km)

Display Type:

Intuvia, Removable, Adjustable Angle, Grayscale, Backlit LCD

Readouts:

Speed, Assist Level (Eco, Tour, Sport, Turbo), Battery Level (1-5), Odometer, Trip Distance, Estimated Range, Clock, Max Speed, Average Speed, Trip Time, Shift Assist Recommendation

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad with Tactile Feedback on Left, 6 Volt Micro USB Port on Display

Drive Mode:

Advanced Pedal Assist (Measures Wheel Speed, Pedal Cadence and Pedal Torque, Power Output Relative to Pedal Input: Eco 50%, Tour 120%, Sport 190%, Turbo 275%)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph) (15 mph in Some Markets)

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Written Review

Benno was a new company to me, I heard about it through my friend Chris who owns and runs Propel Bikes in Brooklyn NY. He’s an early adopter and I always learn a lot during visits to his shop. As it turns out, the founder of Benno Bikes is actually Benno Baenziger who co-founded Electra Bicycles. I’m very familiar with them and their recent acquisition by Trek. Elektra has an awesome ebike called the Townie Go! which switched over to the Bosch system in 2016. That’s the same system the Benno Boost E is using and it’s one of my favorites. As a compact cargo ebike, the Boost E 10D is short enough to fit in some tight spaces while still delivering utility with a longer rear rack. They also sell a tray that attaches to the head tube and provides even more space. I’m being specific about how it attaches because some cargo bikes have a bar and fork mounted basket which turns as you do. These baskets (when loaded) tend to sway side to side and I’m glad that the Benno Boost E is delivering more than just looks and a promise of usefulness. The rear rack can handle up to 110 lbs of weight and has an extra long standard-gauge tube fixed to both sides for the clip-on style panniers. The fenders are another highlight on the utility front and I was impressed with their great coverage and strength… no rattling! You get integrated front and rear lights by Supernova (the front is mounted with an adjustable angle clamp so you can use it to see, not just be seen). In short, this is a nimble bike that’s easier to handle and lighter weight than a lot of full sized models. You may not be able to fit two Yepp seats on the back but they do sell an adapter for one and you may not have running boards to start but the 24″ wheels match so tires and tubes are easier to replace together. They keep weight low and improve wheel strength but aren’t so small that the derailleur hits curbs or have you dragging pedals during leaning turns.

Powering the bike is a Bosch Powerpack 400 downtube battery. It’s easy to charge on the bike but also has a plastic carry-loop on top so you can bring it inside. The mounting interface is forward compatible to work with the larger Powerpack 500 released in the United States in 2017 and in my experience, the charger for these batteries is fast and easy to use. It’s also light weight and compact so tossing it into a pannier or trunk bag is easy. Note that Benno sells their own extra-long bags that work perfectly with the Boost models. I’m a big proponent of bicycle safety and noticed that their bags have reflective stripes woven in. This is key, and something I wish they had considered for their branded tires as well. I’ve seen reflective tape on tires that helps you stand out even more and I’m not sure how easy it is to add at the consumer level. In any case, the lights are nice but the headlight doesn’t shine out to the sides and if you’re a messenger or someone who is just focused on a child or big load of groceries please be safe and consider additional lights and reflective gear. I do like that the frame comes in multiple color choices; the putty white and neon yellow would probably stand out best but the black does look cool.

Driving the bike is a Bosch Performance Line 350 watt mid-drive motor. It peaks at 63 Newton meters of torque and is super responsive. In addition to being powerful and efficient (with great range) it delivers shift sensing which will help your chain, sprockets and derailleur last. It’s still up to you to ease off when shifting gears, it’s a software driven sensor and imperfect, but the sensing technology is better than nothing. The motor measures your pedal cadence, force and rear wheel speed so the bike won’t start if you just rest a foot on the pedal. It’s capable of assisting you up to 20 mph and I appreciate the range of RPM output it delivers. Some motors have more of a sweet spot while the Bosch Centerdrive performs well at a range and allows you to pedal at higher RPMs without dropping out (which is my personal preference due to knee sensitivity). The motor is balanced by excellent hydraulic disc brakes from Shimano. They aren’t the largest or fanciest as you’d see on a downhill ebike but they are larger than average and from a name-brand manufacturer. The Shimano levers are easy to use with just a finger or two and the levers can be adjusted for reach which is great if you’re wearing work gloves or lending the bike to different employees or family members.

Once the battery is charged and mounted, turning the bike on is very simple. You press the power button on the Intuvia display near the lower left corner. It blinks on and delivers battery capacity, current speed, assist level and ride stats. You can change these readouts without taking your hands off the grip which is huge if you’re trying to balance a large load. One thing this cargo bike does not have stock is a super wide double-leg kickstand. Instead, it features a single side adjustable length stand that’s positioned far enough back to clear the left crank arm and pedal but not so far that a front basket add-on would tip the bike. Not everyone needs the huge stands but they do come in handy for large loads… they add cost and weight but the Benno Boost E 10D is already fairly light in comparison to full sized cargo bikes. It weighs about 57 lbs and the removable battery shaves off nearly 6 lbs. Both wheels are also easy to take off with quick release but depending on your environment it could be worth replacing with security skewers. Anyway, the display panel is also removable for convenience and to keep it protected in the rain, direct sun or rowdy bike racks. At the top right edge of the Intuvia display there’s a Micro USB port so you can charge portable electronics like a phone GPS. I love how easy it is to reach vs. some ebikes with a battery-mounted USB charging port.

For now, this is the only e-bike from Benno but I appreciate the unique qualities it offers and can see that they put a lot of time and energy into getting it right. I’m a big fan of the Bosch drive system and noticed that they went with a larger chainring here (which confused me at first), designed to balance out the smaller wheel diameter for a more natural cadence range. You get 10 gears here with a solid Shimano Deore LX derailleur. To me, this is a sweet spot where you don’t drop the chain as frequently and don’t have the complexity of two derailleurs… the Bosch system only works with one sprocket up front for now and the chainring has a nice plastic cover to keep your pant leg or dress clear and clean. I suppose I’d like a bell added for friendly signaling but that’s cheap and easy to add yourself later. The ergonomic grips felt great and used lockers so they won’t twist around if you’re really bearing down while transporting a heavy load. It’s a great bike and I’m excited about how it might empower people who couldn’t fit the full sized cargo ebikes into their garages, elevators, sheds and other storage spots.

Pros:

  • Unique tire size… they’re basically 24″ diameter plus sized tires (like you’d find on a mountain bike or fancy speed pedelec), the extra air provides traction and comfort and the smaller wheel diameter improves strength and lowers weight for stability (technically I think plus sized is 2.8″ to 3″ but 2.6 is still large for something like t his)
  • Cool rack options, there’s a longer cargo-style rack in the rear that can handle up to 110 lbs along with an extra set of braze-ons for bags, up front there are threaded eyelets setup for a porter style tray (the kind that mounts directly to the head tube and offers better handling), they also sell a Yepp child seat adapter
  • Nice fenders, you get matching Aluminum front and rear fenders that are extra wide for the plus sized tires… and given the smaller wheel size you probably won’t clip your toe on them as much when turning! During my ride tests the fenders didn’t rattle at all
  • Heavy duty Shimano hydraulic disc brakes, you get 180 mm up front and 160 mm in the rear, it’s enough to stop you and larger loads (and again, the smaller wheel diameter improves your mechanical advantage here with braking)
  • Premium drive system from Bosch, this is the same motor used for e-mountain bikes and full sized cargo models like the Xtracycle Edgerunner, it’s responsive and very efficient but still plenty powerful
  • Given the shorter frame length of the Benno Boost, you can fit it into more compact places (like some elevators, sheds and car racks)
  • Well positioned kickstand… sometimes they mount these things to the bottom bracket which gets in the way of your crank arms and pedals, in this case it’s set back a little bit and positioned under the cargo rack
  • Comfortable and accessible frame with an angled top tube… I’d call this a mid-step because it’s not as high as a traditional diamond frame but not as low as a step-thru, one advantage of still using the high top-tube is improved strength and stiffness
  • Battery and motor weight are kept low and central (if not a bit forward) on the frame, this keeps the rack completely open and allows for more weight to be added (compared with frame mounted batteries), you can charge on or off the bike easily and the battery can be upgraded to 500 watt hours for maximum range
  • In addition to having a removable battery, the display is also easy to take off and that’s really handy if you’re parking in a city or bike rack where vandalism or accidental bumps and tips can happen
  • The display panel has an integrated Micro USB charging port so you can tap into the main battery for additional power for your cell phone, GPS or other device and it’s right there easy to reach vs. down at the battery
  • You get two awesome LED Lights from Supernova and both are run off the main battery pack, this saves time and materials compared with add-on lights that can be easily stolen and require separate charging or replacement cells
  • I like the cockpit, they went with a riser bar and ergonomic grips to increase comfort and position the rider upright (to help spot traffic and fellow pedestrians)
  • It’s nice that you get several colors to choose from and the putty color and yellow struck me as being high visibility for increased safety and visual footprint
  • I like the oversized saddle with integrated handle at the back, this comes in handy to lift and position the bike but might be hard on a suspension seat post (if you swapped one in) so be careful ;)
  • The brake levers offer adjustable reach so you can fit your hand size and account for wearing work gloves or winter gloves
  • I like the pedals they chose, they seemed sturdy and had a larger surface area with good contact points so you won’t slip off easily
  • Quick release wheels make maintenance and transport easier but you might want to swap them with security hardware to prevent tampering and theft depending on your locale
  • Internally routed shifting, brake and motor cables help to reduce snags and keep the bike looking good
  • Reinforced spokes and rim eyelets reduce breaking and cracking under load
  • The control pad is very easy to reach while riding, you don’t have to take your left hand off the grip in order to arrow up or down in assist power level or change the display readout and that’s extra important if you’re carrying heavy/unstable cargo and need power instantly

Cons:

  • Despite having large tires, this bike can feel a little stiff (especially if they’re fully inflated for a full load), there’s no suspension so if you’re sensitive like me, consider adding a 31.2 mm Thudbuster seat post suspension (you might need a shim to fit this size properly)
  • The frame is only available in one size at this time and while it works okay (and actually pretty well for shorter riders) some taller people might feel scrunched, consider tipping the bars forward to extend reach and really raising that seat
  • Minor gripe here but it would be nice if the tires had reflective sidewall stripes (especially since they were already customized to say Benno on the side)… the LED lights are great but the Supernova headlight doesn’t shine through the sides at all, keep in mind that a brighter colored frame will help increase your visual footprint
  • I’m glad they included a slap guard to protect your right chainstay but wish it was a little longer… just given the stretched out tubing here it might get nicked in places that aren’t fully covered if you ride on very bumpy terrain
  • Benno Bikes are new to the US and may not be available to test ride and purchase in as many locations, on the upside however, Benno was the co-founder of Electra which made great bicycles and was well respected in the space
  • I wouldn’t want to compromise the frame strength but it would be nice to have bottle cage bosses, perhaps under the top tube? Seems like there’s room for a cage, min-pump or lock there
  • The Bosch motor is super quick to start and stop but it rotates at roughly two times your normal pedal cadence and I’ve noticed that there is a little whine sound that is produced which is slightly more audible than some other systems
  • depending on your cargo needs, it would be nice to have a double-side kickstand for added stability when loading, I do like that the single side stand that it comes with has adjustable length

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Johnny
20 hours ago

I'm curious about this statement...

"Trek Crossrip+ .... the frame looks like an entry level model."

What do you mean by "entry level"? What would make it more than an entry level?

IMHO, the components are top notch. IMHO this is one of the few electric bikes that you can pedal at a reasonable clip under your own power. I use the motor in the mornings and sometimes pedal under my own power in the evenings when I don't care about sweating. It's one of the few e-bikes that comes with tires that can be inflated to 90psi. That makes it quite a bit less comfortable, and quite a bit more efficient :)

Trek is one of the few manufactures that caters for the longer distance bike commuter - for both e-bikes and regular bikes (the regular Crossrip - non e-bike - is the one of the few bikes that comes with great components, is light, and is designed to take a bike rack).

I think the Crossrip+ is a great choice if you want to occasionally get a good workout, and occasionally get a good boost. Of course I'm a happy, and biased, owner!

Actually I really like crossrip+ and would have considered it but imo it is not priced right.

What I meant was it seems to be a solid entry level gravel bike and I like it a lot. I am sure it is a great riding bike however it looks like the bike itself is $1-1.5K and the remaining $3K is the electric motor and battery which I can not justify.

MV94941
2 days ago

I'm curious about this statement...

"Trek Crossrip+ .... the frame looks like an entry level model."

What do you mean by "entry level"? What would make it more than an entry level?

IMHO, the components are top notch. IMHO this is one of the few electric bikes that you can pedal at a reasonable clip under your own power. I use the motor in the mornings and sometimes pedal under my own power in the evenings when I don't care about sweating. It's one of the few e-bikes that comes with tires that can be inflated to 90psi. That makes it quite a bit less comfortable, and quite a bit more efficient :-)

Trek is one of the few manufactures that caters for the longer distance bike commuter - for both e-bikes and regular bikes (the regular Crossrip - non e-bike - is the one of the few bikes that comes with great components, is light, and is designed to take a bike rack).

I think the Crossrip+ is a great choice if you want to occasionally get a good workout, and occasionally get a good boost. Of course I'm a happy, and biased, owner!

'chantal'
3 days ago

hi there,

New owners of a shimano step e8000 bike. Just had it for a few days...first ride was all golden. Second ride, the motor worked but it would,cut out while I was pedalling ....I know it is torque sensing, but I was in boost mode going slightly uphill so it wasn't as if there was no resistance ...and I was only going 11kmh ..so less then 10 mph
Then today. I had an error message w013 and the motor would come on at all...display works and I can shift between the modes but no assist - cadence meter works fine too. Tried turning on and off etc but nothing leaped. Drove the bike to the shop and took the bike off the rack and voila, all was fine ? But then back on the trail, my partners bike had exactly the same issue

Looks to be a problem with the torque sensor ? Anybody else have had any issues with the torque sensor? Does it have something to do with the calibration ? Could it be related to turning the system on with a foot on the pedal ?...although we did try again, Moto on and off etc , one the bike off the bike..no luck....drove to the shop....bike works fine again....it's a mystery but it feels like it's something we do

Roland Leisenring
4 days ago

A 250 watt hub is minimal assistance for a lightweight two wheeler. That trike is heavy. Slight boost would be noticed on level ground but there wouldn't be much energy on inclines and zip on hills, especially with a load of stuff in the basket.

If you need a trike, get one and put a stronger mid-drive kit on it. https://tinyurl.com/yd2bjn9q

The forum host has info on the drives https://electricbikereview.com/?s=8fun+mid+drive

emco5
1 week ago

The Electric Shopping Cruiser Any opinions?

A 250 watt hub is minimal assistance for a lightweight two wheeler. That trike is heavy. Slight boost would be noticed on level ground but there wouldn't be much energy on inclines and zip on hills, especially with a load of stuff in the basket.

If you need a trike, get one and put a stronger mid-drive kit on it. https://tinyurl.com/yd2bjn9q

The forum host has info on the drives https://electricbikereview.com/?s=8fun+mid+drive

mrgold35
2 weeks ago

I have two his/her Rad Rovers since Sept/16 with around 3800 miles between both ebikes. The Rad is equally comfortable work commuting at 18-22 mph or single track trail riding. I'm +270lbs and add in 60lbs Rad+30lbs gear, rack, commuter backpack, and accessories. I've had zero issues with the 180mm cable brakes stopping me in emergency stops or on steep down hill runs at top speed. I think the 4" fat tires have a larger contact patch on the ground that helps with stopping power compared to thinner tires. Some folks have upgraded the cable brakes to a cable/hydro combo from TRP HY/RD.

My range is usually between 24-30 miles using mostly PAS 3 with occasional PAS 4 on longer inclines and occasional 750w throttle use for intersections, boost up to cruising speed faster if I had to slow down, or short inclines. I've gone as far as +36 miles with around 10%- 20% battery power if I kept the PAS at level 2 and my speed around the 10-13 mph range. The Rad's heavy duty controller is designed to give you max power until the battery is depleted. The Rad will haul you up that hill, push you through that sand trap, and maintain your speed in a +20 mph headwind because of the programming. The tradeoff is the battery range will be cut by 1/2 or more if you want speed/power over range. I can almost use 60%-70% battery power on my 6 miles work commute home (4900ft to 5400ft) when I have a +25mph stiff headwind and I want to maintain my +18 mph cruising speed.

If range is an issue, you can purchase an extra battery from Rad Power Bikes or Luna Cycles:

48v X 11.5ah = 552 watts (standard Rad battery)
48v X 13.5ah = 648 watts (my pick for most bang for the buck)
52v X 11.5ah = 598 watts
52v X 13.5ah = 702 watts

The Rad rover's battery tray is standard and the 48v and 52v Dolphin packs fit plug-n-play with zero mods to frame or controller. You have to purchase a 52v charger if you go the larger volt route (the Rad 48v charger will work for the 48v/13.5ah Luna cycle pack). Depending on how you use the 52v battery pack, it can give you even more off the line power/faster acceleration/more hill climbing power and longer range.

mrgold35
2 weeks ago

I agree with Vincent about the Rad and Volt eMTB being so similar and interchangeable depending on how you will ride them. Whichever eMTB you pick, you will always have praise, want to upgrade certain parts, or have minor gripes with them.

I haven't looked at the specs of the +2017 Volt; but, the 2016 Rad -vs- 2016 Volt had minor differences that checked a few more of my boxes towards the Rad:

- Rad uses standard ebike and bike parts. I can purchase replacement parts from Rad or on-line when the warranty runs out or just move e-components to another fat tire bike to convert into an ebike
- Rad battery plug-n-play upgrade with higher volts and/or amp hrs from Luna Cycles (48v/13.5ah, 52v/ 11.5ah, 52v/13.5ah)
- I can convert into mid-drive or just remove all e-components to turn into a regular looking fat tire bike
- Rad had 180mm front and back rotors
- Rad had 3 bottle cage connections
- Rad had ego hand grips
- Looked like the Rad had narrower handlebars for a more upright and comfy riding position for +20 miles.
- Rad had more upright riding position to lessen the effects of numb hands and lower back stress
- full 750w throttle power available in any PAS level, even PAS 0
- Rad didn't seem to reduce the power output as the battery was depleted like the Volt. I could ride at the selected PAS level at full watts longer
- Can quickly enter diagnostic screen to adjust motor cutoff speed anywhere from 7-25 mph. Might come in handy if you travel and there are local ebike speed restriction
- Rad had lock outs switch on the forks (I think the 2017 Volt has this now?)
- Rad had a lower seat height for my 4'11" wife. I had to get a 400mm seatpost to fit my 6'3" height to be a touch more comfy.

I love riding my Rad on single track trails near the heavily wooded area of the Rio Grande river in my home town. There are a lot of dips, short inclines, twist and turns, narrow trails, low branches, rocky areas , and sand traps. Having the full 750w throttle REALLY comes in handy when you need a quick boost of power or trying to get over/around/through obstacles when PAS isn't enough (sometimes the pedal could hit in those situations). There are a few spots I had to squat on my downtube and duck my head to handlebar levels to avoid low vegetation on narrow trails because of summer over growth. I wouldn't of made it to the other side without using the throttle.

bob armani
2 weeks ago

I was accepted to go Study Abroad for Spring 2018 in South Korea. I travel by car to my home university and either walk or use a golf-cart service to my classes. The golf-cart service is provided for those with different disabilities. I have a very mild form of muscular deficiency. I am perfectly capable of walking and performing normal physical activities, but compared to an average human being, I perform these activities at a slower rate. I am perfectly capable of riding a bike as well :).

While abroad, I will not have a car with me and even though South Korea has a good transportation system, I would like to invest in an e-bike. The university I will be attending is known to be in a 'hilly' location. The e-bike will give me a little boost for those hills and at the same time, I will have a way of transportation. I plan to use the e-bike as a normal bike and use assistance for hills or longer travels.

I am looking for an e-bike that is not too heavy, but my main goal is to find an e-bike that can get me up those steep hills. I have been looking at models such as:

- Populo Sport Electric Bicycle V3
- Faraday Cortland
- Gazelle NL C7 HMB

I understand that all of these models are quite different, but I am new at this and not sure where to start. Please keep in mind that I am a university student and these e-bikes are not cheap. However, I am open to any suggestions! I am open to ALL recommendations :)

How about the Rubbee compact portable electric drive system reviewed on this forum: https://electricbikereview.com/rubbee/drive-2-0/

There is also a newer version coming soon also on this forum https://electricbikereview.com/forum/threads/rubbee-x-introduction.15247/#post-121643

Gaby
2 weeks ago

I was accepted to go Study Abroad for Spring 2018 in South Korea. I travel by car to my home university and either walk or use a golf-cart service to my classes. The golf-cart service is provided for those with different disabilities. I have a very mild form of muscular deficiency. I am perfectly capable of walking and performing normal physical activities, but compared to an average human being, I perform these activities at a slower rate. I am perfectly capable of riding a bike as well :).

While abroad, I will not have a car with me and even though South Korea has a good transportation system, I would like to invest in an e-bike. The university I will be attending is known to be in a 'hilly' location. The e-bike will give me a little boost for those hills and at the same time, I will have a way of transportation. I plan to use the e-bike as a normal bike and use assistance for hills or longer travels.

I am looking for an e-bike that is not too heavy, but my main goal is to find an e-bike that can get me up those steep hills. I have been looking at models such as:

- Populo Sport Electric Bicycle V3
- Faraday Cortland
- Gazelle NL C7 HMB

I understand that all of these models are quite different, but I am new at this and not sure where to start. Please keep in mind that I am a university student and these e-bikes are not cheap. However, I am open to any suggestions! I am open to ALL recommendations :)

Nahim
2 weeks ago

There are tons of people and that commute on single speed bikes. A great example of that is here in New York City where a vast amount of commuters and messengers are fans of their simplistic single speed/ fixed gear bikes. It makes sense to want one less part (derailleurs and shifters) on your bike to maintain. Even though I've been surrounded by ebikes for the last three years working at Propel Bikes, I still enjoy riding my single speed bike after work and cruising the neighborhood.
The Copenhagen wheel is a cool option for folks that still want to maintain the simplicity of their bike, but with a bit of extra boost. It's a neat package considering if you already have a single speed bike you really love, like a nice Cinelli or Linus, and want to upgrade your commute. I would however like to see more color options, something more stealthy to so it's not as flashy when locking up on the streets of NYC. A neat feature I do like is the regenerative braking when you pedal backwards, which in most other retrofitting cases, requires you to run a brake sensor cable to your brake levers. The Copenhagen wheel takes away the hassle of cables and zipties and leaves that simplistic look it's supposed to have. I hope as ebike technology progresses, the price point will also come down.

barry c
3 weeks ago

Hi, I'm an avid mountain biker, I ride cross country and to a lesser extent mild downhill runs. I put in usually around 100 miles + per week. I ride a Yeti MTB. I'm getting older, knees falling apart and a few other issues, etc so I've decided to invest in an Ebike to ride part time. I've been looking at ebike reviews and unfortunately I cannot find any haibike reviews from actual mountain bikers. I've found one or two, but it's usually someone jumping jumps or riding up a gravel road or paved road. Nobody ever really discusses the frame geometry, how they handle etc? Or if they're good on rocky rooty trails etc. I don't ride on dirt paths, I ride on actual singletrack roots and rocks and switchbacks etc too.

I have ordered a Haibike Sduro Nduro RX. I only found a few reviews and videos for this bike, none of which told me much. This has a long travel fork (180mm) which would normally be excessive for regular cross country riding but it can be adjusted down to 150mm which isn't too bad...especially since this has a motor to haul it around? Or I'm hoping this will be the case anyway?

Is anyone here a regular experienced mountain biker? Does anyone here have a Haibike mountain bike? Do they handle well? I would have gone with the specialized since it's a known quantity, specialized FSR is a pretty decent bike, and the turbo lev just added a motor...but the Haibike was a much better value, but I know nothing about the bike/handling/etc.

Thank you.

Hey, I ride a 2017 haibike Xduro all mountain 7 that has 3" tires (boost) and 27.5 wheels and it rips the single track. I raced for many years and still avidly ride 2000 miles a year on single track in the N cali sierras Tahoe and grass valley areas. I keep an extra 500 battery on board and use it regularly when riding over 20 miles. The tires gobble up obstacles (10 to 15 lb. pressure) like they are not there and my confidence is 30% higher i will make it through a tough spot.
I committed and rode centuries for decades and even raced pro mountain bike in the 80s.
I am 70 and last year developed knee arthritis. I just a month ago finished a procedure called Regenexx. The short version is an MD takes bone marrow blood from your hip and spins it down to get the stem cells and injects it into your knees.
In a month my knees are 80% better and expect the regeneration of my soft tissue to continue for another year. I could not even walk before i was on crutches. This is so cool!! its expensive $7K and no insurance will pay for it. A friend of mine had it done to his hips a year ago and he is way better. I highly recommend it. More info if you ask.

Mike's E-Bikes
3 weeks ago

The Vello bike folks are making quite an outrageous claim on their bike's ability to re-charge to 100% while riding, therefore theoretically will never need to be connected to an outlet. With exception to a few quick write-ups, I've not read any third-party posting that substantiates these claims. Are you aware of any? Here's their Indigogo information:

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/vello-bike-the-first-self-charging-folding-e-bike-bicycle#/comments

Thanks,
Dan
You are going to need one heck of a steep down hill run, to get any decent amount of re-charging, and a very long hill at that. It might give you an extra 5% of battery boost, but probably not enough to get you back up the same hill you came down. (unless you use most of your own leg power). Remember those exercise bikes at the science museum, where you got on them and pedaled, to generate enough electricity to turn on the light bulb ? Well if you don't or haven't, suggest you give it a try, and see how hard it is to light up just a little 40 watt incandescent bulb, and then keep it on for a few minutes. Then you'll understand how much of a joke the concept of 're-gen' is on any 'e-bike', and how worthless it is in terms of adding more 'charge' back to the battery. Re-gen works great on a 4000 lb vehicle, when you have the massive weight and gravity, working for you. But on a 40 lb bike not so much. lol. Of course this would be on Indiegogo, and lets see if the firm lasts longer than 18 months.

Sweetwater
3 weeks ago

I was at a dealership with a 2017 Bosch Performance Cx that was being updated to enable the Walk Assist mode.
It was a cool feature, particularly on this large fat bike that weighed 65 lb easily.
When my 2016 Performance Line Speed was updated, it showed no Walk Assist mode to enable.
It's a firmware issue that depends on whether the feature exists on your bike, if it does, it's just a software adjustment to get it going.
Once enabled, the throttle is controlled using the + button on your boost level controller after you click the small button on the upper side of the controller.
If you use it and stop, you have to activate it again with that small button. It's a single use feature from my experience.

Sweetwater
3 weeks ago

I have a Bosch Performance Line Speed on my FullSeven S Pro.
I have ridden Yamaha and Brose bikes that cut out at 20 mph, mine provides boost to 28 mph.
I have a route that climbs 3000 ft from 5000 ft to 8000 ft over 11 miles.
Several times I have depleted the 400 Wh battery and climbed the final bit without assistance.
The bike does labor under that scenario, so do I, and it seems that there is some "drag" when that happens.
Otherwise, I have always descended without assist, often without the bike turned on.
I easily reach speeds approaching 35 mph or a bit more, held it to less than 40 mph for safety.
Under those conditions, I haven't felt any drag and the bike's final 2 gears take me well above 28 mph.

Cephalotus
3 weeks ago

I have adjusted the settings to what appears the most sensitive for the motor to activate:
0007 - strain gauge gain set to 4
0008 - Gain assist set to 4
0009 - Strain gauge sensitivity set to 0
1234 - strain gauge filter set to F+++

It's rarely a good idea to use all parameters at their extrem settings.

Rather start in the middle and.

0007: 2.0 (which is significantly higher than what you would use on a normal bike)
0008a: 2.0 (0008b irrelevant)
1234: 3 (higher numbers will not help you, it will just force the motor to "pulse"), even 2 or 1 could be better for weaker persons. You have to try that...
3779: (Boost) start at 10, but maybe you want to go higher (maximum = 16)

newfydog
4 weeks ago

newfydog-Those are some really beautiful ebikes head to toe (seen for $3500.00 US online)! How do you like the new Shimano E8000 motor. Does it have enough power @ 250 watts? Looks like the Diamondback Ranger is very similar but currently unavailable in the US. Congrats on your new purchase! Ride safe!;)

The Shimano Steps is so tuned to your input torque that it rides totally naturally. It has power to spare---I seldom use the boost mode because it is hard to handle that much umph.

LimboJim
4 weeks ago

Your post sent me down to check our shock bolts...all tight.

My wire isn't rubbing either, but we have done some mud and slush rides, and the area does indeed scoop up crap.

Did you actually change the settings from the e-tube project? Was the software reasonable? I would not mind turning Trail up and Boost down.

Bikes Direct wrote that they anticipate have spare batteries available by May, but they don't yet know the price.

Spare batteries would be great! Hopefully they'll be in the EU's price range of ~$700 - bike-discount.de sells them for $637.96 (as of this writing), but can't ship them (or any ebike batteries) to the US "due to legal restrictions" (no int'l air for lithium?). You can, however, get many other ebike parts shipped here from them for far less than I've seen available in N. America, even after adding the $25-30 shipping charge.

And yes, I added the E-Tube Project app to my Android phone and think it's pretty cool. If you don't use the app, you're stuck with the motor's default "Dynamic" setting, shown as "Factor Setting" in the graphic below. Shimano's promos for E-Tube's customizability are a bit hyped-up IMO, but it's definitely better than having just one option for motor behavior and response.

After fairly long rides in both Dynamic and Explorer modes, I set my "Custom" setting to keep Boost assist level at the Medium "Sub-Mode," as I found the default High to be overkill for my riding style and needs (I seldom use Boost/High/Turbo on any of my eMTBs anymore, but used to when I was getting back into shape).

When in Trails assist mode (which seems similar to what I've read about Bosch CX's new eMTB mode), I preferred Dynamic's Low over Explorer's Medium, so I set my Custom Trail at Low. This should also extend battery life - we'll see!

newfydog
4 weeks ago

I really like Shimano's customizable assist levels available through their "E-TUBE Project."

Even when tightened over 20Nm, the top mounting bolt for the rear shock loosened on each ride until I added Loctite.

Needs a motor bash guard - I gouged mine on the first ride! The clearance is a bit lower than my Haibike AllMtn+, so I'll be more mindful of it on future rides (I also put some Gorilla Repair Tape on, which seems to help).
The wheel magnet wire routing is funky - it rubbed against the bottom rear shock (and its mount/housing). I wrapped the magnet wire with electrical tape to protect it on those spots, and zip tied it with the rear brake tube so it wasn't flopping around so much inside the rear shock's housing, which is a wide-open catch-basin for debris, as well.

Your post sent me down to check our shock bolts...all tight.

My wire isn't rubbing either, but we have done some mud and slush rides, and the area does indeed scoop up crap.

Did you actually change the settings from the e-tube project? Was the software reasonable? I would not mind turning Trail up and Boost down.

Bikes Direct wrote that they anticipate have spare batteries available by May, but they don't yet know the price.

Lin B
4 weeks ago

Another update:

Hello ShareRoller Indiegogo backer:

We have some exciting news to share. If you remember in our last Update, we mentioned that ShareRoller had been selected as a Finalist in a prestigious international 'Urban Mobility' event? Well, that event was the L.A. New Mobility Challenge:

http://www.lacomotion.com/press_room/laci-newcities-foundation-announce-new-mobility-challenge-finalists-15-startups-selected-100-global-entrants/

And just last week, ShareRoller was selected as the category winner, the Top Startup Innovation in Personal Mobility:

Here's a link to the Tweet above - if you expand the pic and look closely, you'll see that small device I'm holding is the SR4 Mini assembly (Battery Pack + Motor). It really is tiny!
https://twitter.com/LA_CoMotion/status/931719949067763713

We're tremendously excited to have been selected by a jury of mobility industry leaders from amongst an impressive group of competitors. Not only that, but the interest we received from festival participants, including bike and scooter manufacturers and bike share operators, gives us confidence that ShareRoller has a very bright future.

We apologize that we weren't able to invite any of you to attend and see us in person as hoped, but the competition session days were not open to the public, and we weren't able to stay long enough to participate in the public demo days. We've got ShareRollers to get into production after all!

However, if any of you are interested in seeing our presentation, LACoMotion has posted it on their Facebook page. We start 44 minutes in:

https://www.facebook.com/LACMOnews/videos/508478079528112/

And some more good news: our retractor improvements have now passed all our durability tests! So the 6-week battery molding and production process can now get underway. In addition, we've realized an unexpected side-benefit: while re-evaluating the entire retracting battery cable assembly, we discovered some weaknesses in the battery cable itself: it was not flexible enough to convince us it would withstand years of use, and it was getting a bit hotter than we liked under maximum current stress tests (when fully retracted, where air convection disappears).

Unfortunately, given that our retractor design requires coiling a long length of high-current cable into a very small diameter housing, there literally was not a single cable on the market that could meet all of our demands for size (small!), flexibility (max!), and current carrying capacity (high!). Our retractor supplier told us our only option was to significantly increase the size of the retractor assembly, which would have required increasing the size of the battery packs. That was not an answer we were willing to accept!

So we sought out and found the top aerospace cable manufacturer in the world (that fortunately likes working on interesting small projects) and worked with them over the past few weeks to design a custom-spec cable that met all of those demands. The downside is that it is going to be over 20 times more expensive than the cable we had (!), but it's a no-brainer for us given the amazing improvement in quality. Plus, it's pretty awesome that ShareRoller's battery cables will be made by the same manufacturer that supplies cables for fighter jets, guided missiles, and satellites. And they also happen to look pretty cool (see below). It will take them 5 weeks to make the cable batch for us, so this shouldn't hold up the battery packs by much.

We've also now filed our last remaining Patent Application that was holding up our full disclosure of the entire new SR4 design. So as soon as we can get a modest photo shoot put together we will begin updating our website with all the glorious detail that has until now remained under wraps. And we will be sure to send our Backers some early previews as soon as we possibly can, since we realize a full unveiling is long overdue!

Look for lots of new photos and website content coming over the month of December, and hopefully the first production packs rolling out of the factory before NYE. We also plan to open up discounted Pre-Order slots for new customers during the month (to ship after all the Indiegogo units of course, and at much higher prices), so if you have any friends interested in the SR4 this will be their most affordable option. And finally, we promise the Updates will get more frequent and more exciting as we near the finish line!

Thank you again for your patience and support.

Jeff Guida & The ShareRoller Team

Wow, that's exciting news! That's going to give the product a real boost in the retail world. Rubbee just came out with their newest iteration on kickstarter this week - not as good as the share roller and you can't use a rear rack on it. My new bike comes mid-December and a NYE delivery would give me just enough time to get to know the bike a bit. I've a friend who just signed up to get one through the pre-order. Gonna be amazing!!!

Ann M.
4 weeks ago

Philly, removing the throttle (or boost button if it's a newer BionX system) would technically make that system a Class 1. Some of the earlier Trek electric bikes were just that sort of set up. I don't think different states keep lists of specific brands or models for the class rating; however, check with your local laws. If it's Pennsylvania, then chat it up with @J.R.; he's the most knowledgeable about PA laws :D.

Removing the throttle on any PAS system will not interfere with the pedal assist function at all. You just loose the ability to add throttle power to boost the pedal assist.

AdrianDK
1 month ago

Is there an instrument panel?
Its one of those simple ones with 3 buttons boost pas, lower pas and wall funktion. All the buttons and led indicaters seems to work though.
is there a way for me to test the panel before I go out and replace it?

rich c
1 month ago

I ride a 2016 XDURO Full Seven S RX, love the bike and love the 28mph boost with riding streets. My bike has the Schwalbe Super Moto-X. Work great on dirt trails if there is no mud. We can't ride around here when anything sticks to the tires anyway. So I drop the psi and enjoy the ride over rocks and roots. Personally, I just can't see the advantage of Carbon Fiber frames. Especially since it has the motor. An aluminum version will be about half price for less than 9 pounds savings. I'd go on a diet to take off 9 pounds if someone would pay me $3000.

chunzao
1 month ago

Ask for some advises.
A buck converter that provides MPPT as long as the solar voltage is higher than the battery voltage. But I want to extract power to the battery even at low voltage.

I tried building/testing a small 4-switch single-inductor buck/boost but I blew a couple of capacitors on the output. My understanding is - this was because, while switching one side (buck xor boost), I was unable to supply a 100% duty cycle to the opposite side. The interference of the PWMs on both sides caused some serious current/voltage spikes. So I thought of this:

Input: Solar panel or rectified wind turbine output.
V_in, I_in for power throughput tracking, and V_out for battery level checking
H-bridge with NMOS/PMOS setup so there's never a short and (I think) simplifies driving circuitry. The project Tim Nolan did (see link in first paragraph) uses a 50kHz PWM. I would like to use logic-level MOSFETs, but will I be able to switch them at 50kHz from the Arduino?
2-to-1 multiplexer set up so that if one side is receiving a PWM signal, the other side is fully ON and not interfering with the power flow. So just one PWM signal is needed (in this case, Arduino using the Timer1 library). Freeing other pins for SD datalogging, communications, alternator RPM measurement, whatever.
Output: A (lead acid) battery will be connected to the output, which will pretty much prevent the output voltage from actually changing, but the MOSFET switching should be able to match the impedance (is that the correct terminology?) to the input and extract maximum power.

The benefit (I think) is that this should be scalable to a wide range of DC inputs / battery outputs with suitable sensing resistor / MOSFET / minimal code changes. Using lead acid / deep cycle batteries since those are more tolerant to abuse.

Your inputs are welcome! I guess the question is, is this a feasible design?
Thanks.
Edit: More professional-looking picture.

Ike582
1 month ago

MPDX, I ordered the bike the first week of August from Erick's bikes in Deerfield, IL. The seat on my other bikes is a Serfax RX, which I find to be more comfortable than the stock saddle. (I've ordered an other Serfax RX today for the bike.) I have to say the bike handles very well. I have to say the ride is sort of like a Range Rover if I could compare it to a car. It's a meaty bike, it's clear you have a lot of horse under you, but it handles very well. I have to say it's a very comfortable ride aside from my own seat preference. I did 15 miles in 40 degree (c) weather today, essentially flat, in a boost mix of 70% Turbo and 30% sport (measured by time), typical speed was 25-26, frequent stops at intersections. I left the driveway with 70% battery and arrived back at 9%. I guess that was less range than anticipated but probably to be expected considering the cold temp, high level of assist and higher speeds. I've yet to download the iPhone App, and have only a rookie's experience with the display, so there's some technical functionality that I've yet to explore.

qqq uiop
4 months ago

I don't understand why they sell this w/the Bosch Performance 350 w motor, but restrict pedal assist to 20 mph rather than the 28 mph it was designed for. This is one of a couple of small cargo bikes I'd buy today IF it had 28 mph pedal assist AND offered it with the dual 500 Wh battery pack for a reasonable battery range as a car replacement. I guess I have to build my own (I don't have the skills) to get what I want. That's really disappointing, as Bosch offers these systems, and I bet if I wait a year even these will be superseded by batteries with better range and motors with more torque. I'm serious that I want to get rid of my car, but not with an expensive bike that I'm not quite happy with.

Bob Smith
8 months ago

How many water bottle cage braze ons?

D C
10 months ago

Hi Court, great review as always. Can you shed any light on the claimed range? I know this depends upon rider weight, max speed, amount of pedaling, wind, flatness etc, along with BMS etc, but have heard that a useful rule of thumb is around 20 miles per wH. On that basis, one would expect a range more like 20, against the claimed 30 (minimum). What's your take on this? Also since the guys from Propel seem to be responding here, if they have any real world experience with battery life that would be great to hear about. I know you are probably limited in amount of time you can spend with each bike, but if there's a way you could ride them for an hour, or 20-30 miles, that would start to give us a terrific baseline to compare bikes!

D C
9 months ago

Propel Electric Bikes Thanks

Propel Electric Bikes
9 months ago

Most people see between 20-40 miles on the 400Wh battery. The Bosch display will tell you how much range you have in a given mode, for example Eco will get you 60 miles and Turbo will get you about 20 miles. For the 500Wh you should see a 25% increase so 75-25 or for most people 25-50 miles. I hope that helps - Chris

riceburner68
10 months ago

Would be nice if you could carry a passenger but the 110lb (50kg) rating limits who you can carry. Extra mount points on the frame so looks like you might be able to fit a stronger rack though.

Propel Electric Bikes
9 months ago

It's my understanding that Benno is working on a rack with foot rests for this purpose. It's build to be modular so I guess we'll just have to wait and see what they come up with. It sure seems like the stock rack can hold more than 110lbs, but that is indeed what it's rated for.

Graham Siberry
10 months ago

Wow you really know your stuff! Great video, great channel and great guy!

kustomweb
11 months ago

Court, get a follow-me drone, I'm sure you find a spot in the Prius

Benjamin Müller
11 months ago

how about this one:

https://www.rosebikes.de/bike/rose-xtra-watt-3-herren-bike-now/aid:783282

NovaColonel
11 months ago

Very nice bike and review, Chris always looks a little tense, although he's probably a very cool guy.
Also, what's up with that weird german-swiss hybrid flag right above the chainrings?

Propel Electric Bikes
9 months ago

Thanks! I'm still getting comfortable in front of the camera. I think the flag on the frame is a nod to Benno's roots since he was born and raised in Berlin.

Alex NC
11 months ago

add their official panniers in the back and their front basket, and this looks like the perfect bike for me. too bad I'm a cheapskate and that price is looking pretty high :-( Great bike though

philodygmn
11 months ago

What I'd like is an actual Electra FlatFoot version of this bike with weather treated frame and _trigger_ throttle from standstill with walk mode, and also good brakes like this one's. Sealed chain might be nice, def. at least a proper guard, slap guard notwithstanding. Even keeping its less robust FatFrank tires, Townie's FlatFoot still wins out over this bike for me, even without an extra-long rack or stationary front basket mounts either. That handled seat is a great idea that also makes it easier to lock up, FWIW. Townie's hubbed gears make it neater and lower maintenance as well.

Florida Scot
11 months ago

Great cargo city bike, nice quality, looks

Mark Elford
11 months ago

Sleek cargo bike, i like it. they really should have sold it with front rack and bags installed, looks half done.

Propel Electric Bikes
11 months ago

This was an early shipment. It is available with those accessories now.

Darren Brown
11 months ago

what about reviewing some of the riese - muller bikes

Propel Electric Bikes
11 months ago

We're trying to coordinate something next month to get Court out here to review the Riese & Muller bikes. They were supposed to be here for the last trip, but the shipment was a little delayed. We have most bikes here now and it's just a matter of coordinating with Court.

Seb K
11 months ago

I'm tired . Just had a loooooong debate/argument with some guys on another site about Ebikes . So many people have no damn clue about these bikes yet still feel the need to judge others who use them . I was negative about them at first but never posted vile crap about them . Amongst my traditional bikes I now have three Ebikes . Presently building up my electric fat bike (or Efatbike) and it is fast .

grantspassage
11 months ago

YOU REALLY SHOULD START WITH THE PRICE.

cresshead
10 months ago

price $3,999 and a full review here
https://electricbikereview.com/benno/boost-e-10d/

David Macdonald
11 months ago

I wish you would point out Cadence and torque sensing bikes and the differences between them because it matters a lot to someone buying a torque sensor bike by accident not realising they have to work a lot harder than a cadence sensor bike bike court

David Macdonald
11 months ago

Yes I had the bosch system but it mite say it uses cadence as well as torque but if you have poor legs you will definitely have to work a lot harder and yes the battery lasts longer but the reason for that is because you are working a lot harder my cadence sensor bike I don't have to work hard at it with my legs ,but I can put in the effort I can manage, that's where the difference comes in with the torque sensing Bosch system you have to work hard with your legs remember (your) legs might very well be quite fit some people who get an electric bike have very very poor legs that's why often they get a E bike , and the cadence sensor definitely makes the difference the point is for people that don't have a E bike and never have had they mite very well think o good it's electric and no problem, only to find they have as i did paid for a bike like the bosch type torque sensing cube (they still can't use )

Propel Electric Bikes
11 months ago

That really depends on the motor system and the gearing though. The Bosch system uses torque sensing and cadence sensing so you can use the bike in a low gear with a higher cadence if you don't want to work too hard. Just cadence sensing on it's own is almost obsolete in my eyes. It's not very safe as it can be unpredictable. That's just my opinion though.

FRANK ROBY
11 months ago

V good bike.

Tom Thumb
11 months ago

Nice looking bike. I like the black and white. I also like the rack.

Pat Shala
11 months ago

I really love this bike , it looks so good .

the devil is back now he is here
11 months ago

Very nice looking bike! Big fan of the Bosch system, it really is as good as you say Court :)