Benno Boost E 10D Review

Benno Boost E 10d Electric Bike Review
Benno Boost E 10d
Benno Boost E 10d Bosch Performance Line 350 Watt Mid Drive
Benno Boost E 10d Bosch Powerpack Downtube Battery
Benno Boost E 10d Rubber Ergonomic Grips Bosch Intuvia Display
Benno Boost E 10d Supernova E3 E Bike V6s Headlight
Benno Boost E 10d Alloy Fenders 24 Wheels
Benno Boost E 10d Extra Long Cargo Rack With Pannier Rails
Benno Boost E 10d Shimano Deore Lx Components
Benno Boost E 10d Electric Bike Review
Benno Boost E 10d
Benno Boost E 10d Bosch Performance Line 350 Watt Mid Drive
Benno Boost E 10d Bosch Powerpack Downtube Battery
Benno Boost E 10d Rubber Ergonomic Grips Bosch Intuvia Display
Benno Boost E 10d Supernova E3 E Bike V6s Headlight
Benno Boost E 10d Alloy Fenders 24 Wheels
Benno Boost E 10d Extra Long Cargo Rack With Pannier Rails
Benno Boost E 10d Shimano Deore Lx Components

Summary

  • A compact cargo-style electric bike with sturdy 24" wheels, comfortable 2.6" diameter tires and a premium drive system from Bosch
  • Low balanced weight distribution, removable battery and display panel, premium integrated lights by Supernova, Micro USB charging ports and three color choices
  • Solid 10-speed drivetrain from Shimano, the motor offers shift detection for reduced wear on the chain and sprockets, powerful hydraulic disc brakes also from Shimano
  • No suspension elements, currently only available in one frame size, new to the US and possibly harder to locate at dealers for test rides, solid one year warranty

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Benno

Model:

Boost E 10D

Price:

$4,299

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Urban, Cargo

Electric Bike Class:

Pedal Assist (Class 1)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Yeaer Components, 2 Year Motor Battery and Control System

Availability:

United States, Europe

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

57 lbs (25.85 kg)

Battery Weight:

5.7 lbs (2.58 kg)

Motor Weight:

8.8 lbs (3.99 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

19 in (48.26 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

19" Seat Tube, 23.5" Reach, 28" Stand Over Height, 74" Length

Frame Types:

Mid-Step

Frame Colors:

Neon Yellow, Matte Anthracite Gray, Putty Gray

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid CRMO Steel, 9 mm Quick Release Skewer

Frame Rear Details:

9 mm Quick Release Skewer, Replaceable Derailleur Hanger

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Front Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses

Gearing Details:

10 Speed 1x10 Shimano Deore LX, 11-34T

Shifter Details:

Shimano Deore XT Triggers on Right

Cranks:

FSA Alloy 170 mm Crank Arms, 20T Chainring with Plastic Guard

Pedals:

VP Aluminum Alloy Wide Platform

Headset:

FSA 1-1/8" with Two 20 mm Risers and One 10 mm Riser

Stem:

Custom Alloy 50 mm Length

Handlebar:

Alloy, High Rise, 140 mm Rise, 27" Length

Brake Details:

Shimano Deore Hydraulic Disc with 180 mm Front Rotor and 160 mm Rear Rotor, Shimano Deore Levers with Adjustable Reach

Grips:

Benno Branded Rubber, Ergonomic, Locking

Saddle:

Benno Wide Faux Leather Saddle with Handle

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

350 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

31.2 mm

Rims:

Double Wall Alloy, Stainless Reinforcement Eyelets and Nipples, 36 Hole

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 14 Gauge, Black

Tire Brand:

Benno Dual Sport, 24" x 2.6"

Wheel Sizes:

24 in (60.96cm)

Tire Details:

35 to 45 PSI, 60 TPI

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Extra Wide Alloy Fenders, Extra Long Cargo Rack with Pannier Rails 50 kg (110 lb) Max Weight, Supernova 3 LED Integrated Rear Light, Supernova E3 E-Bike V6s Integrated Headlight, Adjustable Length Center Mount Kickstand, Optional Utility Pannier Bags, Optional Utility Front Tray, Optional Utility Front Tray Bag, Optional Baby Seat Adapter

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, 1.7 lb 4 Amp Charger

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Bosch

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Geared Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

350 watts

Motor Peak Output:

570 watts

Motor Torque:

63 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Samsung

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

11 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

396 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

3.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

30 miles (48 km)

Estimated Max Range:

70 miles (113 km)

Display Type:

Intuvia, Removable, Adjustable Angle, Grayscale, Backlit LCD

Readouts:

Speed, Assist Level (Eco, Tour, Sport, Turbo), Battery Level (1-5), Odometer, Trip Distance, Estimated Range, Clock, Max Speed, Average Speed, Trip Time, Shift Assist Recommendation

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad with Tactile Feedback on Left, 6 Volt Micro USB Port on Display

Drive Mode:

Advanced Pedal Assist (Measures Wheel Speed, Pedal Cadence and Pedal Torque, Power Output Relative to Pedal Input: Eco 50%, Tour 120%, Sport 190%, Turbo 275%)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph) (15 mph in Some Markets)

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Written Review

Benno was a new company to me, I heard about it through my friend Chris who owns and runs Propel Bikes in Brooklyn NY. He’s an early adopter and I always learn a lot during visits to his shop. As it turns out, the founder of Benno Bikes is actually Benno Baenziger who co-founded Electra Bicycles. I’m very familiar with them and their recent acquisition by Trek. Elektra has an awesome ebike called the Townie Go! which switched over to the Bosch system in 2016. That’s the same system the Benno Boost E is using and it’s one of my favorites. As a compact cargo ebike, the Boost E 10D is short enough to fit in some tight spaces while still delivering utility with a longer rear rack. They also sell a tray that attaches to the head tube and provides even more space. I’m being specific about how it attaches because some cargo bikes have a bar and fork mounted basket which turns as you do. These baskets (when loaded) tend to sway side to side and I’m glad that the Benno Boost E is delivering more than just looks and a promise of usefulness. The rear rack can handle up to 110 lbs of weight and has an extra long standard-gauge tube fixed to both sides for the clip-on style panniers. The fenders are another highlight on the utility front and I was impressed with their great coverage and strength… no rattling! You get integrated front and rear lights by Supernova (the front is mounted with an adjustable angle clamp so you can use it to see, not just be seen). In short, this is a nimble bike that’s easier to handle and lighter weight than a lot of full sized models. You may not be able to fit two Yepp seats on the back but they do sell an adapter for one and you may not have running boards to start but the 24″ wheels match so tires and tubes are easier to replace together. They keep weight low and improve wheel strength but aren’t so small that the derailleur hits curbs or have you dragging pedals during leaning turns.

Powering the bike is a Bosch Powerpack 400 downtube battery. It’s easy to charge on the bike but also has a plastic carry-loop on top so you can bring it inside. The mounting interface is forward compatible to work with the larger Powerpack 500 released in the United States in 2017 and in my experience, the charger for these batteries is fast and easy to use. It’s also light weight and compact so tossing it into a pannier or trunk bag is easy. Note that Benno sells their own extra-long bags that work perfectly with the Boost models. I’m a big proponent of bicycle safety and noticed that their bags have reflective stripes woven in. This is key, and something I wish they had considered for their branded tires as well. I’ve seen reflective tape on tires that helps you stand out even more and I’m not sure how easy it is to add at the consumer level. In any case, the lights are nice but the headlight doesn’t shine out to the sides and if you’re a messenger or someone who is just focused on a child or big load of groceries please be safe and consider additional lights and reflective gear. I do like that the frame comes in multiple color choices; the putty white and neon yellow would probably stand out best but the black does look cool.

Driving the bike is a Bosch Performance Line 350 watt mid-drive motor. It peaks at 63 Newton meters of torque and is super responsive. In addition to being powerful and efficient (with great range) it delivers shift sensing which will help your chain, sprockets and derailleur last. It’s still up to you to ease off when shifting gears, it’s a software driven sensor and imperfect, but the sensing technology is better than nothing. The motor measures your pedal cadence, force and rear wheel speed so the bike won’t start if you just rest a foot on the pedal. It’s capable of assisting you up to 20 mph and I appreciate the range of RPM output it delivers. Some motors have more of a sweet spot while the Bosch Centerdrive performs well at a range and allows you to pedal at higher RPMs without dropping out (which is my personal preference due to knee sensitivity). The motor is balanced by excellent hydraulic disc brakes from Shimano. They aren’t the largest or fanciest as you’d see on a downhill ebike but they are larger than average and from a name-brand manufacturer. The Shimano levers are easy to use with just a finger or two and the levers can be adjusted for reach which is great if you’re wearing work gloves or lending the bike to different employees or family members.

Once the battery is charged and mounted, turning the bike on is very simple. You press the power button on the Intuvia display near the lower left corner. It blinks on and delivers battery capacity, current speed, assist level and ride stats. You can change these readouts without taking your hands off the grip which is huge if you’re trying to balance a large load. One thing this cargo bike does not have stock is a super wide double-leg kickstand. Instead, it features a single side adjustable length stand that’s positioned far enough back to clear the left crank arm and pedal but not so far that a front basket add-on would tip the bike. Not everyone needs the huge stands but they do come in handy for large loads… they add cost and weight but the Benno Boost E 10D is already fairly light in comparison to full sized cargo bikes. It weighs about 57 lbs and the removable battery shaves off nearly 6 lbs. Both wheels are also easy to take off with quick release but depending on your environment it could be worth replacing with security skewers. Anyway, the display panel is also removable for convenience and to keep it protected in the rain, direct sun or rowdy bike racks. At the top right edge of the Intuvia display there’s a Micro USB port so you can charge portable electronics like a phone GPS. I love how easy it is to reach vs. some ebikes with a battery-mounted USB charging port.

For now, this is the only e-bike from Benno but I appreciate the unique qualities it offers and can see that they put a lot of time and energy into getting it right. I’m a big fan of the Bosch drive system and noticed that they went with a larger chainring here (which confused me at first), designed to balance out the smaller wheel diameter for a more natural cadence range. You get 10 gears here with a solid Shimano Deore LX derailleur. To me, this is a sweet spot where you don’t drop the chain as frequently and don’t have the complexity of two derailleurs… the Bosch system only works with one sprocket up front for now and the chainring has a nice plastic cover to keep your pant leg or dress clear and clean. I suppose I’d like a bell added for friendly signaling but that’s cheap and easy to add yourself later. The ergonomic grips felt great and used lockers so they won’t twist around if you’re really bearing down while transporting a heavy load. It’s a great bike and I’m excited about how it might empower people who couldn’t fit the full sized cargo ebikes into their garages, elevators, sheds and other storage spots.

Pros:

  • Unique tire size… they’re basically 24″ diameter plus sized tires (like you’d find on a mountain bike or fancy speed pedelec), the extra air provides traction and comfort and the smaller wheel diameter improves strength and lowers weight for stability (technically I think plus sized is 2.8″ to 3″ but 2.6 is still large for something like t his)
  • Cool rack options, there’s a longer cargo-style rack in the rear that can handle up to 110 lbs along with an extra set of braze-ons for bags, up front there are threaded eyelets setup for a porter style tray (the kind that mounts directly to the head tube and offers better handling), they also sell a Yepp child seat adapter
  • Nice fenders, you get matching Aluminum front and rear fenders that are extra wide for the plus sized tires… and given the smaller wheel size you probably won’t clip your toe on them as much when turning! During my ride tests the fenders didn’t rattle at all
  • Heavy duty Shimano hydraulic disc brakes, you get 180 mm up front and 160 mm in the rear, it’s enough to stop you and larger loads (and again, the smaller wheel diameter improves your mechanical advantage here with braking)
  • Premium drive system from Bosch, this is the same motor used for e-mountain bikes and full sized cargo models like the Xtracycle Edgerunner, it’s responsive and very efficient but still plenty powerful
  • Given the shorter frame length of the Benno Boost, you can fit it into more compact places (like some elevators, sheds and car racks)
  • Well positioned kickstand… sometimes they mount these things to the bottom bracket which gets in the way of your crank arms and pedals, in this case it’s set back a little bit and positioned under the cargo rack
  • Comfortable and accessible frame with an angled top tube… I’d call this a mid-step because it’s not as high as a traditional diamond frame but not as low as a step-thru, one advantage of still using the high top-tube is improved strength and stiffness
  • Battery and motor weight are kept low and central (if not a bit forward) on the frame, this keeps the rack completely open and allows for more weight to be added (compared with frame mounted batteries), you can charge on or off the bike easily and the battery can be upgraded to 500 watt hours for maximum range
  • In addition to having a removable battery, the display is also easy to take off and that’s really handy if you’re parking in a city or bike rack where vandalism or accidental bumps and tips can happen
  • The display panel has an integrated Micro USB charging port so you can tap into the main battery for additional power for your cell phone, GPS or other device and it’s right there easy to reach vs. down at the battery
  • You get two awesome LED Lights from Supernova and both are run off the main battery pack, this saves time and materials compared with add-on lights that can be easily stolen and require separate charging or replacement cells
  • I like the cockpit, they went with a riser bar and ergonomic grips to increase comfort and position the rider upright (to help spot traffic and fellow pedestrians)
  • It’s nice that you get several colors to choose from and the putty color and yellow struck me as being high visibility for increased safety and visual footprint
  • I like the oversized saddle with integrated handle at the back, this comes in handy to lift and position the bike but might be hard on a suspension seat post (if you swapped one in) so be careful ;)
  • The brake levers offer adjustable reach so you can fit your hand size and account for wearing work gloves or winter gloves
  • I like the pedals they chose, they seemed sturdy and had a larger surface area with good contact points so you won’t slip off easily
  • Quick release wheels make maintenance and transport easier but you might want to swap them with security hardware to prevent tampering and theft depending on your locale
  • Internally routed shifting, brake and motor cables help to reduce snags and keep the bike looking good
  • Reinforced spokes and rim eyelets reduce breaking and cracking under load
  • The control pad is very easy to reach while riding, you don’t have to take your left hand off the grip in order to arrow up or down in assist power level or change the display readout and that’s extra important if you’re carrying heavy/unstable cargo and need power instantly

Cons:

  • Despite having large tires, this bike can feel a little stiff (especially if they’re fully inflated for a full load), there’s no suspension so if you’re sensitive like me, consider adding a 31.2 mm Thudbuster seat post suspension (you might need a shim to fit this size properly)
  • The frame is only available in one size at this time and while it works okay (and actually pretty well for shorter riders) some taller people might feel scrunched, consider tipping the bars forward to extend reach and really raising that seat
  • Minor gripe here but it would be nice if the tires had reflective sidewall stripes (especially since they were already customized to say Benno on the side)… the LED lights are great but the Supernova headlight doesn’t shine through the sides at all, keep in mind that a brighter colored frame will help increase your visual footprint
  • I’m glad they included a slap guard to protect your right chainstay but wish it was a little longer… just given the stretched out tubing here it might get nicked in places that aren’t fully covered if you ride on very bumpy terrain
  • Benno Bikes are new to the US and may not be available to test ride and purchase in as many locations, on the upside however, Benno was the co-founder of Electra which made great bicycles and was well respected in the space
  • I wouldn’t want to compromise the frame strength but it would be nice to have bottle cage bosses, perhaps under the top tube? Seems like there’s room for a cage, min-pump or lock there
  • The Bosch motor is super quick to start and stop but it rotates at roughly two times your normal pedal cadence and I’ve noticed that there is a little whine sound that is produced which is slightly more audible than some other systems
  • depending on your cargo needs, it would be nice to have a double-side kickstand for added stability when loading, I do like that the single side stand that it comes with has adjustable length

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EddieJ
3 days ago

I have long had a passion for hardtail mtb’s be them analogue or pedal assist, and have found the eMTB version through ownership of the superb KTM Macina Race, to make the perfect bike for wet weather/winter use.

With the Macina Race now sold, it is time to introduce the replacement bike, a KTM Fogo 271
Click to enlarge

I decided a long time ago that whatever the next bike was going to be, that it needed to be 27.5” Plus size, and just as the Macina Race, it also needed to have a good component specification. I was also keen to stay with both the KTM marque and Bosch drive unit system.

As things stand the KTM Fogo 271 exceeds my requirements by a significant margin, so I am more than happy with my choice.

The Magura Boltron T-20x110 front forks is an interesting one for me, as I have read so many reports both good and bad, which made me keen to own a bike that had them fitted, just so that I could come to my own conclusion about them. I have also previously been asked privately about the forks and what I knew about them, so at least I finally get to discover for myself, and can offer opinion accordingly, and not just based from hearsay. I shall post more about the front forks as time passes, but from handling them off the bike, and checking them over thoroughly, it is a promising start. Clearly performance in use and durability are key, so time will tell, but from research that I have completed, I have already worked out that poor set up from end users, plays a major role in reported seal failure.
Click to enlarge

My preferred choice of front mudguard has long been the Rapid Racer Neoguard, (thanks guys) but after discussion, there are currently no plans to introduce a guard for USD front forks. There is no way that I could bring myself to install a guard that utilizes the steerer tube, and with that in mind I already have my own neoprene design waiting to fit to the bike.

The full bike/component specifications are detailed below, but as things stand, there is very little that I intend to change. I shall be replacing Intuvia with Purion, fit a Ragley Tracker saddle, Ritchey Foam grips, a 70mm Easton stem, and change what I believe to be a KS LEV Integra dropper post, in favour of a Rockshox Reverb Stealth. These four listed items are just personal preference and nothing more. The dropper post is simply being changed as I have one that I removed from the Macina Race, so the rebadged KS can be squirreled away.

I have chosen 27.5” Plus for a very specific reason, but just as with the front forks, I shall detail how things work out, as time passes. Briefly though, as many will be aware, I ride throughout the year and in all conditions. I treat my bikes very much as tool to do a job, and to date KTM bikes have filled this role very well, but with slight limitation. I now want to go one stage further and 27.5” plus is going to enable this. The plus size will fulfill the role of providing superb low-pressure grip in respect of riding wooded knarly terrain and also over rocks etc, then come the winter months, I intend to drop the tyre size down to 2.25-2.3 to optimize rear chain stay clearance. Running 2.25 for example, will give me a full 27mm of clearance all round, so close to zero issue of potential mud/leaf build up.

Having received the bike today, I cannot yet add ride specific details and data, but as with any bike that I receive, the first job is to strip the bike down to the component stages, then re assemble studying parts and construction as I go. By doing so I gain a greater insight into the construction of a bike, and can see what if anything in my opinion could or should be changed. Also, if anything fails whilst riding, having already stripped and rebuilt the bike, I have a head start on how to repair things. I get as much pleasure from working on bikes, as I do riding them.
Click to enlarge

This is where it gets interesting for me, as after having pulled the bike down, I am already very impressed by the frame. The build quality and paint finish is superb, but it is what is behind all that, that I am interested in. The shape and tube sizing has been improved, and just turning the first screw to remove the motor covers, revealed the first thought out design feature. A small banana shaped cover which when removed, gives clear and easy access to main connectors of the Bosch CX drive unit. That in itself was a simple, but welcome change. KTM have also now chosen to use an additional two motor mounting points. This again impressed me, not because the standard three wasn’t enough, but more from the potential that it may prevent any motor creaking, as the loading on the mounts is now more equal.

Turning the frame upside down gave the biggest and most pleasant surprise from the point of view of working on a bike. KTM have chosen to redesign the cable routing and internal cast mounts to the frame. Routing cables, wiring, hydraulic brake and dropper post hose, is now effortlessly easy and simple to do. I’m very impressed that such R&D has been put into this side of things, but I guess that it must save valuable seconds during the factory assembly stage. Speaking of cable and hose routing, I was also pleased to note that the frame entry points for routing, are now fractionally larger as well. A lot of thought has gone into the production of this frame.

Removal of the two tyres was next on the list, and it was yet another pleasant surprise to see that the rims are tubeless ready, not just compatible. That’ll save a bit of time and money when setting them up to run tubeless. Once the wheel set has been returned from a friend’s bike shop, after giving them to him to check and adjust spoke tension should it be required, it’ll then just be a simple job to install Stans valves and Effetto Mariposa CaffeLatex sealant. A sealant that I have no hesitation in using or recommending.

Whilst in its knock down stage, I decided to take advantage of the situation, and fitted an AMS XL Honeycomb frame guard kit. It seemed silly to pass up the opportunity to test a kit, so time will tell as to how effective that it is. It was certainly easy enough to apply, although the frame colour doesn’t really mask any slight air bubbles very well. I have also added 3M clear film to several areas of the frame as well.

Finally, the lad that purchased the Macina Race hardtail has indicated that he wants to start to ride off road as well, so that being the case, I should be able to format some interesting bike comparisons.

As well as regular updates to this forum, further updates and photographs will be posted at the following places.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/313908402329634/permalink/451984891855317/

https://www.facebook.com/edwardpeterjefferies/posts/474559259568509

https://www.instagram.com/eddiejefferies/?hl=en

Thanks to KTM Bike Industries, The Little Bike Shop, Bikegoo, Effetto Mariposa, Fork Juice, and Magicshine UK.

Full component specification

2017 KTM Macina Fogo 271 8s EX1Frame

:- Macina MTB 27.5"+ BOOST, Alloy for Bosch, with semi-integrated battery
Frame sizes :- 43cm, 48cm and 53cm.
Bike colour :- Matt light grey, black + toxic orange.
Front fork :- MAGURA Boltron inverted, T-20x110 120mm travel, weight 2,200g
Headset :- KTM Team B303AM drop/in-tapered, +10
Headset bearing numbers :- MH-P28 and MH-P08M
Stem :- KTM Team KT-6 7° 95mm Weight 133g
Handlebar :- KTM Team HB-RB12L riser, rise 15°, Width 720mm
Handlebar grips :- KTM Team VLG--775-12D2 Diamond fin with end Clamps
Brake rotors :- Shimano RT86 6-bolt, 180mm front, 180mm rear. 260.4g pr
Brakes :- Shimano Deore XT M8000 Weight 554g pr including caliper/hose/lever assembly
Trigger shifter :- SRAM SL EX1 8speed Weight 122g
Rear derailleur :- SRAM RD EX1 8speed. Weight 289g
Front sprocket size as supplied 16T
Cassette :- SRAM XG899 11-48 ( 11, 13, 15, 18, 24, 32, 40, 48) Weight 360g
Chain :- SRAM EX1 Weight 273g
Pedal cranks :- SRAM EX1, ISIS for Bosch. Length 170mm. Weight 510g pr
Pedals :- VP components VP-539 black platform, with replaceable pins. Weight 370g pr
Wheel set :- KTM Line 27-5" plus B/B Tubeless ready
Wheel rims :- Ryder edge 35, 32 spoke hole, suitable for 2.3 to ‘plus’ size of 3.0. Weight 580g
Front hub :- 20mmThrough axle DT Swiss 350 classic-6-bolt 20/110/TA BOOST. Weight 239g
Rear hub :- 12mm Through axle DT Swiss 350 classic-6-bolt 12/148/TA BOOST. Weight 305g
Tyres :- Schwalbe Nobby Nic 70-584 TL-easy, Snake skin, Apex. Weight 910g per tyre.
Saddle :- Fizik Gobi M7 with Manganese rails. Weight 255g
Seat post :- KTM Comp JD-YSP12L hydraulic adjustable 100-370, diameter 30.9mm Weight 560g
Display :- Intuvia LCD, with Walk assist
Drive unit :- Bosch Performance Line CX 36V-250W, 25km/h 75NM of torque, four assist levels,
Eco giving 50% Tour giving 120% Sport giving 210% Turbo 300% Maximum torque available
per assist level, Eco 40Nm Tour 50Nm Sport 60Nm Turbo 75Nm
Battery :- Bosch Powerpack 13.8Ah - 500WH
Motor weight :- 4kg
Battery weight :- 2.6kg, dimensions 325mm x 92mm x 90mm
Overall Bike weight :- 21.4kg

https://www.instagram.com/eddiejefferies/

And now 'Electric Mountain Bike Collective' on Facebook.

.

1/3
Mark23
5 days ago

Thanks for your reply and suggestions, I'll definitely check them out, Mark.

Juiced OceanCurrent has beach cruiser styling, very wide sweeping back handlebars, both high and mid-step frames, 26" wheels with wide 2.35" tires for a lower riding height and comfort, a 48v rear hub motor, mechanical disk brakes, weighing 51lb, for $1300. It has pedal assist with a torque sensor that modulates power depending on how hard you pedal, and a thumb throttle. The battery is mounted in the center of the bike on the down tube that distributes the weight.

Raleigh Superbe iE has classic bicycle styling, standard width swept back handlebars, both diamond and step-through frames, larger 700c/28" wheels with 1 5/8" regular bicycle tires, a 48v rear hub motor, rim brakes, fenders chainguard and rack, weighing 50.2lb, for $1500. It has pedal assist with a cadence sensing motor on/off switch, no throttle. The battery is mounted on top of the rack and with the motor in the rear wheel hub the handling may feel a little rear heavy. Another model, the Raleigh Retroglide has cruiser styling, 26" wheels with wider 2 1/4" tires for lower riding height and comfort, a 48v Currie mid-drive motor so weight is distributed, an optional boost button throttle, but is slightly heavier at 57.5lb, for $1900.

If you are interested in a crank forward ebike the Luna Smoothie is a conversion of the KHS Smoothie cruiser frame, with 26" wheels and a 3-speed IGH with the step-through frame for $1780. The low adjustable seatpost, 26" wheels, and low step over height of the step-through frame provide an upright riding position, and the powerful BBSHD mid-drive motor is a $100 option that would get you up any hill, but you don't get a warranty unless you spend more, also the photos on the Luna website don't show a chainguard so if desired you would need to contact Luna to ask if the stock KHS chainguard can be made to work with their conversion or try to make one fit using frame clamps as the typical bottom bracket mounts won't work with a BBS motor, also there's no Luna Cycle shop network unlike with Juiced or Raleigh so you would need to find a KHS dealer to test ride the frame, and an independent ebike shop that services bafang mid-drive motors.

Dewey
6 days ago

Juiced OceanCurrent has beach cruiser styling, very wide sweeping back handlebars, both high and mid-step frames, 26" wheels with wide 2.35" tires for a lower riding height and comfort, a 48v rear hub motor, mechanical disk brakes, weighing 51lb, for $1300. It has pedal assist with a torque sensor that modulates power depending on how hard you pedal, and a thumb throttle. The battery is mounted in the center of the bike on the down tube that distributes the weight.

Raleigh Superbe iE has classic bicycle styling, standard width swept back handlebars, both diamond and step-through frames, larger 700c/28" wheels with 1 5/8" regular bicycle tires, a 48v rear hub motor, rim brakes, fenders chainguard and rack, weighing 50.2lb, for $1500. It has pedal assist with a cadence sensing motor on/off switch, no throttle. The battery is mounted on top of the rack and with the motor in the rear wheel hub the handling may feel a little rear heavy. Another model, the Raleigh Retroglide has cruiser styling, 26" wheels with wider 2 1/4" tires for lower riding height and comfort, a 48v Currie mid-drive motor so weight is distributed, an optional boost button throttle, but is slightly heavier at 57.5lb, for $1900.

If you are interested in a crank forward ebike the Luna Smoothie is a conversion of the KHS Smoothie cruiser frame, with 26" wheels and a 3-speed IGH with the step-through frame for $1780. The low adjustable seatpost, 26" wheels, and low step over height of the step-through frame provide an upright riding position, and the powerful BBSHD mid-drive motor is a $100 option that would get you up any hill, but you don't get a warranty unless you spend more, also the photos on the Luna website don't show a chainguard so if desired you would need to contact Luna to ask if the stock KHS chainguard can be made to work with their conversion or try to make one fit using frame clamps as the typical bottom bracket mounts won't work with a BBS motor, also there's no Luna Cycle shop network unlike with Juiced or Raleigh so you would need to find a KHS dealer to test ride the frame, and an independent ebike shop that services bafang mid-drive motors.

Katman4532
1 week ago

Hi Marleen!
I realize this is an old thread, but I recently took possession of a Townie Commute Go. So, here is my mini-review.
First of all, this bike is heavy; perhaps a little heavier than the Townie Go. I live in West Texas which is mostly flat
terrain similar to where you live. I bought this bike sight unseen simply going by my experience on a regular Townie.
The first thing I noticed is that this bike is quite tall with the 700c tires. In fact, unless the seat was lowered almost all
the way, I could not sit "flat footed", (I'm 5ft. 10in. Tall). The bike itself seemed to be very well made with very clean
welds. On my first ride, I purposely left the assist off for the first mile which consisted of 1/2 mile flat road with a 20 mph
crosswind. Next half mile was slight incline with a 20 mph headwind. I had no trouble pedaling in first gear at 6 to 8
Mph. I was concerned about how difficult this would be to pedal with a dead battery. Not bad at all. The next 5 miles
was done on the eco setting (20 mph headwind and rolling terrain). At the 6 mile point, I turned around (time constraints) and pedaled back with the assist off doing between 15 and 23 mph. Two days later, I did a 10 mile circular
ride and then a 6 mile trip to the LBS for a gel seat cover (highly recommended) using mostly the tour setting. Altogether,
I've put almost 31 miles on the bike using 2 out of 5 "bars" battery power. So, here's my opinion so far. The bike is
taller than what I would have liked, however, traffic has no trouble seeing me. The drive system is quiet and seems to
give a boost that comes on subtly but increases as needed. Very nice. I don't think the weight will be a factor since your
terrain is flat. You will want to use the boost coming out of an intersection. I'm going to ride after dark tonight to see
how well the lights work. The ride is very comfortable with the gel pad on the seat, in fact, perhaps the most comfortable
bike I've ever owned. I'm in my early sixties and fit for my age; pedaling with the assist off is quite doable. My only two
complaints are the height and weight. Hope this helps. Feel free to ask any questions!

Denis Shelston
1 week ago

It is a complex question.

Generally speaking I would say no.

But, if you're willing to spend some money and deal with large size panels, it's possible.

Most solar panels only put out under 20v, on a very bright sunny day that is, as they are designed to charge 12v batteries. Panels are connected to a charger controller or MPPT, you would need to boost the voltage out if your panels are to charge an ebike battery, most are 36v or 48v. These MPPT are relatively expensive, $300+. If you have a 48v ebike, you need 52v to charge. Under the best of circumstances it would be somewhat difficult to fully recharge an ebike depleted 48v battery under 5-6 hours of Full sun. You would need large panels, probably 2 x 100 Watts, 2 x 4 feet each, these are probably in the $250 range. Yes, portable, pliable and folding, are also available but much less efficient, they are really expensive.

You would have to charge during full sun, not use the ebike for a while. Another challenge on trips...

Food for thought.

Gary Shannon
2 weeks ago

I just installed my Hilltopper (250W) this morning, and spent the better part of the day cruising around town and running errands. I'm thrilled with my new eBike.

I noticed that I quickly got in the habit of just pushing the button when I was already pedaling, so I used it just to boost my own pedaling. (I'm 72 years old and don't pedal as fast as I used to :( ) I kept my 7-speed Schwinn in 5th gear and cruised at about 10-15 MPH. On level ground I mostly just pedaled. On downslopes I just coasted, and on upslopes I used the motor as a pedal assist. Using the motor that way I put about 15 miles on my "8-mile" battery. I don't know how much charge was left because the Hilltopper has no battery gauge, but it didn't take very long to recharge to full.

One thing that worried me was parking at the supermarket and leaving my battery unattended. So I bought an inexpensive WalMart lock box and bolted it to the handlebars. I used pipe brackets and slotless carriage bolts so the brackets cannot be loosened from outside the box. The wires feed through a hole I drilled in the side. Now I can lock up the battery when I go into the store, yet open the box and take it in the house for charging very easily.

JayVee
2 weeks ago

Being the (temporary) user of a Bosch Peformance (350W, 45km/h version) with a Nuvinci 380, I have to say that the manual version of the N380 was something of a disappointment. On paper the system really appeals to me, but after trying it out I've found that it doesn't suit my needs or riding style. Not to be negative here, but I don't think the Nuvinci is for everyone. Particularly the manual iteration that I'm currently using.

You have to have really strong hands to use the Nuvinci system. After 15 minutes of riding around, I already had blisters on my fingers. But what bothers me the most with the loaner bike I have is how difficult it is to ride around in a city environment. When the Bosch and N380 are combined, they seem to enhance each other's weaknesses. Bosch drives are fairly difficult to get going from a standstill and the N380 makes it equally difficult to gain speed and momentum rapidly. When you stop at a traffic light you're going to have to put the N380 in a 'steep hill' configuration in order to get going again. But once you get going, in order to acquire some speed you''ll need to twist the lever several times to achieve a 'flatter configuration'. And by several times, I mean about 3 strong full twists. To me this is like rolling a computer mouse entirely across the table 3 times just to get the pointer to the top of your screen. There's simply got to be an easier way to do this.. I suppose I'm influenced by the fact that I've been riding a Yamaha drive around for six months and it has a feature called Zero Cadence, which gives you a little boost when starting off. It's a feature that operates in a rather subtle manner and to be honest I barely noticed it up to now. It's more of a little nudge than a big push, but if you have to deal with 7 consecutive red lights, some of which are on hills, the benefits are clearly there even if you're not consciously aware of them.

I enjoyed Shimano's electronic Di2 Nexus hub a lot. It only takes a click of a thumb to switch gears and everything falls nicely under your fingertips (Di2 gears on the right, and assist levels on the left). I tried the Nexus Di2 in automatic mode, but it takes quite a bit of trial and error to optimise it for your cadence and so I ended up using it in manual mode exclusively over the course of an entire summer. With Shimano's system everything falls under your fingers, and so you can combine assist level shifting and gear shifting for some very neat effects which can dramatically increase your range in traffic. Switch into full assist to get started and then slip back into ECO once you reach cruising speed. Shimano's system is one of the most pleasant systems I've ever used in traffic because it allows you to fully focus on the surrounding environment. After a couple of kilometers, shifting gears and assist levels becomes second nature.

Rich N
2 weeks ago

All,
I bought my Vado 3.0 a few weeks ago after buying and returning a Turbo S a week before that. The Turbo S was disappointing (turned out it was actually a 2014 model and had no Bluetooth and was way overpriced) mostly because of the dealer (which I won't mention and will never shop at again).

However, I couldn't be happier with the Vado or the shop I bought it from (Dirty Harry's in Verona, PA). The Turbo Vado is light years better. The pedal crank motor makes the bike much more balanced - I had trouble lifting the Turbo S onto my bike rack due to the weight of the hub motor way in back. The push button controls are more solid than the flimsy rubber joystick of the Turbo S. Also, with the Vado you get the all weather fenders, standard bike rack with taillight, and front lockable suspension! I guess appearance is a personal preference, but I think the Vado looks awesome and I get compliments on it from other riders a lot.

Mine came with the proper software updates (it has a 20mph limit on the electric boost) but also does not seem to have bluetooth enabled. I was trying to get some information from Specialized, but I think we need an update to the Mission Control App for Vado, and probably another firmware upgrade on the bike to enable Bluetooth. I don't really need the extra functions of Mission Control right now anyway. I have only ridden about 100 miles so far - I keep the boost on minimum - and it seems like on moderately hilly terrain I will probably get about 30-40 miles of range. I guess that will vary greatly depending on speed and climb.

So far, so good - looking forward to lots more miles!

Ravi Kempaiah
2 weeks ago

GSD = get stuff done.
Really great design. I was impressed that they spec'd boost thru axle and dual piston brakes.

The pricing is much better than Yuba spicy Bosch or Edgerunner or Benno.

This will be great seller for Tern. I know several shops are looking forward to getting these bikes.

Kudos to the Tern team!

Zach Kadletz
2 weeks ago

Taipei, Taiwan, August 2nd 2017 – Urban transportation specialist Tern Bicycles unveiled the GSD — an ebike that defines a new category: ‘compact utility’. The GSD is designed to carry two kids, a week’s worth of groceries, or 180 kg of cargo, but it’s only 180 cm long—shorter than a Dutch city bike. With Tern’s best-in-class folding technology, it packs down small enough to fit in a VW Touran or an urban apartment. It adjusts to fit riders from 150 – 195 cm—so mom, dad and the kids can all use it. A Bosch Performance motor, with up to two batteries, powers the GSD for up to 250km. It comes fully equipped with integrated lighting, rack, mudguards, double kickstand, two XL panniers, and even retractable passenger foot pegs – everything needed to shift to a bike-centric lifestyle.

“Most of the ebikes on the market today basically look like standard bicycles with motors and batteries grafted on,” said Josh Hon, Tern Team Captain. "That means that all of the valid compromises that were made in designing a muscle-powered vehicle are carried over to the ebike, where they don’t make as much sense. The Tern GSD is the result a fundamental insight: when you design a bicycle around an electric drivetrain, you don’t need to compromise key functionalities like comfort and cargo capacity to optimize for speed. With a Bosch drivetrain, 20” wheel bikes ride just as fast as 700c bikes but thanks to smaller wheels, deliver punchier acceleration. The smaller wheels also allow us to maximize cargo capacity. And with top speed removed from the optimization equation, we were free to design the GSD with a comfortable Dutch-bike riding position. Best of all, we were able to fit all this goodness into a package that’s only the size of a standard city bike.”

“One of our guiding insights was that cargo bikes are most useful in city centers, but they’re correspondingly difficult to manage and store,” according to Galen Crout, Communications Manager at Tern. “Dense urban centers bring cargo bikes to life—where groceries, schools and work are all within a bikeable distance—but they’re also where houses are small, and where bike theft is a persistent problem. We’re creating the compact utility ebike category to let people in cities enjoy the benefits of cargo bikes without the limitations.”

Fits the Family
The GSD is an ebike that everybody in the family can ride. Tern’s patented adjustable stem, special cockpit geometry, and super low step frame make the bike easy to handle and ride, even for very small riders. Taller riders will appreciate the expanding cockpit and handlebars that can be adjusted for height and reach. Heavier riders will appreciate the massively buttressed frame and fork, and components that are designed to handle loads of up to 180kg.

Super Stable
Just as a scooter is easier to ride than a motorcycle, the GSD rides and handles better than many ebikes on the market today. The GSD’s smaller wheels, low frame, and centrally mounted motor and batteries give the bike an extremely low center of gravity. Coupled with an extended wheelbase, the GSD is remarkably stable and easy to handle. This extra stability is critically important and appreciated when the GSD is fully loaded with cargo, especially with the wriggling child variety. And since ebikes are typically ridden at higher average speeds, this extra stability adds to safety.

Capacious Capacity
The GSD is built to carry stuff, lots of it. The frame, fork, and components have been tested to exceed 180kg of total weight for the rider and cargo. The GSD comes standard with an 80cm integrated rear rack and side panniers with a total capacity of 62L. The GSD fits two children in Thule Maxi child seats or one adult passenger. Additional carrying capacity can be added with lower deck supports, a rear tray, and a front tray. Tern will open source the frame attachment point dimensions so riders with an interest can also design and build their own custom cargo accessories.

Portabilty, Storability
Despite its extra large cargo capacity, the GSD packs small to fit into tight urban environments. Since the GSD is no longer than a standard bike, it will work with standard bike racks on cars and buses. But even better, patented Tern folding technology lets the GSD pack even smaller – three seconds is all it takes to reduce its height by 1/3rd and its width by 40% so the GSD can fit INSIDE mid-sized cars like a VW Touran. With two GSD’s packed in the back of the car, family bike adventures will never be the same again. The GSD is even designed to fit into small elevators with a specially designed rack that allows it to stand vertically.

Component Quality
Whereas many cargo-oriented bicycles use mostly standard bicycle parts, the GSD goes a step further with some of the most robust parts available. Examples include Magura 4 piston disc brakes, custom 2.4" Schwalbe Super Moto-X tires, Boost thru-axle hubs, and custom 36mm width double-joined rims.

The GSD, designed as the ultimate car replacement or small business utility vehicle, launches together with a collection of accessories, including Eurocrate-standardized front and rear racks, a passenger kit with KLICKfix adapters, and optional foot supports. The rear rack, sized for up to four Ortliebs, is designed for optimal compatibility with up to two Thule Yepp Maxi Seats. The base price of 3,999 EUR (3,999 USD) includes a pair of 62 L Cargo Hold panniers, a Bosch Performance mid-drive, and a 400 watt hour Bosch battery.

“It’s a bike that fits a family, but it’s also a bike that the whole family can share” said Hon. “When you’re investing $4,000 in a new electric bike, fundamental versatility makes a world of difference. Fit any riders, passengers, or cargo, and fit anywhere.”

Tern will debut the GSD at the Fall trade shows, starting with Eurobike 2017. Dealers and consumers can stop by the Tern booth at B4-405, or the Tern demo booth at DA-417 to test ride the GSD.

bob armani
3 weeks ago

I checked the BH website - actually downloaded the pdf manual - and don't see the word fuse anywhere.
I believe I have a 2015 bike, as it was a demo unit in an e- bike shop in denver.
I rode leisurely for 10 years on nearby open space trails - wide cinder and concrete trails.
Then I had knee surgery last feb, still cannot pedal a bike due to scar tissue.
I love the bike because I can get outside in the sun and air even though I cannot pedal yet.
Sooner or later I expect the pedaling to happen -
Larry

Thanks for your reply Larry! Let me hookup with Will from Scooteretti on this site. He would know. The manual is not very useful for these kind of inquiries. I myself found that the auto power shutdown when the bike is left on for over 5 mins without use is not listed in the manual. The BMS in the battery has a sleep mode that powers the system off.

Sorry to hear about your knee. At least you can take advantage of the throttle option. I also had a bike injury that caused a break in riding for a while. I finally got back on with an ebike for the same reasons. Open trails, air, sun, wind landscape, etc. My new 2015 ebike has changed my life and got me riding again. I keep the bike in BOOST mode and that seems to work great in all pedal assist situations. The off the line boost feels so responsive. The thin tires are great for reduced rolling resistance IMHO. I was always use to knobby MTB tires until I discovered these new models. A very positive transition for me. Hope you get to pedaling again to feel the awesome PAS on the ebike. I test rode the 500 Watt model and wow is it powerful for me at 135lbs! Take Care and ride safe!

jazz
3 weeks ago

I personally like to have an active throttle available all the time especially when trail riding but only thumb as it is not as easy to accidentally engage as a twist. I find it is very convenient have a "throttle boost" readily available rather than having to change PAS, gears etc to get up a small incline etc. I have an 2wd EVO Snow 48v which has no throttle and I really do miss it. My DIY 52v mid-drive with throttle is much more fun to trail ride

Mark Peralta
4 weeks ago

My biggest frustration with this bike is that when I start my commute I put it in setting 1 or 2 and get up to 20mph+ and can sustain that quite easily until I get to some hills. I then put it up to setting 3 and I get the boost I need, but when I come to the flats again I want to drop it into 2 again, but it often feels like I fight against the motor (I actually sent my first bike back as it was so annoying) and I don't feel the same boost from that setting as when I first started my ride.

That is the nature of the ebike battery (or any batteries) and it is true to almost all ebikes except maybe to some that has layers of computer programming to compensate for the voltage drop as the battery is used. The rated 48 volt battery is actually 54 volts when fully charged and 42 volts when fully discharged. So it feels more powerful in the first part of your trip.

Velome
4 weeks ago

I thought I would give my ST1x review as it has been around a month and 200 miles since I received it in the mail. Sorry for the long post, but I hope someone will find all the information useful.

ORDER:
I decided to place an order with an E-bike shop instead of buying from my local shop because of the massive savings I received. I ordered the Sport (high bar) in 22" and charcoal. The shop upgraded me to the ST2 battery (814wh) and provided a body float seat post for a small charge. I got an email from Stromer the day after I placed the order to setup my account/app as the shop tied my bike to my phone number before it was shipped. It took about 12 days in total to get the bike, but there was a holiday weekend that increased that time. 7-10 days is probably reasonable expectation. Saving the 10% Seattle sales tax was also a contributing factor as they included shipping for free. All said and done very happy with the price and the shop I ordered from and would not have done it different.

RECEIVING:
The bike is in a large box that weights over 60 lbs. Because of this there was a local delivery company that did the final transit. Due to this it took an extra weekend to get to me because I had to schedule the delivery. They showed up in a 18-wheeler which caused the driver to have some issues blocking traffic on a busy road to hand truck the bike to my door. But all arrived safely and he wheeled it into my garage.

The bike came nearly fully assembled. I needed to straighten the handle bars (mm allen wrench) which was pretty easy (they are shipped at 90 degrees so the box is flatter). The peddles also needed to be screwed on - the right side goes on traditionally, the left is reverse threaded. I swapped out the seat post (cannot remember if the seat was on the bike or not when shipped), and I was all ready to go. Wheel reflectors, the charger were also in the box with manuals. The first charge took about 2-3 hours to be fully charged.

INITIAL IMPRESSIONS:
So much fun. I had tried out electric bikes before, but this was my first Speed Pedelec and really glad I went that direction, it is addicting. Some people say you work just as hard on an e-bike, but it is hard to explain why. I don't burn as many calories, but your muscles are still sore. You want to work hard just to maintain the speed and always feel the boost. So you work as hard, but over a shorter period of time because you are going so much faster.

The ST1x has a boost/throttle - kind of. If you hold the [+] button it will move you without peddling. But I have yet to have a situation where I could not peddle faster than the boost. On a flat it will get you to about 10-12 mph, on a decent hill you are lucky to get half that. In all cases I can get the bike to go at least 20%-100% faster by peddling at a moderate rate. The brakes squeak a bit (see the EBR videos, sounds the exact same) but they are solid. I am 6'3" 220lbs. The frame size is pretty good for me, but if you are 6'5" I think you might find it a bit too small - and they don't make it any bigger.

I have had several friends take it for a spin, they're all in love with it.

200 MILE REVIEW:
I have had a few issues so lets get those out of the way. About 20 miles in the right peddle was wobbling considerably. I took the peddle off and the aluminum threads were stripped. I put the peddle on so it is possible it was something I did, but I am pretty good with tools and am pretty sure it was a factory defect. I called the bike shop I ordered from and they shipped an entirely new bottom bracket and crankset. It took around 7 days to get that and another 2-3 for a bike shop to do the work (I did not have the right tools). It is working perfectly now. It was all done under warranty through the bike shop I purchased from - I d not call Stromer. All I had to do was send in photos and provide a write up. I think this was more to make sure they sent the right part than not trusting me.

At 100 miles I got a rear flat. Of course I didn't have a spare, pump or tools with me (Murphy!) so my wife picked me up and I swapped the tube with the same kind that came with the bike. I now have a trunk bag with a spare tube, tools and a pump. All of which I had, just not with me at the time.

I have a few complaints as well. The bike creeks a lot. Not sure what exactly is making the sound, but it sounds like tapping on a carbon frame (there is no Carbon), and it bothers me, but does not seem to an issue. Could be that I am too fat. The drivetrain is a little bit clunky. It does not shift as crisp as I would hope. Again, not an issue, but it bothers me. I have learned that if I am not in the right gear it will either not shift right away or will shift really hard. So as I come to a stop I move up a few sprockets to a larger one, and then gradually down shift as I pick up speed. I rarely ever use the largest cogs as with the motor it is rarely needed (even in 10-12% grade)

Absolutely love riding this bike. I rarely take it out of assist level 3 just because it is so much fun. I ride about 14 miles round trip to work and it takes me about 20-25 minutes each way - my commute is across a valley so steep hills going each way with some flat in the middle and a hand full of signals that have a long rotation. I average about 16-20mph. During peak traffic I can easily make the trip quicker than I could in a car. If I took it really easy I could probably get away without showering at work, but the way I ride I always sweat a bit. I charge it every other day and usually have about 50% battery left after the 28 miles. I have not rode it outside of commuting yet, so I have yet to test the range.

OMNI is alright. Signal strength is terrible and does not work from my house. I have a secure bike cage at work so I have only used the electric lock once. I don't really like the screens they have to choose from. I find myself switching between them on a regular basis. I think they could improve this quite a bit - perhaps ill get an update. Stromer - If you are reading this, reach out to me and I'll provide a bunch of feedback.

I added a mirror and upgraded the handle grips.

SUMMARY:
I would buy it again in a heartbeat. 28mph is a must - glad I got that 35 mph would be even better. Get a body float - my bumpy broken asphalt paths would have killed me without it.

Happy to answer questions if anyone has them - I probably could have written twice as much. I plan to do some videos as there is not a lot of info on the ST1x and I can walk through some of the above in more detail.
What kind of impact do you have from the front fork? I see one person mentioned the Redshift Shockstop to lessen feedback from the road. I think I'll add that to my Trek XM700+.

Dewey
4 weeks ago

For what you're looking (PAS + throttle), Easy Motion EVO City (Large) would fit very well. Juiced Cross Current in XL frame would be another choice.

According to Court's review the Easy Motion Evo City throttle works only in pedal assist level zero so you would need to use the thumb pad to turn down the PAS before you could use the throttle. I don't think that's true for other ebikes using the Dapu hub motor like the Pedego City Commuter as Court's review mentioned he could twist the throttle to over-ride the PAS. The Izip/Raleigh boost button looks like a simple on/off switch so it doesn't look like you can hold the speed as with a twist or thumb throttle. I think all the current ebikes from Trek, Specialized or Giant are pedal assist with no throttle.

I would avoid the upcoming Juiced Cross Current S until the speed limit issue is resolved. The spec sheet for the new batch Cross Current S model lists an "off road mode" unlimited motor setting and "user configurable" speed settings in the LCD display. A promotional video shot in China demonstrates >30mph performance, which falls outside both the federal CPSC and California 3-class e-bike definition, and is a motorcycle. Unless there is a VIN # an e-bike cannot be registered or insured as a motorcycle. Juiced should not attempt to sell these as an e-bike as currently specced.

Ravi Kempaiah
1 month ago

(the review on this site says it can have a throttle, but I am having trouble confirming via the izip website - can anyone confirm?)

Yes, the previous Izip models had an option add "Boost" button pad and it's their way of making throttle for those who prefer.
Take a look at this pic:

I suggest test riding some models before getting one. Your nearest Trek, Giant or Specialized dealer might be able to order some for you. Depending on where you live, you could also attend some ebike expo.
For what you're looking (PAS + throttle), Easy Motion EVO City (Large) would fit very well. Juiced Cross Current in XL frame would be another choice.

You could activate throttle on some of the Stromers as well (ST1 series)

1/1
Jestyr
1 month ago

Im looking into purchasing a new ebike for commuting, and Id like some advice or recommendations. Im kind of a newbie to buying nicer bicycles, and the shops in my area dont carry much in the way of ebikes for me to look at - they can order and adjust, but not many options locally for a test ride.

Im 6'1" tall, so the smaller framed bikes tend to feel small for me, even when seat and handlebars are adjusted. I suppose I like slightly larger frames - my 19inch regular bike is a bit small for me, but manageable.

Regarding class of bike, ideally it would have both throttle and pedal assist. Top speed isnt super important to me, so class 1 is about the same as class 3 for me, but I do want it to be both throttle or boost capable as well as pedal assist capable.

My budget is generous, but not infinite, so anything under about $4500 is doable although Id be happy to save money if a lower price model meets my needs.

Id love one with fenders and a rack for panniers, riding upright isnt necessary, my current bike is more aggressive in posture.

I like the Bulls EvoE-8, but it doesnt come with a throttle mode, so Im ruling it out. The Izip Protour looks good as well (the review on this site says it can have a throttle, but I am having trouble confirming via the izip website - can anyone confirm?), but the izip has a 19 inch frame size. Any thoughts on if that would be OK for me? Also, the rack on the izip looks small - will it hold panniers well? Any recommendations or advice? Im open to looking at any bike you recommend.

Thanks,

John

Saratoga Dave
1 month ago

So I just got in from a typical 20 mile ride and suddenly the controller doesn't work at all. System shows Off, cant go up through the boost levels, info button doesn't work, nothing. This is on the button pad at the left end of the handlebars. The Intuvia head works fine as far as info button, lights, but you can't control the assist from there. Anyone seen this one before I loaf I think up and head for the bike shop?

At least it happened at home... I was on some pretty good hills today, and it is humid as hell out!

smitty
1 month ago

I thought I would give my ST1x review as it has been around a month and 200 miles since I received it in the mail. Sorry for the long post, but I hope someone will find all the information useful.

ORDER:
I decided to place an order with an E-bike shop instead of buying from my local shop because of the massive savings I received. I ordered the Sport (high bar) in 22" and charcoal. The shop upgraded me to the ST2 battery (814wh) and provided a body float seat post for a small charge. I got an email from Stromer the day after I placed the order to setup my account/app as the shop tied my bike to my phone number before it was shipped. It took about 12 days in total to get the bike, but there was a holiday weekend that increased that time. 7-10 days is probably reasonable expectation. Saving the 10% Seattle sales tax was also a contributing factor as they included shipping for free. All said and done very happy with the price and the shop I ordered from and would not have done it different.

RECEIVING:
The bike is in a large box that weights over 60 lbs. Because of this there was a local delivery company that did the final transit. Due to this it took an extra weekend to get to me because I had to schedule the delivery. They showed up in a 18-wheeler which caused the driver to have some issues blocking traffic on a busy road to hand truck the bike to my door. But all arrived safely and he wheeled it into my garage.

The bike came nearly fully assembled. I needed to straighten the handle bars (mm allen wrench) which was pretty easy (they are shipped at 90 degrees so the box is flatter). The peddles also needed to be screwed on - the right side goes on traditionally, the left is reverse threaded. I swapped out the seat post (cannot remember if the seat was on the bike or not when shipped), and I was all ready to go. Wheel reflectors, the charger were also in the box with manuals. The first charge took about 2-3 hours to be fully charged.

INITIAL IMPRESSIONS:
So much fun. I had tried out electric bikes before, but this was my first Speed Pedelec and really glad I went that direction, it is addicting. Some people say you work just as hard on an e-bike, but it is hard to explain why. I don't burn as many calories, but your muscles are still sore. You want to work hard just to maintain the speed and always feel the boost. So you work as hard, but over a shorter period of time because you are going so much faster.

The ST1x has a boost/throttle - kind of. If you hold the [+] button it will move you without peddling. But I have yet to have a situation where I could not peddle faster than the boost. On a flat it will get you to about 10-12 mph, on a decent hill you are lucky to get half that. In all cases I can get the bike to go at least 20%-100% faster by peddling at a moderate rate. The brakes squeak a bit (see the EBR videos, sounds the exact same) but they are solid. I am 6'3" 220lbs. The frame size is pretty good for me, but if you are 6'5" I think you might find it a bit too small - and they don't make it any bigger.

I have had several friends take it for a spin, they're all in love with it.

200 MILE REVIEW:
I have had a few issues so lets get those out of the way. About 20 miles in the right peddle was wobbling considerably. I took the peddle off and the aluminum threads were stripped. I put the peddle on so it is possible it was something I did, but I am pretty good with tools and am pretty sure it was a factory defect. I called the bike shop I ordered from and they shipped an entirely new bottom bracket and crankset. It took around 7 days to get that and another 2-3 for a bike shop to do the work (I did not have the right tools). It is working perfectly now. It was all done under warranty through the bike shop I purchased from - I d not call Stromer. All I had to do was send in photos and provide a write up. I think this was more to make sure they sent the right part than not trusting me.

At 100 miles I got a rear flat. Of course I didn't have a spare, pump or tools with me (Murphy!) so my wife picked me up and I swapped the tube with the same kind that came with the bike. I now have a trunk bag with a spare tube, tools and a pump. All of which I had, just not with me at the time.

I have a few complaints as well. The bike creeks a lot. Not sure what exactly is making the sound, but it sounds like tapping on a carbon frame (there is no Carbon), and it bothers me, but does not seem to an issue. Could be that I am too fat. The drivetrain is a little bit clunky. It does not shift as crisp as I would hope. Again, not an issue, but it bothers me. I have learned that if I am not in the right gear it will either not shift right away or will shift really hard. So as I come to a stop I move up a few sprockets to a larger one, and then gradually down shift as I pick up speed. I rarely ever use the largest cogs as with the motor it is rarely needed (even in 10-12% grade)

Absolutely love riding this bike. I rarely take it out of assist level 3 just because it is so much fun. I ride about 14 miles round trip to work and it takes me about 20-25 minutes each way - my commute is across a valley so steep hills going each way with some flat in the middle and a hand full of signals that have a long rotation. I average about 16-20mph. During peak traffic I can easily make the trip quicker than I could in a car. If I took it really easy I could probably get away without showering at work, but the way I ride I always sweat a bit. I charge it every other day and usually have about 50% battery left after the 28 miles. I have not rode it outside of commuting yet, so I have yet to test the range.

OMNI is alright. Signal strength is terrible and does not work from my house. I have a secure bike cage at work so I have only used the electric lock once. I don't really like the screens they have to choose from. I find myself switching between them on a regular basis. I think they could improve this quite a bit - perhaps ill get an update. Stromer - If you are reading this, reach out to me and I'll provide a bunch of feedback.

I added a mirror and upgraded the handle grips.

SUMMARY:
I would buy it again in a heartbeat. 28mph is a must - glad I got that 35 mph would be even better. Get a body float - my bumpy broken asphalt paths would have killed me without it.

Happy to answer questions if anyone has them - I probably could have written twice as much. I plan to do some videos as there is not a lot of info on the ST1x and I can walk through some of the above in more detail.

"86 and still kicking has got it right"...good advice and well worth the money. I made arrangements with our local bike dealer to service the mechanicals on the bike before purchasing (ST-2), as I too bought on the internet because of my distance from anyone selling the Stromer bikes. One has way too much money invested in the machine to not have it serviced as needed. Stromer has been great with any of the problems I have run into (as in replacing my OMNI unit). They sent a new unit along with instructions on how to install it correctly. I communicate with them whenever I fell the need and their service is way above par in my experience.
In regard to shifting, I had to reteach myself to let up on the pedaling pressure before making gear changes, finding that I was exerting more pressure because of the electric assist on keeping a steady cadence. I still miss a decent shift once in awhile, but it is much improved. I have carbon fork on my bike but am looking into a handlebar stem that has elastomer properties similar to the BodyFloat which I have installed on my seat post at https://redshiftsports.com/shockstop- suspension-stem. Check it out, especially so if you have some rough riding patches on your commute. Best of luck with your new purchase and I hope that you enjoy it as much as I have mine...it is a great bike! I enjoyed your post...

nwroller
1 month ago

I thought I would give my ST1x review as it has been around a month and 200 miles since I received it in the mail. Sorry for the long post, but I hope someone will find all the information useful.

ORDER:
I decided to place an order with an E-bike shop instead of buying from my local shop because of the massive savings I received. I ordered the Sport (high bar) in 22" and charcoal. The shop upgraded me to the ST2 battery (814wh) and provided a body float seat post for a small charge. I got an email from Stromer the day after I placed the order to setup my account/app as the shop tied my bike to my phone number before it was shipped. It took about 12 days in total to get the bike, but there was a holiday weekend that increased that time. 7-10 days is probably reasonable expectation. Saving the 10% Seattle sales tax was also a contributing factor as they included shipping for free. All said and done very happy with the price and the shop I ordered from and would not have done it different.

RECEIVING:
The bike is in a large box that weights over 60 lbs. Because of this there was a local delivery company that did the final transit. Due to this it took an extra weekend to get to me because I had to schedule the delivery. They showed up in a 18-wheeler which caused the driver to have some issues blocking traffic on a busy road to hand truck the bike to my door. But all arrived safely and he wheeled it into my garage.

The bike came nearly fully assembled. I needed to straighten the handle bars (mm allen wrench) which was pretty easy (they are shipped at 90 degrees so the box is flatter). The peddles also needed to be screwed on - the right side goes on traditionally, the left is reverse threaded. I swapped out the seat post (cannot remember if the seat was on the bike or not when shipped), and I was all ready to go. Wheel reflectors, the charger were also in the box with manuals. The first charge took about 2-3 hours to be fully charged.

INITIAL IMPRESSIONS:
So much fun. I had tried out electric bikes before, but this was my first Speed Pedelec and really glad I went that direction, it is addicting. Some people say you work just as hard on an e-bike, but it is hard to explain why. I don't burn as many calories, but your muscles are still sore. You want to work hard just to maintain the speed and always feel the boost. So you work as hard, but over a shorter period of time because you are going so much faster.

The ST1x has a boost/throttle - kind of. If you hold the [+] button it will move you without peddling. But I have yet to have a situation where I could not peddle faster than the boost. On a flat it will get you to about 10-12 mph, on a decent hill you are lucky to get half that. In all cases I can get the bike to go at least 20%-100% faster by peddling at a moderate rate. The brakes squeak a bit (see the EBR videos, sounds the exact same) but they are solid. I am 6'3" 220lbs. The frame size is pretty good for me, but if you are 6'5" I think you might find it a bit too small - and they don't make it any bigger.

I have had several friends take it for a spin, they're all in love with it.

200 MILE REVIEW:
I have had a few issues so lets get those out of the way. About 20 miles in the right peddle was wobbling considerably. I took the peddle off and the aluminum threads were stripped. I put the peddle on so it is possible it was something I did, but I am pretty good with tools and am pretty sure it was a factory defect. I called the bike shop I ordered from and they shipped an entirely new bottom bracket and crankset. It took around 7 days to get that and another 2-3 for a bike shop to do the work (I did not have the right tools). It is working perfectly now. It was all done under warranty through the bike shop I purchased from - I d not call Stromer. All I had to do was send in photos and provide a write up. I think this was more to make sure they sent the right part than not trusting me.

At 100 miles I got a rear flat. Of course I didn't have a spare, pump or tools with me (Murphy!) so my wife picked me up and I swapped the tube with the same kind that came with the bike. I now have a trunk bag with a spare tube, tools and a pump. All of which I had, just not with me at the time.

I have a few complaints as well. The bike creeks a lot. Not sure what exactly is making the sound, but it sounds like tapping on a carbon frame (there is no Carbon), and it bothers me, but does not seem to an issue. Could be that I am too fat. The drivetrain is a little bit clunky. It does not shift as crisp as I would hope. Again, not an issue, but it bothers me. I have learned that if I am not in the right gear it will either not shift right away or will shift really hard. So as I come to a stop I move up a few sprockets to a larger one, and then gradually down shift as I pick up speed. I rarely ever use the largest cogs as with the motor it is rarely needed (even in 10-12% grade)

Absolutely love riding this bike. I rarely take it out of assist level 3 just because it is so much fun. I ride about 14 miles round trip to work and it takes me about 20-25 minutes each way - my commute is across a valley so steep hills going each way with some flat in the middle and a hand full of signals that have a long rotation. I average about 16-20mph. During peak traffic I can easily make the trip quicker than I could in a car. If I took it really easy I could probably get away without showering at work, but the way I ride I always sweat a bit. I charge it every other day and usually have about 50% battery left after the 28 miles. I have not rode it outside of commuting yet, so I have yet to test the range.

OMNI is alright. Signal strength is terrible and does not work from my house. I have a secure bike cage at work so I have only used the electric lock once. I don't really like the screens they have to choose from. I find myself switching between them on a regular basis. I think they could improve this quite a bit - perhaps ill get an update. Stromer - If you are reading this, reach out to me and I'll provide a bunch of feedback.

I added a mirror and upgraded the handle grips.

SUMMARY:
I would buy it again in a heartbeat. 28mph is a must - glad I got that 35 mph would be even better. Get a body float - my bumpy broken asphalt paths would have killed me without it.

Happy to answer questions if anyone has them - I probably could have written twice as much. I plan to do some videos as there is not a lot of info on the ST1x and I can walk through some of the above in more detail.

tarhead
1 month ago

'saw an incident first hand. My wife and daughter have another brand of e-bike. My daughter was bringing them into the house after a ride but my wife had forgotten to turn hers off. Suddenly the bike popped a wheelie, literally vertical. Fortunately the kid is a big, strong girl with good reflexes (she's an accomplished equestrian- kinda like an e-bike with a brain of its own ;-) so no damage.
I have mixed feelings on the issue. I test rode a fat bike from another company and definitely liked the immediate throttle for clearing intersections. Part of my reasoning is that, after years of riding with toes clips, I find that I feel insecure without them; like my foot will slip off or not be in the right position when I need it to be. So I would likely add them to a new bike. The problem with them is that they can be a bit tricky to get into at times so being able to boost without pedalling could be a benefit. Yes, I can pedal without getting them on but then they are on the down side of the pedal and drag and scrape.
Seems like there is no "perfect" solution.

Falken
1 month ago

Sometimes it takes me a while to figure things out.

You see I have ridden motorcycles for over 45 years, my latest was a BMW RT1100 bought brand new in 2001. I toured all over, solo, went to the Florida Keys, San Diego and Newfoundland, and many points in between. Always loved the peaceful solo drive. In 2011 I had an accident, when a car cut me off, took a spill and hurt myself bad and totalled by bike. I retired from 2 wheel transportation right then.

I discovered E-bikes not long ago, was hoping I could get some of the kicks of riding again. Low and behold I did. There is a God!

Being from a motorcycle background where twisting the throttle is the only way to move forward, when I sat on my Téo, I twisted the throttle, nothing... hum.. So I pedaled a bit, twisted the throttle and boom, I was riding again. Happy.

Of course, I change the PA from 1 to 9. I would pedal a bit and again twist the throttle and zoom I was going again.

My complete ignorance had me ask our Téo resident expert, aka @america94, "I do not notice any differences between PA 1 or PA9"

His answer was swift... I should be able to notice a difference. Well, for the life of me, I could not!

In my sleep last night, the Pedal Assist Fairy paid me a visit. She told me: "Do not touch or twist the throttle, let it be. Set the PA and just pedal my friend. Then stop, change the setting to 4, pedal and see what happens. Do it again with a PA setting of 9. All without twisting the throttle at all. Can you NOW feel a difference? "

" Use the throttle sparingly, when extra speed is needed, at intersections to avoid incoming traffic, climb a hill, and so on, this ain't a motorcycle meathead "

So I have figured that I do not need to twist the throttle constantly, which is what I did...

I had noticed and felt the PA kick in when pedaling a bit but thought it was just that, a bit of help to get going... I would then twist the throttle... No wonder my wrist was numb... Geez.

Doh! Feel soooo stupid. Now I get it.
Don't beat yourself up Denis.:) We are all having fun with the learning curve on these bad boys. One thing I'm sure you know but I just thought I would caution you on... High PAS number in a low gear. Lets clear something first. I call low gear 1st gear...high gear is 9th gear. Maybe its wrong or backwards but that's what makes sense to me. I have been playing around with the PAS on hills etc, and I've found each gear I change I can then change the PAS and get kind of the same "boost" So 1st gear on a hill I start in PAS1. AS speed increases I shift up to 2nd and correspondingly bump up to PAS2. This continues throughout and seems to keep my "boost" at around the same level as I'm climbing and gaining speed. All good. Just remember when you slow down and shift back to the lower gears to also bring your PAS down as well. 1st gear with PAS9 = possible wipe out. :eek:

Denis Shelston
1 month ago

Fun, ain't it? There really is a sort of art to riding these things that you learn. Like going up a steep hill with a cadence sensor bike, instead of stamping on the pedals, just put up the boost to a higher level, gear it down to a good cadence and pedal as smoothly and evenly as you can... hill goes away!

And it's a different skill set for riding the mid drives than the hub cadence drives, but they're both a riot as you get better at it. I've never had such a good time as I have this past year riding these things (well maybe, but you get the point). Carpe diem!

It is indeed new and loads of fun. Feels great to be on an E-bike. Best of 2 worlds.

Saratoga Dave
1 month ago

Fun, ain't it? There really is a sort of art to riding these things that you learn. Like going up a steep hill with a cadence sensor bike, instead of stamping on the pedals, just put up the boost to a higher level, gear it down to a good cadence and pedal as smoothly and evenly as you can... hill goes away!

And it's a different skill set for riding the mid drives than the hub cadence drives, but they're both a riot as you get better at it. I've never had such a good time as I have this past year riding these things (well maybe, but you get the point). Carpe diem!

Israel Adams
3 months ago

thx for all the videos, seen them all! wondering if you might test a rees and muller tinker/pony? trying to compair the two, wondering especially if the douuble battery is available for the tinker. have fun...

Bob Smith
4 months ago

How many water bottle cage braze ons?

D C
6 months ago

Hi Court, great review as always. Can you shed any light on the claimed range? I know this depends upon rider weight, max speed, amount of pedaling, wind, flatness etc, along with BMS etc, but have heard that a useful rule of thumb is around 20 miles per wH. On that basis, one would expect a range more like 20, against the claimed 30 (minimum). What's your take on this? Also since the guys from Propel seem to be responding here, if they have any real world experience with battery life that would be great to hear about. I know you are probably limited in amount of time you can spend with each bike, but if there's a way you could ride them for an hour, or 20-30 miles, that would start to give us a terrific baseline to compare bikes!

D C
5 months ago

Propel Electric Bikes Thanks

Propel Electric Bikes
5 months ago

Most people see between 20-40 miles on the 400Wh battery. The Bosch display will tell you how much range you have in a given mode, for example Eco will get you 60 miles and Turbo will get you about 20 miles. For the 500Wh you should see a 25% increase so 75-25 or for most people 25-50 miles. I hope that helps - Chris

riceburner68
6 months ago

Would be nice if you could carry a passenger but the 110lb (50kg) rating limits who you can carry. Extra mount points on the frame so looks like you might be able to fit a stronger rack though.

Propel Electric Bikes
5 months ago

It's my understanding that Benno is working on a rack with foot rests for this purpose. It's build to be modular so I guess we'll just have to wait and see what they come up with. It sure seems like the stock rack can hold more than 110lbs, but that is indeed what it's rated for.

TheSimplecanadian
6 months ago

Wow you really know your stuff! Great video, great channel and great guy!

kustomweb
6 months ago

Court, get a follow-me drone, I'm sure you find a spot in the Prius

Benjamin Müller
6 months ago

how about this one:

https://www.rosebikes.de/bike/rose-xtra-watt-3-herren-bike-now/aid:783282

NovaColonel
6 months ago

Very nice bike and review, Chris always looks a little tense, although he's probably a very cool guy.
Also, what's up with that weird german-swiss hybrid flag right above the chainrings?

Propel Electric Bikes
5 months ago

Thanks! I'm still getting comfortable in front of the camera. I think the flag on the frame is a nod to Benno's roots since he was born and raised in Berlin.

Alex NC
6 months ago

add their official panniers in the back and their front basket, and this looks like the perfect bike for me. too bad I'm a cheapskate and that price is looking pretty high :-( Great bike though

philodygmn
6 months ago

What I'd like is an actual Electra FlatFoot version of this bike with weather treated frame and _trigger_ throttle from standstill with walk mode, and also good brakes like this one's. Sealed chain might be nice, def. at least a proper guard, slap guard notwithstanding. Even keeping its less robust FatFrank tires, Townie's FlatFoot still wins out over this bike for me, even without an extra-long rack or stationary front basket mounts either. That handled seat is a great idea that also makes it easier to lock up, FWIW. Townie's hubbed gears make it neater and lower maintenance as well.

Florida Scot
6 months ago

Great cargo city bike, nice quality, looks

Mark Elford
6 months ago

Sleek cargo bike, i like it. they really should have sold it with front rack and bags installed, looks half done.

Propel Electric Bikes
6 months ago

This was an early shipment. It is available with those accessories now.

Darren Brown
6 months ago

what about reviewing some of the riese - muller bikes

Propel Electric Bikes
6 months ago

We're trying to coordinate something next month to get Court out here to review the Riese & Muller bikes. They were supposed to be here for the last trip, but the shipment was a little delayed. We have most bikes here now and it's just a matter of coordinating with Court.

Seb K
6 months ago

I'm tired . Just had a loooooong debate/argument with some guys on another site about Ebikes . So many people have no damn clue about these bikes yet still feel the need to judge others who use them . I was negative about them at first but never posted vile crap about them . Amongst my traditional bikes I now have three Ebikes . Presently building up my electric fat bike (or Efatbike) and it is fast .

grantspassage
6 months ago

YOU REALLY SHOULD START WITH THE PRICE.

cresshead
6 months ago

price $3,999 and a full review here
https://electricbikereview.com/benno/boost-e-10d/

David Macdonald
6 months ago

I wish you would point out Cadence and torque sensing bikes and the differences between them because it matters a lot to someone buying a torque sensor bike by accident not realising they have to work a lot harder than a cadence sensor bike bike court

David Macdonald
6 months ago

Yes I had the bosch system but it mite say it uses cadence as well as torque but if you have poor legs you will definitely have to work a lot harder and yes the battery lasts longer but the reason for that is because you are working a lot harder my cadence sensor bike I don't have to work hard at it with my legs ,but I can put in the effort I can manage, that's where the difference comes in with the torque sensing Bosch system you have to work hard with your legs remember (your) legs might very well be quite fit some people who get an electric bike have very very poor legs that's why often they get a E bike , and the cadence sensor definitely makes the difference the point is for people that don't have a E bike and never have had they mite very well think o good it's electric and no problem, only to find they have as i did paid for a bike like the bosch type torque sensing cube (they still can't use )

Propel Electric Bikes
6 months ago

That really depends on the motor system and the gearing though. The Bosch system uses torque sensing and cadence sensing so you can use the bike in a low gear with a higher cadence if you don't want to work too hard. Just cadence sensing on it's own is almost obsolete in my eyes. It's not very safe as it can be unpredictable. That's just my opinion though.

FRANK ROBY
6 months ago

V good bike.

Tom Thumb
6 months ago

Nice looking bike. I like the black and white. I also like the rack.

Pat Shala
6 months ago

I really love this bike , it looks so good .

Dave Caldwell
6 months ago

Very nice looking bike! Big fan of the Bosch system, it really is as good as you say Court :)