CUBE Cross Hybrid Pro 400 Review

Cube Cross Hybrid Pro 400 Electric Bike Review
Cube Cross Hybrid Pro 400
Cube Cross Hybrid Pro 400 Bosch Performance Line Cx Motor
Cube Cross Hybrid Pro 400 Bosch Powerpack 400 Ebike Battery
Cube Cross Hybrid Pro 400 Ergonomic Grips Bosch Purion Display
Cube Cross Hybrid Pro 400 Schwalbe Smart Sam Reflective Tires
Cube Cross Hybrid Pro 400 9 Speed Shimano Deore
Cube Cross Hybrid Pro 400 Reinforced Sks Plastic Fenders Color Matched
Cube Cross Hybrid Pro 400 Electric Bike Review
Cube Cross Hybrid Pro 400
Cube Cross Hybrid Pro 400 Bosch Performance Line Cx Motor
Cube Cross Hybrid Pro 400 Bosch Powerpack 400 Ebike Battery
Cube Cross Hybrid Pro 400 Ergonomic Grips Bosch Purion Display
Cube Cross Hybrid Pro 400 Schwalbe Smart Sam Reflective Tires
Cube Cross Hybrid Pro 400 9 Speed Shimano Deore
Cube Cross Hybrid Pro 400 Reinforced Sks Plastic Fenders Color Matched

Summary

  • A sporty, value-priced, cross style electric bike with high-end Bosch Performance Line CX motor offering great power and torque for light trail use or steep-hill assistance
  • Available in a an impressive range of five sizes and two frame styles (high-step and mid-step), 700c wheel size is efficient but raises the bike, powerful Shimano hydraulic disc brakes
  • Integrated lights run right off the battery for convenience and the tires have reflective sidewall stripes to increase your visual footprint, matte black frame blends with the battery, motor, and cables
  • Value compromises include a basic spring suspension fork without lockout, mid-level 9-speed drivetrain, fenders that rattle a bit, the smaller Powerpack 400 battery vs. 500 watt hour

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

CUBE

Model:

Cross Hybrid Pro 400

Price:

$2,599 USD

Body Position:

Forward

Suggested Use:

Urban, Commuting

Electric Bike Class:

Pedal Assist (Class 1)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Year Motor and Battery, 5 Year Frame

Availability:

United States, Canada, Europe

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

50.4 lbs (22.86 kg)

Battery Weight:

5.4 lbs (2.44 kg)

Motor Weight:

8.8 lbs (3.99 kg)

Frame Material:

Aluminum Superlite, Gravity Casting Bracket, Double Butted

Frame Sizes:

18.11 in (45.99 cm)19.69 in (50.01 cm)21.26 in (54 cm)22.83 in (57.98 cm)24.41 in (62 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

Diamond 50 cm Stats: 19” Seat Tube, 21.5” Reach, 30” Stand Over Height, 27” Width, 72.5” Length, Trapez 46 cm Trapez: 17.5” Seat Tube, 21.5” Reach, 24” Stand Over Height, 27” Width, 71.5” Length

Frame Types:

Mid-Step, High-Step

Frame Colors:

Black´N´Blue

Frame Fork Details:

SR Suntour NEX-E25 Coil Suspension, 63 mm Travel, 100 mm / 9 mm Hub, Skewer with Quick Release

Frame Rear Details:

135 mm / 9 mm Hub, Skewer with Quick Release

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses, Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

9 Speed 1x9 Shimano Deore Derailleur, Shimano CS-HG300 Cassette 11-34T

Shifter Details:

Shimano Deore 2-Way Release Triggers on Right

Cranks:

Metropolis Urban AL-8, Alloy, 175 mm Length, 15 Tooth Chainring, Alloy Chainring Guard

Pedals:

Generic Plastic and Alloy Platform, Cage Style

Headset:

FSA No.10, 1-1/8", Threadless, Internal Cups, Semi-Integrated

Stem:

CPS Pro, 90 mm Length, 16° Angle, Three 10 mm Risers, 31.8 mm Clamp

Handlebar:

CUBE Rise Trail Bar, 680 mm Length

Brake Details:

Shimano BR-M315 Hydraulic Disc, 180 mm Front Levers, 160 mm Back Rotor, Shimano Adjustable Reach Levers

Grips:

CUBE Natural Fit Tour, Rubber with Lockers

Saddle:

CUBE Active 1.1 by Selle Royale

Seat Post:

CUBE Performance Post

Seat Post Length:

400 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

27.2 mm

Rims:

Alexrims ZX20, Aluminum Alloy, Double Wall, 32 Hole, Reinforcement Eyelets

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 14G, Silver with Nipples

Tire Brand:

Schwalbe Smart Sam, 700 x 40c (28" x 1.6")

Wheel Sizes:

28 in (71.12cm)

Tire Details:

Performance Line, 50 to 85 PSI, Reflective Stripe

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

SKS Plastic Fenders (Color Matched), Integrated Lumotec Lyt LED Headlight, Integrated Busch and Müller Secula LED Backlight, CUBEstand Pro by Hebie Adjustable Kickstand

Other:

Locking Removable Downtube Batter Pack, 1.2 lb 2 Amp Compact Battery Charger

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Bosch Performance Line CX

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Geared Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

250 watts

Motor Peak Output:

600 watts

Motor Torque:

75 Newton meters

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

11 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

396 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

3.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

20 miles (32 km)

Estimated Max Range:

60 miles (97 km)

Display Type:

Bosch Purion, Fixed, Backlit LCD Control Panel with Integrated Button Pad, (Hold - to Cycle Through Readouts, Hold - and Press Power to Change Units)

Readouts:

Speed, Assist Level (Eco, Tour, Sport, Turbo), Battery Level (1-5), Odometer, Trip Distance, Estimated Range, Clock, Max Speed, Average Speed, Trip Time, Lights

Display Accessories:

Micro-USB Port for Diagnostics and Software Updates Only

Drive Mode:

Advanced Pedal Assist (Measures Wheel Speed, Pedal Cadence and Pedal Torque, Power Output Relative to Pedal Input: Eco 50% 40 Nm, Tour 120% 50 Nm, Sport 210% 60 Nm, Turbo 300% 75 Nm)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

For this video review, I visited Cit-E-Cycles in Kitsilano British Columbia, Canada. It was the perfect spot for testing in wet conditions, steep terrain, and for having the different skew levels and frame styles offered by CUBE for their Cross Hybrid models. The Cross Hybrid Pro 400 is the more affordable offering which has a less-fancy but very capable Shimano Deore 9-speed, a coil suspension fork without lockout, and a standard capacity 400 watt hour battery. If you want to pay a bit more, you can go for the Cross Hybrid Race which comes in silver vs. matte black and has a Shimano Deore XT 10-speed with Shadow Plus clutch (to keep the chain tighter), an air fork with remote lockout, and the new Powerpack 500 watt hour battery. To me, this upgrade would make sense for people who plan to go off-road more frequently because the chain won’t bounce as much with the clutch enabled (just push the little grey lever into the up position) and that extra gear will aid in climbing. Both of these bikes are incredibly capable, possibly overkill, in terms of power because they use the Bosch Performance Line CX motor… that was built for full on mountain riding. Some e-bike riders in the UK have written to me about their rides with the Bosch Performance motor, riding in muddy terrain, which occasionally suffers from chain suck (where the chain continues on the chainring vs. releasing and traveling back to the derailleur), but again, the Shadow Plus clutch would reduce this. Is it worth paying more for? Probably not for me as a mostly-city rider… but I love that both versions offer knobby tires and are truly trail-capable for a bit of scenic riding during the weekend. You get capable Shimano hydraulic disc brakes with 180 mm front and 160 mm rear rotors with adjustable-reach levers. That’s a big selling point for people with limited hand strength or smaller hands, even those who plan on wearing thick gloves for part of the year. And with five frame size choices, there may be some petite riders on this thing. I love the mid-step trapez frame option because it allows for easier mounting and I have some knee and hip sensitivity. Once you add a rack to the rear (for commuting utility) it becomes even nicer not to have to swing your leg way up high and over the back. So anyway, this is a fairly comfortable, but still sporty, electric bike that looks and rides familiar. Battery and motor weight are positioned perfectly, low and center near the bottom bracket. And, I love how the matte-black paint blends the cables, battery casing, and motor casing into the frame. I’m also glad that CUBE didn’t overdo the colors and graphics but you get a dash of blue on the frame, wheelset, saddle, fork, and even the stem.

Driving this bike is a more-than-capable Bosch Performance Line CX motor delivering up to 75 Newton meters of torque. It’s rated between 250 and 600 watts, but the main selling point for me is how quickly and smoothly it responds. The motor controller measures rear wheel speed, pedal cadence, and pedal torque 1,000 times per seconds. This means, you can start on an incline and not have to stand up or over-exert yourself to get going, as long as you have chosen a lower gear and turned pedal assist up to the highest Sport or Turbo modes. Sport mode has actually undergone some changes in 2017 which allow it to become EMTB mode (electric mountain bike mode) where you can get low or full power without having to click any buttons. This EMTB mode requires a software update that dealers can perform. It’s a neat feature that again, is probably overkill for a cross style bike. The motor casing on the CUBE Cross Hybrid models is very cool, more angular than the stock oval casing, and well protected underneath by two layers of plastic skid plates. The motor spins a 15 tooth chainring 2.5 times for every crank arm revolution and pulls the same chain you do, allowing you to both benefit from one of the nine gears in the rear. If you shift to an easier gear, both you and the motor will have an easier time climbing and this allows for better efficiency and range than most hub motor designs. You may also notice that both wheels offer quick release which is handy for transport and quick trail maintenance. Working on this electric bicycle is much like working on any other ordinary pedal powered bike because the drivetrain is so independent. Shifting is one way you can empower the motor, but that also puts the chain, sprockets, and derailleur in harms way because of the power being added to the system. And so, while it’s not perfect, the Bosch shift detection software algorithm does reduce strain a bit and sets the Bosch drivetrain apart from most other competitors on the market today. I still recommend easing off of the pedals a bit when shifting to signal to the motor to also ease back and allow for less force and subsequent wear. I want to call out the alloy chainring protector (which will help your pants stay clear of the chain and chainring when riding) as well as the clear plastic slap guard on the right chainstay. This is a key feature considering how close the chain comes to the chainstay tube when pedaling in the highest gears (smallest rear sprocket).

Powering the CUBE Cross Hybrid Pro 400 is a… surprise! 400 watt hour Bosch Powerpack. This thing is proven, very well designed, and the mounting interface is forward compatible with the newer Powerpack 500 battery that offers 25% more capacity. Both packs are built into the same plastic casing which has an LED charge level indicator on the left side, a molded plastic loop at the top, and a proprietary charging port at the base. You can charge these packs on or off the bike and they only weigh 5.4 lbs and 5.7 lbs respectively. They are awesome in most ways, but not as hidden or sleek as some of the new proprietary battery designs from Brose (where the bike manufacturer designs the battery to work with the motor). The downside is style but the upside is easy and cheaper replacement, along with quicker access. I like this battery, especially on a black bike. Notice how it and the motor are about as low and center as they can be on the frame? That improves balance and handling. I love that for the diamond style high-step frames, CUBE managed to squeeze on some bottle cage bosses. I found that the seat tube length was extra long and wouldn’t allow the saddle to go all the way down because of these bosses (or maybe the motor mounting plate) so the folks at the shop told me that they occasionally use a hack saw to shorten the seat post. Coming back to the battery position, design, and integration, I love how it powers the backlit display and two integrated lights. I also appreciate how compact and lightweight the charger is… but believe that you get the slower 2 Amp charger with this bike. Bosch also offers a 0.3 lb heavier and slightly larger 4 Amp charger but seems to be including those with the higher-end bikes now.

Operating this electric bike is very easy. Once you charge and properly mount the battery pack, press the power button at the top edge of the Purion display panel. This is a display and button pad built into one, and it looks gorgeous. There are some downsides to the smaller size and those include more limited readouts, non-removability, and unfortunately, you cannot use the Micro-USB port on the side for charging your own portable electronic devices. It seems to be reserved for software updates and e-bike diagnostics at this time. I have found that interacting with the display can be frustrating at first, if you try to press the + and – power level buttons directly in because they pivot at an angle, with the hinge near the lower left edge. Press near the higher right edge for consistent and easier action. So, once the display is on, you will see your current speed, a readout about trip stats or your assist level in the middle, and a five-bar battery infographic at the bottom. I would prefer a battery percentage or maybe a ten-bar battery infographic… but at least there’s a range estimator readout to provide more feedback about the battery. You can access range, the odometer, trip meter, and assist level by holding the – button for a few seconds to cycle through. It’s a bit more clunky and definitely slower than the i button featured on the larger Bosch Intuvia display. This display is removable, does have an active Micro-USB port, and the buttons are easier to click. I am told that some shops can upgrade the display for you if you wish to pay more, but again, this thing does get the job done. Hold the plus button to activate or de-activate lights. Hold the minus button and tap the power button to switch units (mph to km/h). And, walk mode is enabled here! If you’re planning to occasionally walk through crowds, get off for steep hills, or haul groceries and supplies with this bike, then walk mode is a great feature to have. Just press the walk mode button near the base of the display and hold plus to get it going. Surprisingly, not all electric bike manufactures have enabled this feature, so it’s neat to see here from CUBE.

What CUBE has delivered with the Cross Hybrid Pro and Race is a very capable, efficient electric bike. Capable, because it can actually handle steep inclines and light off-road packed trails. Efficient, because of the mid-drive motor and larger 700c wheelset with medium width tires. The angled stem, ergonomic grips, suspension fork, and even the Selle Royal saddle do a lot for comfort and you could always upgrade the seat post to a value suspension post like this if you’re on a budget. This is, after all, one of the budget options from CUBE. In my opinion, the $2,600 price point is extremely good for what you get. The bones of this bike are solid and there’s a lot of potential for fun and utility. It looks great, comes with an excellent two-year comprehensive warranty, is sold through a select network of dealers in Canada and the US (as well as Europe), and it just works. I don’t see any major mistakes with this electric bicycle. In fact, I see CUBE going above and beyond to protect the chainring with that bash guard, keep the downtube nick-free with a plastic sticker guard, and keep you safe with lights and reflectors. They added the rack mounts and bottle cage option, they ran the cables through the frame to look nicer, and they went with reinforced rims for strength. Big thanks to CUBE for partnering with me on this post and to Cit-E-Cycles for letting me showcase a few different versions of the bike back to back so you could see the differences. Again, I love the mid-step because it makes riding more accessible and comfortable for me but still looks sporty and even masculine with the black paint.

Pros:

  • CUBE produces higher quality but still good-value bicycles and e-bikes, and the Cross Hybrid Pro 400 aims for the lower price point of ~$2,600 while still delivering five frame sizes and two styles (high-step and mid-step)
  • You get an industry-leading two year comprehensive warranty and five years on the frame, CUBE is sold through dealers who provide quality build, fitting, and post-purchase service
  • All of the CUBE electric bikes I have reviewed offer purpose-built frames with internal cable routing that looks nice and stays out of the way, with the Cross Hybrid Pro 400, you also get an integrated mid-motor with angular casing that I prefer to the standard oval casing on other bikes, I like how low and tight the battery mount is as well
  • Rear rack mounting points and a seat tube bottle cage mount offer utility and convenience, the stock fenders are sporty (not quite as long as some pure city models)
  • Perfect tire choice, the Schwalbe Smart Sam is on the narrow efficient side and offers reflective sidewall stripes to stay visible in urban environments but also has a soft knobby tread for a jot on the trails
  • Adjustable-length rear-mount kickstand stays out of the way and has a sturdy spring to reduce bouncing if you take on some trail riding or encounter a rough street, it supports the rear portion of the bike well if you do add a rack, this stand can be lengthened without a tool! just twist it to extend
  • To me, this is a sportier bike, the Cross alludes to cyclocross but also a cross between urban and trail, so I love that they took comfort into account with ergonomic grips, a slightly higher 16-degree angle stem, and a suspension fork, consider adding a 27.2 mm suspension seat post to further reduce back, neck, and arm fatigue (just keep in mind that it will raise the minimum saddle height by ~3 inches
  • The Bosch CX motor is one of my favorites because it offers up to 75 Newton meters of torque, responds incredibly fast to pedal motion and power, and now offers EMTB mode so you can get a full range of power output without having to click up or down on the control pad (which can be distracting in busy or rigorous ride conditions)
  • I love that this e-bike has an integrated headlight and taillight! this improves safety and convenience, so you don’t have to add your own and remember to turn them on/off or have the chance of theft because they are bolted on and wired in, there’s also a decent flick-bell that comes standard on the bike
  • High-quality Shimano branded hydraulic disc brakes offer smooth, powerful stopping and the adjustable-reach levers accommodate small and large riders alike (which is great considering the wide range of frame sizes)
  • This bike just looks good, the matte black paint job hides black cables, wires, the battery and motor casing, and you get a gentle splash of color that matches (saddle, rim stickers, frame, fork, even the stem)
  • The Bosch Powerpack 400 and 500 use the same interface, so you could get this bike and eventually upgrade to a larger capacity, I like that the battery has a built-in LED charge indicator, can be charged on or off the frame, and has a little loop at the top for easier (safer) carrying
  • I wasn’t able to test the bike in water, but the bottom bracket and headset use sealed bearings to reduce rust and wear, and the battery charging port plug seated well to keep it clean and protected
  • As with many mid-drive electric bikes (especially those with traditional cassette and derailleur) both wheels offer quick release, this makes flat fixes, general maintenance, and even transport faster and easier… but consider replacing these with locking bicycle hardware (event the seat post clamp) if you commute and want to reduce the potential for theft
  • The downtube has a clear plastic sticker on it to prevent chips if rocks fly up from the tires, you also get a clear plastic slap guard on the right chain stay, and there’s a dual-layer plastic skid plate beneath the motor for protection and an alloy chainring guard to keep your pants clear… nice details
  • Minor plus here, the rims were upgraded for strength and had reinforcement eyelets to reduce the possibility of cracking under heavy load or off-road use
  • The Bosch Performance CX motor is very strong, and really benefits as you shift gears to either climb or reach the 20 mph top assisted speed, but it also offers shift detection to reduce wear on the chain, sprockets, and derailleur

Cons:

  • I’m glad this bike has a suspension fork but might be willing to pay more for the Cross Hybrid Race model to get lockout and air, the fork on the Cross Hybrid Pro only has preload which requires you to take both caps off and turn clickers manually in sync and I believe it’s heavier than the air fork
  • Note the smaller chainring and how close the chain is to the right chainstay, this is the result of the unique Bosch sprocket system which spins 2.5 times for every crank revolution, it improves chain grab but might rough your chainstay up and produce more noise
  • The Bosch CX motor is powerful, responsive, and efficient but it also produces more mechanical noise (even when pedaling with the bike powered off), you may notice a high pitched whirring noise when riding in the higher levels of assist at higher RPM
  • As cute and compact as the Bosch Purion display is, you don’t get a functioning Micro-USB charging port and the LCD is not removable as it is on the larger Bosch Intuvia which could expose it to more weather wear or scratching at public racks, some shops will let you pay more and upgrade the display panel
  • Minor consideration here, I was told that some CUBE electric bikes run large, and given the taller 700c wheelset here and possibility of a rear-rack, the frame might be bigger feeling and difficult to mount for some, so keep the mid-step trapez frame in mind as an option or consider going smaller in general… just note that the mid-step trapez frame does not have bottle cage bosses because they wouldn’t fit and you might need a crossbar adapter to mount this frame on some bike racks
  • When riding on bumpy terrain, I did notice that the fenders were rattling a bit, despite having additional support struts, I think plastic just tends to rattle more and since the bike doesn’t come with a rack to also support the rear fender, there’s just more play
  • As much as I love the headlight, how it runs off the main battery, is aimable up and down, and has side-windows for increased visibility for cars, it is mounted to the slider portion of the suspension fork and may bounce around more than if it were mounted at the head tube or handlebar
  • If you’re riding in really thick mud, the large sidewall of the motor casing and smaller chainring can allow for some chain suck to occur, the upgraded Race model has a tighter derailleur with Shadow Plus clutch to reduce bounce and possibly reduce chain suck too
  • The + and – buttons on the Purion control pad seem to work best if you press near the screen vs. down towards the left edge of the unit, they pivot in vs. pressing down evenly and this can take some getting used to or result in inconsistent selection if you don’t take the time to figure it out

Resources:

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Chapooski
2 weeks ago

Any PEBL owners finding this thread? better.bike has now started production in their Massachusetts facility. Youtube has about 20 videos on it and new owners are posting videos as their order is delivered. Organic Transit was in the same position 5 years ago. Let's celebrate this expanding category of hybrid powered velomobiles that directly replace cars for many owners.
Specs are available at better.bike/pebl/
My personal opinion on this new as yet unproven design: at 35 pounds heavier then the Organic Transit ELF it is pushing the weight limits for legitimate pedal assist. It has too many accessories as standard equipment so they will start losing money immediately. The body material of hemp fiber w/naturally sourced resins is unproven as to durability and will require special treatment for repairs compared to the recyclable trylon shell of the ELF which usually bounces back after being dented. The enclosed floor and small door of the PEBL will make it too hot and cause a window fogging issue. The smaller door and tighter fit of the rider's legs will restrict use by older drivers. The ELF has three 4000 mile cross country trips to its credit and 4 million road miles logged. 13 reported ELF/car collisions and still no injuries to any drivers! This is what we should celebrate, the safest bicycle type vehicle ever produced! Competition is good, may the best bike win!

Both the PEBL and ELF are too heavy to be considered as electric assisted bicycles/tricycles (Ebikes), but should be thought of as light electric vehicles (LEVs) with human pedal assist. I think about a 100 pound curb weight is the realistic limit of anything that should be considered an Ebike that can still be easily propelled by human power alone.
Some potential customers of the PEBL, ELF or Virtue Pedalist may be better served by the ZEV T3-1 Micro http://www.zelectricvehicle.com/31.html and setting up a pedal powered battery charger at home to get the exercise aspect of the pedal cars. https://www.k-tor.com/Power-Box

Popeye Gordon
1 month ago

Any PEBL owners finding this thread? better.bike has now started production in their Massachusetts facility. Youtube has about 20 videos on it and new owners are posting videos as their order is delivered. Organic Transit was in the same position 5 years ago. Let's celebrate this expanding category of hybrid powered velomobiles that directly replace cars for many owners.
Specs are available at better.bike/pebl/
My personal opinion on this new as yet unproven design: at 35 pounds heavier then the Organic Transit ELF it is pushing the weight limits for legitimate pedal assist. It has too many accessories as standard equipment so they will start losing money immediately. The body material of hemp fiber w/naturally sourced resins is unproven as to durability and will require special treatment for repairs compared to the recyclable trylon shell of the ELF which usually bounces back after being dented. The enclosed floor and small door of the PEBL will make it too hot and cause a window fogging issue. The smaller door and tighter fit of the rider's legs will restrict use by older drivers. The ELF has three 4000 mile cross country trips to its credit and 4 million road miles logged. 13 reported ELF/car collisions and still no injuries to any drivers! This is what we should celebrate, the safest bicycle type vehicle ever produced! Competition is good, may the best bike win!

Carterk
2 months ago

Visited a lbs yesterday, where I test rode the Cube Cross Hybrid Pro Allroad. First ride on a Bosch system, I liked it and was surprised by how quiet it was after hearing from numerous sources that noise was an issue with Bosch. Anyway, they also had the Giant Quick-e, which I'd ridden previously, liked, and is still maybe my first choice (I'm putting off my purchase till spring and better Seattle weather.)

In talking with the salesperson, I found out that the brakes on the 2018 are ebike specific and will be hooked to the rack-mounted taillight to indicate when the rider is braking- cool! Also, the new derailleur is the Shimano Shadow model that lets the user flip a lever to tighten the chain. These two features are worth the $50 increase imho.

Nicknick
3 months ago

Received mine (standard battery, Schwalbe tire upgrade). These are my first impressions.

Building the bike

Putting it together was relatively easy using the videos on the juiced site. It's a heavy bike so having someone help while you put on the front tire is nice. Anyone who is comfortable with some basic tools can do this. Don’t forget to tighten the steering.
The front fender and headlight will be added later when Juiced ships the missing parts (in a few days). UPDATE: I put these on, was doable. Headlight is super bright, but does not have any "to the side" visibility like some other headlights do.
I expected this to have a battery operated rear light, but it seems to be a reflector. UPDATE: It has a tiny light in the box. I ordered the Sweethome rec instead which is about 500x more bright.

The good

First of all: this bike looks AWESOME. It is sooo cool. And it looks like a cool bike, not an eBike. The battery design and not having a mid-drive motor helps with that.
All parts you touch feel like high quality. Saddle, shifter, handles, rear rack, bike standard, it's super solid.
Size is perfect for me, so the Juiced size guide seems spot on.
Tires are super wide compared to my regular hybrid bike. They are comfortable, but not as "precise". Great for dealing with potholes, but it'd make me hesitant to get something like the Hyperfat which must have zero “cornering feel".
The brakes are INSANE. So powerful. I've never had disc brakes before, so maybe that's why, but it's easy to skid the tire even though the combined weight of me+bike is like 250lbs.
There is a lot of power. On a straight road I really doubt I’d go above level 2 (levels are ECO,1,2,3,sport). In sport mode I’m flying by everyone at 28mph before I know it. However, I went to find a super steep San Francisco hill (like 25%+) and even in sport mode I’m pedaling hard to help it get up to 10mph, and the throttle does nothing. These are kind of rare hills and on my regular bike I’d have to get off and walk, so I sort of doubt any eBike could do much there. Even electric scooters seem powerless against these hills. UPDATE: I took it up to Twin Peaks (SF tallest point), was doable, though I was still pretty sweaty when I got up there.
The throttle+pedal combo to get a boost when leaving a stoplight is nice. But generally I end up not using the throttle on its own, it just doesn’t give you enough to get that “wheeeeeeee!” feeling, its more fun to pedal and get the boost from that.
No regen, which is awesome. Regenerative braking ruins easy coasting, which the most fun part of biking. :)
You can easily ride this bike with a dead battery. I rode it for a bit while it was turned off, and even though its heavy it would be fine to ride this home for a few miles.

Things Juiced could do in future CrossCurrent S models to make it even better

Putting the battery in is kind of hard. You really need to push it hard while holding the key in "open" position and it feels like more of a hassle than it should be, especially since I’ll be having to do this multiple times a week to charge it. I might try to find a way to make this easier (maybe WD40?).

UPDATE: I think I was doing this wrong. I checked out the EBR review video which has come out since I wrote this review and it actually clicks in without using the key. It needs a bit of muscle but it's no longer a hassle.

I used “walk mode” to get my bike up the stairs. You have to hold the minus button for a while to enable it, which means you just have to stand there for a few seconds with the brakes on so it doesn’t roll back. You also have to hold that button to keep it active, which means that if you let it go, you need to wait a few seconds again to get going. It would have been better if walk mode just put a 5pmh limit on the throttle (which gives you direct power).
AFAIK there is no way to have the light (screen backlight+headlight) on by default. I wish it was “always on” when the bike is on, because there is only upside to more visibility, even during the day. Most new cars are this way too.
There is a short jerky feel in the pedals when you go from peddling to coasting and you move the pedals a bit backwards. It’s like the motor isn’t sure whether to help you or not. Not super bothersome though.
Bell, chain guard, integrated rear light would be nice.

Nice-to-have’s I’d pay extra for:

Frame lock (euro style) for quick stops at the store.
Rear rack strong enough to carry a person.
An anti-theft security code to turn on the bike (maybe have the motor lock the rear wheel without it).
For juiced to put on the Schwalbe tires for me (they did for me as I ordered early, but no longer do this, so you'll have to take it to a LBS to get them put on).

Summary

I'm no expert, so I don’t have a ton to compare this to, but I’ve tried a bunch of other eBikes. Short rides on a Haibike, Gazelle, Stromer ST1 and a longer ride on a Bulls Lacuba Evo 8. The Bulls is the only bike I would consider a similarly great commuting alternative (though its not a speed pedelec), which feels a bit more smooth and has some higher quality parts, but it is $4000, which makes this Juiced CCS a fantastic deal at well under 2k. It would still be a great deal at $2500+ actually.

This bike is great and I'd for Juiced to do well. Looking at the forum comments here they could probably do a bit more “underpromise and overdeliver”, i.e., tell your customers to expect the bike in October, so September comes as a nice surprise. But even then, some people will never be pleased. :)

I’ll update this review in a month or so when I get some more miles on it. But in the meanwhile I’ve ordered one for my wife as well.

UPDATE after 100+ miles: definitely love this bike. I'm excited to ride it every day on my commute. I'm surprised how often I go over 20mph. I didn't expect to care this much, but at this point I'd definitely not buy anything that is not a 28mph speed pedelec. I'm also totally happy with the amount of power. It's rare (few super steep hills) that I wish it had more.
The only thing that is bothersome to me at this point is the weight. With the added u-lock I mounted on, I'm guessing we're at 60lbs+. It's no problem at all when biking, but using any ceiling hook style bike racks, or hauling it up stairs, is a hassle. That said, I'm not sure how much less of a hassle it would be at 50lbs or even 40lbs. And with bikes below that weight you're getting into the Faraday style, which is super entry-level on power and battery. So maybe this is just part of eBike life. :)

TLDR: I love this thing. Would buy again in a heartbeat.

86 and still kicking
5 months ago

I live in a medium-sized community (~200K people) but we seem to have relatively few options in terms of ebikes in the shops, mostly limited to higher-end, big brand name bikes (Trek; Giant; Specialized, Electra; Haibike). I would like to get a decent-quality bike for commuting (10 miles, partly uphill in each direction) and fun on local trails, for under $2000. The cheapest bikes with the features I want cost $2700+ locally.

If you knew nothing about bike repair/had always relied on bike shops to maintain and fix your bikes, would you order a bike online, or stick to whatever overpriced options were in your area? And if you say "stick to local shops," are there mainstream e-bikes that have a relatively good price point for their quality and reliability?

Wish List:
Torque-sensing rather than cadence-sensing
Front suspension and/or seat suspension for comfort over potholes/cracks/curbs
Range: at least 25 miles in high-assist mode
Power: 350W motor for hills
Battery that can be charged both on or off the bike
Frame fit for my body (I'm 5'2" and 125 pounds); hybrid riding posture
Easy riding when the bike is not using electrical assistance (not sure what this translates into: gearing? bike weight?)

Short list of bikes, based on above (NONE of which are sold in my area): E-Glide ST; e-Joe Epik SE; Juiced Bikes Cross Current; Surface 604 Rook. Other ideas welcome, based on the above.
The e-city from Smart Motion is a very good fit for you. Message me and I will tell you more about it and how to get it.

Andrea Bozoki
5 months ago

I live in a medium-sized community (~200K people) but we seem to have relatively few options in terms of ebikes in the shops, mostly limited to higher-end, big brand name bikes (Trek; Giant; Specialized, Electra; Haibike). I would like to get a decent-quality bike for commuting (10 miles, partly uphill in each direction) and fun on local trails, for under $2000. The cheapest bikes with the features I want cost $2700+ locally.

If you knew nothing about bike repair/had always relied on bike shops to maintain and fix your bikes, would you order a bike online, or stick to whatever overpriced options were in your area? And if you say "stick to local shops," are there mainstream e-bikes that have a relatively good price point for their quality and reliability?

Wish List:
Torque-sensing rather than cadence-sensing
Front suspension and/or seat suspension for comfort over potholes/cracks/curbs
Range: at least 25 miles in high-assist mode
Power: 350W motor for hills
Battery that can be charged both on or off the bike
Frame fit for my body (I'm 5'2" and 125 pounds); hybrid riding posture
Easy riding when the bike is not using electrical assistance (not sure what this translates into: gearing? bike weight?)

Short list of bikes, based on above (NONE of which are sold in my area): E-Glide ST; e-Joe Epik SE; Juiced Bikes Cross Current; Surface 604 Rook. Other ideas welcome, based on the above.

Dewey
6 months ago

The Trek XM700+ low-step is light at 46.5lb, provides pedal assist up to 28mph, it uses the Bosch Performance Line motor that combines both pedal cadence and torque sensors for smooth power delivery and is mounted low and central on the bottom bracket with the battery on the down tube so the balance of weight distribution is good. The hydraulic disc brakes and front mono-shock suspension are helpful riding at speed and a safety update is coming for the Bosch Performance Line motor with the Intuvia display in the form of ABS for the front brake and rear wheel lift control. The front light is powered off the ebike's battery and bolted to the bike. Here's Court's review

The Juiced Cross Current step through is heavier at 48.5lb or 52lb depending on if you go by the manufacturer specs or Court's review, it uses a geared rear hub motor and a torque sensor for pedal assist up to 28mph and the battery is mounted on the down tube for good balance of weight distribution. It has a front suspension fork and hydraulic disc brakes. Juiced has fewer dealers than Trek but still nationwide. You would need to add fenders, lights, and a bike computer if you wanted to see how fast you're going, but it is half the cost of the Trek. Here's Court's review.

Neither ebike comes with a throttle so if that's what you were looking for to help start from the stop signs up hill the Juiced Cross Current has a $99 throttle option that works up to 20mph. While it doesn't have a throttle option the Trek XM700+ has a mid-drive motor so will climb hills better. On both ebikes it would help to change down gear before you come to a stop facing up hill.

Regarding security both ebikes have a battery that locks to the frame or you can remove the battery and take it with you. The Trek has quick release wheels front and back, while the Juiced has a quick release front wheel. I'd recommend a strong lock like an ABUS Granit folding lock or Kryptonite New York U-lock and a chain.

Jaladhi
7 months ago

As @pxpaulx said, Haibike low step bikes are not that visually different. If it helps, I am 29" inseam as well and the low step 44cm Trekking fits me fine. It is the XDuro Trekking S RX but I'd think the frame is similar between XDuro and SDuro.

Thanks for all the replies. This is where I'm getting the dimensions for the SDuro Cross: http://www.haibike.com/en-US/US/bikes/344/2017-sduro-cross-4-0?variant=3848109740#geometry
and the Trek: https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/bikes/hybrid-bikes/electric-bikes/conduit/conduit/p/1329000-2017/

According to Haibike the XS Low step has a stand over height of 73cm, the medium is 72cm, and the XL is 71cm. Something isn't right!
http://www.haibike.com/en-US/US/bikes/344/2017-sduro-cross-4-0?variant=3848109740#geometry

I found another bike shop not too far away with an xduro trekking so I should be able to get this figured out.

Thanks again,
Hugh

Hugh Caldwell
7 months ago

Thanks for all the replies. This is where I'm getting the dimensions for the SDuro Cross: http://www.haibike.com/en-US/US/bikes/344/2017-sduro-cross-4-0?variant=3848109740#geometry
and the Trek: https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/bikes/hybrid-bikes/electric-bikes/conduit/conduit/p/1329000-2017/

According to Haibike the XS Low step has a stand over height of 73cm, the medium is 72cm, and the XL is 71cm. Something isn't right!
http://www.haibike.com/en-US/US/bikes/344/2017-sduro-cross-4-0?variant=3848109740#geometry

I found another bike shop not too far away with an xduro trekking so I should be able to get this figured out.

Thanks again,
Hugh

Matt A
9 months ago

Not being familiar with them, I just took a look at the Super Moto-X tires on the Schwalbe site . They certainly would more than handle rail trails just fine - after all, these trails are pretty tame. I'm thinking they may be a good all around choice for me, but of course I'll run the Rock Razors that come with the GX and see how they work out for the street first. I actually have two wheel sets for my hybrid so that I can easily swap them out if I'm going off the street. Not happening with my Delite Rohloff unless I hit Lotto! There really is very little difference between our bikes other than the choice of internal hubs and a few differences in component brands. I would love to have a belt drive coupled with the Rohloff, but I understand that there were alignment issues doing so. I'm sure that R&M will figure out a way to resolve that, but I'm fine with the chain - no big deal.

No doubt I'll be thrilled with the R&M. Thanks for the encouraging words. Not exactly an impulsive purchase on my end, but it is a lot of money to layout on faith . . . Yes, I'll certainly post the long distance rides. Back in the nineties and up to about 10 yrs ago, my wife and I would annually take three weeks off and do self contained touring. Montana, the Southwest, Alaska, New England, western Canada, etc. In 1999, we rode from northern Maine back to our house in NY. The next year we were homebound since we were each dealing with the terminal illnesses of a parent. That behind us, in 2001 we took a left turn out of our driveway and spent the summer continuing the ride cross country, ending up on the west coast in Washington. I'd do it again in a heartbeat. Unfortunately, life gets in the way sometimes and we haven't done any substantial long distance riding together in the past 10 years or so. Of course, my wife describes our previous tours as "boot camp" now, but she certainly cherishes the memories. I've done some east coast 1 to 2 week distance riding solo since, but Alaska and the American west beckon, so the R&M purchase is a great motivator to get out there and put some quality miles on it.

It sounds like you are thoroughly enjoying your GT, witnessed by your Saturday ride in the arctic conditions. Nothing like a new bike to get you out the door and riding! We get older and, as they say, our toys just get more expensive . . . Enjoy!
I have been impressed with the tires so far. Today especially I hit a ton of large potholes at high speeds not paying attention to the road but more the cars. They absorb the impacts well, in addition to the suspension. I also heard class pop/crush quite loudly when I was riding fast but nothing happened and there was nothing stuck in the tire. I don't think you will go wrong with them, but I think the only negative with the GX tires would be a slight range loss. I have no idea how much but if you aren't stretching your battery consistently then it really doesn't matter.

Our bikes are almost the same you are right. I just have remember as a kid I had chain grease permanently tattooed in black on my legs, and in general wanted something that lasts the longest between replacements. I am not well informed about bicycle chains, but I think a belt stands up better to the use of a motor. From videos I have seen from Court, the shift sensing with Bosch works, but you still can mash the chain and wear that and your cassette down. This really is negligible to someone that is an experienced cyclist and used to maintaining a chain.

You are clearly an extremely experienced rider, and I am sure those trips were wonderful. I am sorry you had family illnesses to deal with, that is never easy. Unfortunately life does get in the way a lot, I would love to do more recreational riding, but my schedule is too crazy at this point in life.

Riding today was much nicer than over the weekend, it was in the 60s and didn't dip below 50 at night. I really do enjoy riding the bike and even when I get home I still want to go around the block a few more times no matter how many miles I just rode. This was an extremely expensive toy haha, but I think it is worth it. Unfortunately, I have a habit of purchasing whatever is the most expensive whether it is practical or not. Luckily, this purchase is worth it relative to the ebike market. Could I have done something better with such a large sum? Probably, but it wouldn't bring the same amount of joy!

I wanted to ask you something as an experienced cyclist. This is diverging from this thread's purpose, but I need some advice. I want a saddle that is comfortable, and that can be ridden on for a very long time. The one the Delite came with was killing me at first, but I got used to it I guess because it is not so bad now, however there is still some soreness. I do not experience any numbness, but I have read some information on how bicycle seats that allow pressure on the soft tissues down there can cause long term and potentially irreversible damage, even with know symptoms until it's too late. This pressure was mostly due to the nose, which is why noseless seats were created. I admit they are ugly, but there is a study with some evidence that there is at least a reasonable risk to prolonged use of a traditional bike seat. I really was not ready to go noseless, I wanted to go more with a Brooks saddle before I came across the information.

So anyway, I found a saddle that may be the best of both worlds. There are a couple brands with this similar concept, but I liked how Bisaddle Da Vinci Performance looked and it seems like the perfect seat with a full range of adjustments. It is more expensive than any of the Brooks saddles I have seen.

http://www.bisaddle.com/product/davinci-a/

My purpose in all of this is to ask your opinion and experience on saddles, and what you think of the Bisaddle. I have read many articles, watched many videos, and read the threads on saddles on EBR. I think the Bisaddle would be the best idea, I emailed them and apparently sometime soon they have a newer Da Vinci model with a longer more standard nose size coming out. I would want to go with that one most likely. Anyway I just wanted to know what you think:)

Drumulac
9 months ago

Not being familiar with them, I just took a look at the Super Moto-X tires on the Schwalbe site . They certainly would more than handle rail trails just fine - after all, these trails are pretty tame. I'm thinking they may be a good all around choice for me, but of course I'll run the Rock Razors that come with the GX and see how they work out for the street first. I actually have two wheel sets for my hybrid so that I can easily swap them out if I'm going off the street. Not happening with my Delite Rohloff unless I hit Lotto! There really is very little difference between our bikes other than the choice of internal hubs and a few differences in component brands. I would love to have a belt drive coupled with the Rohloff, but I understand that there were alignment issues doing so. I'm sure that R&M will figure out a way to resolve that, but I'm fine with the chain - no big deal.

No doubt I'll be thrilled with the R&M. Thanks for the encouraging words. Not exactly an impulsive purchase on my end, but it is a lot of money to layout on faith . . . Yes, I'll certainly post the long distance rides. Back in the nineties and up to about 10 yrs ago, my wife and I would annually take three weeks off and do self contained touring. Montana, the Southwest, Alaska, New England, western Canada, etc. In 1999, we rode from northern Maine back to our house in NY. The next year we were homebound since we were each dealing with the terminal illnesses of a parent. That behind us, in 2001 we took a left turn out of our driveway and spent the summer continuing the ride cross country, ending up on the west coast in Washington. I'd do it again in a heartbeat. Unfortunately, life gets in the way sometimes and we haven't done any substantial long distance riding together in the past 10 years or so. Of course, my wife describes our previous tours as "boot camp" now, but she certainly cherishes the memories. I've done some east coast 1 to 2 week distance riding solo since, but Alaska and the American west beckon, so the R&M purchase is a great motivator to get out there and put some quality miles on it.

It sounds like you are thoroughly enjoying your GT, witnessed by your Saturday ride in the arctic conditions. Nothing like a new bike to get you out the door and riding! We get older and, as they say, our toys just get more expensive . . . Enjoy!

Mafdxg Gfff
6 days ago

You are BORRINNIG!!!!!!!

Gheorghe Falcaru
1 month ago

You are the best!

NovaColonel
1 month ago

There's a 2017 Reaction Hybrid 500 in the background! The blue-grey-white one! It's exactly the model I bought after all my other bikes had been stolen! Amazing!

Tony Edgecombe
3 months ago

I have the Allroad version of this bike, not sure the exact difference as the Cube range is quite large. So far it has been pretty good apart from a few loose screws which was probably the bike shop assembly.

I had to replace the back light as it was on the wrong side for the UK and once I added a rack it was obscured.

The Bosch drivetrain is excellent, it powers up the hills.

Johannes Nilsen
3 months ago

sealed cartridge bearings, is absolutely necessary in my opinion, much less service intervals, but of course you have to service it after few months with fresh grease.

Johannes Nilsen
3 months ago

flimsy plastic seal is a good tell it isn't sealed cartridge bearings,but other than that, its not as easy to tell without the knowledge about a lot of headsets, I can tell for most of them. so for example, Chris king is sealed, the very cheap bikes all have old school headsets.
IF you see no bearing cup on the bottom of the head tube you got integrated headset, which have the bearings sitting directly in the frame, so easy to remove and install, but According to Chris king this is bad engineering,
http://www.bikeradar.com/gear/category/components/headset/product/review-chris-king-nothreadset-10060/
many mountain bikes have integrated headsets, even full suspension bikes, but there are also many that use press fit, Santa Cruz is a one of them, but they use threaded bottom brackets, instead of press fit.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

Right on, yeah it's an important hardware upgrade for most ebikes in my opinion... but not something I have figured out how to identify without taking the bike apart

Johannes Nilsen
3 months ago

bike bobbing, that is caused by wrong suspension setting, which the user cant easily alter on these forks, too high rebound the fork will be a pogo stick, too little air or too soft spring it will dive, if you got both this results in less control, and possibility of crash caused by this,but for mountain biking, high-speed and low speed is recommended. so the air fork is definitely the way to go,at least for these types of bikes.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

Thanks for the feedback Johannes!

Johannes Nilsen
3 months ago

kickstands are useless, wind will blow the bike over.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

For me, it's not pointless because I park in a garage and would rather not lean the bike against my wall or car... and there's no wind inside :)

Johannes Nilsen
3 months ago

4:00 ''Off-road oriented'' this is clearly not, if you I go off road with it I would destroy most of the bike.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

It really depends on the definition of off-road, maybe I should use the term "light hard packed dirt trail" more ;)

Johannes Nilsen
3 months ago

I have lifted this exact model of bike(the blue bike), its crazy heavy, That's the battery and motor of course adding the weight.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

Right, these systems usually add 12 to 18 lbs depending on battery and motor type and capacity

Paul van Lieshout
3 months ago

Correct. I own exactly this bike. These NEX E25 front forks do have pre-load adjustability under the caps. And since it is the E25 version (E-bike, 25 kph), they are heavy-duty and come with double springs. Thus; left and right. They are adjusted, by Cube, pretty much correct on SAG, according to the frame-size they are fitted on (read; riders weight). If you feel the need to alter the pre-load, just pop the caps off and use a 5mm allen. Use the same amount of clicks left and right. Clockwise is more pre-load. If for one reason or another, you get confused, loosen both until the stop and turn both sides 0 to 15 clicks in, where 0 clicks is the correct SAG for 90lbs, to 15 clicks which is the correct SAG for 190lbs.

Jessy Cliche
3 months ago

I was at that shop this spring and that's the exact bike I was looking into buying! (Wasn't there at the moment but they had a bunch of other nice bikes). Nice shop and staff, real friendly!

Vafa B
3 months ago

hi Court
love your channel and reviews are great. like the additional cube reviews!

if you are still in the Vancouver area I have a 2017 cube 140 full suspension hybrid pro 500 for you to review. send me a message and let me know if you would like to take it out for a spin.

can't wait for the 2018 cubes to come out! and for your review

rubbiebubbie
3 months ago

Can I ask what size you are and what size the bike is? I am 5'10'' looking for the right size 18'' or 20''?

Alex NC
3 months ago

Nice bikes.

Javan Russell
3 months ago

Guy's got a nice little shop.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

Yeah, the selection is all good quality and the neighborhood is nice for doing test rides :)

Martin Schmidt
3 months ago

Nice Review again. Keep on. :)

Martin Schmidt
3 months ago

ElectricBikeReview.com good to hear.Will watch them. Have fun in las vegas. You make the Best ebike reviews on yt!

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

Thanks Martin! I'm heading to Interbike in Vegas later today so posts may slow for a bit but I'll have a bunch of new stuff to share soon

FRANK ROBY
3 months ago

Court take a look at the (Cube Stereo Hybrid Team 160 Action Team 500 2018 ) Available next February it's the best looking and best equipped e-bike I've seen and I will be buying one if nothing better comes along which I seriously doubt.

Vafa B
3 months ago

same here that is a crazy nice bike

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

Sweet, thanks for the tip Frank! I will definitely keep an eye out for this own and strive for a review

eBikeaholic
3 months ago

We haven't ridden a Cube bike yet, but they sure are handsome! Thanks for sharing Court.

eBikeaholic
3 months ago

Thanks, you make it look easy but this stuff is hard work! I live in ATX, we should grab a coffee or something. Feel free to email me at eBikeaholic@gmail.com when you're in town. - Ryan

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

Sure thing! By the way, your channel looks cool, maybe we will cross paths at some point and do a video or something!

Martin Schmidt
3 months ago

eBikeaholic i wonder why... ;)

eBikeaholic
3 months ago

Martin Schmidt it sure is, straight out of Waldershof. Some of the German brands are best in the biz right now.

Martin Schmidt
3 months ago

eBikeaholic cube is a german Brand.

Julia M
3 months ago

What is the EMBT upgrade, can explain /elaborate and that be done on the Active Line

Valentin Miholic
2 months ago

ElectricBikeReview.com Hi, Does this bike come with the eMTB mode pre-installed or do you need to upgrade it first in order to get the feature. Thanks

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

It's a software update that makes Sport mode into EMTB where you get the full range of low and high power so you don't have to switch from low to high assist and mess with buttons, it basically turns it into a full range torque sensor vs. limited range. Does that make sense? Like one assist level that can give you a full range of power.

Martin Schmidt
3 months ago

Julia M No Just on Performance line cx. Dont know why. They Could Update the older models also. Emtb Mode makes Bosch the Best in the game. Also quality and reliability is Best of the Best.

Seb K
3 months ago

Well 51 minutes since the upload and listed a new video 1 minute ago . Youtube getting better .

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

Nice, sounds like the notifications are coming up quicker :)

Mr Jhonny
3 months ago

2nd like!!!!!!!!!

Mr Jhonny
3 months ago

Thanks!!!!!!!!!

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

Not bad at all :D

Mr Jhonny
3 months ago

Im in good shape today ElectricBikeReview.com im in time!!!!!!!!!!