FlyKly Smart Wheel Review

Flykly Smart Wheel Review 1
Flykly Smart Wheel
Flykly Smart Wheel Chain Cog
Flykly Smart Wheel Charging Port
Flykly Smart Wheel Cockpit Brake Lever
Flykly Smart Wheel Charging Cap
Flykly Smart Wheel Front Hub Wize
Flykly Smart Wheel Rear Dropouts
Flykly Smart Wheel Rubber Cap
Flykly Smart Wheel Top View Single Speed
Flykly Smart Wheel Review 1
Flykly Smart Wheel
Flykly Smart Wheel Chain Cog
Flykly Smart Wheel Charging Port
Flykly Smart Wheel Cockpit Brake Lever
Flykly Smart Wheel Charging Cap
Flykly Smart Wheel Front Hub Wize
Flykly Smart Wheel Rear Dropouts
Flykly Smart Wheel Rubber Cap
Flykly Smart Wheel Top View Single Speed

Summary

  • One of the most affordable, compact and light weight electric bike conversion options available
  • Comes in eight colors, adjustable speed and power using mobile app, no wires for installation
  • Doesn't work with disc brakes, converts the bicycle to a single speed, no throttle mode

Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

FlyKly

Model:

Smart Wheel

Price:

$800 USD

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Urban

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

20142015

Bicycle Details

Motor Weight:

6.6 lbs (2.99 kg)

Frame Colors:

White, Silver, Blue, Red, Green, Yellow, Pink, Glow in the Dark

Gearing Details:

1 Single Speed

Wheel Sizes:

20 in (50.8cm)26 in (66.04cm)28 in (71.12cm)

Accessories:

Rubberized Charge Port Cover with Leash, Quick Charger

Other:

App Compatible with Android, iOS and Pebble, Fits 120 mm and 130 mm Dropouts, Can Be Ordered Pre-Installed in a WIZE Bicycle for ~$1,800, Integrated Cafe Lock with PIN to Unlock (Motor Won't Allow the Bike to Move), GPS Recovery Feature, 6082 Aluminum Case, Regenerative Braking Activated by Backwards Pedaling, Could Use a Schlumpf Drive to Bottom Bracket For Different Pedaling Ratios Since Kit is Not Compatible with Cassettes

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Zehus

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

250 watts

Battery Voltage:

30 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

6 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

180 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

2.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

20 miles (32 km)

Estimated Max Range:

30 miles (48 km)

Display Type:

NA, Optional Smart Phone Application Communicates via Bluetooth 2.3

Readouts:

Speed, Distance, GPS, Social Network, Power Level

Drive Mode:

Advanced Pedal Assist (Virtualized Torque Sensor, Accelerometer, Cadence Speed Sensor)

Top Speed:

15.5 mph (25 kph)

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Written Review

The FlyKly Smart Wheel is an ebike conversion kit consisting of a motor, battery, control system and bicycle wheel designed to be simple to use, light weight and efficient. It was successfully funded through Kickstarter on November 25th 2013 reaching over 7x it’s $100k launch threshold. While it doesn’t deliver all the bells and whistles of some purpose built electric bikes it is extremely light weight, relatively affordable at $800 and fairly sophisticated with a smart phone app that lets you change the top speed (limited to 16mph) and power output percentage to conserve battery usage. In short it’s smooth, relatively quiet and fairly stealth (so most people won’t even know you’re riding an electric bike). It works with a variety of wheel sizes and comes in eight fun colors including glow in the dark… The final version (which I tested in the video review above) is almost have the size and weight of the original prototype and benefits from a partnership that FlyKly has entered into with an Italian electric bike manufacturer.

The motor contained in the FlyKly hub is a 250 watt planetary geared design that does not freewheel like most comparable offerings. Instead, this one is setup in a direct-drive configuration that allows you to regenerate energy using the motor as a sort of brake. It works a lot like engine braking in a car (where you downshift and force the motor to run at a higher RPM) only in this case magnets are repelling instead of pistons moving at a higher rate (which just converts the mechanical energy into heat vs. electricity). It’s an extremely creative design that reminds me of the regen button used on Stealth electric bikes only here you backpedal to activate it instead of pressing a button. This is a very clever design because it completely eliminates the need for wires to be run along the frame. The motor itself is relatively quiet, fairly powerful (thanks to the geared design) and small. The only real downsides are the top speed of ~16 miles per hour and the cogging. What happens here is that when you’re coasting, the motor is spinning along and the gears are still turning inside. This, along with magnets that repel a bit on the inside, creates a bit of drag that I show in the video review. So that’s cogging… All things considered, the ability to get this system spoked into a 20″, 26″ or 700c wheel at no extra charge and the fact that it delivers both power and regen makes it very practical. While we’re on the topic of regen and motor performance it’s worth noting that if the battery is completely full regen will cut off in order to protect the batteries from overcharging. If you’re relying on regen as your only brake (not recommended) you might be in a tough spot… On the bike I tested there was a rim brake added to the front wheel for added stopping power. You could also add a rim brake to the rear wheel but note that the FlyKly system is not compatible with a rear disc brake. In the case of any brake levers, you will not be cutting power to the motor so keep that in mind because it can wear your brake pads down and make stopping a bit unpredictable until you learn how to operate properly.

The batteries used on this bike are all contained inside the rear hub. They’re placed along the outside of the motor casing but kept within the outer shell which means you can’t remove them for charging. You basically have to carry the bike inside or use an extension cord and connect to the axle-based charging port (shown in the image below). It’s a neat, clean design that again… requires no extra wiring. There’s even a pair of rubber caps that cover and protect both ends of the axle. Thankfully, the FlyKly Smart Wheel system only adds ~6.5 pounds to the overall weight of the bike and that means this is one of the easiest electric bikes to carry up stairs, hoist onto a wall hook rack or transport on cars, trains busses etc. The cells used are 18650 size with Lithium-ion chemistry inside that’s meant to go for 1,000+ charge cycles. They’re light, long lasting and can be replaced by FlyKly once they eventually do expire. You will however, have to send the entire wheel back to them and pay for this service. My testing time was limited but I do know that extreme heat and cold can be hard on Lithium batteries so I was concerned about how these ones will fare being located in such close proximity the motor along with the regen feature which could heat them up. Time will tell.

The other really cool thing about the FlyKly setup is that you can get the wheel pre-installed on a Wize city style bike (which is what I tested in the vide). For $1,800 it’s not a bad option. Keep in mind, the FlyKly is not compatible with rear cassettes so you only get one gear to pedal with. For many people this is fine and they’re already using single speed or fixed gear bikes for city riding. I found that the motor assist really helped when starting and climbing and let me reach a comfortable pedaling cadence that I could then maintain on my own. Depending on which speed is comfortable you can set the system to cut the motor so it’s really just there to give you a regular, gentle boost. While there’s no throttle option with the FlyKly the smart phone app does allow you to choose power percentage for both drive and regen (to start harder or slow faster) and is freely available for Android, iOS and Pebble devices. It’s intuitive to use and offers a GPS, route history and some gamification stuff for comparing rides with friends. Depending on your ride length, the constant use of your phone for GPS could wear the battery down so it’s nice that you don’t need to have the app open to ride. You just unlock and lock the bike with it… and that’s the other cool part. You can use the motor as a quick “cafe lock” that will immobilize the bike by locking the wheel. If anyone else tries to unlock it the system will report in and communicate a GPS coordinate to help you retrieve it. To help mitigate the smart phone drain potential I mentioned earlier (from constant app usage) FlyKly also offers a Smart Light that you can use to improve safety and charge your cell phone all from a dynamo hub that goes in the front wheel. Nice!

Honestly, this is a pretty sweet system and I’m excited for the FlyKly company to begin distributing their kit. The idea that for $800 and less than seven pounds you can get a little boost from each stop sign and some help with wind and hills is exciting. It’s a niche application that’s right at home in the city. The fact that you can use this with an existing bike frame and don’t need to run wires or add a cadence sensor is very cool. The kit blends in (unless you get the glow in the dark option) and can match your style thanks to the eight color choices. I was impressed with how smooth and responsive the pedal assist design was and glad that it was built right into the wheel. This system feels more like riding a bike than operating a scooter and for someone with sensitive knees, a longer or hill commute or just an interest in a little help and fun along the way this is a great option.

Pros:

  • Free app lets you power on the system, change the speed and power settings and is required to lock and unlock the wheel (works with Android, iOS and Pebble)
  • Mobile app includes GPS, speed, route history and usage stats with gamification to compete with friends
  • Drive system is available spoked into 20″, 26″ and 700c wheel sizes
  • Planetery geared motor is small and light weight while offering good torque for accelerating and climbing
  • The batteries, controller and motor are all contained in the rear hub so you don’t have to run wires around the bike, the hub is also designed to be water resistant for easy cleaning and use on rainy days
  • System is basically hands free (pedal forward to get assistance and pedal back to activate regen)
  • Extremely light weight design with motor, batteries, controller and wheel weighing in at just ~6.5 pounds
  • Torque sensor activation is smooth, responsive and efficient extending the range of the battery as you pedal along
  • Optional FlyKly Smart Light lets you charge your phone and add a front light to your bike and power them with a dynamo hub in the front wheel (great for when you use the app since it draws on your battery or GPS data)
  • Available in eight color options including white, silver, blue, red, green, yellow, pink, glow in the dark
  • Relatively affordable at $800 for the wheel and motor combined, pretty easy to intall compared with other kits
  • Option to order the FlyKly built into a Wize bicycle, ready to go

Cons:

  • Brake levers aren’t connected to motor system, if you keep pedaling the motor will fight your brakes (have to stop or pedal backwards)
  • Batteries are not easily removable for charging, have to bring the bike inside or use an extension cord
  • When batteries eventually expired you have to send the entire wheel/hub to FlyKly for replacement
  • When battery is fully charged, regenerative braking won’t work (motor will stop powering the bike but won’t slow you down)
  • Only works as a single speed (can’t add a cassette or geared hub, not enough room to fit… may be able to add a Schlumpf Drive or similar system in front bottom bracket) system only works on rear wheel
  • Not compatible with disc brakes, must use rim brakes or rely on front brake only with rear backwards pedaling regen mode
  • Top speed is limited to ~16 miles per hour vs. other ebikes that can hit 20mph
  • No twist throttle option, pedal assist only which can be tricky to adjust on the fly (easier to stop and use the app vs. a control panel mounted on the bike)
  • Direct drive motor does experience some cogging from gears and magnetic resistance inside (see video review) this enables motor braking and regen

Resources:

Comments (61) YouTube Comments

Ian
5 years ago

Looks very interesting, thanks for doing a review! I’m thinking for me personally it may not be the best option right now since I’ve got a 22 mile each way commute to tackle and I think a more powerful motor with a detachable battery would be best so I could charge it at the office without bringing my bike inside.

However, this may be perfect for my wife who would only be biking under 5 miles at a time, and also has a heart condition that prevents her from pedaling too intensely. Looking forward to hearing some reviews from owners!

  Reply
Jason
5 years ago

Thanks for finally having a review of the Copahegen wheel. But now watching this review and the FlyKly I am confused on which one would be right for me. I like the FlyKly design and price but I am not sure if the Copahegen Wheel would be better or same.

All I want is something that can get me to work with less or no effort at all and climb hills with ease without being sweaty and nasty when arriving to destination (work). Do you have any suggestions for me. I would appreciate it. Thanks keep up the great work.

  Reply
Court
5 years ago

Hi Jason, I enjoyed testing both but believe the FlyKly will be commercially available sooner (unless you pre-ordered the beta-developers kit for the Copenhagen Wheel). I liked the smaller size of the FlyKly and didn’t mind the reduced power but I only weigh ~130 so it might depend on your size and how far you need to go. The Copenhagen wheel has a removable battery which will make charging easier and you could also get a second pack for extended rides.

  Reply
Jason
5 years ago

Thanks for responding to my question. So what do you prefer overall the CW or the FlyKly wheel? I like your opinion before I invest my money in to something. Keep up the great work and have a great day.

  Reply
Don Dassinger Phoenix Arizona USA
5 years ago

Good design and neat engineering. Buyers, users, please periodically post updates and maybe some pictures and video. Want to know best techniques and effective range for use of the electric power assist FlyKly hub in an urban area and what is the effective life, especially any continuing use beyond 1000 recharges of the battery. Good review.

  Reply
Court
5 years ago

Hi Jason, even though the FlyKly only works as a single speed bicycle I prefer its light weight and smaller “stealthier” design. It works pretty well and it will actually be available to buy this year so yeah… that’s my pick :)

  Reply
Court
5 years ago

Thanks Don, you might also check the FlyKly forums periodically to see what people have to say there. It’s kind of empty at the moment (because FlyKly isn’t out until September 2014) but after that it should pick up :)

  Reply
Jason
5 years ago

Hi Court, I backed the Flykly and can’t wait to get mine. However, I’m really interested in the Bike+ with Wize model they also are going to sell. Did you test ride the Bike+ with Wize bike, or just a regular bike with the Smartwheel attached? Thanks

  Reply
Court
5 years ago

I think it was a Wize bicycle frame but the wheels were a bit more custom (with the colored deep dish rims). I’ll reach out to Niko for more info on this and point him here to answer :)

  Reply
FlyKly
5 years ago

@Jason: thank you for your interest in FlyKly. Court has only tired Smart Wheel. Bike with the wize system comes with much more advanced technology in order to extend the range or provide you with the unlimited range. The Wize system detects when you need the assistance and when you do not it recharges the battery so this way your ride is smooth all the time and always ready.

We hope this helps.

Stay Fly!

  Reply
Bobby G.
5 years ago

Wow! Wish I weighed 130 lbs.! Speaking of weight, I’m having concerns about my weight, 350 lbs., and how it will affect the performance of the FlyKly, or ANY add-on electric assist systems. I currently commute to and from work twice per day. Two miles one way, eight miles total. Terrain is moderately hilly, but not bad. Just hoping someone out there could give me some suggestions. EBR is an awesome site. Thanks for all you do!

  Reply
Court
5 years ago

Hey Bobby! Sorry it took me a bit to respond to you here… I’ve been out getting more reviews and stuff ;) given your concerns about power and strength of an electric bike I’d definitely recommend looking at the Pedego Interceptor. This bike is large, sturdy and powerful… Now, if you’re shorter than 5’10” or so then maybe consider the Step-Thru Interceptor because it will have a shorter frame and be easier to mount. The weaker kits like this FlyKly would still help you but be a lot less satisfying and you can’t use gears with this particular kit so you’d have a single speed bike and that would be no fun going up hills. If you do want to go the kit route then I suggest the E-BikeKit 500 Watt Gearless which is sturdy, strong and reliable (but doesn’t offer pedal assist, only throttle). You could add this kit to almost any bike so you can find one that really feels comfortable to you.

  Reply
Bobby G.
5 years ago

Court,

Thank you for the very detailed reply. The Pedego Interceptor is built like a tank! It’s definitely at the top of my list for an e-bike. I know there are plenty of big guys and gals out there who love cycling and share my situation. You’ve been a huge help in making a purchase decision. Keep up the GREAT reviews, and I’ll keep visiting EBR daily!

Bobby G.

  Reply
Lizzie Garrett
5 years ago

Hey! Great review about this product. I recently spoke with Niko, and did a blog post about him and the rest of his team. It’s amazing to see who the people are who actually created products like this. Turns out they’ve been involved in multiple successful Slovenian Kickstarter campaigns! Check it out and let me know what you think… Lizzie

  Reply
Court
5 years ago

Awesome article Lizzie. Great pictures as well! I enjoyed meeting Niko but we didn’t cover the other projects he was involved with so this was illuminating :)

  Reply
Gwen Andersen
5 years ago

Court, I love your reviews. Thank you for your work. I’ve been going through your website like an addict. I would like to commute to work by bike but the route that avoids traffic is 15 miles each way with some steep inclines, declines, and tight turns. When I tested it, it took a bit too long and was a bit too difficult. I’m your weight. So I think the flykly could meet the bill and if it doesn’t really deliver a full 30, it adds little additional weight so I could make it the rest of the way in the evening on my own. I really dig the smart phone functionality. I was a little concerned about the braking though. With all the hills I will be braking a lot. Your thoughts?

  Reply
Court
5 years ago

Hi Gwen! I really liked the FlyKly for the many of the reasons you share… It’s light weight, efficient and affordable. The fact that you have a lot of hills might not be such a bad thing since this can regenerate. The smart phone app is cool because you can change how much assist it offers and that extends the range (you can also top it off at the office if you’re able to park near a plug). The same company that helps manufacture the FlyKly also offers the ZeHus Smart Wheel that has a “forever mode” which is designed to never require charing (it just skims off of the rider at high speeds and going down hills). Maybe this will help you decide on the FlyKly because the ZeHus is not yet available in the USA as of late 2015 and it will only come pre-installed on a bike, not a kit like FlyKly: https://electricbikereview.com/zehus/bike-plus-all-in-one/

  Reply
B
5 years ago

Do FlyKly or CH Wheel have app for Windows phone?

  Reply
Court
5 years ago

Great question! At this time I believe they do not, just Android and iOS. That may change over time but I haven’t heard anything from either company about it.

  Reply
Pepper
5 years ago

I appreciate the review and all the comments. One concern I have is that what is on that bike looks exactly like the wheel from ZeHus but without the labels. Is this just a scam??

  Reply
Court
5 years ago

Hi Pepper! When I met with Niko from FlyKly to do this review I asked about Zehus as well, sounds like they are working together so that FlyKly can be produced by Zehus which had a similar design to the original Kickstarter FlyKly concept. If you look at the original videos and images the FlyKly was different and once they saw what Zehus had, I believe they decided to work with them instead of “reinventing the wheel” themselves. I think the big difference is software and the markets where you can find/buy each one. I hope this helps!

  Reply
Where is my wheel that I paid for
5 years ago

I ordered My wheel over a year ago from FlyKly and so far they have only taken my money with out any wheel. FlyKly has informed me that they will send the wheel that I have paid for but keep telling me that it will take longer and longer as they continue to postpone the shipping date. So far it has all been a lie and wont believe it until I see my wheel.

  Reply
Court
5 years ago

That’s such a bummer, I’m sorry to hear about your experience but appreciate your feedback here. With more crowdfunded projects in the ebike space I have growing concerns about this sort of delay and unmet expectation. I hope the product arrives soon, I really enjoyed testing the unit and hope they can improve upon it in the coming years, including delivering in a more timely manner :(

  Reply
Diogo
5 years ago

I live in São Paulo and here we have a lot of hills. That’s why I started looking for a electric bike or wheel. Knowing you tested both FlyKly and Copenhagen wheels, I have to ask you, if you think this no gear problem of FlyKly would limit my experience climbing hills. I have a 27 gear bike, and I use from 1st to last gear on my daily commute. My first guess is to wait for the Copenhagen, but never tested electric models so maybe with the help of the motor the gears are not that needy? What do you think? Thanks for the reviews, Diogo.

  Reply
Court
5 years ago

Great question Diogo. I preferred the FlyKly because it was lighter weight and a lot smaller and less noticeable. It uses more standard spokes and felt about the same in terms of power as the Copenhagen Wheel. Please note that both of the units I reviewed were prototypes… I’m not sure they are even shipping units yet? I agree that the single speed limitation of the FlyKly is off-putting and that may be a challenge on hills. You could buy something like this internally geared bottom bracket to add three speeds. You could also just get a standard rear hub motor electric bike kit that would work with a cassette. For an even higher quality hub motor (with regenerative braking, pedal assist and throttle) I’d recommend BionX but their stuff is more expensive. The D-Series is quite powerful and would be the best choice for scaling large hills. Hope this helps, if you do get one of the smart wheels, I’d love to hear about it!

  Reply
Liz
4 years ago

Yes, looks interesting, but it is NOT delivered. There are people who paid for their wheels a year ago who are being told to wait yet another four months while new orders are offered to be delivered in three. BEWARE – you might NEVER get the wheel or bike you paid for.

  Reply
Court
4 years ago

Thanks for sharing your experience Liz, I’m sorry it hasn’t been an enjoyable one so far… I hope it comes soon :\

  Reply
Where is my wheel that I paid for
4 years ago

People are asking for their money back any are not getting money or a wheel. This company is a scam. DO NOT GIVE THESE PEOPLE YOUR MONEY!!!!!!!! Please REVIEW http://www.kickstarter.com PEOPLE DO NOT SEND THESE PEOPLE ANY MONEY!!!!!

  Reply
Caroline
4 years ago

I was one of the backers in the crowdfunding project and have received my wheel a couple of months ago. It is so cool! Have attached it to a GT hybrid bike and have three front gears – for me this is sufficient.
I am really pleased with the performance, and can ride my bike to work without beeing too sweaty :)

  Reply
Court
4 years ago

Awesome! So glad to hear it’s working well for you Caroline. I like the idea of using a three sped cassette on the front ring, have you seen this internally geared bottom bracket before? It’s called the Efneo and it looks pretty cool to me. I’ve also seen one called the Schlumpf Innovations Gearing Systems which is used on bikes like the Outrider 422 Alpha.

  Reply
Phil
4 years ago

Sounds like a great electric assist. Does this work w/o a smartphone ap? Are there any local controls, or an optional control that could be mounted on the bike? Or does it even need controls – could one set it at 12 mph, 70 Percent, etc. and keep it there? Most bicyclists already have odometers and speedometers.

  Reply
Court
4 years ago

Great questions Phil, this review was shot a long time ago and apparently some people still haven’t received the product (and it sounds like it has also been changed in some ways). I wish I could help you more here but I simply do not know. You may be able to get some feedback in the forums here.

  Reply
Anonymous
4 years ago

It does work without it as long as you connect once. It saves all your settings. That is good because the range for the bluetooth connection is extremely short. It drops connection as soon as you move your phone more than 50cm away from it. You can’t have it connected to your phone if you plan to have the phone on the holder.

  Reply
Court
4 years ago

Awesome! Thanks for adding these details :)

Peter
4 years ago

I got my wheel a couple of weeks ago. After 2 years + waiting. Quite disappointed so far. Bluetooth Connection is very bad. You need to manually connect every time both on your phone and in the app in several steps. But the biggest issue is that the range is very bad. You can’t connect to the wheel and move further away than you saddle before it drops connection. If you get of you bike and start steering it, you just have to nudge the chain for it to speed away. Lost control of it several times. Feels like danger to people and things all around you, and its also just frustrating to not be able to steer it without being afraid it will take off. The phone holder is of pretty poor quality and it seems impossible to get it to connect tightly enough to your steering bar for it to hold its own weight + your phone. At 20% charge it didn’t help me anything, it became totally useless. Seems very important to keep it well charged. And I realized, too late that it’s a hassle to have to get the bike close to a power outlet to charge it as the bike becomes pretty heavy with this on. I would’ve preferred if you could remove the battery to charge just it, similar to EcoRide and other brands. It’s pretty nice when you going up hills but its too much resistance when you come up to speed and just bike normally, or when you run out of power.

  Reply
Court
4 years ago

Thanks for the feedback on performance and areas for possible improvement Peter. I hope you enjoy the FlyKly and that future iterations of the product address some of these concerns for you.

  Reply
joepah
4 years ago

Court have you validated any of the FlyKly claims from their Kickstarter ad? Delivery delays? I read that some of the original backers are STILL waiting for their FlyKly wheel.. It’s been almost 2 years. Top speed? Range? Bluetooth connectivity GPS tracking? Owner feedback? I think if you applied the same level of review as you did for the Sondors, you will find this $800 cf project is a bust.

  Reply
Court
4 years ago

I appreciate your input, I’d love to review the FlyKly again but haven’t seen one in person. Even this review was more of a demo and I agree that the Sondors was more complete. I do my best to get honest data but some of my older reviews are less complete and there are times where I’m reviewing ahead of launch and it’s just not the same. Sorry about that…

  Reply
Dave
4 years ago

Hi everyone, I am most interested in this technology, my biggest concern is, what if the battery died and I am going on a flat area, would my pedaling recharge the battery again?

  Reply
Court
4 years ago

Hi Dave! With the FlyKly or Zehus electric bike conversion “smart wheel” you actually can generate electricity but the efficiency is something like 10% to 15% so you’ll be spending more energy pedaling than you get back. In my opinion, given the light weight of these kits, it’s best to just use the bike as-is if the battery runs out, you can still pedal and coast which is way more efficient than walking. Many other ebikes weigh a whole lot more and then riding becomes difficult. One of the big benefits of the FlyKly is how minimal and light it is. The only downside is that I think it currently only works with single speed bikes but you can sort of get by this with an Efneo, Schlumpf drive or other geared bottom bracket :)

  Reply
Eric
4 years ago

Their site lists this at $1000 + $100 shipping. They don’t list specs on the built wheel/rim or sell a bare hub. Too bad you can’t actually get one for $800. The weight sounds good, granted the motor and battery are both rather small.

  Reply
Court
4 years ago

Thanks for the feedback, this review is getting kind of old and I’ve heard about some companies changing prices or specs. I try to keep reviewing bikes and kits on a continual basis. I’m hoping that FlyKly updates their product and keeps prices low in the future :)

  Reply
ETW
4 years ago

I received my flykly wheel June of 2015. The wheel is not the greatest around for sure, it works fine on flat streets and flat bike paths through the city but hills are a struggle for the wheel. Also the Bluetooth within the wheel really suck. you literally have to hold the IPhone within an inch of the axle in order to set the wheel up. The Bluetooth range is horrible. To Be fare I did try 3 other cell phones and an android tablet and the results were identical very poor range. So while riding the bike you do not know any of your stats because the cell and wheel cannot communicate do to the short Bluetooth range of the wheel. If I had to grade the wheel I would say it fall at a C- or D+ As I stated smooth flat streets and bike paths it does well. Also the wheel is a bit noisy I assume because of the planetary gears inside. I have emailed Flykly many times with questions regarding the app the noise and the range of its Bluetooth but no one has ever replied back so for now I’m stuck with a faulty flykly wheel. :(

  Reply
Court
4 years ago

Thanks for sharing your experience! I definitely heard the wheel during my test but didn’t have to set it up with Bluetooth… bummer that the range was an issue for you. Unfortunately I’ve struggled to reach FlyKly as well, even just for updating this review. It’s a neat concept, hopefully future iterations or other similar products will come out that address some of these issues :)

  Reply
Silviu
4 years ago

I am a Kickstarter project backer and here’s my experience with this product.

I received my wheel in December 2014. Did not try it out until about a month later. Apart from the Bluetooth range problem that is mentioned in other comments, it worked well the first day, for about 30 minutes. The second day I took it on the street, the wheel stopped working as I was making my way up a (not very steep) hill. So in total it worked for about 45 minutes. After that, I could still connect to it through Bluetooth and adjust the settings, but the assist and brake did not work at all.

I’ve contacted support and after about two months of sporadic emails (sporadic on their side, they constantly forgot to get back to me) they sent someone to take my wheel back into service and repair it. When I got it back the assist worked, barely, and the brake did not work at all. I contacted FlyKly again and they agreed to take it back into service a second time.

When I got it back again I can’t say I noticed an improvement. Assist worked, brake did not work. The wheel stopped working the next time I tried to go up a hill.
That was in September 2015. I’ve been trying to get it serviced again, as they said the wheel is under warranty for a year after you receive it. I’m getting sporadic answers to my emails, about once a month, and the people replying claim that the FlyKly Europe branch is now a different company that the original company that sent me the wheel. They are refusing to service my wheel for free, basically ignoring the 1 year warranty that FlyKly was supposed to honor. They have failed to help me for six months, now.

In conclusion, you should not trust this company! Don’t buy their products! The Smart Wheel does not work as advertised. It is worthless uphill and it breaks down after a few days of using it! And don’t expect any help when you’ll have problems with their products.

  Reply
Court
4 years ago

Ouch! That really sucks Silviu… I’m so sorry to hear that your experience with the product and FlyKly staff has been far, far below what you paid for. Your feedback here is valuable, thanks for sharing and I hope that it may help others who are considering the purchase. There definitely are great electric bike products out there and I hope you find one that fits your lifestyle and budget.

  Reply
Silviu
4 years ago

Funding a Kickstarter project is always a risk, I was prepared for that. All I want now is to warn people about the fact that FlyKly is not a reliable company at this point. It also looks like they are having some search.rpxcorp.com/lit/nysdce-451987-superpedestrian-v-flykly legal problems, which may explain them going underground.

Sonja
3 years ago

I was also one of the original backers through Flykly’s Kickstarter campaign. Three years after initially backing them, I finally received my wheel. It never worked, right out of the box. Contacted support, sent it back to Slovakia Slovenia where ever they were at the time. This is going back to January 2015 now and have yet to see my wheel. Despite numerous emails to ZEUS who took over the European end of Flykly to Niko Klansek himself, as well as Kickstarter, I have not had any resolution to either getting my wheel or getting a refund. This product is a great idea, packaged together by a terribly flawed company, making for a poorly built and non-operational product. If you’re interested in buying a Smart Wheel, my advice is to steer clear of Flykly. I am likely going to pursue a class action lawsuit against Flykly based on their business practices and failure to make good on their promise to their Kickstarter backers. I am well aware of the fact that this has not been an isolated problem with the Flykly wheel or the company itself in its disregard and complete lack of customer service.

  Reply
Court
3 years ago

Hi Sonja… I’m so sorry to hear that this has happened to you, what a frustrating experience spending that kind of money and waiting YEARS. Niko seemed nice enough when I met him but it’s always difficult to review pre-released products. Who knows what will happen, I wish that ZEUS would step up more for you. I hear lots of complaints about the long wait time for the Superpedestrian Copenhagen Wheel as well, same sort of bad experience except without ever getting anything at all! I wish they would at least refund you so that you could buy another ebike product, it makes me sad that so many people might not be enjoying one because they are waiting for one they paid for a long time ago. I wish you luck with the suit, what part of the country or world do you live in? Maybe I can help you out a bit…

  Reply
Sonja
3 years ago

Hi Court, thanks for your comments. I submitted all the email correspondence I had had concerning the bike to ZEUS and was told that because I’m in North America (Canada) that I had to deal with Flykly directly. The only way to contact them is through email. There had been talk by other investors and buyers about a class action law suit, but I don’t think anyone had moved on it yet. I’m a patient person, but I’m not patient when it comes to being ripped off. I don’t think anyone should be.

Brian
2 years ago

Is it possible to use the FlyKly wheel as the FRONT wheel on a bike? That way you could still have the gears of your rear wheel, and the FlyKly wouldn’t reduce your bike to a single-speed which is sort of a deal-breaker of a detail.

  Reply
Court
2 years ago

Hi Brian! Unfortunately, I am pretty sure that is not possible. The FlyKly relies on a sensor to activate pedal assist which looks for the sprocket to turn and pull. If you were able to connect a chain to the front wheel, perhaps it could function but then you probably wouldn’t be able to steer because the wheel would bend the chain side to side. Does that make sense?

  Reply
J. M. C.
2 years ago

Is it possible to get just the hub and spokes so I can have my local bike shop incorporate it with my existing rim set? Can it be used with a two gear front sprocket? I thought I read in a different review that It now comes with a higher wattage motor and a higher top speed and that it now comes with a complimentary light that can also charge your devices while riding. Is this correct or am I confusing this product with a competitors product? One last thing. Can you send some more info. on this manufacturer such as THE PHONE # of the company so I can speak one on one with someone for future questions? Thanks in advance. J.M.C.

  Reply
Court
2 years ago

Hi J. M. C. I have not heard from the FlyKly team for some time now, I’m not sure if they even still sell this product? It was neat, but it sounded like there were customers who did not get the product very quickly after ordering. I also remember something about a light and charging interface, but it has been too long to know the details. Unfortunately, I do not have a company contact either :/ but maybe someone could help answer your questions in the FlyKly forums, which have a few conversations going.

  Reply
Flykly
2 years ago

Hi J.M.C. for general information about Flykly you can send an email to hello@flykly.com! For technical information regarding the aftersale you can send an email to customerservice@flykly.com. You can also contact us on our Facebook! Soon we’ll release also our new website where you can see our new product!

Bye, Flykly Team

  Reply
Court
2 years ago

Fantastic! Thanks for chiming in Flykly, I’m glad that you guys are still around and doing work to re-launch the website and your products :D

Flykly
2 years ago

Hi Court Rye! We have renewed a lot of things! :) Stay tuned! Bye Bye, Flykly Team

  Reply
George
11 months ago

I just bought a Flykly/Zehus smart wheel and I’m loving it. I wanted a lightweight ebike that was under 30 lbs and the Flykly seemed like the only option available without spending a fortune on one of the new road ebikes from Spain or Italy. I was not disappointed. I put the wheel on an old single speed (Dawes SST from Bikesdirect) which was not the lightest, but I had it lying around so it became the donor by default. The bike weighed around 23 lbs before I added the Flykly. Now it’s around 28+ lbs give or take. It’s now a great multi-modal commuter as I can carry it up and down the train station stairs. I really don’t miss having gears as the motor has plenty of torque to get moving and with the right gearing, I can maintain a decent clip on the flats and uphill.

The only down side is that the battery life is not great if hills are involved. I can’t get enough juice back with the backpedal regen. Fortunately the charger is light so I can bring it along if I foresee a need to charge up.

I looked at the Copenhagen wheel but at 16 lbs, it was not an option. I also have a Haibike Urban Xduro which is a great ebike but weighs a ton. While the Flykly doesn’t have the power of the Haibike, it feels smoother in the power delivery, plus it’s pretty transparent. I don’t have to mess with buttons and gauges. Just hop on and go.

  Reply
Court
11 months ago

Awesome! Thanks for the update and testimonial here, George. Hope both of your ebikes continue to work well for you!

George
11 months ago

Court, I had a question that maybe you could answer. You mention in your review that the Flykly has a “virtual” torque sensor. What exactly is a virtual torque sensor? Does the flykly actually work as if it has a PAS sensor built into the motor? Or does it really have a torque sensor that knows how much force you are putting into the pedal stroke? Thanks, George

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