Lectric eBikes Lectric XP Review

Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Electric Bike Review
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Branded 500 Watt 60nm Geared Motor
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Folded
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Handlebar Ergonomic Grips Control Panel
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Large Grayscale Lcd Display And Flick Bell
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Wuxing 5 Star Brake Lever Shimano Sis Thumb Shifter
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Cst Bft 20 Inch Fat Tires
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp 160mm Mechanical Disc Brakes
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Front Blaze Lite Rl1900 30 Lumens Headlight
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp 170mm Crank Arms Alloy Wellgo Pedals
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Steel Rack Spring Latch Kickstand
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Folding Joint Charg Port
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Integrated Blaze Lite Rear Light And Reflector
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Shimano Tourney Derailleur 7 Speed Freewheel 14 28 Tooth 52t Chainring
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Black Left Side
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Black Front
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Black Rear Rack And Saddle
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Black Folded Top View
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Black Folded Side View
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Two Folded In Trunk Of Car
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Battery Pack And D Power Charger
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp 2 Amp Electric Bicycle Charger
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Stock Folding White
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Electric Bike Review
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Branded 500 Watt 60nm Geared Motor
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Folded
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Handlebar Ergonomic Grips Control Panel
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Large Grayscale Lcd Display And Flick Bell
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Wuxing 5 Star Brake Lever Shimano Sis Thumb Shifter
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Cst Bft 20 Inch Fat Tires
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp 160mm Mechanical Disc Brakes
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Front Blaze Lite Rl1900 30 Lumens Headlight
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp 170mm Crank Arms Alloy Wellgo Pedals
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Steel Rack Spring Latch Kickstand
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Folding Joint Charg Port
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Integrated Blaze Lite Rear Light And Reflector
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Shimano Tourney Derailleur 7 Speed Freewheel 14 28 Tooth 52t Chainring
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Black Left Side
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Black Front
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Black Rear Rack And Saddle
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Black Folded Top View
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Black Folded Side View
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Two Folded In Trunk Of Car
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Battery Pack And D Power Charger
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp 2 Amp Electric Bicycle Charger
Lectric Ebikes Lectric Xp Stock Folding White

Summary

  • One of the most affordable folding fat tire electric bikes from a company with dedicated customer support and a solid one year warranty, offers twist throttle and adjustable top speed, up to 28mph, includes fenders, rear rack, and integrated lights
  • Available in two colors, gloss black or white, with matching fenders and nice looking decals, one size fits most thanks to the long adjustable seat post and telescoping height stem, full length crank arms pedal naturally, impressive max weight of 330lbs
  • Seven speed drivetrain provides comfortable pedal speeds, the fat four inch wide tires offer stability and comfort, ergonomic grips reduce numbness, the thick padded saddle has rubber bumpers to take the edge off, and Lectric eBikes sells an optional suspension seat post, excellent pedal choice here too
  • No suspension fork here, the steel fork, fenders, rear rack, and non-sealed headset can rust over time, default cadence sensor settings are a bit slow but can be adjusted, the lights are more "be seen" vs. "illuminate your path" and there's no USB charging port on the display

Video Review

Introduction

Make:

Lectric eBikes

Model:

Lectric XP

Price:

$999 (Free Shipping in Contiguous US)

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Trail, Travel, Sand and Snow

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2), Speed Pedelec (Class 3)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States, Canada

Model Year:

20192020

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

62.2 lbs (28.21 kg)

Battery Weight:

6.6 lbs (2.99 kg)

Motor Weight:

8.7 lbs (3.94 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

14 in (35.56 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

14" Seat Tube Length, 24" Reach, 25.25" Stand Over Height, 31.75" Minimum Saddle Height, 22.75" Width, 67.75" Length, 44.5" Wheelbase, Folded: L 37" x W 18" x H 27"

Frame Types:

Mid-Step, Folding

Frame Colors:

Gloss Black with Metallic Gray and Lectric Blue Accents, Gloss White with Metallic Gray and Lectric Blue Accents

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid Steel, 135mm Hub Spacing, 10mm Threaded Axle with 15mm Nuts

Frame Rear Details:

175mm Hub Spacing, 12mm Slotted Threaded Axle with 10mm Flats, 18mm Nuts

Attachment Points:

Fender Bosses, Rear Rack Bosses

Gearing Details:

7 Speed 1x7 Shimano Tourney Derailleur, Shimano Freewheel 14-28T

Shifter Details:

Shimano SIS Index Thumb Shifter on Right

Cranks:

Prowheel Cold-Forged Aluminum Alloy, 170mm Length, Sealed BB Assembly, Square Tapered Spindle, 52 Tooth Chainring with Prowheel Plastic Chain Guide

Pedals:

Wellgo P256 Aluminum Alloy Folding Platform with Reflectors, CrMo Axle, Black

Headset:

Threaded, Steel Ball Bearings in Retainer, Non-Sealed, 1-1/8" Straight

Stem:

NECO Aluminum Alloy, Folding Telescoping Height with Quick Release Lever 250mm Base with 120mm Extension, 10mm Spacer, 25.4mm Clamp

Handlebar:

Low-Rise, Aluminum Alloy, 570mm Length

Brake Details:

Tektro MD-M280 Mechanical Disc with 160mm Rotors, Wuxing 5-Star Four-Finger Levers with Motor Inhibitors

Grips:

T375 Ergonomic, Rubber, Black

Saddle:

Unbranded Comfort Saddle with Elastomer Bumpers, Black

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy, Tapered Clamp Mount

Seat Post Length:

500 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

31.8 mm

Rims:

Aluminum Alloy, Double Wall, 80mm Width, 36 Hole

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 12 Gauge, Black with Nipples

Tire Brand:

CST BFT, 20" x 4.0" (98-406)

Wheel Sizes:

20 in (50.8cm)

Tire Details:

5 to 30 PSI, 0.4 to 2.0 BAR, 60 TPI, Puncture Resistant

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Rear-Mount Kickstand, Steel Derailleur Guard, Integrated Blaze-Lite Headlight (30 Lumens), Integrated Blaze-Lite RL1900 Backlight (Single LED, 15 Lumens), Steel Rear Rack with Spring Latch (25kg 55lb Max Weight), Optional Suspension Seat Post (500mm Length, Preload Adjust, $89), Optional Pannier Bags ($49), Optional Additional Replacement Battery Pack ($299), Optional Battery Charger ($49)

Other:

Locking Removable Downtube-Integrated Battery Pack, D-Power 1.4lb 2 Amp Charger, 48 Volt 18 Amp Peak Motor Controller, Stainless Steel Torque Arm, 330lb Maximum Weight Rating

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Lectric eBikes Specific

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Motor Peak Output:

982 watts

Motor Torque:

60 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

LG 18650 2600mAH 13S4P Configuration

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

10.4 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

499.2 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion NMC (Nickel Manganese Cobalt Oxide)

Charge Time:

6 hours

Estimated Min Range:

25 miles (40 km)

Estimated Max Range:

50 miles (80 km)

Display Type:

LCD-M5, Fixed, Adjustable-Angle, Backlit, 3.5" Grayscale LCD

Readouts:

Battery Charge Level Energy Bar (10 Bars), Current Speed (MPH or KMH), Assist Level (0 to 5), Odometer, Trip A, Voltage, Current, Trip Time, Lights Indicator, Walk Mode Indicator

Display Accessories:

Independent Control Pad on Left, Buttons: Up, Down, M, Lights: Hold Up, Walk Mode: Hold Down, Settings: Hold Up and Down, Cycle Readouts: Press M

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist, Twist Throttle (12-Magnet Sealed Cadence Sensor)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)(Adjustable to 28 MPH in Display Settings)


Written Review

To run the forums, host the website, and travel, I charge a universal service fee for my reviews. This in-depth review was sponsored by Lectric eBikes. My goal is to be transparent and unbiased with you, this video and writeup are not meant to be an endorsement of Lectric eBikes products. I welcome your corrections, additions, and feedback in the comments below and the Lectric eBikes electric bike forums.

Observations:

  • Great attention to detail on the hardware and customer support for such a young (less than a year old at the time of this review) company. This is definitely value-priced, but they don’t skimp on the truly important parts as much as I was expecting (alloy folding platform pedals from Wellgo, Nice display… but no USB ports, included steel fenders and “be seen” Blaze-Lights wired into the battery pack.
  • The bike defaults to assist level zero for safety, you get full throttle power in levels 1-5, to turn the bike on you must insert and twist the keys… then leave them hanging from the base of the downtube

Pros:

  • One of the biggest and most obvious advantages to this electric bicycle is the low price, it’s slightly more than some China-direct products but offers way more support, better attention to detail, and will arrive sooner with warranty and quality battery cells… to me, that’s worth at least $100
  • The battery pack and controller are hidden on this frame, that gives it a nice aesthetic and probably protects the parts from physical impact and the elements… though it requires a bit more effort to remove the battery. The wires and electrical cabling is all external, but on a folding frame, that can mean they won’t get pinched as easily
  • I love that the bike comes in two colors, and am a fan of their design and accent color choices, this lets you and a friend personalize a bit, and the white is my favorite because it’s more visible at night… great for a lower-riding bike where you’ll be easier to see, and Lectric eBikes even paint matched the fork and fenders on both models!
  • I love the sturdy Wellgo platform pedals they chose here, many other folding pedals are plastic and offer less surface area and rigidity, the plastic chain guide and steel derailleur guard also keep it running smoothly and protected when folding and unfolding, the chain shouldn’t drop off and you’ll be less likely to get a snag or bend in the derailleur cable and motor power cable
  • The battery design is compact and nicely hidden, I like that they use LG cells in the pack (higher quality) and offer a replacement pack for less than a few hundred dollars! Solid one year warranty with good customer support availability and willingness to make things right
  • Two decent accessories including water resistant pannier bags and a long suspension seat post for added comfort. I found their accessories and replacement parts to be well priced
  • The display is large and easy to read, it angles slightly to help you reduce glare, has a higher resolution 10-bar battery charge level indicator, and offers lots of adjustability in the settings… including the ability to set the top speed at ~28 MPH for speed pedelec performance, or lower it for better range and possibly safety or peace of mind for some riders
  • The Lectric XP has a high-resolution 12-magnet cadence sensors which makes starting and stopping more predictable, I love that they also included motor inhibitors on both brake levers, I always turn the bike completely off before hopping on or off and folding just to be safe, and the buttons to interact with the display are easily reachable and simple to understand (up, down, and M for “mode selection” and “power on/off”
  • The kickstand is positioned very well at the rear end of the bike, this won’t cause pedal lock and it didn’t bounce around or make a lot of noise during my test rides… even on bumpy hilly grass sections
  • Both wheels are built with thicker 12 gauge spokes for increased durability and weight capacity on the bike, the official max weight rating is 330 pounds (~149 kilograms) which is the best I’ve seen for a folding model
  • The geared hub motor is zippy and powerful, it gets a big mechanical advantage because of the smaller 20″ wheels and can produce a lot of torque (up to 60 newton meters), it freewheels efficiently and is fat-tire specific so it’s wider and offers a solid bracing angle for the spokes
  • The rear rack is wide, has a spring latch, and uses standard gauge tubing so it will work with most aftermarket pannier bags, please note that it’s 55lb (25kg) max weight rating subtracts from the total load of the bike (so a 55lb loaded rack plus a 275lb rider combine to 330lbs)
  • Even though the saddle and ergonomic grips are unbranded, they both performed very well and offered a lot of comfort, especially the saddle which is thick, not too wide that it chaffs your legs, and has rubber bumpers for added cushion
  • The bike comes fully assembled, so you don’t need any tools or a bike stand to get going. It’s not a bad idea to take it in for a quick tuneup and possibly lube the chain or adjust the twist barrel adjusters on the shifting (if it’s not shifting just perfectly) but in general, this is a great purchase experience for people… just be careful lifting the bike out of the big box, because it’s heavy
  • I thought it was kind of creative that the team put a picture of a television on the outside of the box, which they say has improved the way that shipping companies handle the package… they also added more and more padding to ensure that the product arrives in great shape, and they have touch-up paint for people who need it if they get a scratch
  • I appreciate that the bike has walk mode, especially with the heavier build… this can be useful for ascending hills that are too technical to ride up, or to walk when through a crowded area if the rear rack is fully loaded, but keep in mind that this walk mode doesn’t auto-shutoff like most other ebikes, I had to tap the brakes to send the motor cutoff signal for it to stop, which surprised me a little bit

Cons:

  • The biggest thing I hear when people suggest improvements to the bike is that they’d like suspension, but this adds weight and cost, the Lectric XP opted for high-volume fat tires instead, and they suggest lowering the PSI a bit to improve comfort… and they also sell a suspension seat post
  • The handlebar is a bit narrow, this can make the steering feel a bit twitchy… especially since it has smaller 20″ wheels, this is easy enough to fix with a different handlebar but it’s something Lectric eBikes could also upgrade in the future. Consider a bar that’s got a bit more rise and backsweep like we see on the e-Joe Epik SE, but this could take up more space when folding
  • Very basic Shimano Tourney derailleur and limited range freewheel, it offers 14 to 28 tooth sprockets vs 11 to 34 or more. Given the adjustable speed settings, up to ~28mph, it would be nice to see an upgraded cassette and a rust resistant chain
  • The chain, steel fork, steel fenders, and steel rack are all vulnerable to rust… and the headset isn’t sealed. These are strength and cost savings decisions and it’s cool that the fenders don’t rattle around as much as plastic or aluminum alloy but they do also add weight
  • The bike is fairly heavy at ~62.2 pounds (28.2kg), especially for a folding ebike. Yes, you can remove the 6.6lb battery pack and even take the rack and fenders off… but that takes time and manny people will just want to load it up and go, consider getting help from a friend and lift with your legs, not your back ;)
  • These aren’t complaints as much as comparisons to other slightly more expensive products, the tires don’t have reflective strips, the lights are kind of basic, the mechanical brakes and levers are pretty entry-level, there’s no quick release on the front wheel, no options for adding a front rack, the kickstand is positioned well but not adjustable and the bike leans pretty far to the left, and the seat clamp is just lame… but how often do you need to adjust the seat angle? I believe that these are all cost savings decisions
  • I wish the locking core was somewhere more convenient than below the main tube, it requires you to bend down and insert upwards in a direction that you can’t really look at unless you get down on your knees, and turning the key wasn’t particularly easy or smooth for me… these issues are all compounded by the requirement that you insert the keys and turn the bike to on each time you want to ride! The guys said this has to do with safety so the bike can’t be tampered with, and also that it completely shuts down the battery so it won’t slowly drain and get damaged… but for me, even having to leave the keys in while riding (possibly dangling down with a keychain on them) is annoying and uncommon
  • There are no USB charging ports on the display or battery pack here, that’s something you get with most competing bikes that are just a bit more expensive, but that can also slowly drain the battery, add electronic complexity, and not everyone needs it, so I see why they left it off
  • The display is large and easy to read but not removable, so it could take extra weather wear and possibly get scratched at a bike rack, if the bike gets crashed, or if you’re folding it
  • The motor controller is square wave vs sine wave, so it produces more noise and isn’t as smooth as some of the more expensive products, you can see and hear this in the video review above during the ride test
  • This is more of a preference thing, but the pedal assist engaged slower than I’m used to and the lowest level was a bit stronger and more abrupt than competing products… but the bike does offer good power
  • Only one frame size with the mid-step style, but that’s part of what keeps the price down, the top tube is easy enough to step over and the extra long seat post and telescoping stem provide great fit options for taller people, be careful when pedaling so you don’t bonk your knees on the big folding buckle
  • I’m not a huge fan of the big thumb shifter design for the gears because it seems like I have to stretch my right hand to reach it and the gears don’t shift as quickly or crisply, but this same shifter is often chosen to make room for twist throttles (as we see here), and the larger shifter levers can be easier to interact with when wearing gloves
  • The 160mm mechanical disc brakes worked okay during my ride test, especially with the smaller 20″ wheels, but I definitely prefer hydraulic because the levers are easier to pull and can be reach-adjusted for small and large hands, expect the right lever (for the rear brake) to be harder to pull, for there to be some cable stretch over time, and for both levers to become more gunked up over time as dust and water get into the cable housings
  • Minor gripe here, there doesn’t appear to be any bottle cage mounting points, you might have to use a trunk bag with a bottle holster, or maybe wear a hydration pack or something, I can see why they skipped bosses because the frame is compact and the folding could bend an accessory
  • There is no folding retention mechanism (like magnets or a rubber strap), so consider buying so plastic bungee cords and putting a towel between the two portions of frame to keep the bike from rattling around and scratching itself up

Useful Resources:

Comments (33) YouTube Comments

Roys Andrews
6 months ago

CAN U ROLL THE FOLDED BIKE EASILY, SAY WALK IT 20 YDS. to a car? WHAT ARE THE OPTIONAL UPGRADES AND COSTS PER ITEM? WHAT ARE THE OUTER DEMENTIONS TO FIT IN A CAR TRUNK OR BACK SEAT OF A 2010 MERCURY MELAN HYBRED? AM REALLY INTERESTED IN BUYING. IS THERE A DEALER CLOSE TO ST. PAUL, MN 55110?

  Reply
Court
5 months ago

Hi Roys, I don’t think there are any ebike dealers that sell the Lectric XP, they just sell and ship directly to customers… but at least it’s fully assembled ;) and yes, it was fairly easy to roll when folded… but lifting is difficult given the 62.2lb weight with the battery in. You can remove the battery, it weighs 6.6lbs. Hope this helps!

  Reply
Tom
5 months ago

Thanks for the review and all the time you took getting inside the company and getting answers from the team. For me, the combination of price point and components was a winner. I might add it’s also a great bike for personal customization. Things like suspension seat posts, longer handlebars, better freewheel, and other upgrades can easily be done and the cost is still below the $1500 average for a fat folder. Good work, Court – you are responsive to your readers to a fault!

  Reply
Court
5 months ago

Thanks Tom! Doing my best, I really appreciate your feedback and support. The Lectric XP is pretty sweet for the price, and it was really neat to meet their team and have fun with the visit ;)

  Reply
eric carney
4 months ago

I bought a black lectric bike from you a few months ago. I want to buy one (white), for my wife. When is the soonest i can get one for her?

  Reply
Court
4 months ago

Hi Eric, we just review the bikes here. I’m not sure about the soonest they could send one to you, but you could contact them directly through their website here. Good luck :D

  Reply
Bryce
3 months ago

Hi Court, love your reviews! I am looking to use my bike mostly to commute home from work (6 miles) and maybe light trails. I will probably ride with my wife to work in the morning and throw the bike in our minivan. I have narrowed my search down to the RADRunner, Lectric XP, and Volt Urban. Do you have any recommendations?

How different is the riding experience between the Volt and Lectric because of the fat tires? How much of a difference does the weight differential make in ease of transport? Any advice is greatly appreciated! Thanks!

  Reply
Court
3 months ago

Hi Bryce! Sounds like a good ride… I lean towards the efficiency and lightweight of the standard wheel and tire size that VoltBike is offering here vs. fat tires. The RadRunner, for example, doesn’t fold at all and might be difficult to fit into the trunk of your minivan. The folding fat tire models like Lectric XP, RadMini, and others are all going to weigh more and be physically larger. Now, it is possible to load them up into a rubbermaid tub like these guys have done, to keep the van clean and make lifting easier. Still, riding with fat tires for six miles is going to introduce extra drag and noise. The fat tires are great for trails, they are stable and comfortable… but there is a trade off in range. For me personally, I’d consider getting a bike rack that could hold two ebikes (like the ones from Thule or Küat) and then opting for a full sized ebike with 26″ 27.5″ or 28″ wheels because they can be narrow and efficient but offer a lower attack angle that will be more comfortable over bumps. Also, full sized ebikes like the RadCity or VoltBike Elegant can use suspension seat posts… or you could go for one of the full suspension VoltBikes like the Outback. The thing is, FS trail bikes don’t usually work well with racks. Consider a hardtail trail bike like the Surface 604 Shred or any of the other hardtail models with rack bosses. This is my personal bike style pick for a bit of trail but mostly commuting ;)

  Reply
Bryce
3 months ago

Thank you so much for the advice! I will add the others to my comparisons. If I did go with the volt urban do you think that would be a comfortable enough ride for 6 miles? I also need a bike where I sit pretty upright due to a back injury.

Thanks again!

  Reply
Court
3 months ago

Hi Bryce, you’re welcome! Yeah, I think you could make it work. I tend to ride fast, but also have scar tissue in my neck and back from some ski injuries and car accidents when I was younger. Any sort of vibration where I’m leaning forward can start to feel bad. If you ride a bit slower, keep the tire pressure down, keep an upright body position, you should be okay… but the larger wheels and seat post suspension do make a difference… even going with knobby tires helps to reduce vibration and impact while riding and can make a difference over the long run :)

  Reply
Mike M
2 months ago

Live near grocery stores and a library; recommendations on how to secure your bike?

  Reply
Court
2 months ago

Hi Mike! I use a u-lock in combination with a long cable that goes through both wheels, since my bike has quick release axles. I also sometimes get a saddle-leash cable to wrap through my saddle rail and down to the main cable so people won’t steal it. Here’s a little video guide on locking bikes I made a while back :)

  Reply
Ezra Byer
2 months ago

Hi Court, two questions!

  1. In your opinion, what is the best folding E-bike (Under $2,000) to use for transporting kids on the back? Or are folding E-bikes not the way to go for this?
  2. If you have the money, would you say the extra cost of the Rad Mini is worth it over the Lectric XP? We like the XP but it seemed like the Rad Mini was a little better quality.

Thanks!
Ezra

  Reply
Court
2 months ago

Hi Ezra! If you like the lower frame height and fat tires, I think that one of the two folding ebikes you mentioned could be a great fit… and yes, the RadMini uses higher quality components. I also like that it’s part of a longer running brand with other models that share the same battery pack design. You will definitely pay more, and be required to pay extra for the rack on the RadMini, but if you want to mount a child seat like the Thule Yepp! Nexxt Maxi, the sturdier rack is going to be worthwhile in my opinion. My favorite RadMini is their step-thru model. Keep in mind that the RadMini also has front suspension, that will add comfort for you and your child. You could also consider non-fat folding ebikes (lighter, more efficient, similar low price) but you’ll lose the “go anywhere” tires and the comfort that higher air volume offers. I hope this helps you narrow down the choices. And yes, the Lectric XP is still a great choice, but for me… I’d spend a bit extra given your circumstances (sturdy rack, still within your budget, better resale value due to more recognized brand).

  Reply
Ezra Byer
2 months ago

Thanks Court! Much appreciated :)

Paul
2 months ago

I was just wondering if this would be a good choice for a couple in their early sixties ? My wife and I are looking for some e bikes to use while camping. The Lectric XP looks as if they a quality product and also a good value. Any comments would be greatly appreciated.

  Reply
Court
2 months ago

Hi Paul! This is the most affordable folding fat ebike I’ve covered. It checks a lot of boxes, but lacks a suspension fork and more universal cross-compatible battery like you’d see on the Rad Power Bikes RadMini Step-Thru and RadMini original. There are many others to compare and I’ve got a whole section for folding ebikes to skim through, most are at least $1,500. I hope this helps in your search!

  Reply
Kerry
2 months ago

Perhaps the most useful review site and writeup I’ve ever seen on any product, honestly, fantastic job! I had an ebike back in the early 2000’s to commute 13 miles to work in Phoenix, to save overheating and get exercise and am considering getting back in with a shorter commute and half work at home now. Will also be doing at least half easy trail dirt riding in flagstaff higher elevation, and prefer to stay under $1,500. At 6 2″ 190 lbs with 35 inch inseam I need durability for taller rider, this lectric is pretty intriguing with suspension stem, and I’ll look thru the other bikes mentioned here. If you have further advice, very much appreciate it, thx for the truly outstanding review!

  Reply
Court
1 month ago

Wow, you made my day. Thanks Kerry! I do have the “top rated ebikes” page here on the site, which is good to explore too. Given your taller size, consider the big brands like Trek, Specialized, Giant, CUBE, etc. since they offer a range of frames for each model vs. one-size-fits-all which you see more with Lectric eBikes and other affordable offerings :)

  Reply
Carl S
2 months ago

I purchased this bike on the last day of January 2020. I received it on the 10th of February. 100% assembled; just had to remove the storage protection. The tires came with 5 to 10 PSI of air but I had a portable micro compressor w/automatic cutoff as I figured there wouldn’t be a lot of air in the tubes. Took less than 5 minutes per tire to get them to 25 PSI each. I know, the tires are rated for 30 PSI but I choose to run them a bit light for a better ride since there is no suspension in the forks.

Cons:

  • Key on the bottom of the bike. Until you are used to it, inserting the key, which is a must to enable the battery, is a bit fiddley. But once you get used to it, it’s not that big of a deal.
  • It is kind of a pain getting the cover on the charging port after charging (which isn’t really necessary unless it’s raining or snowing).
  • Handle bars don’t offer much room to mount anything.

Pros:

  • Too many to list and I’m not sure where to even start. I have about 150 miles on mine and am completely happy with my purchase. I would purchase it again in a red hot minute. I use it mainly for a scooter; I don’t pedal a lot but do use the throttle. I’ve never gotten less than 10 miles per charge but still had plenty left, never less than 45 volts. Of course I’ve never gone more than 10 miles so I really can’t address the range at this time.

All in all, a great electric bicycle. And for the price an excellent value. I love this bike Best $900 I’ve ever spent.

  Reply
Court
1 month ago

Fantastic! Thanks for sharing your insights with us, Carl! I hope the Lectric XP continues to work well for you and welcome any future updates ;)

  Reply
CARL S
1 month ago

Just a bit of an update. I did a 10 or so mile ride a week ago and had plenty of battery left when I got back; 5 or so miles out and the same back. Of course I didn’t lay into the throttle. Had I done that I probably would have been close to pedaling as I had 42.8 volts displaying. I also don’t care for the hard grips on long rides. Not really sure how to change them as I don’t see any screws or Allen heads holding them in place (yeah, I’m pretty much brain dead when it comes to mechanical repair/maintenance). Still not sorry I purchased it though. Nothing is or ever will be perfect.

Ben W
1 month ago

Hey Court, I am 6′, 270 lbs (mostly fat, not muscle), and have a 33-inch leg length. I live in Utah, and we get a decent amount of snow where I am at. I have a 4-mile commute one way. I have a hybrid bike, and I don’t feel stable enough on it in rainy or snowy weather, so I am looking at fat tire bikes. Even if I factored in errands, I would likely be doing less than 15 miles a day in total travel, but there is a 30+ mile trail running up the canyon not far from my house that would be fun if I ever got ambitious. I LOVE the reviews y’all give on your website, and I’m hoping for some advice. I am looking at the Lectric XP, the RadRover (either the Radrover 5 or the Radrover Step Through 1), or the M2S All Terrain Scout. Right now the Lectric XP is on sale for $899, and the others are listed at $1499. I’m leaning toward the Lectric XP because of price, but I’d love your advice. Does the square wave motor cause so much noise or problems that it would be worth paying the extra for a sine wave motor? How important would it be to have a 750W vs. the 500W for my weight? I guess that I like the idea of the cheapest one because for close to the same price as the Rad Power bikes or the M2S bike, I could almost buy 2 Lectrics, so I could get one for both me and my teenage daughter (who is 5’9″). What are your thoughts?

  Reply
Court
4 weeks ago

Hey Ben! Sorry for the slow reply here. What a fun idea, getting one for you and your daughter! I appreciate you sharing your height/weight specs and feel like I have an understanding of your intended use. I do feel that Rad Power Bikes is using higher quality parts all around. Their lights, the reflective tire stripes, the sine wave controller, durable but lightweight plastic fenders, even their gears and derailleurs are a step up. That said, you have to pay extra for a rear rack and other accessories (and Lectric XP just includes the rack). Are you leaning towards a folding fat bike like the RadMini models, or just looking at the Lectric XP folding fat bike due to price? I really like that all of the Rad models use the same battery, and that their resale value might be a little higher because of the cross-compatibility of accessories. Even if you had to save a bit longer for two Rad models, your daughter could use your hybrid in the meantime and you could determine which bike she might really want and get the style that best suits here vs. being forced into the same folding fat model. maybe she wants a RadCity for more city type riding, and that one does include a rack. Anyway, I can’t say for sure but they might also offer a discount if you buy two ebikes at once, and it could be worth asking about. You could get the most affordable RadRunner for your daughter and a RadRover Step-Thru 1 for yourself (since the larger wheels will be more comfortable overall, and especially for trail and other off-road use). I could see you taking her extra battery for that long 30 mile ride one day (just toss it into a backpack) and I think the comfort for you (given your height) would be better on a full sized ebike, especially since you do weigh a bit more. Fat tires offer stability and more comfort… and full sized fat tires have more air volume and a lower attack angle to smooth out bumps. I realize that money is always a factor and I think you’ll have fun whichever way you go, the Lectric XP is great. However, if I was in your shoes, I’d be targeting the RadRover Step-Thru 1 for reliability and comfort. Comfort is such a big deal for me because I have back and neck pain from a car accident when I was a kid. I hope this helps, that’s my honest feedback :)

  Reply
Ben W
4 weeks ago

Thanks for the response! So now I am all torn. I’m assuming from what you said that it would be better to get a bike with the larger-than-20-inch tires, so that would rule out the M2S All Terrain Scout? Or would it matter less because the M2S All Terrain Scout has front shocks?

I am now also feeling torn because I read everything on one of the forums on your website about mid-drives vs. hub motors, found here. I don’t really care if I have a throttle (though it would be nice), so I’m leaning towards a mid-drive bike now, but I am really worried about busting a chain or wearing down the gears. How much of a problem is this likely to be? It probably wouldn’t be a big deal to pop a chain because I would likely never be more than 30 miles from home, and my wife could always come and pick me up, and I am thinking about using a reinforced chain like the KMC e10 or something. Would that work?

How hard is it to re-thread a chain through a mid-drive bike? I’m not very mechanically inclined, and I don’t want to have to pay a bike shop an outlandish amount of money to repair a mid-drive. And, how much do I need to worry about wearing down the gears with a mid-drive? If so, can I just replace the gear cassette? And what is the life of an e-bike likely to be anyway, either mid-drive or hub?

The cheapest brand of mid-drive that seems to have any quality (I think?) is the M2S All Terrain FS Max (which has full suspension), which right now is $2000. But for $2000 could I get a better mid-drive bike from another brand? And do I even need full suspension if I’m just commuting a few miles to work on a fat tire bike, or would front suspension be enough, or no suspension? With my weight of 270lbs, how many watts would I need from a mid-drive motor? Is 350W enough? And is 500W enough from a hub-drive motor, or should I really be getting the 750W?

What are your thoughts on hub drive bikes from M2S vs. Rad Power? Thanks for your patience with all of my questions!

Debanjana
3 weeks ago

Hi Court,

I am a petite 5″ and light weight woman living in Boston. I am not a pro biker and hence the idea of getting an “assist” to go longer distance with less effort. Is the saddle height of this bike too high for me? How low can I get the saddle height to be? Will this bike be too heavy for me to move around? My main aim with this bike is to go around biking trails around Boston in the summer.

Do you think this is a right choice for me. Appreciate the help :)

Thanks,
Debanjana

  Reply
Court
2 weeks ago

Hi Debanjana! Thanks for sharing your details so I can try to help. For the money, the Lectric XP is a great option. Yes, it’s very heavy… so I’d recommend removing the battery pack before lifting, or just getting help from a friend. I measured the stand-over height (the height of the top tube just in front of the saddle) at 25.25″ and the minimum saddle height (how low you can get the saddle) at 31.75″. So you might have to jump forward to put your feed down, vs. being able to sit flat on the seat and also have your feet down… but most ebikes are going to be at least 31″ so don’t let this be a huge deterrent. I think the biggest consideration is price. Lectric XP is super affordable, and has lights, fenders, and rack! But, it doesn’t have reflective sidewall stripes and I’m not sure the puncture protection is as good as the RadMini Step-Thru, which is also very approachable and has an extremely low standover and minimum saddle height of 16″ and 29″ respectively (all specs listed here with the full review). You would spend more for the Rad, but the brand might hold it’s value better since the company has been around longer. It’s all about your unique situation and budget! I hope this helps, and I hope you enjoy whichever ebike you choose :D

  Reply
Debanjana
2 weeks ago

Thank you so much Court for your advice! Based on your advice, I explored RadCity ST 3. It was perfect for my height. It also has a walk mode (based on your review) so I don’t have to lug it around. I don’t need a foldable bike. I placed an order for RadCity ST3 for me and RadCity 4 for my husband. Thank you so much for all your reviews. We have watched just waaay too many of your reviews on YouTube. Thank you for your response.

mike wolfe
3 days ago

Hi. I just became aware of your site. Seems you really care about us. I’am 5’6″ 150 lbs going crazy after logging in on various ebike sites. Want distance, power, speed, durability, low maintenance, affordable. Is there such an ebike? Am I asking too much?

  Reply
Court
2 days ago

Hi Mike! I do my best here… Based on your list of requirements, I’d recommend checking out Ride1Up because all of their models are pretty affordable, offer high speeds (Class 3), will provide more range than the Lectric XP (since it has fat tires), and power and durability should be on par with most other affordable products. Ride1Up was a new brand for me this past year, but they seem to do a great job. I’ve only covered two of their models, and both seem to have been improved a bit since then. I hope this helps, and I welcome further comments if you feel that a fat bike is best, or if you just don’t see a fit with Ride1Up for some reason. Do check out my long list of best electric bikes as well.

  Reply

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.