e-Joe Epik SE Review

2017 E Joe Epik Se Electric Bike Review
2017 E Joe Epik Se
2017 E Joe Epik Se Rear Rack With Spanninga Lineo Backlight
2017 E Joe Epik Se Removable 48 Volt Ebike Battery
2017 E Joe Epik Se Grip Shifter Relaxed Handlebar Telescoping Stem
2017 E Joe Epik Se Side Lcd Display Soft Trigger Throttle
2017 E Joe Epik Se Tempo Parafit Spring Suspension Color Matched
2017 E Joe Epik Se Independent Spanninga Led Headlight
2017 E Joe Epik Se 500 Watt Internally Geared Motorj 7 Speed Drivetrain
2017 E Joe Epik Se Kickstand Magnetic Folding Clip
2017 E Joe Epik Se Volded Ebike Side View
2017 E Joe Epik Se Folded Battery Compartment
2017 E Joe Epik Se On Off Switch Usb Port Charging Port
2017 E Joe Epik Se 2 Amp Electric Bike Charger
2017 E Joe Epik Se Electric Bike Review
2017 E Joe Epik Se
2017 E Joe Epik Se Rear Rack With Spanninga Lineo Backlight
2017 E Joe Epik Se Removable 48 Volt Ebike Battery
2017 E Joe Epik Se Grip Shifter Relaxed Handlebar Telescoping Stem
2017 E Joe Epik Se Side Lcd Display Soft Trigger Throttle
2017 E Joe Epik Se Tempo Parafit Spring Suspension Color Matched
2017 E Joe Epik Se Independent Spanninga Led Headlight
2017 E Joe Epik Se 500 Watt Internally Geared Motorj 7 Speed Drivetrain
2017 E Joe Epik Se Kickstand Magnetic Folding Clip
2017 E Joe Epik Se Volded Ebike Side View
2017 E Joe Epik Se Folded Battery Compartment
2017 E Joe Epik Se On Off Switch Usb Port Charging Port
2017 E Joe Epik Se 2 Amp Electric Bike Charger

Summary

  • A comfortable, highly adjustable, value-priced folding electric bike that's a third generation build with lots of little improvements and refinements like a more durable battery connection point
  • Color-matched suspension fork and swept-back handlebar with adjustable height improves comfort, integrated plastic fenders, a built in rack, and front and rear independent lights improve utility and safety
  • Removable battery pack with on/off switch and integrated USB charging port for portable electronics, magnetic clasp system keeps it folded but might not be super solid, four fun color options
  • Powerful 500 watt motor and 48 volt battery combination with more capacity than ever before and smooth power delivery, updated compact display with comfortable trigger throttle built-in, larger chainring for natural pedaling

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

e-Joe

Model:

Epik SE

Price:

$1,599 USD

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Urban, Commuting, Travel

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

20172018

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

51.5 lbs (23.35 kg)

Battery Weight:

5.1 lbs (2.31 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

14.5 in (36.83 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

Unfolded Dimensions: 14.5" Seat Tube, 26" Reach, 23" Stand Over Height, 25.5" Width, 65.5" Length, Folded Dimensions: 39.5" Length, 22.5" Width, 27" Height

Frame Types:

Mid-Step, Folding

Frame Colors:

Metallic Orange, Bright Blue, Matte Black, White

Frame Fork Details:

Tempo Parafit Spring Suspension, No Adjustments, 70 mm Travel, 100 mm Hub Length, 9 mm Skewer with Quick Release

Frame Rear Details:

142 mm Hub Length, 11 mm Threaded Axle with Nuts

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses

Gearing Details:

7 Speed 1x7 Shimano Tourney Derailleur, Shimano MF-TZ21 Cassette 13-28T

Shifter Details:

Shimano Revo Grip Twist on Right Bar

Cranks:

Prowheel, Aluminum Alloy, 170 mm Length, 52T Chainring with Plastic Guide

Pedals:

VP Folding Plastic Platform

Headset:

Threadless Internal Cups

Stem:

Alloy, Telescoping Height 14" to 17.5", Quick Release Fold

Handlebar:

Alloy Low Rise, Swept-Back, 650 mm Length

Brake Details:

Tektro Aries Mechanical Disc with 180 mm Rotors, Generic Levers with Rubberized Edge, Integrated Bell, and Motor Inhibitor

Grips:

Rubber, Semi Ergonomic, Black

Saddle:

Selle Royal

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

510 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

30.2 mm

Rims:

Aluminum Alloy, Double Wall, 36 Hole

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 13 Gauge, Black with Adjustable Nipples

Tire Brand:

Kenda Kwest, 20" x 1.75" (47-406)

Wheel Sizes:

20 in (50.8cm)

Tire Details:

40 to 65 PSI, 2.8 to 4.5 BAR, Nylon

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Plastic Fenders with Mud Flaps, Elevated Aluminum Alloy Rear Rack with Spring Latch (25 kg / 55 lb Max Weight), Independent Spanninga Daryo LED Headlight, Independent Spanninga Lineo LED Backlight, Adjustable Length Mid-Mount Kickstand, Magnetic Clasp for Secure Fold, Metal Bottom Bracket Protection Bar

Other:

Locking Removable Internally Downtube-Mounted Battery Pack, Maximum Load 300 lbs, Model: Sport Edition (SE), Quick Release on Seat Tube and Front Wheel, 1.5 lb 2 Amp Charger

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Yonge

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

10 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

480 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

6 hours

Estimated Min Range:

25 miles (40 km)

Estimated Max Range:

50 miles (80 km)

Display Type:

Fixed, Backlit, Greyscale LCD, (Hold - for Two Seconds for Backlighting, Hold - for Three Seconds to Switch Trip to Odomete, Hold + and - for Two Seconds to Switch Unitsr)

Readouts:

Battery Level (5 Bars), Speed, Assist Level (0-5), Trip, Odometer

Display Accessories:

USB Charging Port on Battery Pack

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist, Trigger Throttle

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

I have reviewed the e-Joe Epik SE a couple of times before, I believe the one that I looked at in this review is a third or forth generation. In the early days, there weren’t as many folding electric bikes to choose from and this one struck me as a great value because it had fenders, a rear rack, and lights. That is still the case, it even has a suspension fork to help smooth out the ride and the cadence sensor, chainring size, and different levels of assist have really been dialed in. In the years since those first reviews I conducted, e-Joe has refined the product with a nicer LCD display panel and gentle throttle design, a neat integrated motor inhibitor to kill power whenever you pull the brakes, battery connector that is less vulnerable when folding, and new color choices that are both professional (black or white) but also include bright fun options like the metallic sparkly orange shown here or a bright blue. In all this time and with all of these improvements and upgrades, they have still maintained a reasonable $1,600 price point and continue to offer a year long warranty. I have heard from some visitors, in the comments, that they felt that the fenders on earlier versions rattled, or that some of the components were cheap… and that is certainly the case with the drivetrain here. You get a seven speed Shimano Tourney which is the entry level hardware in the Shimano line. However, in my experience, what you get is pretty reasonable and still a step up from the cheapest online offerings. This is an electric bike that is great for zipping around town, either in pedal assist or throttle mode, and I love that it is sold through shops so you can take a test ride and make sure it fits because the frame is highly adjustable. Between the telescoping stem, long adjustable seat post, and the mid-step frame, I find it to be approachable and comfortable. Also, the shop will deal with anything that might have been bent or messed up in shipping and they can act as a go-between for you when dealing with the company. Anyway, I love how hidden and protected the battery pack is and that the geared motor has been upgraded to something a little stronger now. You get a mechanical advantage from the smaller wheel diameter, and that makes the motor more efficient. There are now cheaper electric bikes being sold on Amazon and even Walmart, but you usually have to do some assembly and the warranty may be very limited. e-Joe offers a one year comprehensive warranty and should be able to provide parts and battery replacements to keep this thing going.

A few hardware highlights worth pointing out include the magnetic clasp mechanism that keeps the bike in a folded position. I don’t have a lot of experience traveling with this particular electric bike, but many others have no magnets or rubber bands so I usually recommend purchasing an adjustable bungee cable like these. Apparently, the magnets can rattle a bit more and maybe come loose, so the bungees are a great backup to reduce noise and scratching. I like the aluminum bar below the chainring that the bike rests on when folded (and that also protects the chainring). And, I also like the new swept-back handlebar. This provides a more comfortable upright body position for me and handles in a way that feels steady vs. a short twitchy bar. The only drawback is that the bike is wider when unfolded (in case you have to fit through a tight entrance or between cars) and even in the folded position it adds to the dimension of the bike so it’s just not as compact. Keep in mind, this electric bike may look small, but it still weighs about 51.5 lbs. That’s because the motor and battery add to the weight and the frame has to be reinforced to handle the folding design and increased forces of use under power. Sure, it can fit into a closet more easily, maybe the trunk of a car or RV, perhaps a boat or even private plane. For me, the added comfort of the suspension and many ways to use the bike, not even having to pedal, make it enjoyable compared to some cheaper offerings. And I especially like being able to test ride it and buy in person knowing that it was built by a trained mechanic who I can go back to for help. Also, I like that the lights they chose are from a well known company, Spanninga, and are probably more reliable, larger, and more reflective than cheaper alternatives. Finally, I love the 180 mm mechanical disc brakes in use here! Stopping is important, and while hydraulic brakes with adjustable levers would be even better… these provide great power and should stay cleaner than rim brakes and work better in wet riding conditions.

I want to elaborate on a discussion we had in the video review above. Sam made an interesting point about being able to lower the seat a lot, for petite riders who want to put their feet on the ground while seated, but the longer 170 mm crank arms that are directly below the seat tube end up putting their feet up high near where they are sitting (and their keens in their chest) vs. 165 or shorter crank arms or a feet-forward position where the bottom bracket is mounted forward, the trade-off is that for larger riders the 170 mm cranks will feel more natural and this bike is trying to be compact so moving the pedals forward would increase the frame weight and completely change the design, it’s just a side point about being able to test ride and fit yourself to an ebike like this and maybe raising that saddle even if you are a bit shorter. Big thanks to e-Joe for partnering with me on this review and to Sam at the Electric Bicycle Center in Fullerton California for inviting me to his shop and going on camera to film this review and provide broader feedback.

I wanted to share a couple of quick tips about the display. It only has two buttons which makes it pretty easy to use (press the + button to power it on). I like that the throttle overrides assist 1-5 and that it is disabled in level zero for safety. Because the trigger throttle is so large and so easy to press, just be careful that you have either clicked the – button to go to level zero or completely turned off the bike before mounting/dismounting and folding. You can hold the minus key to switch from an odometer to a trip meter and it might also turn on backlighting. The display isn’t quite as large and fancy as some of the full sized bikes, but it does have a disconnect point for easy repair/replacement and is going to stay out of the way more when the bike is folded. It’s just a monochrome design and the readouts could be small for some people with vision issues, but I’d call it above average for folding products. I love that the stem can be raised and lowered but on the point of cables, just don’t raise it so high that the cables get pulled apart or stretched when turning. I mention this in the video around 23:54 timestamp.

Pros:

  • The 500 watt internally geared hub motor offers increased power and torque compared to older e-Joe Epic electric bike models, it should climb better and gets a mechanical advantage from the smaller wheel size here, 20″ diameter
  • e-Joe has improved the drivetrain by using a larger 52 tooth chainring that offsets the smaller wheels, which spin faster, in short, it pedals more naturally at higher speeds up to the supported 20 mph
  • The display panel is compact but simple to use and easy to read, I like the new trigger throttle because it’s so easy to press and is built into the display so the cockpit isn’t as cluttered, this seems like a throttle that would be easy to use even if you have short fingers or sensitive arthritis pain types of situations
  • The bike comes with all of the accessories you really need, and the work pretty well, from the fenders to the rack and even the lights, it’s ready to go and “feature complete” without you having to install anything extra
  • It’s neat to see full sized, almost overkill, 180 mm disc brakes on a folding electric bike, these will help you stop at higher speeds and with added weight
  • I think it’s neat that the battery pack has a USB type A charging port built in because you could run some accessories while riding or use it for backup power with the batter off the bike… the on/off switch on the battery keeps this from phantom power draw which makes sense, if you do try to plug something into the battery while it’s on the bike, I recommend considering a right angle USB adapter like this to keep the cord out of your way when pedaling
  • This is the first time I have seen an inline motor inhibitor system, so when you pull the brakes it sends a signal to stop power for safety and faster response, the inline system is much less cluttered than the extra wires of traditional inhibitors I have seen and probably also less prone to damage and confusion that people have had with the older style at times
  • I appreciate the plastic chain guide that keeps the chain on track (when riding or when folding), it’s not as tough as an alloy guide but probably less expensive and definitely lighter weight
  • e-Joe has adopted the new sealed cadence sensor design which is much smaller and probably more durable than the older ones (which were plastic discs with visible magnets), this seems less wasteful in terms of materials used and it worked great during my test rides, once the sensor is activated by your pedaling, you don’t have to push hard for it to keep going because it’s based only on motion, it can however feel more abrupt than a torque sensor
  • A really big upgrade for the 2017/2018 model seems to be that the battery pack makes an electrical connection at the end of the tube vs. the part that folds open, this keeps the pins more protected from getting bent
  • Even though most folding electric bikes do not route the cables internally like their full sized companions, this one does a great job of retaining those cables with metal clasps and a plastic channel below the main tube, they really stay out of the way
  • I’m not always a huge fan of the plastic folding pedals because they can flex more and just seem cheap sometimes… and they can also be difficult to fold, but these ones had a nice folding mechanism where you pull with your fingers on a little release lever inside the pedal and they were just easy to work with
  • Power deliver feels smooth and the lower levels of assist aren’t so overwhelming even though the motor is very capable if you press the throttle or arrow up to higher levels of assist
  • I love the integrated bell on the left brake lever, I see this bell design frequently with the Tektro levers but it’s just a nice highlight, very friendly but also loud to signal to other riders or pedestrians
  • I like the grip shifter mechanism because it has a window to easily show which gear you are in and can be used intuitively vs. the alternative cheap SIS Index thumb shifter that Shimano offers, this just looks clean and works well
  • Both folding points (on the stem and the middle of the frame) have a plastic locking mechanism for safety, so you don’t have to worry so much about it when riding

Cons:

  • Priced at $1,599 this is no longer one of the most affordable folding e-bikes around, but that’s due in part to the high powered motor and battery upgrade to 48 volts
  • Even though this thing looks compact, it still weighs over 51 lbs, most folding electric bikes are heavier than they look so at least the battery is removable for ~5 lb weight savings if you want and the front wheel has quick release so that could reduce another couple of pounds
  • Minor gripe here but the charger isn’t especially compact, lightweight, or fast, I would call it very average… and now with the larger battery capacity it can take longer to completely charge the bike if it is completely used
  • As much as I like the Spanninga lights, I do wish they were integrated and could take power from that main rechargeable battery pack because as it stands, you have to turn them on independently which takes time and they could be left on accidentally vs. all being on the same system
  • The suspension fork doesn’t have lockout so it could bob up and down as you pedal and dive forward if you stop hard, I’d rather have this than a rigid fork, it’s just not all that fancy or versatile and adjustable… at least they color matched it to the frame though!
  • As much as I love having a kickstand, it can be a little annoying at times because it’s mounted at the bottom bracket and will get in the way of the left crank arm if you back the bike up without stowing it first, at least it’s adjustable length
  • As cool as it is to have the throttle and display all combined (for reduced clutter on the handlebar) there is the drawback of having to replace the entire thing if say, just the throttle gets damaged, it sounds like the replacement cost is ~$65
  • As with most internally geared hub motors, you can hear this thing a bit as you accelerate in the higher assist levels or use the trigger throttle at full power

Resources:

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A-Dog
1 week ago

Court-

What a great site and another great review. You have really helped me (and countless others) navigate the world of electric bikes. This 2018 version of the e-Joe Epik SE is checking a lot of boxes on my wish list. I read another review of this bike and there was a complaint about how awkward and heavy it felt while towing it by hand on its two wheels when folded. But I noticed on your video at time stamp 4:54 that the bottom of the seat post is very close to the ground while the bike is resting on the orange support handle below the pedals. Assuming that the post is hollow, it would seem to be easy enough to find a small castoring wheel with the right sized stem to fit inside the seat post. That would allow the bike to simply be pushed with zero lifting force required. The saddle could easily steer this “tricycle” arrangement.

Is there anyway to move the bike stand aft and out of the way of the pedals? Keep up the great work and the reminders to “ride safe!”
A-Dog

Reply
Court Rye
1 week ago

Hmm, that’s a really creative idea! I have seen some folding ebike cases with caster wheels on the bottom that roll like big pieces of luggage like this and there are some kick scooters like the Glion with an extendable handle and wheel on the back. I think there is even a folding ebike that already does have a wheel on the bottom just like you’re describing, it’s from eProdigy and called the Fairweather. With a little bit of handywork, I think you might be able to solve the challenge of porting the e-Joe Epik SE around, I’d invite you to post pictures and links to parts in the e-Joe forums here if you do get something like that setup because I’d love to see it :D

Reply

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Gogogordy
3 weeks ago

Those mag wheels are indeed amazing. I got a great deal on the Epik SE 500 watt 2017 model, so I ordered one of those for $1,300. And I actually liked the curved handlebars that the new Epik SE has more than I realized. The eBike that I rented from Pedegogo has those curved handlebars and it makes cruising ever more comfortable.
Im certain you can have a great time on any of them. Congrats!

Danimal
3 weeks ago

Those mag wheels are indeed amazing. I got a great deal on the Epik SE 500 watt 2017 model, so I ordered one of those for $1,300. And I actually liked the curved handlebars that the new Epik SE has more than I realized. The eBike that I rented from Pedegogo has those curved handlebars and it makes cruising ever more comfortable.

Danimal
3 weeks ago

That's so wonderful! I was debating between the the Urban, e-Joe Epik SE 2017 500 watt 48v, and the Magnum Premium. As much as I love the mag wheels, I'm thinking of getting those LED lights on the wheels and they usually only fit normal spokes. And I got a decent deal on the Epik SE for ~$1,300 free shipping and I thought that was close enough to choose it over the Urban @ $1,129 for US shipping. And way cheaper than the $1,899 that the Magnum Premium was going for. I was hoping Magnum was going to update the Premium at Interbike this year (since they released it at Interbike 2016 with no updates since then) and was very disappointed that they did not update anything on the Premium.

sucka free
3 weeks ago

Hi all

I just received my Dillenger Opia today (see below link for the US version). I was in the market for a folding electric bike and this fit the bill, literally and figuratively. The price was right and figured I'd give it a whirl after entering the ebike foray via the Juiced CrossCurrent Air (500w version). I've decided the CrossCurrent Air was way too heavy to lug around (ie carry, put on a car rack, navigate in a tight bike parking garage) so I'd give this Opia a whirl.

To give context, I test rode an E-Joe epik and Motiv Stash (both 350w) and a velomini plus. I really liked the stash but couldn't justify the price thus I found the Opia.

https://dillengerelectricbikes.com/electric-bikes/folding-electric-bikes/opia-by-dillenger.html

At any rate, I received the Opia this afternoon and opened the box and it was packed protectively. Just enough styrofoam cushioning and wrap around the frame. No instructions were included but it was pretty straightforward to assemble and it took me about 15 minutes to put the skewer on the front wheel, adjust the front brake, install pedals, etc. Oh, about the brakes. They're reversed; left lever controls the rear and the right lever controls the front. I will be switching that out as all my other bikes are the other way around.

I took it for a ride around the block and although it's not as powerful as the CrossCurrent, it has plenty of pep for a 250w motor. It handles pretty well for having 20" wheels and a lower overall (close to the ground) design. It shifts well but will probably upgrade the derailleur in the near future.

There are some changes that I noticed from the bike on the website. First, if you look at the frame in the pics, it doesn't have braze-one for a rear rack or for rear disc brakes. The bike I received has the rear rack braze-ons and disc brake tabs. Oddly the fork does not have disc tabs so if I go that route in the future I'll have to replace the fork. Second, the LED display is different from the website as it is an updated version. (I've read the updated version comes with a rear rack, fenders and updated LED so it's nice that I can upgrade and still be under $1000 for a nice commuter).

At any rate, currently I'm pleased with my purchase as it fulfills most of what I want in a folding ebike. I was just surprised (pleasantly) at what I got versus what I expected.

I'm going to commute on it tomorrow and will give a review on it.

1/6
Gogogordy
3 weeks ago

Those are wonderful photos!!

Also a question: Did you test drive any new 500 watt e-Joe Epik SE's when you were taking a look at bikes, Gogogordy?
Yes, I did. Same day in fact. It was a fine bike, but the cast wheels and larger battery capacity of the Magnum were attractive features the e-Joe doesnt have, and I'm not crazy about the more proprietary in-frame battery of the e-Joe (although that might be an unfounded worry....I've never let that stop me from worrying before!)

Also I find the styling and color scheme of the high-step premium more "masculine"! I know...it's hard to look macho on a 20" folder but the matte black and mag wheels help!

Danimal
3 weeks ago

Those are wonderful photos!!

Also a question: Did you test drive any new 500 watt e-Joe Epik SE's when you were taking a look at bikes, Gogogordy?

Danimal
3 weeks ago

I looked high and low for updated info on the 2017 eJoe Epik SE. eJoe's site is near-useless (what gives with that?), so I want somewhere to document what I've heard and experienced, and for updated discussion as needed.

I got the bike for commuting up to 5 miles each way and everyday errands. I'm 6'2" and 175lbs (fit), and no other folding eBikes appeared sufficient for my height, other than the Pedego Latch (which I was told is massively over-priced and has parts-supply issues) and the new (and dizzyingly expensive) $3400 Tern Vektron (coming out next year). The Tern is also heavier by ten lbs and harder to work on, with a mid-drive motor; I can't imagine having a folding eBike that weighs more than the eJoe's ~45lbs.

First, the bike seems quite good. 2017 changes: more powerful battery (12A) and a charging port *on the side of the bike* instead of the bottom. I'm happy with it and recommend it so far. Currently, I'd recommend this bike to someone who is willing to spend the $$ on upkeep of a bike and upgrading a couple key components, especially if they'll be using this bike as more than just a "last mile" method of transport.

Bike arrived from an online retailer through Amazon; i bought through them to get an extra 3% back on the purchase, thinking this would be a smart fiscal move. NOTE: It wasn't. I should have ordered the bike through a bike shop and have them put it together; to the untrained eye the bike was fine, but when I took it to a shop they pointed out some important issues and ended up charging me a fair amount of money to tweak and tune it. Takeaway: although an eBike may seem expensive, don't cut corners. If you get an eJoe, have it assembled at a bike shop. They may also throw in a better rack, better tires, and maybe other goodies.

I've had the bike about 2 weeks. I like the seat/handlebar adjustability for my height and the power of the 12A battery. I immediately noticed that my pedaling was overpowered by the pedal assist. I'd read here that one could replace the freewheel; I recommend this and so did the eBike shop I went to. Hey eJoe: Why not do this for all your bikes?

Suggestions by the bike shop: They said they sell a fair number of eJoes, but seemed like purists so take the following with a grain of salt.
First, they made great suggestions about taking care of the bike, a LOT of suggestions about checking your bike and cables once a week, and other maintenance. They had a handout which eJoe might do well to include in their user manual!

1) They suggested updating the freewheel, which they do as a matter of course when they get a new Epik into their shop. Will update with what type exactly.

2) Holy heavens, make sure that the fork is tightened down appropriately! They took a look at it and said that it was looser than it should be and could be dangerous. It did feel slightly loose.

3) The bike shop suggested replacing all the bolts on the bike asap with USA-made bolts. Their take was that the parts are made in China (battery is made in San Diego, though, and is quality) and higher-quality bolts will be a good step toward reliability.
A hole for the rack mount in the back of mine was mis-drilled. I don't feel like shipping the bike back to eJoe, so I drilled it smooth.

4) Use the plastic derailleur til it breaks, it's pretty cheaply made. Replace it with a higher-quality one, and consider buying one and having it ready to install.

5) Replace the disc brakes with either higher-quality pads or rim hydraulic brakes. The Epik's stock disc brakes may wear down very quickly. They recommended hydraulic rim brakes, which can be had for a $100-200.
Maintenance: check and adjust your brakes regularly, since eBikes often wear down brakes faster than regular bikes.
Buy: a long Hex Key for tightening brake pads down as they wear.

Helmet: After reading around, it sounded like getting a visor (not just glasses/goggles) for riding made sense. I got a Bell Annex that already has a visor. Plus, it fits people who have glasses.

Tires: I've read that Schwalbe Marathons would be good, and after seeing what they look like I'd probably agree. I hear Kenda Small Block 8s work well too, but are more like mountain bike tires so will net you less distance from 1 battery charge.

Rack: Spent WAY too much time researching this. In short: an Axiom adjustable Journey rack (not the regular one) at its highest setting should work fine if you want panniers AND are willing to attach the rack by replacing the quick-release collar on your seat with one having rack mounts. I'm currently looking for a quick-release collar that will also accommodate a rack mount; I'm sure they must exist. I read somewhere that panniers on a folding bike is a problem looking for a solution (to use a trunk instead) but I'd like to use both. I'll post which panniers I get that avoid heel-strike.

Stock Lights: A cycling friend commented they look really good and are bright. If you're switching out the rear rack, be prepared to find a different way to mount the rear tail light, especially on the axiom Journey. I haven't solved this one yet, but will update when I do.

Overall: I'm sure there are errors/oversights here, as I'm new to cycling, but I wanted to at least get my experience out there. Talking to local bike shops I just don't understand... they say that people aren't buying eBikes very much here and don't even know what a folder is. I live in a high-crime city that's hilly. Crime: get a folder so you can take it indoors. Hilly? get an eBike. It seems like a perfect solution, so this is my attempt to help anyone else looking to make the switch and save them the countless hours I spent making calls and searching google for eBike info.

I'm curious why eJoe doesn't have regular updates/news on their website. I had to be told by a bike shop about the 2017 model upgrades, which seems stupid. eJoe, wanna sell more bikes? Update your online shop and info on your own products!

Hey there, Dripdry!

I'm curious; how are you liking the Epic SE now that's it's almost been a year out?

Danimal
4 weeks ago

I am a new owner of one. And so is my wife (yes, we have a pair of them) what type of input are you looking for?
I'm debating (a ton) over the Premium vs the Epik SE and maybe even the VoltBike Urban. Court obvious has done a wonderful job reviewing all of them, but sometimes full appreciation or a quirk doesn't arise until after you've lived with it long enough. I'd just like to hear your thoughts on being a new owner of a Premium. :)

DenkiRider
1 month ago

Thanks for the pic SuperGoop. The frame looks nice, it's similar to that of the E-Joe Epik SE. I like how it has the added bar on the bottom of the frame which will help to stand it up while in the folded position. Does anybody know if it includes a magnet to help secure it together while folded? I just looked at Voltbikes website and they did include one upgrade regarding the battery. The battery will now be a 36volt 11.6 ah using LG 1860 cells.

Kathy Smith
2 months ago

https://electricbikereview.com/e-joe/epik-se/

Current model:

E-joe Epic SE 2017

Specifications
Motor: 350W Rated with 550W Peak Rear Brushless geared hub motor
Battery: 36V 13Ah LG 18650 cells Lithium Ion
Range: up to 55 miles (depending on terrains and rider’s weight)
Recharging Time: about 4 hours (at low battery)
LED Display: On/OFF Power, Battery Level, Pedal Assist Level, Throttle/PAS Mode Switch
Electric Assist Modes: 3 Level Pedal Assist, Thumb Throttle Control
Frame: 6061 Aluminum Alloy Frame Foldable Design
Tires: 20” x 1.75” Kenda Puncture-Resistant Street Tire
Seat: Selle Royal Hertz Trekking Saddle
Brakes: Front/Rear: Zoom 160 mm Disc Brake
Transmission: 7-speed Shimano Tourney TX-55
Accessories: Front/Rear Fenders, Rear Rack, Magnet Clip, Folding Bag (optional), Front/Rear Lights
Gross Weight: 62LBS
Net Weight: 42LBS
Box dimension: 35 x 18 x 27 inches
Load Capacity: 300LBS

Colors: Frosty White, Black Matte, BubbleGum Pink and Sky Blue

Dimensions when Folded: 35 x 24 x 17 inches

MSRP $1599

Thank you but I need something under 4olbs

JayVee
2 months ago

https://electricbikereview.com/e-joe/epik-se/

Current model:

E-joe Epic SE 2017

Specifications
Motor: 350W Rated with 550W Peak Rear Brushless geared hub motor
Battery: 36V 13Ah LG 18650 cells Lithium Ion
Range: up to 55 miles (depending on terrains and rider’s weight)
Recharging Time: about 4 hours (at low battery)
LED Display: On/OFF Power, Battery Level, Pedal Assist Level, Throttle/PAS Mode Switch
Electric Assist Modes: 3 Level Pedal Assist, Thumb Throttle Control
Frame: 6061 Aluminum Alloy Frame Foldable Design
Tires: 20” x 1.75” Kenda Puncture-Resistant Street Tire
Seat: Selle Royal Hertz Trekking Saddle
Brakes: Front/Rear: Zoom 160 mm Disc Brake
Transmission: 7-speed Shimano Tourney TX-55
Accessories: Front/Rear Fenders, Rear Rack, Magnet Clip, Folding Bag (optional), Front/Rear Lights
Gross Weight: 62LBS
Net Weight: 42LBS
Box dimension: 35 x 18 x 27 inches
Load Capacity: 300LBS

Colors: Frosty White, Black Matte, BubbleGum Pink and Sky Blue

Dimensions when Folded: 35 x 24 x 17 inches

MSRP $1599

Danimal
2 months ago

SuperGoop, thank you so much for those beautiful pictures and honest review points. Very much appreciated from someone who's still trying to choose a folding e-bike. I'm between this, the Magnum Premium, and the E-Joe Epik SE 2018. I'm leaning towards the Premium, but I have a feeling Interbike is gonna change things up.

sucka free
2 months ago

Hey there

Thanks for posting the info. I was debating the e-Joe epik or the Motiv Stash and now this is in the mix!

I'd be using whatever bike I end up getting to commute 2 miles each way, most flat but with a 200 yard steepish hill at the beginning (downhill) and end (uphill). Also I'd be folding it daily as I'd take it up to the office. Any thoughts? Also, is the weight manageable when toting it around? In other words, is it klunky or easy to carry it around?

Thanks in advance.

86 and still kicking
3 months ago

I live in a medium-sized community (~200K people) but we seem to have relatively few options in terms of ebikes in the shops, mostly limited to higher-end, big brand name bikes (Trek; Giant; Specialized, Electra; Haibike). I would like to get a decent-quality bike for commuting (10 miles, partly uphill in each direction) and fun on local trails, for under $2000. The cheapest bikes with the features I want cost $2700+ locally.

If you knew nothing about bike repair/had always relied on bike shops to maintain and fix your bikes, would you order a bike online, or stick to whatever overpriced options were in your area? And if you say "stick to local shops," are there mainstream e-bikes that have a relatively good price point for their quality and reliability?

Wish List:
Torque-sensing rather than cadence-sensing
Front suspension and/or seat suspension for comfort over potholes/cracks/curbs
Range: at least 25 miles in high-assist mode
Power: 350W motor for hills
Battery that can be charged both on or off the bike
Frame fit for my body (I'm 5'2" and 125 pounds); hybrid riding posture
Easy riding when the bike is not using electrical assistance (not sure what this translates into: gearing? bike weight?)

Short list of bikes, based on above (NONE of which are sold in my area): E-Glide ST; e-Joe Epik SE; Juiced Bikes Cross Current; Surface 604 Rook. Other ideas welcome, based on the above.
The e-city from Smart Motion is a very good fit for you. Message me and I will tell you more about it and how to get it.

Andrea Bozoki
3 months ago

I live in a medium-sized community (~200K people) but we seem to have relatively few options in terms of ebikes in the shops, mostly limited to higher-end, big brand name bikes (Trek; Giant; Specialized, Electra; Haibike). I would like to get a decent-quality bike for commuting (10 miles, partly uphill in each direction) and fun on local trails, for under $2000. The cheapest bikes with the features I want cost $2700+ locally.

If you knew nothing about bike repair/had always relied on bike shops to maintain and fix your bikes, would you order a bike online, or stick to whatever overpriced options were in your area? And if you say "stick to local shops," are there mainstream e-bikes that have a relatively good price point for their quality and reliability?

Wish List:
Torque-sensing rather than cadence-sensing
Front suspension and/or seat suspension for comfort over potholes/cracks/curbs
Range: at least 25 miles in high-assist mode
Power: 350W motor for hills
Battery that can be charged both on or off the bike
Frame fit for my body (I'm 5'2" and 125 pounds); hybrid riding posture
Easy riding when the bike is not using electrical assistance (not sure what this translates into: gearing? bike weight?)

Short list of bikes, based on above (NONE of which are sold in my area): E-Glide ST; e-Joe Epik SE; Juiced Bikes Cross Current; Surface 604 Rook. Other ideas welcome, based on the above.

Guitar487
3 months ago

my epik is virtually silent, but I've noticed it becomes noisy at 19-20 mph.
Hard to describe but almost a contact or rubbing noise? Any ideas?

keyboardmashing
4 months ago

I think I've narrowed it down to these three. I live in Buffalo, NY - very flat, and very snowy. Most rides would be 10+ miles.

Must have: PAS and Throttle (thumb, not twist), 350W+, folding, $1,600USD or less.

Voltbike Urban: The price is great ($1100), Motor and Battery weaker than the other two. Easier to transport. No-name cells.
Voltbike Mariner: 6lb heavier than the Urban, Motor and Battery are stronger too but the fat tires probably compensate for this. Name-brand battery cells. Claims longer range than the urban. Better derailer than the other two. No suspension but the fat tires probably help. I'd really enjoy off-road capabilities but 90% of my riding will be on-road.
E-Joe EDPIK: More expensive, softer suspension, lighter than the other two, fun colors, longer battery range.

I'm open to other suggestions, corrections, or thoughts on the above three. Thanks!

Dewey
5 months ago

No experience with either but for 2017 the epik-se comes with a 13ah battery vs the 9ah battery of the Stash. You'll go at least 1/3 further distance on one charge on the e-Joe. It also comes with fenders, lights, and a rear rack, which cost $200 extra on the Stash. That being said one commenter on Court's review of the e-Joe complained about difficulty removing and re-installing the rear wheel due to keyed washers that need to go in a certain direction for the wheel to fit in the frame, and the inner tubes needing extra long stems to clear an extra plastic piece on the wheel and the difficulty finding 20" tubes with long stems, and two commenters complained about losing their rear light. The local dealer test ride/support would sway it for me towards the Stash.

Edie
5 months ago

Hi

I've returned to finding a bike, and many thanks for all the previous replies to my last thread. I can test drive a Motiv Stash locally;
https://electricbikereview.com/motiv/stash/

and see that the Ejoe Epik-SE is a similar price, but not available locally.
https://electricbikereview.com/e-joe/epik-se/

EBR's reviews of both were complimentary, and they seem a similar weight and layout.
Does anyone have experience of both, or either? I prefer the look of the eJoe (not just a black option) but am cautious of an online purchase without a test drive.

Many thanks for any advice.

Edie

Saucy
6 months ago

Hi all,

I'm sorry if this question has been asked before. I'm thinking about getting a folding ebike such as the Voltbike Urban or the Epik SE. I am just wondering your guys' opinion on what type of lock to get (links to buy would be appreciated!) and the best way to lock these folding bikes since their frames are unique. If it helps, I would be parking in a low-crime area, but I would still like the peace and comfort of a more secure lock. Thank you guys so much!!

akakpaws
6 months ago

This has been a problem since I purchased my EJoe Epik SE bike. Initially it would take several rides before the stem started to loosen up at the folding joint. Lately I can only ride for a few minutes without the stem starting to come loose. Then I have to fold down the handlebars and retighten the adjusting nut which controls the tightness of the joint. This bike is becoming unusable. Any suggestions are appreciated.

Glenn Watson
4 days ago

Man, nice bike. Digging the price point. Overall, well balanced review.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 days ago

Thanks Glenn! I really appreciated Sam's help for this one, he knows what to point out and highlight (even though he's a bit more promotional sometimes) it was great improvement over the older Epik SE

supernova1976
1 week ago

Very in-depth detailed review as usual , Sam was in good mood today 😀, just a quick question if you remember , was the speedo set to km/h? Because it was showing 26 when you mentioned 20? That was quite fast acceleration to it's too speed in 6 to 7 sec 😋

ilikewasabe
1 week ago

Great review and great bike!.. Would opt for a rigid fork and 2.1 tire though :)

Chip Meyer
1 week ago

Hey could you do a review of the new luna cycle apex bike? carbon full suspension fat bike with a mid drive looks amazing but I'm waiting to see what you say about it first.

Honky Tonk
1 week ago

watch your fingers. 12:41

Rotormatic
1 week ago

Fun little e-bike with a good price. The small size and folding capability would complement my other regular sized e-bikes very well.

dmnguyen15
1 week ago

Thank you so much for reviewing this bike!! I just purchased one and am waiting for it to ship by freight. It was a leap of faith since I bought it before this video came out. But your wonderful video just made me even MORE excited!! I would've thought it was going to be a technical Class 3 speed-pedelec like the Magnum Premium since it was 500 watt / 48 volt.

ScottHaleCreative
1 week ago

hey bro, you will love it!!! thats MY butterfinger!

Rich C.
1 week ago

That's a lot of features for the money. Thanks for the review.

DiGiTaLGrAvEDiGGA
1 week ago

Sam so truthful and honest this is why you wait for 3rd 4th gen models, patience is a virtue.

Carpenter Family
1 week ago

Another great review & I'm very impressed with the improvements on this bike.
Sam is it okay to stop by the bike shop & charge my phone ?😎

Johannes Nilsen
1 week ago

I don't think I would like how this bike will ride, the steep head angle, the super short wheelbase, the low saddle height, using so low saddle height will give major knee pain, very quickly.
He uses wrong pedal technique, which can cause a crash or other issues, like loss of controll.

but thats how a 20 inch biek is like.
Yes I have ridden a 20inch folding bike.
this guy talks halftruth, if you are a dwarf or jsut a low person, you jsut need to pget the right frame size, and right saddle size, right crank arm length, not raice the saddle.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 week ago

Yeah, there's this trade-off between comfort, stability, and compact design so it can be folded and stored easily. I feel like some of Sam's comments were confusing, I agree that you want to find something comfortable but with a folder sometimes it's okay to compromise for space savings.

trekkeruss
1 week ago

I'd be concerned about the throttle paddle/display getting damaged when the bike is folded. Even if it is not touching any other part of the bike, it might be in a more vulnerable position. For that reason I think a twist throttle separate from the display would be a better design choice.

ScottHaleCreative
1 week ago

its MY bike, I have not had a problem with that issue. I'll write more of my thoughts after I watch.

Carpenter Family
1 week ago

Great bike & review.
Sam ok to stop by the bike shop and charge my phone ?
Sorry couldn't help myself 😎

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 week ago

That's a good point, I included some folded pictures back at the site and it actually seemed well protected because of the new bend bar. The display and throttle are on the inside of the bar and folded towards the bike so they are out of the way if the bike tipped or banged up against something in your car, rv or whatever. Picks here https://electricbikereview.com/e-joe/epik-se/

snaht1
1 week ago

Wow the owner is all in defensive mode ..couldnt take any criticism about this bike ... I like it will buy it

snaht1
1 week ago

ElectricBikeReview.com it did, remind me of a boxing match Sam won't just give up, he is aggressive sales man. Good, def. buying this one.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 week ago

It's fun to discuss with Sam, he's a sales guy and I'm trying to break the bike down and observe the trade-offs, overall I think it's neat to get his perspective but I hope it also felt balanced at the end :)