Specialized Turbo Vado 6.0 Review

Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Electric Bike Review
Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0
Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Vented Motor Protector Plastic Chainring Cover
Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Custom Mid Frame Battery With Bottle Cage Mount
Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Body Geometry Ergonomic Grips Side Mirror
Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Custom 600 Lumen Aspheric Lens Headlight
Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Suntour Ncx Mcd Suspension Fork 50 Mm
Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Flextender Fender Extender
Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Thru Axle 15 Mm Rebound Adjust
Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Canopy Comp Saddle 30 9 Mm Seat Post
Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Elegant Adjustable Length Kickstand
Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Minimalist Rack With Pannier Blocker
Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Rack Integrated Backlight Lightguide Technology
Womens Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0
Womens Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Plastic Motor Protector
Womens Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Airflow Motor Cover Integrated Horn
Womens Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Energy Bus Battery Charging Port With Cover
Womens Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Adjustable Seat Height Mid Step Frame Easy To Mount
Womens Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Display Mount Angles To Reduce Glare
Womens Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Tft Display Panel Micro Usb Port
Womens Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Ergonomic Ladies Grips
Womens Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Led Headlight
Womens Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Tubular Alloy Fenders With Water Dam
Womens Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Gray Black Color
Womens Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Electrak 2 0 Armadillo Tires
Womens Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Nylon Platform Pedals Sandpaper Grip
Womens Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Racktime Compatible 22 Kg Rear Rack
Womens Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Shimano Deore Xt Shadow Plus 11 Speed
Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Electric Bike Review
Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0
Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Vented Motor Protector Plastic Chainring Cover
Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Custom Mid Frame Battery With Bottle Cage Mount
Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Body Geometry Ergonomic Grips Side Mirror
Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Custom 600 Lumen Aspheric Lens Headlight
Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Suntour Ncx Mcd Suspension Fork 50 Mm
Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Flextender Fender Extender
Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Thru Axle 15 Mm Rebound Adjust
Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Canopy Comp Saddle 30 9 Mm Seat Post
Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Elegant Adjustable Length Kickstand
Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Minimalist Rack With Pannier Blocker
Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Rack Integrated Backlight Lightguide Technology
Womens Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0
Womens Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Plastic Motor Protector
Womens Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Airflow Motor Cover Integrated Horn
Womens Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Energy Bus Battery Charging Port With Cover
Womens Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Adjustable Seat Height Mid Step Frame Easy To Mount
Womens Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Display Mount Angles To Reduce Glare
Womens Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Tft Display Panel Micro Usb Port
Womens Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Ergonomic Ladies Grips
Womens Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Led Headlight
Womens Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Tubular Alloy Fenders With Water Dam
Womens Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Gray Black Color
Womens Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Electrak 2 0 Armadillo Tires
Womens Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Nylon Platform Pedals Sandpaper Grip
Womens Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Racktime Compatible 22 Kg Rear Rack
Womens Specialized Turbo Vado 6 0 Shimano Deore Xt Shadow Plus 11 Speed

Summary

  • A high-speed, feature-complete, urban electric bike with unique tubular fenders that have flexible extensions and water routing system to keep your legs, back and face dry, integrated lights and a tight modern rack
  • Available in four sizes including high-step and mid-step frame styles with gender-specific saddle and grips, custom tuned 50 mm suspension fork with lockout, sturdy thru-axles for improved power transfer and handling at high speed
  • Removable TFT touch-screen with integrated Micro-USB for accessory charging, Mission Control smartphone app syncs with display for GPS readouts and battery optimization, powerful 180 mm hydraulic disc brakes
  • High-end Shimano Deore XT Shadow Plus derailleur with one-way clutch to reduce chain bounce, narrow wide chainring delivers extra hold, rear light goes bright when either brake lever is pulled, bottle cage bosses on both frame types

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Specialized

Model:

Turbo Vado 6.0

Price:

$4,800

Body Position:

Forward

Suggested Use:

Urban, Commuting, Touring

Electric Bike Class:

Speed Pedalec (Class 3)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Year Battery and Motor, Lifetime Frame and Fork

Availability:

United States, Europe

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

55.4 lbs (25.12 kg)

Battery Weight:

6.6 lbs (2.99 kg)

Motor Weight:

7.5 lbs (3.4 kg)

Frame Material:

E5 Aluminum Alloy, Smooth Welds

Frame Sizes:

15.75 in (40 cm)17.72 in (45 cm)19.69 in (50.01 cm)21.65 in (54.99 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

Medium 45 cm: 17.72" Seat Tube, 32" Stand Over Height, 44.3" Wheelbase

Frame Types:

High-Step, Mid-Step

Frame Colors:

Satin Lime with Black Accents, Slate with Black Accents

Frame Fork Details:

Suntour NCX with Multi Circuit Damping (MCD), Compression Lockout Clicker, Preload Adjust, 100 mm / 15 mm Thru Axle, Sealed Bearings Hub

Frame Rear Details:

142 mm / 12 mm Thru-Axle, Sealed Bearings Hub

Attachment Points:

Bottle Cage Bosses, Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses

Gearing Details:

11 Speed 1x11, Shimano Deore XT Shadow Plus SGS cage, Shimano SLX M7000 11-42T Cassette

Shifter Details:

Shimano SLX Triggers on Right

Cranks:

Custom Alloy, 48T, Narrow Wide Chainring, 104 mm Bolt Circle Diameter (BCD), Single Xsync Style 10- / 11-Speed

Pedals:

Custom Specialized Fitness, Nylon Platform with Grip Traction

Headset:

FSA 1-1/ 8" Upper and Lower, Cartridge Bearings

Stem:

Alloy, 7-Degree Rise, 31.8 mm Clamp, 60 mm (S) / 70 mm (M) / 80 mm (L) / 90 mm (XL)

Handlebar:

Specialized Alloy, 9-Degree Backsweep, 4-Degree Upsweep, 680 mm Width, 31.8 mm Clamp

Brake Details:

Tektro Zurich Hydraulic Disc with 180 mm Rotors, Tektro Zurich Levers with Tool-Free Adjustable Reach, Four-Piston Calipers, Integrated Read Switch on Both Levers for Rear Light Bright Mode

Grips:

Specialized Body Geometry XC Contour, Ergonomic, Black

Saddle:

Canopy Comp, Hollow Cr-Mo Rails

Seat Post:

Alloy, 2-Bolt Clamp, 12.5 mm Offset, Anti-Corrosion Hardware

Seat Post Length:

350 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

30.9 mm

Rims:

6061 Aluminum Alloy, Double-Wall, 40 mm Width, 28 Hole, Reinforcement Eyelets, Reflective Stickers

Spokes:

XDB Stainless Steel, 15 Gauge, Black

Tire Brand:

Electrak 2.0 Armadillo, 28" x 2" (700 x 51c) (51-622)

Wheel Sizes:

28 in (71.12cm)

Tire Details:

30 to 65 PSI, Armadillo Anti-Flat Technology, Gripton Compound

Tube Details:

Presta Valve

Accessories:

Custom Specialized Rack with Racktime Snap-it System and Integrated Rear Light (22 kg / 48.5 lb Max Load), Tubular Alloy Fenders (Extra-Long Flextender Multi-Plastic Lower Piece), Integrated Specialized Headlight with Aspheric Lens Technology (12 Volt, Two-LED, 600 Lumen, IP67 Rated, Aluminum Die-Cast Body, Stem Mount), Custom Specialized Side Mirror (Alloy and Glass), Rack-Integrated Specialized Backlight with Lightguide Technology (12 Volt, 8 SMD LED, Clear Window, IP67 Rated, Plastic Injected Housing, Aluminum Rack Attachment Studs, Inner Cable Routing in Left Stud), Plastic Chainring Guard, Transparent Slap Guard Sticker, 40 mm Spaced Standard Rear-Mount Kickstand, Electronic Horn (Mounted Below Bottom Bracket), Optional Replacement Battery Pack $800

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack with ABUS Locking Core, 1.9 lb 42 Volt 4 Amp Charger with Rosenberger Plug (Magnetic EnergyBus Standard), Optional 1.3 lb Portable 1.6 Amp Travel Charger, IP67 Water and Dust Protection Rating on Battery Pack, Battery Stops with 4% at Top and Bottom to Avoid Straining Cells, Internal Cable Routing, Shimano CN-HG601 Chain

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Brose, Rx Street Tuned, Custom for Specialized

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Geared Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

250 watts

Motor Peak Output:

530 watts

Motor Torque:

90 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Samsung, LG

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

16.8 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

604.8 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

4.5 hours (7 Hours with Optional Travel Charger)

Estimated Min Range:

30 miles (48 km)

Estimated Max Range:

80 miles (129 km)

Display Type:

BLOKS Removable Adjustable Angle 2.2" Backlit TFT Touch-Screen LCD (Buttons: History / Back, Home, Menu) with 5 Volt Micro-USB Female Plug, 5 LED Charge Indicator / Power Button on Battery

Readouts:

Battery Level (5 Bars or Percentage), Assist Level (Off, Eco, Sport, Turbo), Trip Distance, Odometer, Available Range, Ride Time, Clock, Rider / Motor Power, Watts, Cadence, Elevation Profile, Distance Climb, Slope, Map

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad near Left Grip (Set, +, -, Light / Horn), Hold + for Walk Mode, Long-Press Set Twice for Settings Menu, Mission Control App (Bluetooth, iOS and Android)

Drive Mode:

Advanced Pedal Assist (Speed, Cadence and Torque Sensing, Eco: 20%, Sport: 50%, Turbo: 100%)

Top Speed:

28 mph (45 kph) (15.5 MPH in Europe)

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Written Review

Specialized has introduced four new urban electric bikes and the Vado 6.0 is their top-of-the-line offering. Compared with the original Specialized Turbo models, developed in 2010 and dating back to 2012 in the US, the Vado is more balanced and efficient. It relies on a mid-motor from Brose vs. a gearless hub from Go SwissDrive and is being produced in a mid-step as well as traditional diamond high-step frame style. This is excellent news for men and women alike, despite the gender-specific labeling and Body Geometry touch points that Specialized is highlighting. Those with limited flexibility, shorter legs, or the desire to ride with a loaded rear rack, might opt for the mid-step because it doesn’t sacrifice frame stiffness the way many other ebikes do. Both models feature a bottle cage mount on the downtube but the high-step has another pair of bosses on the underside of the top tube which can be used for a folding lock, mini pump or other accessories. And, since Specialized has used an ABUS locking core to secure the Vado battery, you can get a key-matched ABUS folding lock to reduce the number of keys floating around in your life. Note that the demo models we were riding for this media event / review were pre-production and had Specialized Z-Cage bottle holders and SWAT toolkits added, these are not stock.

I was riding a glossy yellow Men’s size Medium and the ladies were spread across black Medium and Small sized Vado 6.0’s. Even though this ebike looks great, I think the triangle downtube isn’t quite as beautiful as the older straight tube… and you miss out on regenerative braking, but benefit from efficient freewheeling action whereas the hub produced cogging slowdown (magnetic drag). Specialized reps stressed this point during the press event, but I think it’s true of most mid-drive systems using high-end motors like Brose, Bosch, or Yamaha that coasting and pedaling is unimpeded. Indeed, I was able to reach 40+ MPH coasting down a steep section of pavement in the hills of Los Altos, California during our demo ride. The bikes really shine on smooth tarmac but I didn’t suffer as much going over cracks and potholes as I have on some of the earlier Turbo models thanks to a 50 mm suspension fork. You could lock this out for increased stiffness and have access to compression and preload adjust. Suspension aside, the fatter 51c (2-inch) wide tires absorb vibration and shock pretty well on their own. It’s interesting to see the Vado 5.0 with a rigid Aluminum Alloy fork because at higher speeds and longer distances, you really start to feel the jitter and that’s a high-speed model as well. One area to consider upgrading on any of the Vado models is the seat post which is rigid aluminum with a 30.9 mm diameter. There are lots of quality suspension seat posts available now in the $150 range, and they go a long way towards reducing neck and back stiffness (at least for me). The cockpit come setup with 25 mm of riser stacks under the stem, which is fairly short so you don’t have to lean far forward. In summary, this is a high-quality, stable, good looking electric bike from a mainstream manufacturer. Other highlights include 180 mm hydraulic disc brakes with tool-free reach adjust on the levers and read switches that signal bright mode for the rear light when pulled. Many electric bicycles come with bells, but the Vado 5.0 and 6.0 come with an electronic horn that’s quite satisfying to honk… for fun or otherwise. I love the 11-speed Shimano Deore XT Shadow Plus drivetrain because it shifts quickly and has a one-way clutch (a little grey lever on the side) to keep the chain tight on rough terrain. It also has rigid thru-axles front and rear to increase stiffness and stability at high speed, neither these or the seat tube collar have quick release (to prevent theft or tampering). You get reinforced rims, puncture-resistant tires, integrated LED lights (the headlight was designed by a motorcycle maker and is said to evenly distribute light) and a pair of life-changing fenders. Actually, I feel like they could have named this bike the Specialized Turbo Fender because that’s where the real action is happening! Sure, they custom tuned the suspension fork, dialed in the motor controller, opted for high-end batteries from Samsung / LG and got a battery management system from the people who design for Apple… but those fenders! Made from tubular Aluminum alloy, they are stiff, quiet, and supposedly very effective. Unfortunately, there was no rain available for me to confirm, but this video was pretty convincing. Normal tubular alloy fenders work great but usually stop short in the front because they could get in the way of your toes while pedaling or collide with curbs and other low obstacles. So, Specialized developed a bendable plastic extender called the Flextender (cute). And, with a bit of wind-tunnel testing, they realized that water is often deposited towards the back of fenders and then gradually pushed forward during high-speed rides… only to blow back into your face. Did I mention the Vado 5.0 and 6.0 can hit ~28 mph and are classified as Class 3 speed pedelecs? So yeah, you’ll get to work faster but your face might get very wet if it weren’t for those fenders. This is where another little innovation comes in. Two curved strips of plastic were designed into the upper edge of the front fender to chanel water out of the sides vs. straight up and forward. Apparently, in parts of Europe there are fenders with little brushes that perform a similar role. It’s a proven concept but one that Specialized has dialed in. One final callout I’d like to make is the magnetic charging port cover for the battery pack. Specialized uses the EnergyBus Rosenberger Standard which can be connected to the charger on or off the bike and pops out easily if tripped over. The only downside to this standard (as seen with earlier Turbo models) is that the cover for the port can be set down and left behind… only to be vacuumed up or swallowed by small children. So yay! The cover now stays attached thanks to a little rubber leash.

Driving the Vado models, all of them, is a Brose mid-drive that physically the same as what’s used for the Specialized Levo mountain line of ebikes. I was told that the software has been optimized for each product line and speed class (the slower Vado 2.0 and 3.0 vs. the Class 3 Vado 5.0 and 6.0). You’ll get increased range riding slower on the Class 1 models (up to 20 mph) but the battery packs are lower capacity and don’t reduce weight because the cells aren’t as energy dense. It really comes down to price and desire for speed. Anyway, the confusing thing for me is that the motor systems are rated at 250 watts nominal for the 20 mph bikes and 350 watts nominal for the 28 mph bikes. And to me, this just seems like marketing because I believe they can all reach 90 Nm of torque output (which is more than Bosch or Yamaha) and they peak out above 500 watts. I’m telling you this because there are many other Brose powered electric bikes on the market these days and I think the real difference is not so much in the hardware or watt rating but in how the controllers are setup, how the batteries are integrated into the frame, and possibly how the motor is cooled. And Specialized is a leader in all of those arenas. A plastic skid plate is mounted along the base of the bottom bracket motor area with channels for air to pass through and passively cool the drive system (allowing it to operate more consistently and for longer periods at high-power). That sounds pretty neat but my first thought was “won’t dust or mud get in there?” and that’s where those magical fenders come in again. Note that the electronics on this ebike are all rated against water and dust ingress at IP67 so you can probably hose it down (with low pressure) without risk of damaging the electronics. The final points to share about the motor are that it uses an internal belt system to transfer power from planetary gears to the chainring which makes it feel smooth and operate quietly, and that it relies on rear wheel speed, pedal cadence and pedal torque to activate. Unlike many of the other systems on the market, which use spoke-mounted magnets to measure rear wheel speed, the Vado uses a disc-rotor mounted magnet that is less likely to be bumped out of alignment… or hacked, for those who try to change how motor performance is handled using after market dongles.

Powering the bike is a massive 36 volt 16.8 amp hour battery pack with some of the highest grade of energy-dense Lithium-ion cells available on the market today. Unfortunately, I got to the press event late and was not able to take the pack off to weigh it independently… so the Swiss product manager told me it’s ~6.6 lbs. I’ll be sure to weigh one in the future and update this. Assuming he’s correct, that weight is pretty good for 604.8 watt-hours of capacity. Unfortunately, I didn’t see a handle on the pack and was not able to take it off and really hold it myself. This is one of the most sensitive, expensive parts of the bike. So be careful with it and consider leaving it on-frame to charge. If you live upstairs, you can use walk-assist (hold the plus button on the control pad) to help you push the bike vs. lifting it as I did towards the end of the review. It’s a bit of a trade-off unfortunately, because with walk-assist the pedals can bang on the steps or hit your shins. At 55.4 lbs, this is not the lightest electric bike out there by any means. I did weight it independently and think that the bottle cage and tiny SWAT toolset might have added a half pound or so but this is still slightly more than the Specialized reps said. The Turbo line has always been a little heavy, but that gives the bike a solid stable feel… and the weight is positioned very low and spread naturally across the Vado frame vs. the rear-heavy Turbo X and S models. The largest battery should take you from 30 to 80+ miles depending on how you ride, how much you weigh, how old the pack is and even what temperature it is outside. Store it in a cool, dry place and always avoid high heat. I wasn’t able to test this, but I’d guess a full charge would take 4.6 hours from empty with the stock 4 Amp charger. Specialized sells a smaller, lighter weight 2 Amp charger for travel or if you’ve got limited space in your bags and want to take it along.

Operating the Vado e-bikes is a one-step process that starts with a button near the top end of the battery pack. Once mounted, press this power button for a full second and look for the five green LED lights below the button to flicker on. Then, look up at the TFT display panel and wait… The system isn’t as quick or intuitive to turn on and off as some others, the most intuitive being Bosch, and I found myself a little confused at times, especially when turning it off. I felt like I had held the off button and should see some feedback about the system shutting down but then the display would just stay on. It’s like those automobile lights that stay on for a few minutes even after you’ve shut the car off, locked it, and walked away. I was told by another rep that the display times off on its own after a bit longer, perhaps this is meant to keep the lights active for safety if you’re parking on the street? The fact that the display can be removed from the bike is very handy because it can reduce tampering and weather wear (or vandalism), so maybe I should have just twisted and taken the display to ensure the bike was shut off? I’ve been trained by other ebike brands not to do this until products have been fully shut down so as not to disrupt the system. Anyway, it’s a cute little screen and features touch controls for quick intuitive navigation of settings. Despite being small in size, the readouts are large and clear. Because it’s transflective, the display is easy to see in bright settings but is also backlit for the dark. I mostly like it and feel that the remote button pad (used to navigate the three levels of assist, change readouts and honk the horn) is easy to reach and understand without being distracting or attention grabbing. The display mounts to a special adapter on the stem along with the headlight and can be pivoted up or down to reduce glare if not over-tightened. And of course, there’s the Micro-USB port at the base of the display panel which is perfect for charging your phone or additional portable electronic devices. The Turbo Levo electric mountain bike models did not have USB charging ports and this meant that using the Bluetooth Mission Control app would drain your phone. With the Vado, there’s plenty of space on the handlebar to mount your phone and keep it charged… And you can use the app to plan rides and tell the bike to arrive with a set percentage of battery remaining. Or, you can send GPS data to the TFT display on the bike and leave your phone in your backpack… This is a cool feature because it saves phone battery (since I believe it’s able to receive data from your phone without the phone screen being on). It keeps the dash area of the bike clear and doesn’t require such a fancy ebike system that might require a phone plan of its own to operate and download map data. In short, the display is a big step up from the Levo (which didn’t have a display at all) and prior Specialized Turbo models which used rubberized joystick navigation (that would often wear thin or break) but I wish it turned on and off a bit quicker or more intuitively.

It’s clear that Specialized has put a lot of thought into this new city line of electric bikes. And depending on how you intend to ride, you could swap the tires for some hybrid designs up to 52 mm in width and still manage to use the fenders. The rear rack is sleek and capable with Racktime mounting points compatible with baskets and other branded accessories and the lights are bright and sleek so you don’t have to add your own later, charge them separately, or deal with extra wires. Just like most of the other Specialized e-bikes, the Vado feels clean. The big upgrade for me was in frame balance, climbing power, and operational efficiency if you shift appropriately. Even though it’s not super light, it’s easier to lift and carry. Shifting gears is one area to be careful with, especially if you find yourself climbing a hill from rest Be patient and slow, practice shifting down as you approach stops so that you can accelerate more efficiently and reduce hard shifts. If you do start off in a high gear, gather some momentum then ease back on your pedal force and THEN shift. If you handle the bike carefully like this and learn to shift thoughtfully, the chain, sprockets and drivetrain will last a lot longer between tuneups and not break as often. My Uncle has owned a mid-drive powered electric bike with built in shift sensing and he has gone through several chains and two high-end derailleurs over the course of a couple years. Now, he ride every day and uses the bike off-road… but that’s the big opportunity with a bike like the Vado that could help you commute every day. It’s very capable, blends in, can go far while keeping you dry and safe, and there’s a range of models to fit your body size and budget. Big thanks to Specialized for offering to fly me out to their event (I drove) and putting me up in a super fancy hotel for a night. They provided locks and schwag for members of the press (along with a nice dinner) but I got there too late and missed out on some of the goodies. Dang! Events like this are fun but I’ve been extra detailed and transparent here in the review and am trying to scrutinize the bike so you can decide if it fits your needs. I imagine that for many people, this could be the first ebike they’ve come across, which is ironic considering how perfectly it blends in. I love that Specialized is sold through a wide network of shops around the world, that they offer a solid warranty, and are committed to developing integrated solutions with custom work vs. a bolt-on kit. For those with limited budgets but a love for speed and beauty, check out the older Specialized Turbo ebike models that have been on sale in recent months to make way for the Vado.

Pros:

  • Interactive TFT touch-screen display panel allows you to navigate menus quickly, can sync with the Mission Control smartphone app to display GPS, track routes, and record elevation, you can also engage with it using the handlebar remote to adjust assist level or cycle through standard trip stats like odometer, trip distance, ride time and range estimator
  • The display panel interface has a Micro-USB port offering 5 Volts and 700+ milliamps of power so you can charge a phone and use the Bluetooth Mission Control app from Specialized while riding without draining your battery too much, the app allows you to plan trips and adjust motor performance characteristics at a deeper level
  • Sturdy tubular fenders hug the tires to keep you dry and clean, the front fender is extra-long featuring a multi-plastic (sort of rubberized) Flextender to keep your feet and shins dry, if this portion of the fender is kicked or collides with a curb it bends naturally, Specialized calls their new fenders “drytech” and has tested them in a wind tunnel to simulate how water responds at ~20 mph, the top portion of the front fender features a plastic wall to spread water to the sides vs. out to the front and up into your face… this can happen when air is pushed quickly forward at high speed
  • The fenders and rack were very quiet, even though the Flextender portion vibrated and bounced around a bit, it didn’t produce much noise at all and the custom cargo rack felt sturdy but didn’t add much width or length to the bike, I like how it’s minimalist and integrates the brake light
  • Integrated lights help you see and be seen in dark riding conditions, the headlight is mounted underneath the stem keeping the cockpit clean and points where you steer, the rear light is at the very end of the rack so it won’t get blocked by panniers or trunk bags and it goes extra-bright when either brake lever is pulled
  • In addition to integrated LED lights, there are several reflective stickers on the fenders and rims to increase your visual footprint in dark riding conditions, this is especially important given the optional black / grey color scheme
  • The Brose mid-drive motor is extremely compact and quiet, it has a carbon belt inside that transfers power from the planetary gear, it feels smooth and is very responsive… the base of the bottom bracket has vents to allow air to pass directly across the motor casing and cool it
  • Excellent weight distribution with both the motor and battery mounted low and center,
    the frame is totally custom so the electronics blend in and wires are internally routed, the battery doesn’t stand out thanks to a paint-matched shell
  • I like how the battery tips out towards the left side vs. going up and down because this allows the mid-step frame to have a lower top tube and will reduce frame bumps when mounting and dismounting the battery
  • Available in four frame sizes for improved fit, I was riding the Medium for this review ant it handled very well in a default “upright” position but the stem can be flipped and spacers put on top vs. below if you want a more aggressive aerodynamic body position
  • The Men’s high-step Vado frame has two sets of bottle cage bosses (in the traditional spot on top of the downtube and below the top tube) This is especially useful if you want to mount a folding lock, mini-pump or other accessories without adding panniers or a trunk bag
  • Specialized offers a solid two-year comprehensive warranty with lifetime on the frame and has a vast network of dealers who can provide expert fitting and maintenance
  • The bike frame was designed to feel stable and I was able to pedal down a hill at 40+ mph comfortably, Specialized uses Body Geometry fit data from over a decade of research and includes gender-specific Body Geometry saddle and grips for improved comfort
  • The battery pack and display are removable so you can store them safely and charge them conveniently, I’d suggest removing the battery when carrying the bike or using walk mode to help climb stairs, the locking core is made by Abus and they can match folding locks to the same key for convenience and reduced clutter if you want
  • The charger has a magnetic interface so it won’t knock your bike over as easily if the cord gets tripped over,
    the cover for this plug on the bike is also magnetic and has a little rubber leash so it won’t get lost so easy
  • High-end 11-speed drivetrain makes it easy to start and climb or maintain the ~28 mph top speed, The Shimano Deore XT Shadow+ derailleur keeps the chain tight on bumps to reduce bouncing and slipping with a one-way adjustable clutch (this drivetrain has traditionally been reserved for mountain bikes), the same clutch can make removing the rear wheel easier if locked so the derailleur doesn’t spring back
  • Unlike the Specialized Turbo Levo e-mountain bikes that also use the Brose drive system, for the Vado models the battery actually locks to the frame (the mountain models just have a 15 mm thru-axle holding it in place) and the charging port has been elevated to the top of the pack to stay clear of the cranks vs. the Vado where it’s very low, basically under the bottom bracket
  • The battery mounts from the top left side so putting it on and taking it off is less likely to bang the top tube and has allowed for a lower top tube on the Women’s model
  • The drive system uses freewheels to decouple when pedaling unpowered (or above the top assisted speed) which is likely what other Brose ebikes do as I did not notice a difference… but Specialized was emphasizing this
  • Unlike most other bikes with kickstands, the Vado put a 40 mm mounting bracket on the inside of the left chainstay to make it look sleeker… even the stand looks tight and sleek
  • With great power and speed come great responsibility! and for that you get Tektro Zurich hydraulic disc brakes with 180 mm rotors and quad pistons that reduce overheating
  • In addition to having a plastic chainring guard (that keeps your pants or dress clear of the front sprocket and oily chain), the sprocket itself uses a narrow wide tooth pattern that grabs the chain better to reduce drops and noise

Cons:

  • I love that the Vado 6.0 has wider tires and includes a suspension fork (vs. the 5.0 that has a rigid Aluminum fork) but would still consider the use of a 30.9 mm suspension seat post for longer rides on bumpy terrain, consider the BodyFloat Kinekt or Specialized CG-R Carbon Seatpost
  • The rear rack looks sleek (with fewer support arms) but doesn’t support as much weight as most standard racks I see on other ebikes, you get 48.5 lbs (22 kg) vs. 55 lbs (25 kg) capacity
  • You pay a premium for what amounts to a larger battery and higher speed on this model verses the Vado 3.0 which aslo has suspension, fenders, a rear rack and LED lights (though the headlight is brighter here)
  • This doesn’t seem to be an issue for most riders who reduce pedal pressure as they shift gears (because the motor controller measures torque) but you don’t get shift sensing like Bosch and some Impulse motors which could result in more mashing if you’re not careful, I saw this happening a lot on our media ride… people would slow down for stop signs and lights just before hills (or on hills) and then clunk the gears hard shifting down as they started from zero which is bad for the chain, sprockets and derailleur
  • Unfortunately, the tires on the Vado models do not have reflective tape on the sides, this reduces your visual footprint which is a bummer (apparently it’s a requirement in the EU) but at least they put reflective stickers on the rims
  • I don’t think the battery has an integrated handle, so be careful taking it off the bike and carrying it around, it’s sensitive and should be handled with care
  • The bike takes a moment to power on after pressing the on/off button at the top of the battery pack, I feel like you have to press that button for a full second and the display isn’t immediate to light up or turn off… it just feels annoying compared to some others like Bosch

Resources:

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Senseiwai
3 hours ago

It appears that my fears were incorrect. Specialized seems committed to deliver batteries at least until 2021: https://electricbikereview.com/forum/threads/turbo-batteries-2013-and-beyond.3478/

Sounds worrying that your battery died. Where did you go to get it fixed? Specialized Concept Store in Hammarby sjöstad?

Thanks! Yes, Sjöstaden! They have couple of Vado 25 version and they told me 45 higher end comming in jul-aug. ;). They called me yesterday they are going to lend me a 500w ish battery meanwhile they send my battery to HQ in Holland for replacement.

jimmy
14 hours ago

Sorry, 2016 Turbo S still looks more bad ass than the Vado's.

JayVee
3 days ago

Overall, I think Specialized did a good by addressing most of the complaints people had about the old Turbo:

- The rack comes as a standard part. No retrofitting necessary.
- The fenders look like they might actually help keep water off you, unlike the kit sold for the original Turbo.
- The battery starts at a capacity that's reasonable for a speed pedelec.
- The price is a little more in line with competing e-bikes.
- There is no drive differentiation for S-Pedelec models. You get one drive type and choose whether you want shocks or not (Vado 5.0 vs 6.0). The Turbo S vs Turbo X choice was a little frustrating for some people.
- The weight has been dialled down, particularly on the Vado 5.0.
- The chain allows for variable tensioning via the derailleur, unlike the previous Turbo.
- The oversized 51c tires are better suited to faster speeds.
- Drive availability probably won't be an issue going forward.

I guess the sexy yellow color is only for California (or the US market). The Turbo Vado 5.0 & 6.0 models are already present on the Swiss and German Specialized portals, but we are proposed a somewhat dull grey. But still a very nice bike.

1/1
Michael G
4 days ago

Torque for sure plays a factor and the mid drive's are big on touting the nm figures. However because the motor goes through the drive gears it is kind of more up to what gear you are in for your given situation and the same applies to a hub motor. A 48/52v battery @ 25+ amps will put out a maximum of 1200+ watts and a typical system like the Turbo/Vado at 36v/20 amps puts out 720 watts. The advantage the mid drive has is its ability to access the gearing so that helps to multiply the nm which can be calculated with this formula:

Watts to torque conversion can be mathematically derived from the below formula

With a hub motor I depend on my pedaling as much as I would with a mid drive and climb in the gear the compliments my desired cadence and input. I tend to not go to the limit unless I have to as ah savings are important to me so that I can go as far as I have planned for but I do always climb at a speed faster than I could without the motor using close to the same amount of input which is what makes it fun and still a workout. I do feel that running a 1000w motor at 750w is less stress on the motor though than maxing out a smaller motor and it is good to have some in reserve.

Not being much of a math wiz I do know I have climbed some seriously steep hills, both pavé and gravé with my bikes and they have never let me down.
Ah-- thx sp much. I was leaving out a very important part of the equation i.e. gearing for mid drives (can be a multiple or divider, depending on gear selected, yes?) --that and given your equation, torque increases with wattage-- Thx again for the knowledge--

JRA
4 days ago

Torque for sure plays a factor and the mid drive's are big on touting the nm figures. However because the motor goes through the drive gears it is kind of more up to what gear you are in for your given situation and the same applies to a hub motor. A 48/52v battery @ 25+ amps will put out a maximum of 1200+ watts and a typical system like the Turbo/Vado at 36v/20 amps puts out 720 watts. The advantage the mid drive has is its ability to access the gearing so that helps to multiply the nm which can be calculated with this formula:

Watts to torque conversion can be mathematically derived from the below formula

With a hub motor I depend on my pedaling as much as I would with a mid drive and climb in the gear the compliments my desired cadence and input. I tend to not go to the limit unless I have to as ah savings are important to me so that I can go as far as I have planned for but I do always climb at a speed faster than I could without the motor using close to the same amount of input which is what makes it fun and still a workout. I do feel that running a 1000w motor at 750w is less stress on the motor though than maxing out a smaller motor and it is good to have some in reserve.

Not being much of a math wiz I do know I have climbed some seriously steep hills, both pavé and gravé with my bikes and they have never let me down.

Michael G
4 days ago

I Own a 2012 Kalkhoff "Pro Connect"- In the main I've been happy but the bike is getting up there, Khalkoff has left the market in PDX and I'm weighing a new e-bike purchase vs throwing repair/maintenance dollars at the "Pro Connect". If I had one wish for improvement for a new purchase it would be more hillclimbing power. I'm a moderately fit 60 yr old and I live in very steep Hilly area of PDX. Even when I'm in the "best" of shape I still find the Kalkhoff with its weight not too drastic of an improvement over a lightweight traditional bike--in that I still have to bust a gut to get up that hill. So the question is what are some good new bikes that might have more torque in conquering hills? I am looking at two Specialized bikes the Turbo X (but looks like its being discontinued /) and Turbo Vado 5.0. I am sure there are other excellent options out there so I'm looking forward to hearing all your opinions. Thx Michael in PDX.

jwb
6 days ago

Yeah but even the hard-forked Vado 5.0 has a 28h wheel, and I smashed the factory 36h front wheel on my Turbo in less than 90 days.

I have to admit the 6.0 is looking pretty slick with that fork, big motor, big battery, and almost reasonable price.

Douglas Ruby
6 days ago

I wonder why they went from a 36-spoke wheel down to 28 on the Vado. Excessive wheel strength is not one of the complaints I have heard about the Turbo.
With the motor no longer in the wheel, the rear wheel takes a lot less pounding. With the suspension fork, the front wheel also takes less pounding. I would guess the Vado to be just a bit lighter as well. DD hub drive has to have very heavy magnets to get adequate torque unlike geared hub or mid-drive.

jwb
7 days ago

I wonder why they went from a 36-spoke wheel down to 28 on the Vado. Excessive wheel strength is not one of the complaints I have heard about the Turbo.

Charlie Rohlfing
7 days ago

So they just released even more Vados in the US and now show a Vado 6.0. I have enough money on the shops books cause they took back my Turbo S. It looks like the Vado 6.0 added a better shifter and a front shock. I know the shock will add more weight but would that be an improvement, should I cancel my 5.0 order and grab the new one win a front shock. I know all the video reviews on here, he always loves that front shock.
I would absolutely go for the front shock. The extra weight and power absorbing issues that are a concern on a standard bike are non-issues when you have E power. The extra comfort (and safety at higher speeds) will be well worth it, IMO.

Roadrash3
7 days ago

So they just released even more Vados in the US and now show a Vado 6.0. I have enough money on the shops books cause they took back my Turbo S. It looks like the Vado 6.0 added a better shifter and a front shock. I know the shock will add more weight but would that be an improvement, should I cancel my 5.0 order and grab the new one win a front shock. I know all the video reviews on here, he always loves that front shock.

Douglas Ruby
1 week ago

What about type 2 e-bike? My bike is an Turbo Vado 4.0 (sweden) class 2 in usa if i'm correct.
The Vado 3.0 and 4.0 are both Class 1 (20 mph non throttle) in the USA. The Vado 5.0 is Class 3 as are all of the earlier Turbo models.

Bengt A
1 week ago

Ha. Of course in California it would be unlawful to ride a type 3 e-bike on a class 1 bike path, like the one on the Golden Gate Bridge shown in the video.

What about type 2 e-bike? My bike is an Turbo Vado 4.0 (sweden) class 2 in usa if i'm correct.

ronin2000
2 weeks ago

Thanks for posting that Scott. So I am excited for this new model. I owned a Turbo S a few years ago but sold it when I needed the cash. I regretted it and found myself wanting to mostly commute by bicycle again, I picked up the S at what I thought was a good deal. Well the bike had quite a few issues and the shop took it back. Specialized is all out of the Turbo in my size and its gone. I really preferred the look of the S turbo the best and not a huge fan of the Vado look, but I could not find a rack for the turbo as it is also discontinued. So the ability of parts for the new bike, the new display, the new rack, the easy maintenance of the mid drive, I have high hopes, looking forward to Curt's review this month.

Couldn't find a specialized rack so I went with a bontrager Disc brake model. Worked out ok. Kinda odd having trek parts on a specialized though

Roadrash3
2 weeks ago

Thanks for posting that Scott. So I am excited for this new model. I owned a Turbo S a few years ago but sold it when I needed the cash. I regretted it and found myself wanting to mostly commute by bicycle again, I picked up the S at what I thought was a good deal. Well the bike had quite a few issues and the shop took it back. Specialized is all out of the Turbo in my size and its gone. I really preferred the look of the S turbo the best and not a huge fan of the Vado look, but I could not find a rack for the turbo as it is also discontinued. So the ability of parts for the new bike, the new display, the new rack, the easy maintenance of the mid drive, I have high hopes, looking forward to Curt's review this month.

Dunbar
2 weeks ago

At your weight and a 6-10% grade I would recommend a mid drive. In addition to the E3 Protour there's the new Specialized Turbo Vado 3.0. At 6'3" you probably want to stick with brands that offer multiple frame sizes.

Allan47.7339
2 weeks ago

It will feature the Turbo models for the first six weeks then switch to road bikes for the TDF start.

http://www.bicycleretailer.com/international/2017/05/05/specialized-opens-pop-store-germany-launches-new-turbo-model

Douglas Ruby
3 weeks ago

There has been a lot of discussion recently about replacement batteries and availability for the Specialized Turbo. I wanted to start this thread as an informational post targeted at the "facts" of what batteries are available, compatible, and what upgrades and/or replacements are possible. PLEASE do not turn this thread into a complaint forum for Specialized policies. Please do comment about your experiences in replacing batteries with new or used batteries, finding compatible solutions, or availability of sources.

Details: Specialized has used a variety of batteries numbered from SBC-B01 to at least SBC-B05. As far as I know, any of these batteries can be used in any model Turbo. (If this is not true, please let me know)

Here are the various form-compatible Turbo battery specs:

2013 Turbo - 342Wh/9.5Ah - SBC-B01 (later upgraded to 396 Wh)
2015 Turbo - 468Wh/13Ah - SBC-B02
2015 Turbo X- 468Wh/13Ah - SBC-B02
2014/2015 Turbo S - 504Wh/14Ah - SBC-B03
2016 Turbo FLR - 396Wh/11Ah - SBC-B01
2016 Turbo - 468Wh/13Ah - SBC-B02
2016 Turbo X- 562Wh/15.6Ah- SBC-B04 - bluetooth
2016 Turbo S - 691Wh/19.2Ah - SBC-B05 - bluetooth

It appears that the 504Wh 2014/15 Turbo S battery at $687.65 (US) is now the mail order replacement battery for the base Turbo and any older model (base, X, or S). The Turbo SC battery at $999 is the intended mail order replacement for the 2016 Turbo X and Turbo S, but it is currently backordered.

Swapping Batteries: The proprietary batteries used in the Turbo family are of very high quality, but have a unique architecture which makes swapping batteries, even of the same type, a bit problematic. As would be expected, battery management information such as State of Charge (%), Charge Cycles, Voltage, State of Health, Temperature, Duration Not Charged, and Date Of Last Max Charge are inside the battery. Unlike many other e-bikes, the motor control and bicycle configuration functions of the bike (Top Assist Speed, Acceleration level, default ECO level, default Regen level, Wheel Circumference. and Odometer) are also embedded inside of the battery rather than in the bicycle or motor.

This means that when you first use a new battery on your Turbo, you MUST insure that the dealer diagnostics are used to set (at minimum) the following motor control parameters: Bike Speed (in km/h), wheel diameter (in mm), and odometer setting (in km). Other "tuning" parameters can be set including Acceleration%, ECO%, and Regen%. On the bluetooth batteries, the last 3 parameters plus wheel diameter can be set using Mission Control. With the non-bluetooth batteries, the dealer diagnostics must be used to set ALL parameters.

If you intend to cycle multiple batteries to extend your ride range, they must all be configured the same. Also, be aware that your odometer will never be accurate since each battery only "sees" the mileage accumulated while it is in use (which may be a good thing).

Caveats: I am not entirely sure how the Top Speed limits are enforced in various countries. In the US, all Turbo's are certified as Speed Pedelecs for a 45Km/h (28 mph) max speed. In many countries, e-bicycles are limited to 25 Km/h (16 mph) unless certified and licensed as a Speed Pedelec. The default for all of the batteries as shipped from Specialized tends to be 25 km/h unless upgraded by the dealer diagnostic (I am pretty sure). While local laws prohibit upgrading to 45 Km/h for unlicensed bicycles (or bikes not certified as Speed Pedelecs), I am not sure what would keep someone from breaking through the limit if they had access to the diagnostic.

Douglas Ruby
3 weeks ago

Ya know, I have enjoyed my Turbo and do not regret purchasing it. While it is true that I wrote a detailed letter to Specialized outlining a support program Id like to see, I, like many, am not too concerned. Yes, I would like to see a product life cycle management approach that emphasized customer satisfaction a bit more, but I am willing to take 2021 at face value.

I already know that certain aspects of the Turbo design make supporting and evolving it difficult. The battery architecture is part of that. As long as I have some reasonable expectation of support, I expect to continue to enjoy my bike.

It is quite clear that the investment and development of ebikes is going into mid drive and digital integration. Assuming that the Vado performs well and is not afflicted with firmware or mechanical bugs, I will certainly consider one as a replacement sometime in the next 2-3 years. I like many aspects of the design particularly the ability to leverage the advances in standard wheel and mechanical developments. I also like the aesthetic of the frame and think it does a decent job of leveraging the look of the turbo while hiding and protecting the mid drive.

If my Turbo dies an untimely death and Specialized is unwilling to provide replacement batteries, motors, or handlebar controllers then I will not replace it with a Specialized bike.

Lets move on.

mattbytes
3 weeks ago

I too hope you're done with this soon and move on. Sounds like a bit of analysis paralysis to me. I have no regrets purchasing the Turbo X for an amazing price and I've been enjoying the Turbo for a few weeks now and I expect to enjoy it as long as I have it. When the Vado becomes available (and the hundreds of bikes from other manufacturers) I may come to the conclusion that it's time to move onto a different bike. I'm not going to waste time and energy speculating what Specialized will do based on battery back order. I'm going to go outside and enjoy my bike!!

Drew224
3 weeks ago

Drew (and others),

I don't know the status of the Turbo SC battery availability or your source of data. If you would like to communicate with the Product Manager for the Turbo line, her name is Olivia Bleitz and her email is: Olivia.Bleitz@specialized.com. She is out of Specialized's HQ at Morgan Hill, California.

Doug

Thanks and spoke to Olivia...which I'm surprised she answered the phone on a Saturday. I told her the backorder issue here in the states....and that she said the European market is stronger with sales of electric bikes...and I told her that they're out of stock on these batteries as well...which overall I'm not that confident to purchase this $6k bike...being she couldn't confirm when these batteries would be back in stock. So the first thing she said like all other sales people is...what don't I like about the Vado...and I told her it looks like every other bike out there. As well as telling her that they have 2017 models that they are not backing is very odd. She came back and said we have too keep up with the times (in so many words if not exactly what she said)...so basically...your screwed if you bought a turbo, because specialized wants too be the newest, bestest bike out there....ridiculous!!!!

JayVee
3 weeks ago

I would agree with that. However I did a review of the Moustache Friday 27 Speed which is Bosch-powered, and it was amazing too, and better up hills than the Turbo S. Handled brilliantly which is where I think the Vado will eclipse the Turbo S. Being Bosch likely means that batteries etc are commodity items. Not quite as fast as a Turbo S with the restraints off though if it matters, but a whole lot more comfortable. Depends what you want...
https://electricbikesnz.com/2017/04/23/moustache-friday-27-speed-at-the-top-of-the-class/

Regarding the kickstand on the Moustache, you probably don't have to replace it: just remove the outer spring seen on your image and it will revert to a 'normal' kickstand. People who design these kickstands understand how unsafe & unpopular the EU regulations are. A 4 yr old kid who merely nudges the bike could have it topple over on him. So it's probable you wouldn't have to spend 50 bucks... I removed the 'autoretracting spring' after about an hour of ownership on my Haibike. It works like a normal kickstand in every way. By removing the outer spring, the traditional spring in the kickstand becomes active again and will prevent it from accidentally retracting. Shop owner where I bought my Haibike told me that 99% of speed pedelecs he sells use this design....

Zoumios
3 weeks ago

Quick discussion I have to bring up considering I know little to nothing about ebikes.

As I understand it, peak motor watts is designated by the volts x amps that the bike posses (ex: 36V x 15A = 540 watts)

Here's the quandary:

This E3 ProTour is listed as a 500 nominal watt ebike, yet it's battery watt hours is only 417.6. Isn't that a contradiction? If its peak watts, not even nominal, is 417.6, then how is it claiming 500? https://electricbikereview.com/izip/e3-protour/

Here's another scenario, though:

This Specialized Turbo Vado 5.0 is listed as only a 350 watt ebike, yet it pumps out 604.8 watts. Couldn't the nominal be considered higher? https://electricbikereview.com/specialized/turbo-vado-5-0/

In both instances, I assume the answer is not only easy but obvious for someone who actually knows what they are talking about.

Note: I am not directly comparing the bikes or claiming they are similar. I used them both as individual examples for this question.

Thank you in advance.

ronin2000
3 weeks ago

I would agree with that. However I did a review of the Moustache Friday 27 Speed which is Bosch-powered, and it was amazing too, and better up hills than the Turbo S. Handled brilliantly which is where I think the Vado will eclipse the Turbo S. Being Bosch likely means that batteries etc are commodity items. Not quite as fast as a Turbo S with the restraints off though if it matters, but a whole lot more comfortable. Depends what you want...
https://electricbikesnz.com/2017/04/23/moustache-friday-27-speed-at-the-top-of-the-class/
The Vado are going to be “Brose” not Bosch though right? Ive ridden quite a few Mid drives and I like the Torquey giddy feeling the rear hubs provide. Though I can appreciate the mid drives ease of maintenance and quick release front and rear wheels. Simple solution is to get them both.

David Macdonald
1 day ago

much nicer to see a longer review thanks .

Stephen Donohoe
2 days ago

Ive watched a lot of your vids, i would like to ask your opinion on, what bike would suit best for 90% on road 10% lite off road with decent milage, as i am looking to buy, i am 6foot tall, thanks in advance.

Casey
2 days ago

Court,

Saw you guys Friday on Sandhill road by Stanford campus while I was biking
to my yoga class.

Chad Holdorf
2 days ago

Love your reviews, great job. How did you get the stats to show up on the bottom of the video? That is awesome.

MBA NONI
2 days ago

What happened to your subscribers? I thought this channel hit a 100k a while ago.

Lord Crimsiden
2 days ago

best eletric bike i can get for 2 grand by june ?

Folk
3 days ago

great review. it seems the hiviz yellow isn't available on the is site. only the charcoal gray. bummer. the yellow looks awesome.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 days ago

I think the bike is still waiting to be added to the Specialized website, this was filmed at a pre-release media event type of thing :)

Bob A
3 days ago

Hi Court-This is some of your best work overall! The new Specialized, the scenery, the Garmin Virb, etc. I love this bike design and the class 3 (28mph) seems great for this bike. Looks like this will be a good bike to be compared to the Stromer St1 or ST2.
I love those shots from Stanford, but how can a palm tree be that expensive?? I think I need to make my next stop in that area the next time I'm up visiting my relys! LOL Thanks again Court and ride safe. Enjoy!

actnowone
3 days ago

30 mph seems super fast on a bicycle maybe too fast, for me anyway? I live in the U.K. so the maximum assist is up to 15 mph which is a little on the low side, would have been better had it been 20 mph.

George Lawther
3 days ago

Hi court haven't been watching much content for the past few months might even be nearer 5 months :( mainly because of replicated designs but this new model caught my eye! really loving the new fat tubing on these specialized bikes and so glad they are adopting the mid drive! Keep up the great videos mate and I'll try to keep up from now on as the 17/18 ranges appear ;)

benzoesan sodu
3 days ago

Just would like to know what is a model of your private ebike? :D

guy idel
3 days ago

Please you can do review on ITALWIN +K2

Wes Choy
3 days ago

I work on campus and it was fun seeing you navigate there. Your reviews got me into ebikes and now I commute 35 miles round trip daily on my Haibike. One thing that could be a good video idea is how universities like Stanford are promoting biking by providing incentives to employees like cash back, enclosed bike lockers, etc.

Also I had a chuckle when you were riding on the sidewalk going the wrong way through the bike turning circle.

George Herman
3 days ago

That rear rack doesn't have much support. For some reason I thought it funny they test the bike in a wind tunnel. Sounds like ridiculousness to me. I like the bright yellow color though.

George Herman
3 days ago

OK that makes sense.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 days ago

Yeah, there's a video where they show the wind tunnel... I haven't been there in person but it's like a medium sized thing that they probably use for their helmets and triathlon bike testing. In this case, they used chalk boards to show the splatter marks of water coming off of the tires in different locations (sides, rear, face) here's the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7APHYs_7K7w

Martian Megafauna
3 days ago

Great work as always.
I just wanted to give you a shout out for your CAMERA WORK. You ride one handed and juggle that thing but the video is seamless and useful. I cannot imagine how poor my version of those rides would look like.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 days ago

Thanks Martian! I've been practicing for a long time but also pick and choose clips that are smooth. I have to balance riding, talking and looking out for traffic while also being respectful to pedestrians etc. it takes some extra time but I have actually crashed and hit stationary objects in the past... which is no fun

ajish kumar
3 days ago

This is the best review yet, very comprehensive. Keep up the good work. Given a choice between this bike and the BULLS SIX50 E2 Street, which would you recommend ?

ajish kumar
3 days ago

Thanks for the reply. Appreciate it.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 days ago

Oh man! That is so close... the Vado wins on looks because it's so seamless but the SIX50 E2 Street is cheaper, has longer travel suspension and still comes in multiple sizes. It might depend on whether a dealer was located nearby? The fender on the Vado is actually very useful and I like how quiet and smooth Brose is but Bosch is one of my favorite motor makes too... This is such a difficult trade, I think they would both be great choices!

Andrew Hunter
3 days ago

it was nice to see it in a group setting and the university was stunning.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 days ago

Thanks Andrew! Normally I'm just out there on my own but this event provided an opportunity to get more feedback. Thanks for your positive comment, it's fun to share these places along with the bikes... I try to keep it from going overboard so the fact that you enjoyed it and said so means a lot

Stephen Cho
3 days ago

The weight of this bike minus the battery and motor is 41 lbs. Similar non electric mid to high end versions weigh ~25-30 lbs. I understand extra wires, controller, display... etc adds weight but 10-15lb?

Stephen Cho
2 days ago

As an example this diamondback weighs in @ 29.54 lbs. This bike also has thru axles, even thicker tires, suspension fork, dropper seat post, and probably can take even more abuse than the Vado.
https://www.diamondback.com/mountain-bikes/sync-r-pro

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 days ago

Hi Stephen! Great point. The larger thicker tires, thru-axles, coil suspension fork and larger reinforced tubing are probably where that additional weight is. Plus, the tubular alloy fenders? Most standard city bikes don't have that. The motor on its own weighs about 7.5 lbs... here are some more details with weight broken out a little https://electricbikereview.com/specialized/turbo-vado-6-0/

Will
3 days ago

Some of the best content on YouTube, thank you.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 days ago

Wow, thanks Will! I'm glad you enjoyed it and appreciate that huge compliment. I'm doing my best ;)

Bruce Ballad
3 days ago

man, talk about quality. I like Specialized in term of build quality and stealth design. They know that electric motors and battery look odd on bike body. So they make it whole with frame. So cool. I loved the ride footage. Nice group, nice route. Pretty fast but smooth:)

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 days ago

Hey Bruce, you're exactly right... I was able to hit 40+ mph in those downhill sections but the bike never felt wobbly or unstable. The thru-axles help and the slightly heavier, fatter tires also smooth it out and give you stability. Specialized did an excellent job with this product... I like most of their bike to be honest, they look cool and perform great