Trek Lift+ Review

Trek Lift Plus Electric Bike Review
Trek Lift Plus
Trek Lift Plus Shimano Steps Mid Drive Motor
Trek Lift Plus Shimano Steps Battery Pack
Trek Lift Plus Ergonomic Grips Shimano Steps Console
Trek Lift Plus 10 Speed Shimano Deore
Trek Lift Plus 160 Mm Hydraulic Disc Brakes
Trek Lift Plus Quick Release Wheels
Trek Lift Plus Step Thru Frame
Trek Lift Plus High Step And Low Step
Trek Lift Plus Electric Bike Review
Trek Lift Plus
Trek Lift Plus Shimano Steps Mid Drive Motor
Trek Lift Plus Shimano Steps Battery Pack
Trek Lift Plus Ergonomic Grips Shimano Steps Console
Trek Lift Plus 10 Speed Shimano Deore
Trek Lift Plus 160 Mm Hydraulic Disc Brakes
Trek Lift Plus Quick Release Wheels
Trek Lift Plus Step Thru Frame
Trek Lift Plus High Step And Low Step

Summary

  • A light weight, efficient and more upright city style electric bike with a two year warranty, features an adjustable stem and is available in both high-step and step-thru frame styles in four sizes for improved fit
  • Leverages the Shimano STePs drive system keeping weight low and centered across the frame, the step-thru model is reinforced for rigidity and strength, both get excellent range
  • Rigid fork and seat post aren't as comfortable as suspension but reduce weight and the larger tires help to cushion the ride over cracks and bumps
  • More expensive than I expected at ~$2,729 considering you don't get fenders, a rack or lights and the Shimano system isn't as refined as Bosch or Impulse, the battery pack has to be removed for charging and shift sensing isn't as responsive

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Trek

Model:

Lift+

Price:

$2,799

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Commuting, Urban

Electric Bike Class:

Pedal Assist (Class 1)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Years Comprehensive, Lifetime Frame

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

2016

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

44.8 lbs (20.32 kg)

Battery Weight:

5.9 lbs (2.67 kg)

Motor Weight:

7.05 lbs (3.19 kg)

Frame Material:

Aluminum Alloy (Continuously Cold Extruded and Butted)

Frame Sizes:

13.5 in (34.29 cm)16.5 in (41.91 cm)17.5 in (44.45 cm)20 in (50.8 cm)

Frame Types:

Step-Thru, High-Step

Frame Colors:

Crystal White, Dnister Black

Frame Fork Details:

Lift+ Alloy, Rigid

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Front Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses

Gearing Details:

10 Speed 1x10 Shimano Deore, Shadow Plus, HG62, 11-32T

Shifter Details:

Shimano Deore Triggers on Right

Cranks:

Shimano for STePs

Pedals:

VP Aluminum Body with Kraton Inserts

Headset:

1-1/8" Semi-Integrated, Semi-Cartridge Bearings

Stem:

Alloy, Adjustable Rise, Quill

Handlebar:

Bontrager Satellite, Swept-Back, 25.4 mm, 50 mm Rise

Brake Details:

Shimano M355 Hydraulic Disc

Grips:

Bontrager Satellite Elite, Lock-On, Ergonomic

Saddle:

Trek Urban Comfort

Seat Post:

Bontrager SSR, 12 mm Offset

Seat Post Length:

300 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

31.6 mm

Rims:

Bontrager AT-850 Aluminum Alloy

Tire Brand:

Bontrager H2, 26" x 2"

Wheel Sizes:

26 in (66.04cm)

Tire Details:

Hard-Case Ultimate Puncture Protection

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Rear-Mount Kickstand

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, EC-E6000 Fast Charger (Reach 80% in Two Hours), KMC X10e Chain, Manufacturer Part Number (519382, 519383, 519384), Quick Release Skewers

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Shimano STePs

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Geared Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

250 watts

Motor Peak Output:

500 watts

Motor Torque:

50 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Shimano STePs

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

11.6 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

417.6 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

4 hours

Estimated Min Range:

30 miles (48 km)

Estimated Max Range:

75 miles (121 km)

Display Type:

Removable, Adjustable Angle, Monochrome, Backlit LCD, Model SC-E6000

Readouts:

Speed (mph or km/h), Average Speed, Max Speed, Odometer, Trip Meter, Battery Level (5 Bars), Assist Mode (Eco, Normal, High), Time Clock

Display Accessories:

Independent Control Switch near Left Grip

Drive Mode:

Advanced Pedal Assist (Measures Wheel Speed, Pedal Cadence and Pedal Torque, Power Output Relative to Pedal Input: Eco 50%, Normal 100%, High 200%)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph) (25 km/h in Europe)

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Written Review

The Lift+ is Trek’s most affordable electric bike (unless you count the Townie Go! from Electra which is also owned by Trek). The Lift Plus is significantly lighter at just ~45 pounds and I’m a huge fan of the quick release seat tube clamp, quick release wheels and adjustable angle stem! You can dial this thing in for a range of heights and body types and it comes in two frame style (high-step and step-thru) as well as four sizes… wow, that’s the power of a more established brand like Trek. The downside is that in my opinion the bike is on the more expensive side for what you get. While the Townie Go! mentioned earlier uses a more refined drive system from Bosch, the Lift+ relies on a Shimano system. The difference is that shift sensing is delayed, you get fewer levels of pedal assist, there’s no USB charger on the display, the motor puts out less torque and you have to take the battery off the frame each time you want to charge it. This last point is a big deal for me because I store my bike inside and have accidentally dropped batteries before when removing them so being able to plug directly in without removing the pack would just feel safer… plus, the Shimano charger has a really large blocky plug at the end that just doesn’t seem as well thought out.

The bike works very well on smooth streets and sidewalks but isn’t as cushioned as some of the other models I’ve covered in recent years. You don’t get a suspension fork or seat post shock and while the rubber ergonomic grips feel great and the sizes compliment the adjustable stem for a more upright, relaxed seating position I found the saddle to be very firm. The tires are slightly oversized at two inches in diameter and I’d probably run them a little low for added comfort… just don’t go so low that you get a pinch flat! The recommended PSI is listed on the sidewall so follow that closely and check often if you run low because air tends to leak slowly over time. So what am I really saying? Consider a suspension post like the Thudbuster, Body Float or something more cheap on Amazon and just make sure you get the correct size 36.1 mm diameter or use a shim to convert from the more standard 27.2 mm diameter.

All things considered, the Lift+ is an efficient and well made ebike. It’s backed by a reputable brand with dealer outlets all across the country so you should be able to take a test ride. There’s room for improvement with the motor system but I don’t hold that against Trek. I would love to see those bottle cage bosses added but I love that you get them for adding a rack and fenders because the bike would make an excellent commuter. There are ways to improve comfort with accessories and depending on your environment those may not even be necessary. I had a blast riding this bike on the smooth paved streets of Irvine California for the review and I felt well taken care of by Jax Bicycle Center because they spent time on fit and provided feedback about regular maintenance and things like hydraulic disc brake adjustment. There are some high end systems at work on this bike including the ten speed drivetrain but I’d love to see the price closer to $2,500 because it’s very plain compared with the next level up (the Conduit+) and doesn’t deliver the same feature set as the Electra Townie Go! which can also be had from Trek.

Pros:

  • All Trek bicycles have to be shipped to a local Trek retailer but this is free of charge, from there some retailers will deliver to your house
  • Awesome two year comprehensive warranty, they recommend storing the battery in a dry room at 60° to 70° Fahrenheit and keeping it fully charged, expect a 5% degrade each year
  • Unique frame designs (the high-step version has a curved top tube for easier stand over) both are stiff and I love the internal cable routing
  • Quick release seat tube clamp makes adjusting the ride quick and easy, the front and rear wheels also feature quick release skewers so maintenance and transport are both quick and easy
  • Mid-drive motor system leverages the rear cassette for efficient energy use, the bike should get excellent range in Eco and Normal settings up to 75 miles per charge
  • Highly adjustable stem and handle bar will accommodate shorter and taller riders, with four frame sizes (and two frame styles) this model should fit most riders
  • Hydraulic disc brakes are smooth and powerful, much more enjoyable to use than band brakes or v-brakes but may require a shop’s help to adjust and bleed occasionally
  • Premium drivetrain (especially for a neighborhood/city style electric bike), ten speed Shimano Deore Shadow Plus… enough gears to climb steep hills comfortably and also max out the 20 mph motor speed limit (you can also pedal faster than that but the motor won’t help)
  • Front and rear mounting points for cargo racks, you could outfit this bike to carry a lot gear or add premium fenders to stay dry commuting
  • The step-thru model is reinforced with two downtube/top tubes as well as an extra tube at the rear for improved strength and rigidity (this combined with the mid-mount motor and battery feel very balanced and stiff)
  • At just under 45 lbs I consider these to be light weight electric bikes, they could easily reach 50 lbs with fenders and a rack but not everyone needs these things and the removable ~6 lb battery and quick release wheels make transporting much easier than comparable e-bikes
  • Shimano STePs features a remote button bar that’s easy to reach while riding (to adjust assist level), I like that it clicks when you change levels and there’s also an electronic beep (that can get a little annoying), I also appreciate that the display is removable

Cons:

  • Battery must be completely removed from the frame in order to charge it, the charging socket is located at the base where it connects to the mounting plate, this adds work and increases the potential for accidental drops vs. leaving it on the frame to charge
  • Firm ride, no suspension fork or seat post shock but the larger 2″ tires, ergonomic grips and enlarged saddle help, I found the saddle to be firm and would probably replace it
  • It seems like there’s room on the high-step frame to add a bottle cage mounting point and this would be useful given that the bike doesn’t include a rack, the more expensive Conduit+ model does offer bosses on the seat tube
  • The Shimano STePs drive system isn’t as refined as Bosch or Impulse in my opinion, shift sensing isn’t as smooth and the on/off activation isn’t quite as fast (but it’s still a top level drive system)
  • In my opinion this electric bike is priced a little high, you get an excellent warranty but the frame is basic and you don’t get accessories like fenders, chain guard, rack or lights
  • Limited color choices with this model… not a huge deal but basically gloss black for the high-step and gloss white for the step-thru, as a guy who would probably get the high-step model I’d like a silver option for increased visibility to cars at night
  • The rear hydraulic disc brake cable is not run through the frame and stand out on the white step-thru model, perhaps it’s easier to service and I appreciate that most of the other cables are internally routed but considering the price I’m surprised this one was left out because it could snag more easily and just doesn’t look as good

Resources:

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Jon in Seattle
9 months ago

The 2017 model Trek ‘Lift’ has been updated so the battery can be charged while it is attached to the bike.

Shifting any geared transmission while under load [aka power shifting] will stress the system and create some interface noise. Manual-shift cars and motorcycles have a clutch to allow smooth gear changes. On a standard pedal bicycle with a derailleur shifter it is common practice to decrease force on the pedals while shifting to obtain smooth engagements. Changing gears on the Lift in that manner works perfectly for seamless shifting.

Power from the Shimano Steps with its 44-tooth chainring is quite surprising. The motor is a mere 250 watts but its internal gearing in combination with the torque, crank rpm, and wheel cadence sensors, and smart software, creates a lot of hill climbing energy. My testing showed the Lift to be a noticeably stronger [and much easier] climber than a 350-watt geared-hub bike using the same battery voltage. With the Step’s optional 38-tooth chainring, it would be even better.

Reply
Court Rye
9 months ago

That’s correct Jon! Thanks for chiming in about the updates to charging on the 2017 Shimano STePs system. I just reviewed the Wallerang which also uses the new battery. You’re completely correct about easing off pressure while shifting and given how smart the Shimano motor is, you can usually avoid mashing by gaining some speed, easing off the pedals a little and then shifting. Thanks for adding your thoughts, it sounds like you’re enjoying the product and I hope this helps others consider it as an option. Indeed, the smaller chainring would increase torque but for most of the urban riding the Lift+ seems designed for I feel like the 44 tooth is great :)

Reply
Jon
9 months ago

Shimano changed the Steps battery mount which now includes a receptacle for on-bike charging, and the charger has a new small plug to fit that port. To retain the off-bike charging option, the updated charger includes an adapter for direct connection to the end of the battery.

The earlier Lift could be updated with the new battery mount, and new charger.

Reply
Court Rye
9 months ago

Great comment Jon, you’re exactly right! The new Shimano batteries allow you to charge on-bike and do indeed require an adapter/dongle for charging off. You and others can see this new battery in my Walleräng review here, in the video mostly.

Reply
Julia
8 months ago

I tried this bike out; it was really comfortable and in my opinion, quiet. I am surprised that there are no integrated lights on this bike. No fenders, no lights, and no way to plug the bike in with the battery on board… that’s a few too many deal-breakers for me for a rather expensive bike.

Again, I appreciate your expert review Court; you mention details I wouldn’t even think about. Each review I listen to, I become a bit more educated … a bit wiser consumer. Thanks! Julia

Reply
Court Rye
8 months ago

Hey Julia, well thanks for the positive feedback. I agree that there is room for improvement with this bike and am glad to have contributed to your awareness and education. With so many ebikes available now, I hope you find one that fits and feels like a great deal :D

Reply
Jean
5 months ago

No site ever gives the dimensions of the trek or Towine bikes. How long are they?
How high are they? This information lets one know if it will fit into their vehicles.
Thank You.

Reply
Court Rye
5 months ago

Hi Jean! I do this for all of my new reviews (at least for the frame size I have to test) and have got the measurements for the 2017 Medium 16.5″ Lowstep which are: 22″ Reach, 19″ Stand Over Height, 24″ Width, 71.5″ Length and also for the 2017 Large 21″ Highstep which are: 23.5″ Reach, 24″ Width, 30″ Stand Over Height, 71.5″ Length. I hope this helps you! I do my best to be thorough here and provide an open space to help people… but I’m just one guy ;)

Reply

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mrgold35
2 weeks ago

I have the Saris Freedom SuperClamp 4 bike platform rack is use with my two SUVs. I mostly transport my two Radrovers at around +60lbs each; but, occasionally need to add a 3rd or 4th pedal bikes at 35 lbs or less for family outings only a few times a year.

I have limitations on tongue weight for both vehicles of 500 lbs for my larger SUV and only 150 lbs for my smaller one. My smaller SUV standard hitch is 1.25"; but, I found an aftermarket 2" hitch so I didn't have to add an adapter to switch between vehicles. You might want to double-check the max tongue weight of the Subaru compared to the hitch? Also factor in the length of the a 4 bike rack and if there are passenger and rear cargo restrictions as you increase tongue weight. You don't want your headlight blinding people, reduced front wheel traction, bottoming out over bumps, or handling/braking issues if the Subaru is too tail heavy.

The good things about the Saris rack are:
- tilts down for hatch access
- short lift height being a platform rack
- very secure clamps for front/rear tires and has straps in tire trays. My ebikes do not move at 75 mph on the hwy
- has an cable lock at each end of arm for an extra layer of security
- the second outer arm for bike 3 & 4 can be removed for weight savings and it is easier to put bikes 1 & 2 on the platform
- designed for 190lbs total weight with 4 bikes (60lbs+60lbs+35lbs+35lbs)

Bad things:
- expensive at $799 (got lucky and found an Amazon return for $550 with some mission nuts/bolts)
- heavy at around 65 lbs, made from iron (not aluminum), I never look forward to adding the rack to the vehicle
- hard to secure tire clamps if you have front and rear fenders
- get some bounciness over bumps because of the joint where the rack tilts

Marc Webster
2 weeks ago

Saris does make nice racks. Mine will hold 2 bikes and up to 120 lbs. It does not tilt but it is set back several inches from the bumper. If you don't have a flipper window on the Subaru you won't be able to open the lift gate.

As to the roof rack, lifting a 50+ lb. bike onto a rear rack is hard enough. Raising it up to roof height may be a challenge and you could possibly damage the car.
Hello Al,

Thanks for the reply with info on the Saris racks. in regards to the roof rack, I have no intention of trying to lift a 50lb bike up onto a tall Subaru. My Plan B would be to use my roof rack accessories (bike rack try portion) ad mount them to an assembly I make that is 2" hitch mounted and will have the ability to use my existing roof trays. Might be a worthwhile item since many people in my situation who have old roof rack items but own a car with a hitch setup.

Al P
2 weeks ago

Saris does make nice racks. Mine will hold 2 bikes and up to 120 lbs. It does not tilt but it is set back several inches from the bumper. If you don't have a flipper window on the Subaru you won't be able to open the lift gate.

As to the roof rack, lifting a 50+ lb. bike onto a rear rack is hard enough. Raising it up to roof height may be a challenge and you could possibly damage the car.

Alan Acock
2 weeks ago

I purchased an XM700+ about a month ago and have 200 miles on it. I initially noted the front fender was rattling, so I inserted foam rubber between the fender and the headtube. That eliminated the rattle. However, there was still a loud noise when I hit large pot holes or depressions in the road. The mechanic adjusted the front brake, but that didn’t work. When I lift the front wheel and drop it the noise is not evident. I can’t find anything that might be generating the noise and of course the origin of noise is sometimes difficult to determine in some situations. I am tempted to remove the front fender and see it that is still the issue, but everything seems tight in that area.

So I am reaching out to see if anyone with an XM700+ has experienced this issue?

I have a note about my XM 700+ a bit lower where the front fork had to be replaced. I still get this same (apparently) noise on a rough road. I wonder if it has something to do with the front shock absorber. It is irritating to have this noise on what should be a quiet ride.

TntE3+
2 weeks ago

Oh the 35 mm stem takes a few miles to get used to once your comfortable with the stock stem.
But the bike is so much more agile and feels 10lbs lighter with the short stem.
Also really helps on chunky drops the bike pushes through better. 180 berms the bike is much faster and more balanced, square edge drops the bike floats off and you don’t feel the need to rub you butt on rear tire to keep the front from dropping out on you.
The company i ride with are very accomplished riders on Evil wreckoning and Santa Cruz. High tower LT.
both 9k plus builds and when the trail is chunky, steep and fast the Fs3 gives them all they can handle and when it gets chattery machine gun arm rough the 50lbs monster shines and they can’t match the speed.
18 KOM on strava now with the Fs3 on lagit enduro trails that put a pucker factor on most seasoned of riders.
I went from hating this bike stock and took it back to bike shop asked them to sell it because there was no data available to set it up. To completely blown away and it was less then 400 invested in mods.
Dropper seat, 35mm riser bars, grid tires, 35mm stem, 160mm air rod, 203mm rotors, 1 air token front, 3 shock tokens rear.
The monarch rear shock is the biggest limit and keeps big air out of this bikes comfort Zone, But i take this bike on any chair lift DH run and feel solid.

GillBoyNewn
3 weeks ago

A quick update. I collected my Delite GX Rohloff HS, ordered on 26 August from OnBike, on 11 November. This is 11 weeks, against a promised delivery wait of 6 weeks. Part of the delay was, according to OnBike, due to R&M being short of a key component, though R&M refused to specify which. Nonetheless, demand has apparently pushed delivery times up to around 10 weeks.
I've only ridden the bike around 150 miles so far, and generally I am delighted. No pun intended. It's a heavily engineered, stable, easy-rolling, long range (with the two batteries) and fairly nimble bicycle - though I don't want too much "nimble" at my age. The turning circle is anyway quite small.
My only niggle is the two front wheel punctures I've had so far. Both were caused by tiny thorns (three of them in the second puncture) but the Rock Razor tyres with their SnakeSkin side wall protection are supposed to be robust. I'm thinking about replacement tyres - anyone got any ideas?
And the bike is very heavy, though you don't notice this much once you're on your way. The drawback for me is how get it on top of my Subaru Forester - I can manage to lift the Kalkhoff Endeavour but the R&M is a bit too much. So, a new tow-bar and Thule VeloSpace 918 has been called for. More expense.

mrgold35
4 weeks ago

My wife hates trail riding while I love it. The Radrover's big advantage is when it gets sandy and the fat tires can float on top instead of digging in (you will need the throttle with really deep sand). I had to add the larger Cloud-9 cruiser seat and Suntour NCX SP-12 suspension seatpost to my Rad for the trails. The updated seat combo also came in handy for my work commutes smoothing out the ride at 18-22 mph where I can remain seated 95% of time compared to always having to lift up over every bump.

Rom
4 weeks ago

why did you choose a low step model? Any regrets going with a low step bike?

I don't have any mobility issues at all so I've always just ridden a standard frame bike. My previous (non-electric) bike was a Trek mountain bike that I lightly modified for more road-worthy riding (slimmer, non-knobby tires, panniers bolted onto the back) but I couldn't overcome the geometry of the frame, which made it annoying in stop and start situations due to the top bar. Add in the hassle of trying to throw my leg over the back with full panniers, and I started thinking more about low steps. What sealed the deal for me was using the local bike share bicycles, which are all low step to accommodate everyone. I really got used to the ease and convenience of just stepping through the bike and going.

No regrets at all about low step. The one criticism that people have with them in general is frame flex, but this bike doesn't have that. It's totally solid. In terms of downsides, I suppose it reduces the surfaces available to lock onto a bike rack, so that's one minor drawback. Also, no room for water cages or bike pumps or anything that you would otherwise place on the top bar, but easily solved with a pannier on the back. Without a top bar it's harder to carry or lift (especially since it's such a heavy bike). I don't ever need to do that, but if you live on a 4th floor walkup it's probably not the best choice. Oh, and one of my idiot friends tried to mock me by calling it a "woman's bike" until he test-rode it, then he was asking how he could get one.

emco5
1 month ago

Trek Lift + may have crank forward technology .
That's what it felt like test riding...

The Lift's 65.5* seat tube does give it slight crank forward geometry, but it isn't enough for flat footing. It is a very comfortable riding bike, though.

e-boy
1 month ago

Trek Lift + may have crank forward technology .
That's what it felt like test riding .
Chat up Trek support .
https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/bikes/hybrid-bikes/electric-hybrid-bikes/lift/lift-mens/p/1325600-2018/?colorCode=black

indianajo
1 month ago

Sorry about the cancer. Enjoy yourself while you heal or plan.
Body size, leg legnth, back length, arm length, weight matter. Proposed posture matters, forward for efficiency, straight up for comfort. There are bike frame sizing programs on line, use one to pick a frame size, and rise. Some frames come only in one size, that size may not fit you. Top speed matters, length of trips between charges, roughness of pavement or softness of beach sand determine your desired wheel and tire size. Maximum grade matters, mine is 15%, pretty radical. I draw 750 W on the display up those if I start too slow, but 400 W if I hit 15% at >5 mph. Type of mount on the motorhome matters. There are ramp up devices, there are cable lifts from the ladder, there is lift it yourself. Choose now.
For example, I'm 67, needed a e-ride home 30 miles from summer camp if injured (no phone, no car). Plus occasional festival rides of 80 miles round trip without charge. I'm miniature, with short legs, so I was able to take a ninety's kid's 10 speed cruiser and convert it with a powr wheel for $600 (for the 80 mile range battery). 26"x1.9" tires are fine on our roads. Bigger people have to pony up for a bigger frame which will not be at the charity resale shop. Higher speeds than my typical 10 mph indicate suspension built into the frame. My frame is rigid. Snow or sand indicates big tires, 3 or 4". Ultra smooth pavement allows tiny wheels, 16"x 1.5". I wanted pedal assist plus throttle only, since if injured (pulled muscle or tendon) I don't want to pedal. On festival excursions, I can extend range by pedalling. Whatever NYC/California are requiring don't matter to me. If I break a leg the police tell me my $8/mo cell phone will call an ambulance, otherwise Verison service is $70 a month. Park riding in CA or MA or other "civilized" states may dictate no throttle. Stealth batteries and no visible motor may cut number of encounters with park rangers.
Nuvinci 380 is reported to have trouble with higher power motors, it was designed in the leg powered era. Some oil leaks reported under maintenance. I like the idea of 380; the detent shifting of Shimano 7 speed derailleur has given me a big cyst above my thumb tendon. I tried Sturmey-Archer S80 IGH, it has a reliability problem with the shifter cable mount. But the twist grip SA shifter is making my cyst go down. Nivinci is twist grip shifting.
Have fun shopping.

Dfstarman
1 month ago

I like the assisted lift method :-0

JimE
1 month ago

Here are some photos of a simple rack I built to haul two Ultras in the bed of our 2013 Tacoma. The Ultra is 78-1/2 inches long and the truck bed is just over 73 inches so I have to take the front wheel off and mount the front fork on a fixed bracket. The only bracket I could find for the 130 mm front fork is a Kuat Phat bracket. I just received the bracket so the photos of the rack don’t show the bracket. The rack is 2x4 and 1x4 lumber. I’ll rig straps from the truck bed sides to the built-in rear bike rack to keep the bikes from swaying. If your pickup has a full 8 foot truck box, the Ultra would fit nicely without removing the front wheel. The truck bed is quite high off the ground with the tailgate down. It will take two people to lift each Ultra onto the tailgate to load so I may end up using a ramp and use walk-mode to “drive” the bike into the truck bed.

1/5
Mark Stonich
1 month ago

Thanks for your answer. She had a motorcycle accident when younger. Things were actually fine until last year when she slipped on an ice patch and broke her knee cap. That's when the knee problems started to come back. There's a loss of strength accompanied by pain when putting too much pressure on the knee. Walking is not a problem, but carrying heavy loads is no longer possible. Not sure of all the details, as it's a friend's wife. I offered to help put the bike/kit together as they're both over 75.

In a lot of cases the apparent lack of strength isn't that the muscle isn't strong, but pain prevents you from applying full tension with it. Reducing the bend in the knee with short cranks and spinning freely (easier with shorties) often helps. That she has no trouble walking, where the knee isn't loaded while bent, suggests that reducing the bend MAY help. She should run this past her Ortho and PT to get their opinion.

If she's a candidate for knee replacement, everyone I know who's had one, including my wife, says they should have done it sooner. 7 weeks after Jane's TKR she was climbing much better than before. And she rode 9 miles the day before her surgery. But after replacement, a lot of people lose range of motion and still need shorties. I've sold at least 100 sets 100mm or shorter to adults. Many to people with knee replacements whose PT wasn't aggressive enough.

If you want to have them contact me I can help them determine if short cranks are likely to help. I have all the work I want/need and would have retired years ago if there was someone else, anywhere on the planet, doing the work. So if her situation doesn't warrant shorties, I won't try to talk them into anything to try to make a sale. If nothing else, I can offer her some strategies for biking with bad knees. And Jane can share her experience with the Copenhagen Wheel.

Mark Stonich; BikeSmith Design & Fabrication
5349 Elliot Ave S. Minneapolis, MN 55417 USA
Ph. (612) 710-9593 http://bikesmithdesign.com
https://www.flickr.com/photos/bikesmith/ (Mostly Wildlife)

Recommended reading;
Crank Length, Leg Length and Power
Short Women / Short Crank Feedback
Range of Motion Limitations & Crank Length

In case they worry that short cranks will cost her power;

I recently got a phone call from an average sized adult mountain biker who says he's climbing familiar hills 1 or 2 gears higher on 135s than he'd used with 175s before he messed his knee up. He was just hoping shorties would let him ride again. Now he wants to get back into racing. He’s in Big Bear Lake California where the “Hills” are mountains.

A local Gravel Road racer is 6'-2” (188cm) and after much trial and error finds he is fastest on 135s despite having no RoM or other issues.

Another 6’2” gent in Texas competes in long distance Brevets on 95mm cranks due to severe range of motion limits. Another man with range of motion limits is climbing the hills of San Francisco with a single 38t chainring and a 12-25 cassette, also on 95s. The fellow in San Francisco bends pedal spindles. I just heard from another gent who does the grueling 200 mile Seattle to Portland on 95s.

One of my customers, 5'-7" (170cm) tall professional triathlete Courtney Ogden, won the big money 2011 Western Australia Ironman on 145s. He's done extensive work with the people at PowerCranks where they are becoming big advocates of shorter cranks.

A few years ago a team of 4 Australian MTB racers, ranging in height from 5'10 to 6"1 won a 24 hour MTB race on 125s. With the shorter cranks they rarely had to stand. conserving energy. And they were able to get by with a single chainring, before today’s monster cassettes, because the useful RPM range is so wide with shorties. Many customers have reported that they notice themselves needing to shift much less often.

This from a serious roadie with severe range of motion limitations;
"I’m 5’8” 168lbs – regarding strength, I’m not the strongest. However, I’m not the last up the hills and can do more than my fair share on the front of the group. The 115mm Andels you made for me still have no issues what so ever, I’m on my second set of rings! Please send me another set of 115s for my new bike.”
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Knee Friendly Pedaling

Riders usually push down on the pedals by using their quads to straighten the knee joint. First pushing the pedal forward, then down. There is always going to be a bit of this going on but you can do a lot to reduce the loads on your knees.

Try concentrating on using your glutes and hip flexors to swing your knees up and down. Relax your quads and just let everything below the knee act as a connecting rod between the knees and pedals. At the bottom of the pedal stroke use your hamstrings just a little bit to pull your foot back as though you were scraping mud off your shoe. Don't consciously push forward at the top of the circle. That's when knees are most bent and the tissues around them are most vulnerable.

If you aren't clipped into the pedals, and most of the time even if you are, you don't pull up on the pedal. But the idea of using the hip flexors to lift the knee is to reduce the amount of work done by the front foot that is wasted by raising the weight of the other leg and foot. If you aren't clipped into your pedals you don't want to completely unweight the upward foot. Some contact is needed to keep it located on the pedal. A grippy pedal like a spiky MTB platform or the MKS Grip King (AKA Lambda) makes this easier.

Pedalling on the mid-foot instead of the ball of the foot reduces stress on the knee. And testing has shown that it increases endurance, at a slight cost in peak power. However, be careful to avoid toe/tire interference.

If you do this while spinning freely, in low gears, you won't have to apply much force with any single muscle group. If you aren't comfortable spinning, your cranks are probably too long. 21-21.6% of inseam is best for healthy, non-triathlets, without joint issues. When a person is uncomfortable at higher RPM it isn't due to the muscles switching from extension to contraction more often. It is because their muscles are extending and contracting at a speed that is too fast for them. This recruits more fast twitch muscles, which produce more heat and lactic acid. Shortcranks reduce this speed by moving the muscles a shorter distance per revolution. Allowing more use of slow twitch fibers for a higher comfortable cadence.

Your quads will still end up doing much of the work. But easing some of the tension pulling your patella down onto the joint can make a big difference. When I get a twinge in my knee, it reminds me to concentrate on my pedaling and I actually accelerate.

BTW I read about this type of pedaling years ago, as a way to help you spin better. So it has a double benefit.

For eBike types, think of more efficient pedaling as a way to lessen drain on your batteries. ;)

mid drive merv
2 months ago

Disclaimer: This is my first ever Ebike, so my expectations may be unreliable. If so, feel free to tell me off so I can make better purchase decisions in future.

After spending weeks researching on BBSHD conversions, I got lazy and picked this bike because it looked cool, EBR seemd to like it, and the specs looked great for the price.

Model: 16"

Use: Bought this bike for a sweatless daily travel of 18 miles to and from work. Route is pure tarmac road/trail, with the exception of this particular 100 yard stretch with tree roots cracking open the trail path. Slight up/down gradients no more than 6 degrees (calculated using my Runkeeper elevation chart) along the way making up about 5% of the trip.

Delivery:
Free shipping is great. Delivery was prompt and fast. However, the UPS people dumped the box on first floor. Had a fun time hauling the 70lb package up the stairs alone. The plastic handles on the cardboard box are not reliable, do not use them to pull. Mine gave way causing the box to cut up my knuckles. Wear gloves and pull on the plastic straps, get help if possible.

Assembly:
Followed the assembly video on the Rad website. It was really frustrating to assemble alone, mostly due to the weight of the frame causing it to constantly want to tip over and smack my face. The overly tightened disc brakes made installing the front wheel (the first time) really painful, and the rear wheel rotor kept squeaking.

The rear derailleur is okay. Not tuned out of the box so it can't go below gear 5. I don't use anything less than gear 5 so didn't bother indexing it. Both disc brakes are overly tightened, I highly recommend tuning them before first ride and get the rear wheel removal pain over with ASAP.

Bike Weight:
I severely underestimated what 60+lbs meant.

If you stay on any floor other than level one, you're going to have a fun time. I don't lift, but have sort of decent upper body and leg strength. This bike is very unwieldy to carry up and down the stairs. After a few times of experimenting and eventually injuring my wrist+elbows, I found the most efficient and least painful method to carry it.

Squat down to wrap the upper frame bar under your armpit with the saddle above your shoulders. Grip the lower frame bar directly beside the rear hub motor and lift it up with your legs, with your other hand holding on to the handle bar to prevent the heavy fork from giving you a bitch slap. This method gives you enough height clearance (I'm 5'5" 150lb so YMMV) to go upstairs without the front wheel bouncing off the steps, while relieving stress on your joints.

First ride impressions:
It was really awesome to ride. The heavy frame makes the bike really stable. The large rear rack welded to the frame made carrying all sorts of cargo really easy. The throttle was great and the cadence sensor was quick to respond. Again, this is my first ebike, so not sure how responsive candence sensors should be like. Motor was very quiet; all I hear is the rolling of the tire treads. Free toolkit was a nice touch.

Impressions after riding the first 10 miles:
Ride quality is generally smooth until you hit the bumps. Get a suspension seatpost if budget allows if you don't enjoy having your crotch violently punched by a 60lb frame.

The 20mph limit was extremely irritating. From what I learnt on YouTube, I thought a 20mph limit meant that the motor will only assist up to 20mph, and speeds beyond that require extra effort to pedal. It didn't really feel that way with this bike. At 20mph, the motor actively kicks with its regenerative braking to stop you from going faster. It activates unpredictably causing really unnatural feeling. The closest analogy I can give is driving a car while someone is randomly tapping your brakes. Or if you drive a Nissan Leaf, imagine randomly lifting off your foot from acceleration while driving on ECO.

That said, you are able to enter the metric-based settings mode to increase the speed limit from 32kph to 40kph (~25mph). That made the ride a lot more natural, with short bursts of ~23mph going down gradients, but averaged at 20mph on flats with minimal pedalling.

Impressions after 100 miles:
This may be an issue of bad luck. Rad recommends 50-60psi, so I kept both wheels at 55 psi. My front wheel got a puncture less than 50 miles into riding the bike. A week later at 100 miles, my rear wheel got a puncture on the way to work. The culprit was a tiny piece of rock not more than 2mm wide embedded into the tires. For comparison, my $300 hybrid bike hasn't had a puncture in 7 years, of which 1000+ miles were put on this exact same route.

The rear wheel is tightly bolted down. The EBR YouTube review glosses over this, but mark my words you'll want to throw the bike into the ravine when you get your first rear wheel flat if you didn't do prior preparations to the rear wheel (anti-seize, grease etc.). The spanner provided in the free tool kit is way too short to loosen the bolt, so you'll need to hammer it to make it work. For me, hammering didn't work as the free spanner was chipping before the bolt would budge. I just ordered a new spanner set with a larger spanner instead. The free screwdriver provided was undersized for the bolt washer plate, causing stripping to the screw. My rear wheel bolt dust cover also managed to slip off while riding, so that sucks.

During the rear wheel tube patching, I realized the Rad team installed the tube valve incorrectly. The Schrader valve was only threaded halfway through, so the rim hole had been slicing into the valve. Didn't want to risk another rear wheel removal, so used a new tube instead of a patch.

The Rad rep stated that consumables are not covered under their limited warranty, which I can totally understand. But it'd be nice to at least cover the first 100 miles in case of assembly errors on their part.

I intend to swap out the Kenda K905-007 tires for maybe Schwalbe tires to prevent more commute pain. In the meantime, also budgeting for a BBSHD to convert my hybrid before selling this bike, purely due to the bad taste in my mouth.

Radcity Prep Kit before hitting the road:
1. Your typical bicycle multitool.
2. A screwdriver that won't strip the washer screw. (+$5)
3. The free toolkit (after applying anti-seize/grease to the rear wheel bolts)
4. Patch kit, granted this is required for any bike. (+$5)
5. Wire cutter (to cut zip ties during rear wheel removal) (+$5)
6. At least 2 backup tubes, given the high failure rate I've experienced. (+$18)
7. Change the damn tires for decent puncture resistant ones. (+$100)
8. Tape down the rear wheel bolt dust covers, or just don't use them at all.

Who this bike is for:
1. Heavyweight and strong riders.
2. People who need a strong sturdy frame to carry heavy cargo.
3. People who already have a decent tool set in their house.
4. Riders who can store the bike on ground floor.
5. Riders who are less whiny than me.

Summary:
From my understanding $1500 is considered entry-level pricing for an ebike, but the price point still makes me sort of expect more from the product, considering the same price can get me an excellent 2017 Trek Emonda ALR5. At the very least, don't have the bike break down every 50 miles. What I got was a lot of buyer remorse and extra hidden costs that came with PITA bike maintenance. If you do intend to buy this bike, just budget a bit more to upgrade the parts, prep the bike before your ride, and you should have a better time than I had.

LeftyLoosey
2 months ago

Disclaimer: This is my first ever Ebike, so my expectations may be unreliable. If so, feel free to tell me off so I can make better purchase decisions in future.

After spending weeks researching on BBSHD conversions, I got lazy and picked this bike because it looked cool, EBR seemd to like it, and the specs looked great for the price.

Model: 16"

Use: Bought this bike for a sweatless daily travel of 18 miles to and from work. Route is pure tarmac road/trail, with the exception of this particular 100 yard stretch with tree roots cracking open the trail path. Slight up/down gradients no more than 6 degrees (calculated using my Runkeeper elevation chart) along the way making up about 5% of the trip.

Delivery:
Free shipping is great. Delivery was prompt and fast. However, the UPS people dumped the box on first floor. Had a fun time hauling the 70lb package up the stairs alone. The plastic handles on the cardboard box are not reliable, do not use them to pull. Mine gave way causing the box to cut up my knuckles. Wear gloves and pull on the plastic straps, get help if possible.

Assembly:
Followed the assembly video on the Rad website. It was really frustrating to assemble alone, mostly due to the weight of the frame causing it to constantly want to tip over and smack my face. The overly tightened disc brakes made installing the front wheel (the first time) really painful, and the rear wheel rotor kept squeaking.

The rear derailleur is okay. Not tuned out of the box so it can't go below gear 5. I don't use anything less than gear 5 so didn't bother indexing it. Both disc brakes are overly tightened, I highly recommend tuning them before first ride and get the rear wheel removal pain over with ASAP.

Bike Weight:
I severely underestimated what 60+lbs meant.

If you stay on any floor other than level one, you're going to have a fun time. I don't lift, but have sort of decent upper body and leg strength. This bike is very unwieldy to carry up and down the stairs. After a few times of experimenting and eventually injuring my wrist+elbows, I found the most efficient and least painful method to carry it.

Squat down to wrap the upper frame bar under your armpit with the saddle above your shoulders. Grip the lower frame bar directly beside the rear hub motor and lift it up with your legs, with your other hand holding on to the handle bar to prevent the heavy fork from giving you a bitch slap. This method gives you enough height clearance (I'm 5'5" 150lb so YMMV) to go upstairs without the front wheel bouncing off the steps, while relieving stress on your joints.

First ride impressions:
It was really awesome to ride. The heavy frame makes the bike really stable. The large rear rack welded to the frame made carrying all sorts of cargo really easy. The throttle was great and the cadence sensor was quick to respond. Again, this is my first ebike, so not sure how responsive candence sensors should be like. Motor was very quiet; all I hear is the rolling of the tire treads. Free toolkit was a nice touch.

Impressions after riding the first 10 miles:
Ride quality is generally smooth until you hit the bumps. Get a suspension seatpost if budget allows if you don't enjoy having your crotch violently punched by a 60lb frame.

The 20mph limit was extremely irritating. From what I learnt on YouTube, I thought a 20mph limit meant that the motor will only assist up to 20mph, and speeds beyond that require extra effort to pedal. It didn't really feel that way with this bike. At 20mph, the motor actively kicks with its regenerative braking to stop you from going faster. It activates unpredictably causing really unnatural feeling. The closest analogy I can give is driving a car while someone is randomly tapping your brakes. Or if you drive a Nissan Leaf, imagine randomly lifting off your foot from acceleration while driving on ECO.

That said, you are able to enter the metric-based settings mode to increase the speed limit from 32kph to 40kph (~25mph). That made the ride a lot more natural, with short bursts of ~23mph going down gradients, but averaged at 20mph on flats with minimal pedalling.

Impressions after 100 miles:
This may be an issue of bad luck. Rad recommends 50-60psi, so I kept both wheels at 55 psi. My front wheel got a puncture less than 50 miles into riding the bike. A week later at 100 miles, my rear wheel got a puncture on the way to work. The culprit was a tiny piece of rock not more than 2mm wide embedded into the tires. For comparison, my $300 hybrid bike hasn't had a puncture in 7 years, of which 1000+ miles were put on this exact same route.

The rear wheel is tightly bolted down. The EBR YouTube review glosses over this, but mark my words you'll want to throw the bike into the ravine when you get your first rear wheel flat if you didn't do prior preparations to the rear wheel (anti-seize, grease etc.). The spanner provided in the free tool kit is way too short to loosen the bolt, so you'll need to hammer it to make it work. For me, hammering didn't work as the free spanner was chipping before the bolt would budge. I just ordered a new spanner set with a larger spanner instead. The free screwdriver provided was undersized for the bolt washer plate, causing stripping to the screw. My rear wheel bolt dust cover also managed to slip off while riding, so that sucks.

During the rear wheel tube patching, I realized the Rad team installed the tube valve incorrectly. The Schrader valve was only threaded halfway through, so the rim hole had been slicing into the valve. Didn't want to risk another rear wheel removal, so used a new tube instead of a patch.

The Rad rep stated that consumables are not covered under their limited warranty, which I can totally understand. But it'd be nice to at least cover the first 100 miles in case of assembly errors on their part.

I intend to swap out the Kenda K905-007 tires for maybe Schwalbe tires to prevent more commute pain. In the meantime, also budgeting for a BBSHD to convert my hybrid before selling this bike, purely due to the bad taste in my mouth.

Radcity Prep Kit before hitting the road:
1. Your typical bicycle multitool.
2. A screwdriver that won't strip the washer screw. (+$5)
3. The free toolkit (after applying anti-seize/grease to the rear wheel bolts)
4. Patch kit, granted this is required for any bike. (+$5)
5. Wire cutter (to cut zip ties during rear wheel removal) (+$5)
6. At least 2 backup tubes, given the high failure rate I've experienced. (+$18)
7. Change the damn tires for decent puncture resistant ones. (+$100)
8. Tape down the rear wheel bolt dust covers, or just don't use them at all.

Who this bike is for:
1. Heavyweight and strong riders.
2. People who need a strong sturdy frame to carry heavy cargo.
3. People who already have a decent tool set in their house.
4. Riders who can store the bike on ground floor.
5. Riders who are less whiny than me.

Summary:
From my understanding $1500 is considered entry-level pricing for an ebike, but the price point still makes me sort of expect more from the product, considering the same price can get me an excellent 2017 Trek Emonda ALR5. At the very least, don't have the bike break down every 50 miles. What I got was a lot of buyer remorse and extra hidden costs that came with PITA bike maintenance. If you do intend to buy this bike, just budget a bit more to upgrade the parts, prep the bike before your ride, and you should have a better time than I had.

PCDoctorUSA
2 months ago

I would prefer not to ride with a backpack because I don't like the weight and it leaves my back soaking wet. I did find a backpack from Osprey that has a web design to lift the pack off my back and allow air to flow behind it. I also found a commuter pannier with good reviews, but it doesn't come cheap. I've lightened my daily cargo load by purchasing an extra pair of dress shoes in both black and brown and leave them under my desk at work. Now all I carry is my change of clothes, lunch, and a few bike tools.

Rambler
2 months ago

You are one of those guys? Really easy for two guys to lift that bike 4', no matter what sized chain holds it to an open top post. Stolen bicycles are really easy to sell. The police really don't care, in fact around here, they like to sell them at auctions for benefit. On the other hand, scooters and motorcycles use a vin or serial number because a title and license is needed. If it is stolen, no one wants to go to the DMV and give them the numbers off the stolen vehicle. I guess if the states start requiring registration and a license on bicycles, maybe theft will be reduced?

I WAS one of those guys. O:-)

Was my first build. Took me all of Friday to Sunday to just put it together. Couldn't wait to play with it. I blame the gallon of milk, yep THAT'S what made me do it. ;-)

rich c
2 months ago

Rookie mistake in my part. It was 10pm at night. Had a choice between those yellow car stoppers by the front entrance or bike rack in the dark. Choose yellow car stoppers that were only 4 feet tall figured 80lb bike would be safe 5 feet from front entrance of a Ralph's. Over estimated public interest, under estimated motivation of thieves. They just lifted it over stoppers. I'm sure it was caught on surveillance cans of Ralph's. Huntington Beach P.D is considering it a Vehicle theft, so they just stole themselves a Felony.
You are one of those guys? Really easy for two guys to lift that bike 4', no matter what sized chain holds it to an open top post. Stolen bicycles are really easy to sell. The police really don't care, in fact around here, they like to sell them at auctions for benefit. On the other hand, scooters and motorcycles use a vin or serial number because a title and license is needed. If it is stolen, no one wants to go to the DMV and give them the numbers off the stolen vehicle. I guess if the states start requiring registration and a license on bicycles, maybe theft will be reduced?

Over50
2 months ago

...Choose yellow car stoppers that were only 4 feet tall figured 80lb bike would be safe 5 feet from front entrance of a Ralph's. Over estimated public interest, under estimated motivation of thieves. They just lifted it over stoppers...
I'm glad you told us about this. A number of times my only lock-up option in front of my favorite coffee shop has been a parking meter. And I figured the same: "no one is likely to lift a 60 lb bike 4 feet in the air in broad daylight in order to steal it...". I won't do that again....

mrgold35
2 months ago

Updated Pic of my 2016 Radrover with +1700 miles after one year of riding. First day of Albuquerque Balloon Fiesta from 10/7 to 10/15. Able to ride the 27 miles roundtrip from my house to the north end of town to watch the early morning lift off. Able to avoid the crowds, parking issues, wasted time waiting trying to get there and leaving by car.

1/4
Ravi Kempaiah
2 months ago

My vote would be plus tire.
The best of both. You get traction, comfort without sacrificing too much on the handling side.
For some reason, I could never bring myself to like fat bikes (may be I just ride too much on paved surfaces). I have to lift my bike up and down 10 stairs , twice everyday.
My mind automatically goes towards the lightest bike I have. I am sure this is a non-issue for those who just wheel it into their garage.

mrgold35
2 months ago

I've had my his/her Radrovers for over a year and put +3400 miles between them work commuting, traveling, and trail riding. The Radrover, Teo, and Volt will be very similar riding experiences if you need a fat tire ebike. Fat tires are very comfy and capable if you need to transition anywhere from sandy beaches to paved road on the same ride. Plan on getting a suspension seatpost (suntour, bodyfloat, thudbuster). The spring front forks do provide damping on rough terrain and work for my type of riding. Very easy to use my Radrover as an utility ebike because it has a lot of capacity of 290lbs of rider+gear limit.

There are slight differences in brakes, battery capacity, PAS levels, frame sizes, riding positions, and how the throttle is used. At the time I was looking last year; it was mostly Volt, Rad, and Sondors. I scratched Sondors because being under powered and 30 day warranty. I ended up scratching Volt because of forward leaning riding position, lack of bottle cages, no ergo hand grips, didn't have full 750w throttle at any PAS level like the Rad, and watts seems to be reduced as battery levels dropped on the Volt compared to max power at any battery level for the Rad.

A few downsides with my Rad or other fat tire bikes in this price range are:
- they are big, bulky, long, and heavy (especially in the rear). The Rad is a little over 60lbs out the box, 53lbs without the battery, and my Rad is about 70lbs fully loaded with rack, rack bag, accessories, and gear (flat kit, tools, locks, etc...). My wife cannot lift the Rad on our Saris platform rack even at 53lbs.
- Can be very tough to pedal if you run out of power. You will be walking these bike up an incline if you run out of power.
- The bike parts can be low or middle of the road quality (brakes, suspension forks, derailleur, tires, pedals, etc...).

Dewey
3 months ago

https://argobikes.com/products/argocargokit

This started off as a Kickstarter project called “Lift” and as far as I know has not begun deliveries to the original backers, currently estimating deliveries starting this month October 2017 but the proof will be in the delivery. I’m interested to read reviews on how it handles loaded.

A lot of posts on a Family Biking forum I read are from cargo bike riders wanting advice on how to convert a complete cargo bike with e-assist. From what I can tell the Argo is not suitable for mid-drive motors as there is an attachment piece you put on your bike’s bottom bracket and there can’t be anything under it. The simplest e-bike conversion that would work with the Argo would appear to be a rear hub motor.

The utility the product promises is the cost of the Argo is 1/3 the price of most complete cargo bikes, and it’s a cargo bike that breaks in two for ease of transportation/storage. You will need a donor bike, and an e-bike kit battery and rear hub motor. If you don’t have these, the cost of acquiring them plus the Argo would bring the price close to the cheapest complete e-cargo bike the (currently sold out) Virtue Gondoliere. But if you already have a rear hub powered e-bike or just needed to buy a rear hub motor and reuse the battery you have, this could offer the useful choice between your regular front wheel for commuting during the week, then switch to the box for carting kids/groceries at the weekend.

Brenda Cooke
7 months ago

you did not mention lights. I take it those are an ad-on?

Iain Hendry
7 months ago

Another great review! Any chance you will get to ride the Trek Dual Sport+? It seems like the ultimate Trek + Shimano Steps bike!

Pamela L
8 months ago

i just bought this bike, i am thankful for the electric power, i can still ride a medium steep hill in normal mode. i am not used to the gear shift? there appears to be two gear shifters?

Andrea L
1 year ago

I bought one of these for my commute and I love it! The main reason, other than it's a great bike is that, for an electric/pedal assist bike, it's light enough to carry up a few flights of stairs.

Jacinto Gentine
1 year ago

Great review. We are currently looking for an E-Bike. Whats the best E-Bike in your experience. Thank you

Richard Overstreet
2 years ago

hi thanks for great review... question.. is the "low Step" model generally preferred by female riders? I'm shopping now for a conduit or lyft. due to my mobility issue i'm thinking about the low step.. yet don't want to ride a Girls Bike.. LOL thanks for youir thoughts.

jessasdad
2 years ago

Is that the Greentree Neighborhood in Irvine? My Inlaws live there.

Zachary Gruber
2 years ago

I'm just a bit confused. once it hits 20mph, then the engine won't provide any assistance until it slows under 20?

plant based paleo
2 years ago

hey Cort just seen my first e bike in the wild lol I'm a trucker stopped at Walmart in des moines ia girl rode by on the st2 stromer. I'm surprised I don't see more as many places I go hope I start seeing more "normal people" riding them

plant based paleo
2 years ago

Yes a st1 loved it I'm leaning towards a imax s1 scooter for my semi truck but I want a Bosch OE similar mid drive for exercise when I'm home I love the 28 mph ones

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Brian Mcbee Wow! She had a fancy bike :D yeah I see them popping up more and more but it's a big purchase and I think it's still being discovered in America or is known but forgotten because people don't ride bikes in their day to day commuting as much (further distances, busier roads than Europe). They are becoming a lot more common in big cities, I see them all the time in San Francisco. Have you tried one yourself Brian?