Ariel Rider D-Class Review

Ariel Rider D Class Electric Bike Review
Ariel Rider D Class
Ariel Rider D Class Front Fat Tire Front 750watt Motor
Ariel Rider D Class Padded Banana Seat
Ariel Rider D Class Cockpit View
Ariel Rider D Class Color Lcd Display
Ariel Rider D Class Display Controls Motor Switch
Ariel Rider D Class 12 Led Integrated Headlight
Ariel Rider D Class 750watt Rear Hub Motor
Ariel Rider D Class Adjustable Cup Holder
Ariel Rider D Class Optional Rear Rack
Ariel Rider D Class Rear Fat Tire Battery Pack
Ariel Rider D Class Rear View Battery Integrated Rear Light
Ariel Rider D Class Wellgo Pedals Chain Guide
Ariel Rider D Class Stitched Logo Rear Fender
Ariel Rider D Class Optional Front Rack With Optional Basket
Ariel Rider D Class Stock Black
Ariel Rider D Class Electric Bike Review
Ariel Rider D Class
Ariel Rider D Class Front Fat Tire Front 750watt Motor
Ariel Rider D Class Padded Banana Seat
Ariel Rider D Class Cockpit View
Ariel Rider D Class Color Lcd Display
Ariel Rider D Class Display Controls Motor Switch
Ariel Rider D Class 12 Led Integrated Headlight
Ariel Rider D Class 750watt Rear Hub Motor
Ariel Rider D Class Adjustable Cup Holder
Ariel Rider D Class Optional Rear Rack
Ariel Rider D Class Rear Fat Tire Battery Pack
Ariel Rider D Class Rear View Battery Integrated Rear Light
Ariel Rider D Class Wellgo Pedals Chain Guide
Ariel Rider D Class Stitched Logo Rear Fender
Ariel Rider D Class Optional Front Rack With Optional Basket
Ariel Rider D Class Stock Black

Summary

  • A 2WD dual-motor 750 watt electric fat tire bike with a stretched banana seat position, all-purpose set up, scrambler style
  • Comfortable fat tires can take on sand or snow, longer seat that can fit a passenger with built in pegs, adjustable drink holder and bottle cage bosses add utility
  • The drive system is powerful and is complimented by the hydraulic disc brakes, smaller wheel base, throttle, and vibrant color display
  • The bike is a bit on the louder and heavier side with the two motors, you get throttle power according to the pedal assist level, display is not removable and the custom handlebars offer limited adjustability

Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Ariel Rider

Model:

D-Class

Price:

$1,999 (Premium Model $2,399)

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Cruising, Sand and Snow

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2), Speed Pedelec (Class 3)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Battery, 2 Year Motor/Controller, Lifetime Frame

Availability:

United States, Canada

Model Year:

2019

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

74.6 lbs (33.83 kg)

Battery Weight:

8.6 lbs (3.9 kg)

Motor Weight:

8.15 lbs (3.69 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy, Double Heat Treated T4 and T6 for Strength

Frame Sizes:

18.75 in (47.62 cm)14.75 in (37.46 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

18.5" Virtual Seat Tube Length, 18" to 32" Virtual Reach, 29.5" Stand Over Height, 32" Minimum Saddle Height, 27.25" Width, 69" Length

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

Satin Black with Yellow Accents

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid Aluminum Alloy Fork, Double Crown, 135mm Hub Spacing, 10mm Threaded Axle with Keyed Washers and 15mm Nuts

Frame Rear Details:

170mm Hub Spacing, 10mm Threaded Axle with Keyed Washers and 15mm Nuts

Attachment Points:

Fender Bosses, Rear Rack Bosses, Front Rack Bosses, Cup Holder

Gearing Details:

7 Speed 1x7 Shimano Tourney TZ25007428 Derailleur, 14-28 Tooth Cassette

Shifter Details:

Shimano AMFLTX50RCT SIS Index Thumb Shifter

Cranks:

Prowheel, Forged Alloy, 170mm Length, 48 Tooth Steel Chainring with Plastic Guide

Pedals:

Wellgo B087DU Aluminum Alloy Platform

Headset:

Neco, Internal Cups, Straight 1-1/8"

Stem:

Fork-Handlebar Integrated, Aluminum Alloy, Adjustable Height, 25.4mm Cross Bar Diameter

Handlebar:

Fork-Handlebar Integrated Aluminum Alloy, 670mm Length

Brake Details:

Tektro Dorado HDE350 Hydraulic Disc with 160 Rotors, Dual Piston Calipers, Three-Finger Levers with Motor Inhibitors and Adjustable Reach

Grips:

Rubber, Flat, Non-Locking

Saddle:

Custom Made, Retro Banana, Padded, Stitched, 23" Length, 7.5" Width, Faux-Leather

Rims:

Double Walled, Aluminum Alloy, 28 Hole, 80mm Width

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 12 Gauge Rear, Silver with Nipples

Tire Brand:

Kenda Krusade Sport K1188, 20" x 4"

Wheel Sizes:

20 in (50.8cm)

Tire Details:

5-30 PSI, 0.4 to 2.1 Bar, 60 TPI Casing, Wire Bead, Reflective Branding Logo

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Paint-Matched Aluminum Alloy Fenders, Flick Bell on Right, Custom Integrated Headlight (12 LED), Battery Pack Integrated Backlight, Fold-Out Passenger Foot Pegs, Ruihong Adjustable Length Mid-Frame Kickstand, Optional Front Rack, Optional Front Basket, Optional Rear Rack

Other:

Locking Removable Seat Under-Seat Mounted Battery Pack, 1.1lb 2 Amp Charger, IP56 Water Resistant Controller, Honeycomb Battery Cell Layout (Avoids Short Circuits and Stays Cool), Maximum Weight Capacity 320lbs

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Dapu M155

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub, Front-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

750 watts (Two Motors 1,500 Watts Total)

Motor Peak Output:

900 watts (Two Motors 1,800 Watts Total)

Motor Torque:

75 Newton meters (Two Motors 150 Watts Total)

Battery Brand:

Samsung 18650 25E

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

14.5 ah (Optional 17.6 ah)

Battery Watt Hours:

696 wh (Optional 844.8wh)

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

5.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

20 miles (32 km)

Estimated Max Range:

60 miles (97 km)

Display Type:

Ariel Rider Branded APT Fixed, Color, Backlit, LCD, Buttons: +, -, Power, Hold + for Lights, Hold - for Walk Mode, (Double Tap Power for Settings Menu: Language, Units, Brightness, Auto Off, Scenes Analog or Digital, Battery Indicator Voltage Off or Percentage, Power Indicator or Current, Clock, Wheel Diameter, USB Port On Off, Advanced Settings, Password 1919, Speed Limit)

Readouts:

Clock, Voltage, Battery Infographic (Precise), Speedometer, Watts, Trip Distance, Odometer, Range, Timer, Max Speed, Average Speed

Display Accessories:

Display Integrated 5 Volt 500mA USB Type A Charging Port, Motor Selector Toggle Switch (Left is Rear, Right is Front, Centered is Both)

Drive Mode:

Twist Throttle, Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)(Up to 28mph Unlocked, Password 1919)

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Written Review

To run the forums, host the website, and travel, I charge a universal service fee for my reviews. This review was sponsored by Ariel Rider. My goal is to be transparent and unbiased, this video and written review are not meant to be an endorsement of Ariel Rider products.

Ariel Rider is a company I have worked with before… they have been around for a number of years now and it’s nice to see them bring something new to the table like this Ariel Rider D Class bike. So what is the D Class? It is a retro style 2WD dual motor electric fat tire bike with a lot of extra features and really fun to drive. It comes in 1 size and 1 color (matte black) while weighing 74.6lbs and costing $1,999. For $2,399 they have an upgraded version with a longer range battery and front suspension fork, but today we are looking at the $1,999 version. This one may not have the suspension fork or larger battery, but I think you will be surprised by the battery power it still has as well as comfort. For example, you get this custom padded banana seat with retro stitching and even a logo on the back. You may not be able to adjust the seat, but with a length like this, you can slide yourself back and forth on the seat to adjust your leg extension and geometry, so it is really quite comfortable. The seat is so long and comfortable, you can fit a passenger on the back and they even get their own foot pegs (although I hesitate to call them simply pegs as they are more of a whole sturdy platform set!). Adding to that comfort are these 20” x 4” Kenda Krusade Sport fat tires with reflective logos and nobby tread to help absorb bumps. These are 5-30psi rated, and I really recommend dropping that pressure if you are going on sand, snow, or loamy terrain, although do be mindful of pinch flats (aka snake bites) if you keep that pressure low. The spokes here are both 12 gage which is wonderful cause that is going to add sturdiness to the front and rear as well as handle that power of those 2 motors. Unfortunately, these rims have not been punched out for weight like some other fat tire bikes, but this was likely to save on cost. The bike is using wider hub spacing with 135mm in the front and 170mm in the rear. I love these color matched black aluminum alloy fenders here… as a matter of fact, most the entire bike is aluminum alloy which is nice since it won’t get scratched or rust. Another great addition are these super bright battery integrated lights. More and more bikes are adding these which makes me very excited, but the D Class goes above and beyond with this aimable 12 LED front light with metal housing. The 12 LED is super bright and it compliments the 5 LED rear light built into the battery pack. This goes beyond being seen and may actually give you some visibility on the road as well. I love that the bike includes bottle cage bosses on the downtube, but you may want to use it for a folding lock or tool set because Ariel Rider also included an adjustable cup holder in the middle of the frame in front of the seat! Really an awesome addition, adding to the fun and practicality. There are also a couple of optional accessories that can be of similar benefit here too, like the rear rack or front rack, each of them are capable of using this metal basket option too which is really nice. Other features include Wellgo platform pedals, adjustable length kickstand mounted away from the pedals to eliminate pedal lock, an integrated bell, and some internally routed cables and wire wraps.

Diving the D Class is 2 separate 750watt (nominally rated) Dapu geared hub-drive motors with 5 modes of pedal assist and a twist throttle. It has a 12 magnet high resolution cadence sensor, which used to be kind of a premium setup, but nowadays it is considered somewhat older technology. Compared to todays top of the line systems, it tends to feel sluggish because it has this very pronounced on or off feeling, so I recommend using the throttle to ramp up your speed if you want that smoother feel. It kicks up to 20mph with no problem and stopping is nice since they also equipped it with motor inhibitors. I love that you can switch to just the front motor, rear motor, or have both going at the same time for 2WD. Keep in mind, with the two hub motors, this is on the louder side of the bikes I have reviewed. It is also a bit heavier, the motors weigh 8.15lbs each, so that is what is largely contributing to that 74.6lb weight. This is a Class 2 electric bike but can be configured in the display menu to get it past 20mph to 25mph. On the mechanical side, they have an entry level 7 speed Shimano Tourney setup. It has a 14-28 tooth on the cassette… not the best for climbing but is fine for cruising around the city. In the front you have a 48 tooth chain ring with a plastic chain guide, great for keeping your pants from getting messed up and should help the chain not bounce as much. A thumb shifter is here, and I have never been a big fan of these, but I understand if you have a twist throttle attached, sometimes the thumb style shifter is the only option for the engineers to mount a shifting system. Stopping the bike is a set of Tekto hydraulic disc brakes with 3 finger adjustable levers. These are 160mm which is smaller than usual, but don’t let that worry you… since the bike has smaller 20” wheels, it evens out and the 160mm works perfectly here. The fact that they are hydraulic makes them that much better.

Powering the bike is a large high capacity 48v 14.5ah battery. This is a very large battery and would serve any bike extremely well. It is quite capable for the D Class, but do keep in mind you are now powering 2 motors, so you could drain faster. If this is a concern, as mentioned before, you can upgrade the bike for $400 more and get the front fork and a 48v 17.6ah battery. That being said, we rode the smaller battery around (which is still very large) most of the day with no worries. The battery weighs 8.6lbs and on top of having a rear 5 LED rear light setup, also has an LED charge level readout. There is a handle here as well as a power switch, so do be aware that turning on and off the bike is a 2 part process. To really care for this and other lithium-ion packs, I have heard that storing in a cool dry location vs. extreme heat or cold will extend the life and try to keep it about 50% full when not using for long periods so you won’t stress the cells. Try not to let it run down to zero, because that’s really hard on the cell chemistry.

The display here is a large color display that is easy to read and can can swivel but unfortunately cannot be removed. This means the display could be left to the elements if you leave the bike outside for extended periods of time. Controlling the bike is easy with the +, -, and power button on the right. The bike starts at 0 with 1-5 levels of pedal assist. You can use the + and – buttons to scroll through the pedal assist modes and once you are in level 1, the throttle becomes live. I noticed something interesting about this bike, the throttle works accordingly to the pedal assist level. For example, if you want the throttle to act at its most powerful, you will want to put it in pedal assist level 5. Some may like this controlling ramp up feature, but I personally would like the throttle to override whatever mode of assist I am at with full power in case I need to get out of the way of something. Anyway, the display here has readouts for current time, voltage, speed, watts, trip, time, odometer, range, max speed, and average speed. The battery readout is an info graphic on the top right, but you can also change it to a battery percentage which I love. This takes out the guess work of how much battery you have left when you are riding home, as opposed to others that just use 4 separate ticks, so that last tick could be anywhere from 0%-25%. Really a great little feature I appreciate. If you hold the + button, that turns on the battery integrated lights. There is also a walk mode here and a 500ma USB port on the bottom of the display. 500ma is good for maintaining a charge on small devices, but won’t charge up heavy duty devices like an iPhone.

In summary, I like the Ariel Rider D Class a lot. The comfortable saddle, 2WD dual motor setup, powerful battery, and 50/50 weight distribution make for a really fun ride! There are some tradeoffs as there is with any bike to consider however. There is no way to have full throttle capabilities unless you are in assist level 5, so it could be annoying if you are in assist level 1 and need to get out of the way of something quickly. The dual motor setup is also a little louder and heavier than most bikes. I should also mention that turning on and off the bike is a 2 step process with the power switch also on the battery, however, it is easy to reach under the seat if you are sitting down. Tradeoffs aside, you can’t go wrong with the lifetime frame warranty Ariel Rider offers. They also sell online direct to consumer and have a great support setup with a lot of plug and play parts they can send as replacements should something go wrong. At the end of the day, it is a great option for fun riding and is also comfortable if you have a passenger too. I would like to give a big thank you to Ariel Rider for letting me check out the D Class.

As always, I welcome questions and feedback in the comment section below. Whether you own the bike, have taken a test ride, or are brand new to the space, my goal is to provide an objective and honest resource. You can also join the Ariel Rider Ebike forums and share your own photos, videos, and review updates to help others! Have fun out there, and ride safe :)

Pros:

  • The seat is very plush and one of the more comfortable ones I have sat on, with this longer saddle, you can either fit a passenger or slide yourself back to change the pedal angle, giving you more of a full extension
  • The seat also makes adding a passenger easy, especially since down below there are folding foot pegs for the passenger, I almost hesitate to call these pegs, they are more of a real sturdy platform!
  • The dual motor setup can be configured to turn just the front motor on, the rear, or you can use both for 2WD, a lot of fun and really helps on various terrain
  • The bike has great support with its warranty, plug and play parts, and optional accessories
  • Kenda Krusade Sport tires compliment the setup well as they excel in loamy or soft terrain as well as sand and snow and are rated for 5-30psi
  • Tekto hydraulic disc brakes with 3 finger adjustable levers, 160mm rotors which is smaller than usual, but don’t let that worry you, since the bike has smaller 20” wheels, it evens out and the 160mm works perfectly here
  • With smaller diameter wheels, you have a more mechanical advantage… it is easier than moving a really large wheel, so you get strength and efficiency, making for a really fun ride
  • Another great addition are these super bright battery integrated lights, the front is an aimable 12 LED with metal housing, the rear is a 5 LED built into the battery pack, this goes beyond being seen and may actually give you some visibility on the road as well
  • The dual 750 watt Dapu geared hub-drive motors with 5 modes of pedal assist and a twist throttle really get up to 20mph quickly and is a lot of fun to tackle terrain
  • The 48v 14.5ah lithium ion battery is capable and you can even get an optional 17.6ah battery too
  • The display is easy to use, color, backlight, straight forward, and even has USB Type A charging, overall a great for the price
  • I was pleasantly surprised by this bike and you get a lot for $1,999 and it even comes with an adjustable cup holder and bottle cage bosses

Cons:

  • The starting process is a 2 step process, which is a little annoying if you just want to get on and ride, you have to turn on the both the battery and the display separately
  • Because this is a dual motor setup, and they are hub-drive motors, you may notice it is a little bit louder than other bikes, but you can always switch off one of the motors which is nice
  • I noticed the rims don’t have punched out holes to save weight, this as well as the high capacity battery and dual motor setup make everything a little heavier
  • The passenger folding foot platforms are really cool, make sure you do put them in the up position on when not using it, cause you can hit your ankle or your leg which could really hurt
  • There is no way to have full throttle power capabilities unless you are in assist level 5, so it could be annoying if you are in assist level 1 and need to get out of the way of something quickly
  • It has a 14-28 tooth on the cassette, not the best for climbing but is fine for cruising around the city
  • It has a 12 magnet cadence sensor, which used to be kind of a premium setup, but nowadays it is considered somewhat older technology since it feels a bit sluggish because it has this very pronounced on or off feeling, so I recommend using the throttle to ramp up your speed if you want that smoother feel

Resources:

More Ariel Rider Reviews

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Comments (32) YouTube Comments

Michael Walker
6 months ago

That’s funny I ordered my Super73 last month and I am still waiting for it. And now I regret buying it. This e-bike seems to be better and cheaper.

  Reply
Court
6 months ago

Bummer! I really did enjoy the Ariel Rider D-Class… sorry this didn’t come out just a bit sooner. I don’t think we had covered it one month ago, it’s a brand new model from them :)

  Reply
Greg
6 months ago

Hi Court

Is the headlight always on on can it be shut off to save power? Also is the tail light, a brake light too.

Thanks

  Reply
Court
6 months ago

Hi Greg, I believe that the headlight can be turned off by holding the up arrow on the control pad and the back light is just always on if the headlights are on as well. Part of me remembers it going bright when braking, but I might be incorrect on that. Overall, I was very impressed with the headlight brightness and the overall build value of the D-Class :)

  Reply
Carlo
6 months ago

Great review Court! I love the dual aspect of this bike but I’m not sure I see myself as a scrambler bike type of guy. Are there any other bikes with dual motors out there?

  Reply
Court
5 months ago

Hi Carlo! I’m so glad that you asked ;) the only other dual motor product that I’ve reviewed is the Easy Motion Big Bud Pro and EVO Snow which are now being sold under the BH name vs. Easy Motion. I haven’t covered any of the newer models yet. I know that there are other dual-motor ebikes out there, perhaps this is a great topic to create and discuss in the EBR Ebike Forums?

  Reply
Michael
6 months ago

Hello Court, I weigh about 335 lbs. and I need to get out into the mountainous National Forest near my home, for rock hounding and exercise. Is my weight going to be too much for the D class Ariel, even with the battery upgrade???

  Reply
Court
5 months ago

HI Michael, most ebikes I’ve covered in recent years are rated 250lbs to 300lbs, so you could be in a position where you exceed that. I didn’t get specific weight limits from Ariel Rider but the good news is, these smaller 20″ wheels tend to be very strong, so spokes won’t come loose as easily. The smaller diameter also provides a mechanical advantage for the motor to climb easier. All things considered, this is probably one of the best options for your body and use case! These are the things I would consider, but I can’t really say for sure. I hope it works out for you if you go for it :D I’d love to hear back and see some great pictures of mountains and rocks in the Ariel Rider ebike forums someday!

  Reply
Temka
6 months ago

The website says Dapu M155 motor can do 350/500 W maximum. How does it come up with 750?

  Reply
Court
5 months ago

Hi Temka, I don’t have a good way of testing or verifying the motor watt data. Perhaps they got a custom motor made for this project or perhaps they are estimating the peak output vs. nominal. My goal is to provide the best data I can, and you could check directly with the company for more feedback. I would love to hear what they say if you do go that route :)

  Reply
Michael Skinner
5 months ago

I have a D-Class on order, so when I read this, I decided to just ask Ariel Rider about the discrepancy. They assured me that “the Dapu M155 has a 750W version which we’ve been using on our W-Class, N-Class and now D-Class.” They also mentioned that, “The Dapu mid-drive motors we use are also not on their website, but we’ve been using them for about 3 years now.” Dapu seems to be great at making motors, not so good at keeping their website up-to-date.

Ray
5 months ago

I love these scrambler type bikes, and this one definitely has peaked my interest!

I’d really love a single speed version though, besides the Super 73, any other single speed versions out there? Or do you know if Ariel plans to do a single speed version?

  Reply
Alan
5 months ago

What are thoughts on the Ariel D Class vs Super73 and Juiced Scrambler? Those are three I have my eye on but mostly the D-Class

  Reply
Court
5 months ago

Hi Alan! I prefer Ariel Rider, then Juiced, then Super73 just based on customer support alone. Super73 is the original, and they’ve spent a lot on marketing, but Ariel Rider has come in with something really special at an amazing price. Juiced offers great value, and I love their team (Tora is really smart and hardworking) but I haven’t spent time with their bikes as much lately. I hope this feedback helps you decide! Feel free to ask around in the EBR forums (once they are back online).

  Reply
Pablo Pappano
5 months ago

Hi Court, I’d love to see you review the Juiced Scrambler and a newer SUPER 73 review.

D
3 months ago

Hi!! I’m a 5’7 woman and thought this would be great for my kiddo and I in the snow and trails in Alaska. With the seat as not adjustable do you think this bike would be manageable for me? Thanks for your time!!

  Reply
Court
3 months ago

Hi D! That sounds like a blast, you’re a fun Mom :D yes, even though the seat height isn’t adjustable, this type of bike can be really fun to romp around on, especially since it has a throttle. The longer seat would make it possible for you to ride with your kid and I think it would handle the off-road and packed snow better than a lot of competing products. There’s a unique balance of fat tires, lower frame that’s easy to approach, and long but sturdy frame that can accommodate a passenger. Sounds like a really good fit, to be honest. Have fun out there!!

  Reply
RYAN
3 months ago

Hi, what a great review! I’ve watch the video on YouTube twice from start to finish.
I wish I had discovered this bike before I placed an order for Super73 S1. What a mistake that was. But I placed an order for this bike and I am hoping I can sell the Super73. I believe D-class is head and shoulder above Super73.

Thanks again for great review!

  Reply
Court
3 months ago

Hi Ryan! Glad this review came in handy. Yeah, I haven’t had super good luck contacting and working with Super73, even though their bikes look very cool! Whatever you end up with, you’re welcome to share here and you could even post your S1 for sale using the forums here.

  Reply
Red Mage
3 months ago

Hey, great reviews on all of the bikes. We live in very hilly Westchester NY (not west coast hilly but still steep…) I was considering the Ariel M or D Class. Would do mostly street or light trails with the hills here which do you think is a better fit? Can the M Class take some light trails?

  Reply
Court
3 months ago

Hey! I think that both the M and D Class will be able to handle medium sized hills… even though they use different motor types. The mid-drive is going to be most efficient, but the powerful geared hub motor on the D-Class gets a mechanical advantage because of the small rear wheel. I think the D-Class will be most comfortable off-road because it has more air volume inside to compress. It will also feel the most stable because the fat tires offer more surface area for traction. Yes, the M-Class probably can handle some light gravel off-road type of riding, and it may be more enjoyable to pedal since you can adjust seat height. It’s a tough decision, but I hope this quick feedback helps you out :)

  Reply
Jessica Ma
2 months ago

This looks really cool. Is the battery locked in with a key? So how exactly do you “start” the bike, I read there is 2 step process but what does that entail? Do you need to also charge the display?

“There is no way to have full throttle power capabilities unless you are in assist level 5, so it could be annoying if you are in assist level 1 and need to get out of the way of something quickly” Can you explain more about this? Do you have to twist the throttle basically 4 times if you’re on level 1 to get it to be only motor, no pedal assist?

I’m 5’4″ female, would I be able to fit this comfortably? Does it regenerate when you break? I know the XMERA bike had this capability. How would you lock this baby up for safety?

Thanks!

  Reply
Court
2 months ago

Great questions, Jessica! I’d love to clarify for you. You do need the key to lock the battery pack to the frame, and then again if you wish to remove it from the bike for safe storage or transport… but you don’t need to turn the key to power up the bike. You simply press the power button on the control pad, which is mounted near the left grip. The bike starts up and the display shows some readouts. Next, you can click the up or down arrow to raise or lower the level of pedal assist which makes the motor more or less powerful. This power level also dictates how fast the bike can go and how much power the twist throttle can deliver. The LCD display and headlight both run off of the main battery pack, so you don’t need to charge them or use disposable batteries.

So again, just to clarify, you press buttons to change assist and this also adjust the throttle power. The half-grip twist throttle on the right is there to let you operate the motor without pedaling, if you wish, but its power is limited by the chosen level of assist. Yes, I do think that you could mount and ride this bike, as a 5’4″ individual. The 32″ minimum saddle height means that you might have to tip the bike to one side when standing over the seat vs. being able to put both feet on the ground. If you slide forward a bit, the stand over height of 29.5″ could make it just a bit easier to straddle. If you want something with fat tires that’s a bit lower to the ground and easier to step over, consider something like the RadMini Step-Thru. As for electricity regeneration, no, this type of motor doesn’t offer that. However, it also doesn’t produce any drag and weighs less than motors that do. It’s not a feature that most ebikes use because the magnetic drag and additional weight isn’t necessarily offset by the benefits of regeneration. I’m neither for or against regen, but it usually makes more sense with heavy automobiles vs. ebikes, which tend to be light and don’t recapture much energy. As for locking, I’d recommend a u-lock and cable lock, as well as removing the battery at night to store in a cool dry location and to reduce the chance of theft. I made a guide about locking ebikes here.

  Reply
Jessica Ma
2 months ago

Oh also, just how well do you think this could handle in the Winter time? I live in Montreal, Canada. It gets pretty snowy and cold so I’m thinking about the battery + the slushiness with all the salt ruining the frame (rust), I’d likely ride it on only fresh snow days where there is no salt yet on the ride (or take it off road onto the packed trails nearby where the salt doesn’t get). What are your thoughts?

  Reply
Court
2 months ago

Hi, Jessica! I also live in Canada (on the West side) and can understand how you’d want a fat tire ebike to deal with snow and ice. I actually got to test ride one from VoltBike recently where we filmed on the snow and you could watch that video to learn more and see it in action! The key is to keep the tire pressure low so they can spread out and get better traction and float. I’ve even ridden ebikes in soft sand by using this technique, and it worked great. Here’s an example video of that. As for rust… yeah, that could be tricky. I think it might just be a part of any ebike with some steel components… but they are designed to be fairly water resistant. You can rinse ebikes with light water or a damp washcloth… and if you get plastic or aluminum alloy fenders, they might not rust as much. Most frames are made out of aluminum alloy, so that’s not an issue, just the chainring, sprockets, and sometimes the chain, though most of those are rust resistant as well :)

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DH
1 month ago

Any feedback yet on the suspension fork?? The upgrade to that bike is cheaper than just buying the bigger battery.

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Martin
3 weeks ago

Hi there, how’s things? Thanks for a good and comprehensive review. Can you help me figuring out if/ when/ how I will be able to order and get my hands on one of these Class D bikes, as I’m situated in Denmark, Europe? I haven’t been able to spot an european dealeship yet.

Thanks in advance,
Cheers!

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Court
3 weeks ago

Hi Martin! I’m not sure if they ship internationally but you could contact the company directly through their official website here :)

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Chris
3 weeks ago

I’m a tall rider, 6 foot 4, would I be too large for this bike?

  Reply
Court
3 weeks ago

Hi Chris! I think that depends on how you’d like to ride it. You won’t be able to get full leg extension, even if you scooted way to the back. If you’re just looking to zip around using throttle and maybe stand and pedal or do it in a squished seated position… then it could work fine. If you want a more active body position and correct fit for pedaling, I recommend BULLS, Specialized, Trek, Giant, or one of the other major brands that offers a range of sizes ;)

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