Ariel Rider N-Class Review

Ariel Rider N Class Electric Bike Review
Ariel Rider N Class
Ariel Rider N Class Avid Bb7 Mechanical Disc Brakes
Ariel Rider N Class Ebike Battery Charging Port Ignition Key
Ariel Rider N Class Cruiser Bars Twist Throttle
Ariel Rider N Class Ebike Display Panel Backlit Fixed
Ariel Rider N Class 42 Tooth Chainring Bash Guard
Ariel Rider N Class Custom Leather Saddle Sprung
Ariel Rider N Class Custom Springer Fork Cst Maxxis Balloon Tires
Ariel Rider N Class Spanninga Vena Brake Light
Ariel Rider N Class Electric Bike Shimano Altus 7 Speed
Ariel Rider N Class Beige Black Red Cover Colors
Ariel Rider N Class Custom Battery Box Cover
Ariel Rider N Class Ebike Battery Charger
Ariel Rider N Class Electric Bike Review
Ariel Rider N Class
Ariel Rider N Class Avid Bb7 Mechanical Disc Brakes
Ariel Rider N Class Ebike Battery Charging Port Ignition Key
Ariel Rider N Class Cruiser Bars Twist Throttle
Ariel Rider N Class Ebike Display Panel Backlit Fixed
Ariel Rider N Class 42 Tooth Chainring Bash Guard
Ariel Rider N Class Custom Leather Saddle Sprung
Ariel Rider N Class Custom Springer Fork Cst Maxxis Balloon Tires
Ariel Rider N Class Spanninga Vena Brake Light
Ariel Rider N Class Electric Bike Shimano Altus 7 Speed
Ariel Rider N Class Beige Black Red Cover Colors
Ariel Rider N Class Custom Battery Box Cover
Ariel Rider N Class Ebike Battery Charger

Summary

  • A powerful electric cruiser with unique battery box design reminiscing of vintage motorcycles, three color choices for the box, fenders and chain guard including red, black and beige
  • Integrated LED lights by Spanninga, comfortable CST balloon tires with reflective sidewall stripes and a generic flick bell are included standard which improve visibility and safety
  • Powerful 500 watt geared motor, large 48 volt battery and adjustable speed settings (password protected) make this a versatile platform, solid 160 mm mechanical disc brakes with motor inhibitors stop well
  • The battery pack is not designed to be removable for charging off the bike or reducing weight during transport and the weight is a bit higher than a downtube or seat tube pack

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Ariel Rider

Model:

N-Class

Price:

$2,899 (Premium Model $3,099)

Body Position:

Upright Relaxed

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Cruising

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2), Moped or Motorcycle (Class 4)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Battery, 2 Year Motor/Controller, 5 Year Frame

Availability:

United States, United Kingdom, Germany, Holland, Singapore, China, Taiwan, Japan, South Korea, Turkey, Spain, Italy, Switzerland, Portugal, Austria, United Arab Emirates

Model Year:

2016

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

62.5 lbs (28.34 kg)

Battery Weight:

7 lbs (3.17 kg)

Motor Weight:

8.37 lbs (3.79 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy, Double Heat Treated T4 and T6

Frame Sizes:

20 in (50.8 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

20" Seat Tube, 26" Reach, 32" Stand Over Height, 74" Length

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

Beige, Red, Black

Frame Fork Details:

Custom Made Springer Style, 10 mm Bolt Skewer

Frame Rear Details:

10 mm Bolt Skewer

Attachment Points:

Fender Bosses

Gearing Details:

7 Speed 1x7 Shimano Altus, CS HG20-7, 11-36T

Shifter Details:

Shimano SIS Index

Cranks:

Prowheel 244A-2, 42T Chainring with Alloy Bash Guard

Pedals:

Wellgo Aluminum Alloy Platform, B087DU

Headset:

Neco 3510

Stem:

Promax MA-525 Adjustable Angle

Handlebar:

Zoom Cruiser, 25" Width

Brake Details:

Avid BB7 Mechanical Disc with 160 mm Rotors, Easy Adjust Calipers, Artek Levers with Motor Inhibitors

Grips:

Custom Hand Stitched Leather with Lockers

Saddle:

Custom Leather, Sprung (Optional Velo Extra-Wide Plush Plus, Sprung)

Seat Post:

Promax Aluminum Alloy, Tapered

Seat Post Length:

300 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

27.2 mm

Rims:

Double Walled Aluminum Alloy

Spokes:

Stainless Steel 13G

Tire Brand:

CST Maxxis, 26" x 2.35"

Wheel Sizes:

26 in (66.04cm)

Tire Details:

Reflective Sidewall Stripe, 22-60 PSI

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Paint-Matched Full Length Composite Fenders with Mud Flaps, Paint Matched Composite Chain Guard, Flick Bell on Right, Integrated LED Lights Front: Spanninga Swing 40 LUX Back: Spanninga Vena, Aluminum Alloy Bash Guard

Other:

2 Amp Charger 1.1 lb with Cell Balancing, IP56 Water Resistant Controller, Honeycomb Battery Cell Layout (Avoids Short Circuits and Stays Cool)

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Dapu

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Motor Peak Output:

700 watts

Motor Torque:

48 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Samsung 29E

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

11.6 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

556.8 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

4 hours

Estimated Min Range:

25 miles (40 km)

Estimated Max Range:

40 miles (64 km)

Display Type:

Fixed, Backlit LCD Console on Left

Readouts:

Speed, Battery Capacity (5 Bars), Assist Level (0-6), Trip Meter, Odometer, Average Speed, Max Speed (Hold Plus Button to Activate Lights)

Drive Mode:

Twist Throttle, Torque Sensing Pedal Assist (12 Magnet Sensor)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph) (Up to 28 MHP Unlocked)

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Written Review

The N-Class is Ariel Rider’s top of the line offering with the most integrated aesthetic and a special option to customize the top tube battery box. I struggled to grasp what the bike would be like before seeing it in person, the top part is all plastic (aside from the surrounding tubing), is dyed completely through and is made from durable scratch resistant polycarbonate. This approach strikes a balance between reduced weight, increased strength and a nice aesthetic reminiscent of the popular Sondors bikes but much higher quality. This platform is very strong, fast, offers pedal assist with twist throttle override and even has integrated lights. You get a seven speed Shimano Altus drivetrain (a step up from entry level) and an impressive two year warranty on most of the bike with one year on the battery. My only complaint or question mark is that the battery is not removable. Considering the 62.5 pound (28 kg) weight this would have been a nice feature for transporting the bike as the pack weighs ~7 lbs on its own. Also, not having a removable battery means you’ll have to park the N-Class near an outlet every time it needs a fill-up and that could be difficult if you’re using it to commute.

In practice, the Ariel Rider N and W Class electric bikes I tested were more geared towards neighborhood “fun” riding. They don’t have racks or even rack bosses and you don’t even get a bottle cage mounting point. It wouldn’t be an ideal commuting platform but that’s not what it’s about and frankly, with a backpack on you’d fare pretty well because of the power and range on offer. The motor is a 500 watt internally geared hub mounted in the rear wheel. It’s made by Dapu that’s a solid brand in my experience and the battery is 48 volt 11.6 amp hours for more than a half kilowatt of capacity. It’s arranged to support more power and speed than efficiency but if you ride in a lower assist level there’s no reason it won’t take you 30+ miles. The best features of this bike for me were how it looks, the speed adjustability built into the display (password protected) and how comfortable it rides. With large balloon tires, a custom sprung saddle and cruiser bars (with padded leather grips) the strain of bumps and cracks are significantly reduced. Note that the custom springer fork really doesn’t travel much so if you’re willing to trade style for more comfort then consider the Comfort model vs. Premium I reviewed. It costs less and uses a different (but still comfortable) saddle and comes with a basic oil suspension fork.

Ariel Rider is a company that dates back to 2010, having been rebranded after 2014 as the founding team expanded internationally. Today their products are sold in 26 countries which is very impressive to me. The N-Class is being used by some businesses and fancy hotel chains due to its brandable customizable battery box. The company name “Ariel Rider” is a nod to Ariel Motorcycles, a company dating back to 1870, which was an innovator in British motorcycle design that eventually spun off into cars. Interestingly, the Ariel name has been taken up by a modern sports car producer called Ariel Ltd in much the same way that Ariel Rider uses it. So the point here is that these are all distinct entities, each building on a long heritage of innovation and style, paying homage if you will. Aesthetics are a huge draw with the W-Class and touch points like the custom leather saddle, locking leather grips, color matched fenders, chain guard and sturdy black pedals bring it home for me. I went into this review impressed but curious about the width of the oversized top tube battery bay and came away convinced that it all works together well for a good ride experience… though I wish the key did not have to be left in when riding.

To operate the bike you charge the battery using a nice, light weight 2 amp charger then press the power button on their LCD console for a couple of seconds. It blinks to life and you see speed, assist level and battery level among range and other ride details. From here you can arrow up or down exploring six levels of assist and a level zero which keeps the display and lights going while also allowing for throttle on demand operation. It’s setup very well and really makes you feel like you’re in control of the bike. Having six levels of assist vs. 5 or even 3 as I see on other electric cruisers means that you have more control over top speed when pedaling and as mentioned earlier, you can go deeper by double clicking the power button to adjust other settings and even cap the top speed or allow it to reach ~25 mph for private and off-road use. The bike grew on me and I actually went through a sort of wave of emotions at first expecting it to be more like the Tracker from Vintage Electric Bikes then seeing the plastic and wondering if it would rattle (it stayed very quiet and felt sturdy) then gaining an appreciation for the power but also the control of operation and the finer touches like the saddle and protected wires on the rear light. For the price, it’s a unique looking bike that really puts you in control. There are sacrifices in terms of utility but it keeps you dry and safe which I love.

Pros:

  • Beautiful touch points on the Premium model, the saddle is large and comfortable but also has the Ariel Rider name on it in cursive which looks classy, same thing with the display, I love the wing logo on the battery box and the ability to custom print onto the box for ~$350
  • I like the quick release seat tube collar and front wheel, this helps to reduce weight and make the bike easier to move since the battery is not easily removable
  • I’m a fan of the Avid BB7 mechanical disc brakes because they offer tool-free rotor adjustment, you can use your fingers to twist the little red discs to fine tune the calipers as your pads wear down
  • Depending on where you live it’s wonderful to have full length fenders and the color matching on the Ariel Rider ebikes is spot on, the chain guard also matches and is a sort of custom thin guard which looks great
  • The chainring has an aluminum bash guard on it which also acts as a chain guide to some extent making the drivetrain more robust (useful at higher speed riding and on bumpy terrain), I like that the spokes they went with are a bit larger at 13 gauge vs. 14G given the heavier build of the bike
  • You get three color choices (for the fenders, chain guard and battery box cover) including red, black and beige and the box plastic is scratch resistant
  • I absolutely love the integrated LED lights, both are made by Spanninga and the tail light is wired in so it lights up when you pull the brake levers
  • Nice display panel and control unit, it’s compact but the buttons are large and easy to reach without taking your hand of the left grip, you can get into settings by double clicking the power button and change your speed when the passcode is entered (up to ~25 mph in the USA)
  • The controls default to 0-6 pedal assist and you can override with twist throttle at any level! This is awesome for people who want a more scooter-like experience, the cadence sensor uses 12 magnets making it pretty responsive
  • The Ariel Rider N-Class uses a custom designed hydroformed Aluminum alloy frame that feels solid and all of the wires and cables are internally routed to reduce snags
  • Upgraded Wellgo Aluminum alloy platform pedals offer lots of surface area and feel stable and stiff, the saddle is completely custom with leather imported from Australia… it feels firm at first but should soften over time (you can request the comfort saddle from Velo if you’d like and that comes stock on the Comfort trim level which costs less), even the brake levers are upgraded and have a nice rubberized grip on the leading edge, you get a basic bell to top it all off

Cons:

  • The battery pack is mounted inside a polycarbonate box that isn’t designed to be removable or opened easily… so the battery stays with the bike making it heavier to transport and less versatile to charge
  • The springer fork on the Premium model looks cool but doesn’t offer much travel and adds weight, Ariel Rider offers a more traditional suspension oil fork on the Comfort model but it doesn’t have lockout
  • The battery box is pretty wide (widest towards the head tube) which looks cool like a motorcycle gas tank, but is easier to bump with your knees while pedaling
  • No bottle cage bosses or rack bosses on either the Comfort or Premium models, you might have to bring a little backpack along to carry supplies
  • This electric bicycle is only available in one frame size but the stem is adjustable angle and the seat tube has quick release so it’s actually quite versatile
  • I noticed that the cadence sensor starts quickly but doesn’t always shut the motor down when you stop pedaling (I was told this was a choice made to smooth out the ride with inconsistent pedaling), it alarmed me at first because I thought maybe the throttle was stuck on but you can always cut power by pulling either brake lever so that’s nice

Resources:

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More Ariel Rider Reviews

Ariel Rider W-Class Review

  • MSRP: $2,350
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

A beautiful, custom designed cruiser electric bike drawing from vintage motorcycle designs with a springer fork, chopper bars and wider top tube. Powerful 500 watt geared hub motor by Dapu paired with a 556 watt hour battery…...

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Dewey
1 day ago

For folks seeking a step-through donor pedal bicycle frame to convert to an ebike with a DIY motor kit, the Reddit City Bikes spreadsheet has a column indicating where a step-through frame is available together with price, type of drivetrain, and web link:
https://www.reddit.com/r/citybike/comments/45zbr3/the_rcitybike_spreadsheet_updated_for_spring_2016/

Common features of ebikes used in urban bikeshare systems such as the Smoovengo E-Bike (Paris), Social Bicycles JUMP (Washington, DC), Bewegen Pedelec (Baltimore), and BCycle Dash+ (designed by Trek, coming in 2018), are a step-through frame, 26" wheels, 3 or 7 speed IGH, Class 1 pedelec, 250w front hub or 350w mid-drive motor, and rollerbrakes. Dock based systems recharge off the bikeshare dock vs dockless systems like JUMP incorporate a GPS locator chip and require you lock up the ebike with a provided U-lock and a maintenance guy either swaps out the battery or recharges it at a hub collection point every 2-3 days.

Siganberg
3 days ago

My experience with my Bulls (Brose) is I always left behind with my buddy running on Giant (Yamaha) on a long pavement climb but equally matched them on the offroad climb on different stiff. They are usually on level 2 assist and I'm on level 4 but even with that setting I always have more battery left remaining after the session. Maybe because Brose drawing not many amps on highest level assist or I have 150watts more capacity on my battery compare to them (650 vs 500). I just always think that they are just stronger than me and more physically fit. Although they are older than me, they have long experience on regular mtb when they were young vs me that never really physically had the endurance to do regular mtb. But I start doing more and more eMTB and noticed that I start improving my endurance.

Either way, I'm satisfied with the level to assist from my Bulls. My main goal is to improve my health and enjoy trails. I also got the FS 3 27.5 on good deal price. $3000 out the door on my local ebikes store here.

I do have Class III ebike that I use for my daily commute and that one is very fast but it's not good on an offroad climb and it's not really allowed on trails. I need that power to be able to catch my train on time. :)

Mark Peralta
2 days ago

Hello!
i have a round trip commute of 34 miles (total). The road is mostly flat. I am looking for a fast class 3 bike that also offer offroad mode, that allows me to ride faster than 28 miles limit.

any recommendations?

thank you
If you ride like Tora (the company owner and designer of the CrossCurrent S ebike himself) on this video where he easily maintained 29-30 mph on some sections of the 16 mile trip and consumed 8.5 ah for the ride, then your 34 mile round trip will consume roughly 18 ah. That's barely enough for the 17 ah battery but you will have more than enough charge if you use the 21 ah battery. That's assuming your battery consumption is same from Tora's ride at 25.5 wh/mi (1.88 ah/mi).

Interestingly, as a side note, when Ravi did his Guinness 5K run with the Stromer ST2, he averaged 22 mph and consumed about 18 wh/mi. That coincides with Juicebikes' tabulated consumption at the indicated speed (highlighted in green). That only shows that the CCS is very close in performance and efficiency to the Stromer ST2. CCS is a great product by Tora considering that it is a fraction of the price.

1/1
flipper
4 days ago

So i have a one-day chance to buy a lightly used Yuba Spicy curry Bosch, which retails for like 4500, I think, but I can get it for 2575. The other option is the Radwagon, on sale for $1349, which is 200 off the normal price. Price diff is $1200, in favor of the Rad. That said, which do you think would be the better bet for me, given that:

-- I'll be going up some pretty steep hills.
-- I need a bike that's very easy to step through. looks like the Yuba might be better on this front, though I don't know for sure.
-- I need as much stability as possible, especially since I plan to carry my 20 lbs dog on the front or the back.
-- the Yuba weighs around 60 lb, the Radwagon about 71 lbs. How much real world difference does that 10 lbs diff make to ease of handling?
-- and so forth.

What say ya'll? I know this topic has come up before, with the Radwagon given the nod by most people. Then again, there weren't many Yuba riders around at that time, and the price for the Yuba was 4500 not 2575. Sure, I'd love to save $1,200 but maybe the Yuba, with the mid Bosch motor, is that much much better.

Thanks for any thoughts you might have!

late contender that I don't know much about: Ariel c class cargo bike. retails for $2200 but if I drive 3 hrs north, i can get a lightly used one for $1220. this one can go up to 30mph w 500watt motor. wow. https://www.amazon.com/Ariel-Rider-C-Class-Electric-Cargo/dp/B06WD13GK8 . weight is 72 lbs. it's a very good looking bike, imo, and comes with a nifty bamboo basket on the front.
https://www.arielrider.com/product/c-class-comfort-ebike/#pod-system--power-on-demand-

I dunno. But at the very least I have to decide on the Yuba by later today or it'll be gone.

halp!

Dunbar
4 days ago

Class III as described by the CA. law and being adopted in other states does allow for 28mph but doesn't address the wattage it takes to get there, but 750w, né 960w even, is not going to maintain that speed unless you are on flat ground with no wind for very long.

750w of motor assist on a speed pedelec will allow you to maintain 28mph on flat ground if there isn’t a strong headwind. What more power allows you to do is hold that speed across a wider range of conditions (headwind and\or incline.) Also, as the battery depletes you lose peak power. So with that 20A \ 48v controller you would be down 200w of peak power once the battery voltage drops 10v.

Ken M
4 days ago

Good question. There is actually some studies on average riding speed for people that own Class 3 45kph speed pedelec in Europe. They average around 20mph/32kph so that data can make people think that there is no value to having a faster bike. Most of time I'm commuting (not stopped at a light) I'm cruising at around 23-25mph/40kph (my PIM/Polaris eBike assist ends at that speed so it's a comfortable cruising speed. But there are some long stretches I go faster but essentially on under my own power and I'm on the road where it would be nice to get up to 35mph/50kph crusing speed.

I have Schwalbe Moto X 27.5 x 2.4 tires on this bike and they provide the performance and handling that make higher speeds feel comfortable/safe. Just because an eBike has the capability to assist up to 50kph doesn't mean responsible riders are going to be running over pedestrians (although I would prefer they walk in the grass :) ) and running slower riders into the ditch (although like some bad drivers inevitably they end up there anyway). Anyway, I'm just joking around but when you are commuting approx 15 miles each way as often as possible (my bike does not replace my car) having the higher speed capability does save time. IT'S IMPORTANT! Bizarre that Europe has Autobahns with crazy high speeds for cars but they think bikes should be literally manufactured with speed limitation build in (I guess the conservatives were thrown a bone on that legislation as that is the only explanation I can come up with as to why they did this - sorry conservatives but you did fight to keep the highway speed limits here in the US at 55mph....thankfully you lost that debate...your scared of speed, I can respect that so stay in the slow lane and let me pass).

FYI - I'm 56 years old and have multiple fused vertebrae from a degenerative arthritis (in remission but the discs are fused already) so I definitely do not want to have a high speed wreck on my eBike. I ride at the speed that I feel safe at but that speed is sometimes faster than 20mph or 28mph which legislators, that probably never rode a bike faster than 20mph, feel should be the max speed an eBike can be produced to go......and then these guys/gals have such a bad reputation.

We need more people to start getting out of cars and on commute solutions that are more rational - an eBike uses like 1/50th the energy of a car so they make sense. Now I get all the burly idiots chiming in that it's god-given right to drive their 8000 truck because the were born with a small member. I get that.

Ken M
4 days ago

How fast do you ride, Ken ? When I ride around town 28 is about it for me with a fatbike. I can see with a commuter bike and good roads, maybe a little faster. Riding faster than that in a urban situation, is a little crazy to me.

Good question. There is actually some studies on average riding speed for people that own Class 3 45kph speed pedelec in Europe. They average around 20mph/32kph so that data can make people think that there is no value to having a faster bike. Most of time I'm commuting (not stopped at a light) I'm cruising at around 23-25mph/40kph (my PIM/Polaris eBike assist ends at that speed so it's a comfortable cruising speed. But there are some long stretches I go faster but essentially on under my own power and I'm on the road where it would be nice to get up to 35mph/50kph crusing speed.

I have Schwalbe Moto X 27.5 x 2.4 tires on this bike and they provide the performance and handling that make higher speeds feel comfortable/safe. Just because an eBike has the capability to assist up to 50kph doesn't mean responsible riders are going to be running over pedestrians (although I would prefer they walk in the grass :-) ) and running slower riders into the ditch (although like some bad drivers inevitably they end up there anyway). Anyway, I'm just joking around but when you are commuting approx 15 miles each way as often as possible (my bike does not replace my car) having the higher speed capability does save time. IT'S IMPORTANT! Bizarre that Europe has Autobahns with crazy high speeds for cars but they think bikes should be literally manufactured with speed limitation build in (I guess the conservatives were thrown a bone on that legislation as that is the only explanation I can come up with as to why they did this - sorry conservatives but you did fight to keep the highway speed limits here in the US at 55mph....thankfully you lost that debate...your scared of speed, I can respect that so stay in the slow lane and let me pass).

Ken M
6 days ago

Ahh, so your opinion is FACT, and if anyone disagrees they need to share actually data that supports their opinion.
Sure, sounds fair to me......
I don't want to sound like my opinion is fact but it is a fact that non-eBikes achieve speeds much higher than 20mph so it seem solidly rational and objective that the assist speed limit of an ebike should be set by law at 20mph. We need viable solutions to reduce automobile congestion (unless your income is entirely dependent on that industry...you probably agree with that statement) so why not seriously consider regulations that encourage the growth of options.

The implication that data should be an essential part of this debate is common sense. There are people claiming the 20mph class 1 limit is for "safety" reasons but I've seen no data presented. Remember the 55mph speed limit for automobiles....some tried to argue we should not raise it because higher limits cost lives. That may be true but if every life were truly priceless we'd have 5mph speed limits and the economy would slow to the speed you seem to think eBikes should travel at.

Larry Sloan
1 week ago

Oh...and another thing. I am struggling to understand why Shimano can’t come up with a solution for all of us struggling with these issues?? And, where is Trek in this whole matter. I don’t understand why they just wash their hands of any responsibility. Perhaps a class action lawsuit would open some eyes -lol

JohnT
1 week ago

Big news! I’m at our Pedego dealer meeting this week, and we were introduced to a few interesting new models! I’m not going to get into details, but I thought people would be interested in a quick overview. I’m going from my notes and from memory, so don’t be surprised if I get something wrong.

“Elevate” - A full suspension eMTB with Shimano Steps mid-drive, and plus size knobby tires. Class 1, pedal assist only, no throttle.

“Conveyer” - A solid street ride with a Brose mid-drive, Gates carbon belt drive (Conveyer belt, get it?), Shimano Nexus 8 IGH, and plus size street tires. No chain and no derailleur! Class 1, PA only, no throttle.

City Commuter Mid-Drive - Basically what I said, it’s a City Commuter with a mid-drive. The interesting thing is that it has a throttle, but it only activates while the pedals are moving. Like all City Commuters, it has PA. I’m not sure whether this makes it Class 1 or 2.

City Commuter Black Edition - This upgrades the regular City Commuter similarly to how the Platinum Edition upgrades the Interceptor. This means front suspension, torque sensing pedal assist, hydraulic disc brakes, and Shimano SLX for smooth shifting. The trim is blacked out.

Dual Motor Stretch - The Stretch is our cargo bike. In this version, a unique controller splits power variably between a torque wound rear motor and a speed wound front motor, resulting in both more torque and better efficiency while keeping the total power under 750w!

Another exciting development is that we’re going to be integrating some “smart” technology into our bikes. I’m not sure which are are going to be available when, so I won’t discuss them today, but at least one model will have built in GPS for anti-theft and navigation!

Most of this is available now, and some will be available soon. I can’t wait to see Court review the new bikes!

hurricane56
1 week ago

If this is going to be short distance commuter, 20mph Class 1 bike will work. If you ever need the higher top speed, the Yamaha drive could possibly be unlocked via plug-in tuner.

The iZip E3 has a better front fork, RockShox Paragon vs the SunTour model on the Haibike. I feel the Yamaha drive unit is more popular than the TransX.

As far as the class of ebike, I think nobody cares at the moment as long as you're not being a jerk with speed or crazy in traffic.

Bryan995
1 week ago

Hi All,

I've recently moved, and now have the opportunity to bike commute (previously I lived 0.5 miles from work, so I walked)

New commute is 4.5miles each way, with a large hill in the middle.

Looking for a well-built commuter bike that can be used daily and or taken on local paths, to grocery store, etc etc.

Live in sunny CA, so little risk of cold/rain. Per CA law, class 1/2 look to be the most permissive. Class 3 is banned from bike paths (not bike lanes).

I've narrowed things down to two bikes.

2017 HaiBike Trekking 4.0 (20mph, class 1)
2017 Izip E3 dash (28mph, class 3)

Working with both a local dealer and a remote dealer.

After some negotation, I can get the Izip E3 via remote dealer for ~$1550 OTD or the Haibike trekking for $2200 OTD via local dealer.

Does the Haibike command a $700 increase over the iZip in anyone's opinion?

Is there another key bike I am leaving out?

Thanks !

harryS
1 week ago

And I've just experimented with the geared wheel motor market, there is a reason that Luna is always out of stock. The 1000 W 48v one I bought elsewhere lasted 60 miles. There must be a initial quality problem in the $220 versions. It was fully capable of 15% grade with gross weight of 300 lb though (me + 50 lb supplies).

Well, that's one trouble with plastic gears. The nylon melts when the motor overheats. Luna's motor is just bigger, so more heat can dissipate before it melts the plastic, but Luna's kits for that class of motor don't seem to have pedal assist sensors. (Just looking at pictures.)

On their 1000W direct drives that have sensors in the pics, it seems like pedal assist works like cruise control. You set a button and as long as the pedals spin, the bike holds speed.

DarthVado
1 week ago

There is a big difference in gearing between the Vado 3.0 and Vado 5.0/6.0. The Vado 3.0 has a 40T chain ring while the Vado 5.0/6.0 have the same 48T that all of the previous generation Turbos did. They all have an 11T small sprocket on the rear 10 or 11 speed clusters.

The cadence needed to hit 28 mph on the Vado 3.0 is 97 rpm in the highest (10th) gear (40T-11T) and is 115 rpm in 9th gear. The cadence to cruise at 28 mph on the Vado 5.0/6.0 is just 80 rpm in top (11th) gear (48T-11T) and 96 rpm in 10th gear.

So even if the Brose mid drive on the lesser Turbo Vado's is set up to handle 28 mph at a cadence of around 100 rpm, the stock gearing on the Vado 2/3/4 bikes is not optimal. Most of us are not professional class athletes, so maintaining a cadence of 100+ rpm is pretty difficult.

OTOH, purchase a larger chainring and you should be able to gear the Vado 3.0 for a more comfortable high speed cruise.

Doug

DarthVado
1 week ago

I can confirm the Vado 3.0 goes 28 mph, and much faster. The motor cuts off at 28 mph, and it is a class 3 bike. My bike required a firmware update, maybe two sometime in July.

I love the bike, but mine is having a problem with shifting and staying in the high gear, constantly skipping during pedaling. I have also had the motor spin the chain out of control, sort of like revving the engine in a car while in neutral. Is anybody having a similar problem?

daniel58
2 weeks ago

Much better warranty with EM3ev. A world apart really. They build ALL their batteries, unlike the other guys. AND none of those GA cells with fewer cycles.

Yes, Thomas I saw a most impressive youtube video of how they utilize their own semi-automated lithium ion production factory line where they use truly "state of the art" CNC high precision and high accuracy spot welder to minimize the spot welding time(which causes unnecessary heat that can damage lithium ion cells) to tightly control and make sure quality assurance is actually baked into every one of their EM3EV lithium ion batteries; all so that no human error can potentially cause and/or introduce a potential error that could effect lithium ion battery cycle life and its intended recharge cycles that it can optimally deliver; they are truly a quality outfit indeed;

now they actually have and utilize a clean room environment temperature and air controlled lithium ion battery manufacturing production facility which of course can potentially effect lithium ion battery quality and life if not actually kept absolutely clean and tightly temperature controlled; absolutely no knockoff asian chinese factory quality assurance issues as they are the real deal by having invested the manufacturing investment money in the right lithium ion battery production tooling to get the job done right for its EM3EV customers; they also have the full range of lithium ion battery voltages and amp capacities at very competitive lower than average market prices while also delivering superior quality lithium ion cells;

now the lithium ion battery buying customer can even specify the actual type of lithium ion cell that is used in ones lithium ion battery also as well; they can actually give the customer a customized lithium ion battery quote also as well; now with EM3EV they have truly carved out a very unique and rather impressive market niche for themselves as I for one would likely only buy from them not only for their vastly superior below market average pricing lithium ion battery banks but their impeccable sterling "no excuses" customer service policy reputation for building those high quality lithium ion batteries that their brand name EM3EV loyal customers demand highly and only buy from them in the future repeatedly; because they trust they are buying the best quality designed and built lithium ion batteries in the lithium ion battery industry; their simply is no equal to EM3EV lithium ion batteries when it comes to both pricing and quality criterias over the long term; as this positively serves to ultimate lower the total cost per anticipated recharge cycle of ones EM3EV purchased lithium ion batteries over the long term; literally world class impeccable quality lithium ion batteries indeed.

bob armani
2 weeks ago

The Trek SuperCommuter 8 is at about the same price point with Bosch mid-drive in the same class for a speed pedelec as the Vado 6.0. Test rode the Trek at the Expo and it was also a well oiled machine which also felt like I was on a Range Rover eBike. The Vado 3.0 was tested soon after, and I have to say the Trek won hands down in all categories IMHO.

Dewey
2 weeks ago

Do any of those companies manufacture in Canada? If so, give them preference. But, if all of them have the bikes made in China, it's a toss up.

Yes Bionx motors are designed and assembled in Aurora, ON, the battery cells are Sony made in Japan but it's probably the highest domestic motor content. The companies I mentioned in my previous post do the R&D or assembly in Canada but the battery cells and bicycle components and frames will for the most part be manufactured in the Far East.

To answer the OP, all the companies you mention are resellers of Chinese ebikes and simply put their own decals on, Court has reviewed several models from Voltbike on this website and I like they give you a free DoT polo style helmet. Check the return policy if you go with a direct to consumer ebike, ideally you want free return shipping or a local retailer, I tried out 2 or 3 kit motors before I settled on my BBS01 and battery shipping is expensive.

If you go with a big 3 ebike they have the economies of scale to be able to offer their ebikes in several sizes, local in-person shop support, and they will stand behind their warranty. Some of this years Class 1 pedelecs like the Specialized Turbo Como, Giant Explore E+, and Electra Townie Go! from Trek, have lower starting prices than in previous years, all are nice ebikes.

Andy_Austria
2 weeks ago

Got one from here, free to download:
https://www.r2b.ch/Ariel-Rider-Manual

The "6 km walk" function is an assist mode to walk your bike uphill or whereever you want, by pushing and holding the minus button on similar controllers - but not with my arielrider N-class.

Andy

MLB
2 weeks ago

Set and enforce speed limits. Makes no sense to limit the speed of what is considered an ebike when pro cyclists are hitting 100+kph on some descents and even avid weekend riders can hit 70kph on some descents on road rides. These riders are as concerned about safety as possible because they know if they have a crash they are going to suffer the consequences. If there people abusing speed limits on hyper powerful eBikes then ticket them for speeding...you don't impact all the eBikers that want to commute to work on a bike that provides assist to 35mph/50kph yet they only use that speed where it's permitted.

I would prefer to see restrictions set on the size/weight of the bike and limit them to roads with posted speed limits of 70-75 kph/45-50mph or less. Anything that is capable of traveling on highways and interstates needs to be considered full powered scooters and motorcycles that meet DOT safety standards with separate registration and insurance requirements. I don't think a 50kg or less weight eBike that in only used on slower speed limit roads and paths needs to achieve DOT status but they must adhere to the posted/established speed limits. Allow the technology a chance to succeed. In the US the value of time requires that eBike commuters are going to hope to achieve nearly the same commute times as they can in an car or there is no realized savings.

What really drives me nuts is that law makers are claiming the 20mph Class 1 or 28mph Class 3 speeds were established for safety reasons. That is total BS because I would simply ask them to provide the data then. There is none because very very bikers are causing accidents that are harming pedestrians or drivers - the vast majority of accidents involving bikes are caused by pedestrians and drivers that are not paying attention. That is FACT but I do want anyone that disaggrees to share and relevant data they may have to justify limiting the assist speed of an eBike to 20mph or 28mph depending on class.

Ahh, so your opinion is FACT, and if anyone disagrees they need to share actually data that supports their opinion.
Sure, sounds fair to me......

JRA
3 weeks ago

There are a few states that have 1000w limits in the law books. Oregon where I live is one of them.

It is kind of a game at this point. Some EU spec 250w bikes can peak at over 600w depending on how they are programmed and a US 750w bike with a 48v battery and a 20amp controller that is a popular option will peak @ 960w. The big thing to me is the speed restriction which is 15.5mph EU and 20mph US and bikes programmed to those restrictions will be only that fast under power, and hard to pedal above that unless on a downhill grade or with a tailwind.

Class III as described by the CA. law and being adopted in other states does allow for 28mph but doesn't address the wattage it takes to get there, but 750w, né 960w even, is not going to maintain that speed unless you are on flat ground with no wind for very long.

Timpo
3 weeks ago

What do you think about Yamaha's 4 bicycles that are coming in 2018?

Although they have not announced the pricing yet, I am sure these bikes won't be particularly cheap bikes.

Just bike looking at the design, it's just kind of like another Haibike or something.

The worst part is, they will all be Class 1...I don't know if that would be competitive enough for today's US market?

I know Yamaha makes good motorcycles so I was a bit excited about this, to see what they are going to offer. But I feel like I'm quite a bit disappointed..

Andy_Austria
3 weeks ago

TAIL LIGHT / BRAKE LIGHT FAIL

Hi there,
owning my N-Class for some weeks I can report an issue to maybe save you some hassle there.

The N-Class comes with fat tires and very low mounted fenders, which looks great. Also the cables for the tail light are routed neatly inside the fender.
But - and this is a big BUT - while the cables live in their own little tube on the side of the fender for most of the time, they cross to the middle fully exposed before they penetrate the fender to connect to the light unit.

And this is where seemingly a small rock picked up by the tire thread was cutting the wires and shorting them out.

Result was a completely dead tail light unit which did not come to life even after the wires were fixed. Doing my homework I tested the tail light/brake light unit on a 6V battery, as the connectors are clearly labelled "positive" and "negative" stating they expect 6V AC/DC. The light fired up, so the problem was elsewhere.

As the light cable only has two wires, but can produce a permanent tail light as well as a brake light, I assumed this is done by different voltages, say 6V or 7V being sent to the same positive terminal on the light. The 2 light wires connect to a little black box under the "tank" cover, which is connected to the main controller by 3 wires and fed with 36V. So that little black box (light controller?) may do the conversion from 36V down and produce different voltages for brake/tail light, depending on the controller wire input.
And it was definitely shot.

To prevent that I recommend moving the fender further away from the tire where the tail light lives, and maybe protect the wires with some extra heat shrink tube.

As the damage was already done and I did not have spare light controller, I found the following fix:
The front LED headlight has 4 connectors of which 2 still were free (unused). Knowing from other bicycle contraptions these two were for connecting a standard tail light. So I just routed a new 2 wire cable from the headlight to the tail light unit and connected it there. Tail light now works as expected, I only lost the brake light (which I did not like anyway). This was a cheap fix. The main work was to get that new cable into the frame and back out, at least to down where the cranks live. From there I chose to route the cable along the rear frame and fender struts, so it is not exposed to wear inside the fender.

For removing that old cable from inside the fender I had to take the wheel out. I then removed the little stainless steel brackets holding the cable, noting that one rivet was already loose and one clip was gone, so the rivets seem to eat through the plastic fenders over time. I drilled them out and closed up the holes with some black tape.

FRONT CABLE ROUTING

While I was at connecting that new light cable I also corrected one major design flaw (IMHO): the front cable routing ist just plain awful, as all the cables come down on one side of the light and right beside it as seen here: https://electricbikereview.com/ariel-rider/n-class/
I had to temporarily undo one of the switch/lever units from the handlebar and cut the harness a bit wider open to correct that. Only some black cable ties were used to bring the cables closer to the handlebar.
The cables are now routed motorcycle style left AND right BEHIND that light. Which complements the motorbikish look of it :-)

This was a lot of text - I try upload some pictures later on.

Andy

Andy_Austria
3 weeks ago

Hi there,
not many user reviews about that bike are out there. I have the 250W version, bought second hand, and can answer your real world questions if there are any.

Owning the Ariel Rider for a month I can say it keeps the promises of the flashy ads and videos so far. I am not super happy with the range which seems to be closer to 30 km (assist level 1 in a rather flat city) than the 50 km promised, but on the other hand it is quite cold now in Austria, the battery gets charged overnight in my yard at typically 5-10 °C and used during the day at about 5-15° C which is not ideal.

Only thing I really miss is any kind of instructions, e.g. on the assist levels and that "6 km walk" thingy I read about. Can anybody enlighten me here? Do new bikes come with any instructions?
Ariel Rider does not seem to have such downloads on their home page.

Thanks,
Andy

Andy hoff
2 months ago

batteries are expensive. I don't like how you can NOT easily remove for anti-theft or easy remote charging

Sunlite sells this disc brake Springer fork on Amazon $130.

wb6uce
4 months ago

Show the )(*&^%## bike. we know what the breaded guy looks like!

Richard Day
4 months ago

Really ugly and old fashioned .

Maggie Tang
10 months ago

My boyfriend has one of those and heis so much in love with the bike. He said it is one of the fastest and most comfortable e-bike .

Helena Wolfenstein
1 year ago

I bought my ariel rider last month. Really happy with performance. Also i ordered a customized covers. Really love riding and getting all the looks.

Ariel Rider Ebikes
10 months ago

Aaron she bought online from us as there wasn't a dealer nearby her.

Aaron Zane
12 months ago

Helena Wolfenstein nice! did you buy it locally or did you have it shipped?

Leamon Miller
1 year ago

I am saving up to get my first ebike. Can I get some help?

Chemtrail Dreams
10 months ago

Leamon Miller radpower bikes has great financing

Liz Seelbach
10 months ago

i can advise this e-bike as works perfect for me.

EnhancedNightmare
2 years ago

I dig the design very much. Those guys know how to do a good looking cruiser type bike. I especially like the old-school suspension in the front. Reminds me of the bikes from the 1930's.

Lurking Crass Zero
2 years ago

Lovely looking bike. You review a lot of e-bikes mate. Do you have a personal fave?

Fred Brands
2 years ago

These bikes are different from the ones we see here in Holland. These are more fun. I would buy one immediately

Ariel Rider Ebikes
10 months ago

Fred sorry for late reply but we have a warehouse in Amsterdam. So contact us if you looking for one. we can help you about it.

Helena Wolfenstein
2 years ago

schön fahrrad .

Kyle Sherman
2 years ago

sweet bike dudes...please make a dual shock version people

Michael Caffey
2 years ago

I don't see myself buying an electric bike for at least a couple more years, just because of money. That being said, I really appreciate your enthusiasm and detail you put into your videos. I have been watching them for over a year now, just to check out whats new out there.

Thanks!

Иван Федорович
4 weeks ago

yeap thinking the same, after 5-10 years e bike will be chip af, and can drive more distance

Liz Seelbach
10 months ago

seems they offer discount now you can check it.

Aaron Zane
12 months ago

Michael Caffey i feel you man. just started saving up for an e-bike and take it slow if you need to. in time, you'll get there. one thing that helps me to keep saving is the fact that some bicycles cost even more than some e-bikes out there. I have a modified Trek urban/touring bike that was roughly $800 new when it was a mountain bike, and i've seen e-bikes as low as $600. i wish you luck!

Lurking Crass Zero
2 years ago

+Michael Caffey You could make do with many of the no-name chinese bikes. They're all the same motor tech etc. That's what I've done. My bike arrives this week ;-)

ForbinColossus
2 years ago

Has nice quality details. Love that the throttle can deliver full power at any setting. Huge feature to me that makes an ebike fun. I am still more a haibike FS MTB preferrer.

HYPERSHADNIC
2 years ago

How long, fast, and does it last from Featherstone to Manassas?

Alex Jones
2 years ago

The red bike reminds me of an early Indian motorcycle

Maggie Tang
10 months ago

Exactly and love that one.

EnhancedNightmare
2 years ago

Spot on!

DrZarkloff
2 years ago

it looks really cool but the gas tank screams cop magnet.

Casey Neistat
2 years ago

As the road bike with drop bars is the most aerodynamic I would like to see more road bikes as I can only see just a few for sale world wide.

difflocktwo
2 years ago

Road bikes are far from aerodynamic. Look into recumbent bikes for true performance.

Casey Neistat
2 years ago

+THE LOST Ref e bikes.

Dean Botton
2 years ago

Until the bike falls over & snaps that key in half

Ariel Rider Ebikes
2 years ago

Hi Dean, thank you for raising your concern on the key location.
Actually even if the bike falls, since the front fork can only turn to a certain angle, the only contact with ground on a side fall would be the edge of the handle bar grips.
So the keys would stay safe at all times :)

EnhancedNightmare
2 years ago

Yeah the key placement isn't very fortunate.

HYPERSHADNIC
2 years ago

Um, are you the type to leave keys in your car too?

minnie saab
2 years ago

the guy with strange accent is really cute !

cigaro
2 years ago

frankly its stupid not to offer a product online in this day and age

Henrijs Rozenkopfs
2 years ago

And even more stupid is to use the leather seats in this day and age...