Ariel Rider N-Class Review

Ariel Rider N Class Electric Bike Review
Ariel Rider N Class
Ariel Rider N Class Avid Bb7 Mechanical Disc Brakes
Ariel Rider N Class Ebike Battery Charging Port Ignition Key
Ariel Rider N Class Cruiser Bars Twist Throttle
Ariel Rider N Class Ebike Display Panel Backlit Fixed
Ariel Rider N Class 42 Tooth Chainring Bash Guard
Ariel Rider N Class Custom Leather Saddle Sprung
Ariel Rider N Class Custom Springer Fork Cst Maxxis Balloon Tires
Ariel Rider N Class Spanninga Vena Brake Light
Ariel Rider N Class Electric Bike Shimano Altus 7 Speed
Ariel Rider N Class Beige Black Red Cover Colors
Ariel Rider N Class Custom Battery Box Cover
Ariel Rider N Class Ebike Battery Charger
Ariel Rider N Class Electric Bike Review
Ariel Rider N Class
Ariel Rider N Class Avid Bb7 Mechanical Disc Brakes
Ariel Rider N Class Ebike Battery Charging Port Ignition Key
Ariel Rider N Class Cruiser Bars Twist Throttle
Ariel Rider N Class Ebike Display Panel Backlit Fixed
Ariel Rider N Class 42 Tooth Chainring Bash Guard
Ariel Rider N Class Custom Leather Saddle Sprung
Ariel Rider N Class Custom Springer Fork Cst Maxxis Balloon Tires
Ariel Rider N Class Spanninga Vena Brake Light
Ariel Rider N Class Electric Bike Shimano Altus 7 Speed
Ariel Rider N Class Beige Black Red Cover Colors
Ariel Rider N Class Custom Battery Box Cover
Ariel Rider N Class Ebike Battery Charger

Summary

  • A powerful electric cruiser with unique battery box design reminiscing of vintage motorcycles, three color choices for the box, fenders and chain guard including red, black and beige
  • Integrated LED lights by Spanninga, comfortable CST balloon tires with reflective sidewall stripes and a generic flick bell are included standard which improve visibility and safety
  • Powerful 500 watt geared motor, large 48 volt battery and adjustable speed settings (password protected) make this a versatile platform, solid 160 mm mechanical disc brakes with motor inhibitors stop well
  • The battery pack is not designed to be removable for charging off the bike or reducing weight during transport and the weight is a bit higher than a downtube or seat tube pack

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Ariel Rider

Model:

N-Class

Price:

$2,899 (Premium Model $3,099)

Body Position:

Upright Relaxed

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Cruising

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2), Moped or Motorcycle (Class 4)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Battery, 2 Year Motor/Controller, 5 Year Frame

Availability:

United States, United Kingdom, Germany, Holland, Singapore, China, Taiwan, Japan, South Korea, Turkey, Spain, Italy, Switzerland, Portugal, Austria, United Arab Emirates

Model Year:

2016

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

62.5 lbs (28.34 kg)

Battery Weight:

7 lbs (3.17 kg)

Motor Weight:

8.37 lbs (3.79 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy, Double Heat Treated T4 and T6

Frame Sizes:

20 in (50.8 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

20" Seat Tube, 26" Reach, 32" Stand Over Height, 74" Length

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

Beige, Red, Black

Frame Fork Details:

Custom Made Springer Style, 10 mm Bolt Skewer

Frame Rear Details:

10 mm Bolt Skewer

Attachment Points:

Fender Bosses

Gearing Details:

7 Speed 1x7 Shimano Altus, CS HG20-7, 11-36T

Shifter Details:

Shimano SIS Index

Cranks:

Prowheel 244A-2, 42T Chainring with Alloy Bash Guard

Pedals:

Wellgo Aluminum Alloy Platform, B087DU

Headset:

Neco 3510

Stem:

Promax MA-525 Adjustable Angle

Handlebar:

Zoom Cruiser, 25" Width

Brake Details:

Avid BB7 Mechanical Disc with 160 mm Rotors, Easy Adjust Calipers, Artek Levers with Motor Inhibitors

Grips:

Custom Hand Stitched Leather with Lockers

Saddle:

Custom Leather, Sprung (Optional Velo Extra-Wide Plush Plus, Sprung)

Seat Post:

Promax Aluminum Alloy, Tapered

Seat Post Length:

300 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

27.2 mm

Rims:

Double Walled Aluminum Alloy

Spokes:

Stainless Steel 13G

Tire Brand:

CST Maxxis, 26" x 2.35"

Wheel Sizes:

26 in (66.04cm)

Tire Details:

Reflective Sidewall Stripe, 22-60 PSI

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Paint-Matched Full Length Composite Fenders with Mud Flaps, Paint Matched Composite Chain Guard, Flick Bell on Right, Integrated LED Lights Front: Spanninga Swing 40 LUX Back: Spanninga Vena, Aluminum Alloy Bash Guard

Other:

2 Amp Charger 1.1 lb with Cell Balancing, IP56 Water Resistant Controller, Honeycomb Battery Cell Layout (Avoids Short Circuits and Stays Cool)

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Dapu

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Motor Peak Output:

700 watts

Motor Torque:

48 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Samsung 29E

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

11.6 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

556.8 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

4 hours

Estimated Min Range:

25 miles (40 km)

Estimated Max Range:

40 miles (64 km)

Display Type:

Fixed, Backlit LCD Console on Left

Readouts:

Speed, Battery Capacity (5 Bars), Assist Level (0-6), Trip Meter, Odometer, Average Speed, Max Speed (Hold Plus Button to Activate Lights)

Drive Mode:

Twist Throttle, Torque Sensing Pedal Assist (12 Magnet Sensor)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph) (Up to 28 MHP Unlocked)

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Written Review

The N-Class is Ariel Rider’s top of the line offering with the most integrated aesthetic and a special option to customize the top tube battery box. I struggled to grasp what the bike would be like before seeing it in person, the top part is all plastic (aside from the surrounding tubing), is dyed completely through and is made from durable scratch resistant polycarbonate. This approach strikes a balance between reduced weight, increased strength and a nice aesthetic reminiscent of the popular Sondors bikes but much higher quality. This platform is very strong, fast, offers pedal assist with twist throttle override and even has integrated lights. You get a seven speed Shimano Altus drivetrain (a step up from entry level) and an impressive two year warranty on most of the bike with one year on the battery. My only complaint or question mark is that the battery is not removable. Considering the 62.5 pound (28 kg) weight this would have been a nice feature for transporting the bike as the pack weighs ~7 lbs on its own. Also, not having a removable battery means you’ll have to park the N-Class near an outlet every time it needs a fill-up and that could be difficult if you’re using it to commute.

In practice, the Ariel Rider N and W Class electric bikes I tested were more geared towards neighborhood “fun” riding. They don’t have racks or even rack bosses and you don’t even get a bottle cage mounting point. It wouldn’t be an ideal commuting platform but that’s not what it’s about and frankly, with a backpack on you’d fare pretty well because of the power and range on offer. The motor is a 500 watt internally geared hub mounted in the rear wheel. It’s made by Dapu that’s a solid brand in my experience and the battery is 48 volt 11.6 amp hours for more than a half kilowatt of capacity. It’s arranged to support more power and speed than efficiency but if you ride in a lower assist level there’s no reason it won’t take you 30+ miles. The best features of this bike for me were how it looks, the speed adjustability built into the display (password protected) and how comfortable it rides. With large balloon tires, a custom sprung saddle and cruiser bars (with padded leather grips) the strain of bumps and cracks are significantly reduced. Note that the custom springer fork really doesn’t travel much so if you’re willing to trade style for more comfort then consider the Comfort model vs. Premium I reviewed. It costs less and uses a different (but still comfortable) saddle and comes with a basic oil suspension fork.

Ariel Rider is a company that dates back to 2010, having been rebranded after 2014 as the founding team expanded internationally. Today their products are sold in 26 countries which is very impressive to me. The N-Class is being used by some businesses and fancy hotel chains due to its brandable customizable battery box. The company name “Ariel Rider” is a nod to Ariel Motorcycles, a company dating back to 1870, which was an innovator in British motorcycle design that eventually spun off into cars. Interestingly, the Ariel name has been taken up by a modern sports car producer called Ariel Ltd in much the same way that Ariel Rider uses it. So the point here is that these are all distinct entities, each building on a long heritage of innovation and style, paying homage if you will. Aesthetics are a huge draw with the W-Class and touch points like the custom leather saddle, locking leather grips, color matched fenders, chain guard and sturdy black pedals bring it home for me. I went into this review impressed but curious about the width of the oversized top tube battery bay and came away convinced that it all works together well for a good ride experience… though I wish the key did not have to be left in when riding.

To operate the bike you charge the battery using a nice, light weight 2 amp charger then press the power button on their LCD console for a couple of seconds. It blinks to life and you see speed, assist level and battery level among range and other ride details. From here you can arrow up or down exploring six levels of assist and a level zero which keeps the display and lights going while also allowing for throttle on demand operation. It’s setup very well and really makes you feel like you’re in control of the bike. Having six levels of assist vs. 5 or even 3 as I see on other electric cruisers means that you have more control over top speed when pedaling and as mentioned earlier, you can go deeper by double clicking the power button to adjust other settings and even cap the top speed or allow it to reach ~25 mph for private and off-road use. The bike grew on me and I actually went through a sort of wave of emotions at first expecting it to be more like the Tracker from Vintage Electric Bikes then seeing the plastic and wondering if it would rattle (it stayed very quiet and felt sturdy) then gaining an appreciation for the power but also the control of operation and the finer touches like the saddle and protected wires on the rear light. For the price, it’s a unique looking bike that really puts you in control. There are sacrifices in terms of utility but it keeps you dry and safe which I love.

Pros:

  • Beautiful touch points on the Premium model, the saddle is large and comfortable but also has the Ariel Rider name on it in cursive which looks classy, same thing with the display, I love the wing logo on the battery box and the ability to custom print onto the box for ~$350
  • I like the quick release seat tube collar and front wheel, this helps to reduce weight and make the bike easier to move since the battery is not easily removable
  • I’m a fan of the Avid BB7 mechanical disc brakes because they offer tool-free rotor adjustment, you can use your fingers to twist the little red discs to fine tune the calipers as your pads wear down
  • Depending on where you live it’s wonderful to have full length fenders and the color matching on the Ariel Rider ebikes is spot on, the chain guard also matches and is a sort of custom thin guard which looks great
  • The chainring has an aluminum bash guard on it which also acts as a chain guide to some extent making the drivetrain more robust (useful at higher speed riding and on bumpy terrain), I like that the spokes they went with are a bit larger at 13 gauge vs. 14G given the heavier build of the bike
  • You get three color choices (for the fenders, chain guard and battery box cover) including red, black and beige and the box plastic is scratch resistant
  • I absolutely love the integrated LED lights, both are made by Spanninga and the tail light is wired in so it lights up when you pull the brake levers
  • Nice display panel and control unit, it’s compact but the buttons are large and easy to reach without taking your hand of the left grip, you can get into settings by double clicking the power button and change your speed when the passcode is entered (up to ~25 mph in the USA)
  • The controls default to 0-6 pedal assist and you can override with twist throttle at any level! This is awesome for people who want a more scooter-like experience, the cadence sensor uses 12 magnets making it pretty responsive
  • The Ariel Rider N-Class uses a custom designed hydroformed Aluminum alloy frame that feels solid and all of the wires and cables are internally routed to reduce snags
  • Upgraded Wellgo Aluminum alloy platform pedals offer lots of surface area and feel stable and stiff, the saddle is completely custom with leather imported from Australia… it feels firm at first but should soften over time (you can request the comfort saddle from Velo if you’d like and that comes stock on the Comfort trim level which costs less), even the brake levers are upgraded and have a nice rubberized grip on the leading edge, you get a basic bell to top it all off

Cons:

  • The battery pack is mounted inside a polycarbonate box that isn’t designed to be removable or opened easily… so the battery stays with the bike making it heavier to transport and less versatile to charge
  • The springer fork on the Premium model looks cool but doesn’t offer much travel and adds weight, Ariel Rider offers a more traditional suspension oil fork on the Comfort model but it doesn’t have lockout
  • The battery box is pretty wide (widest towards the head tube) which looks cool like a motorcycle gas tank, but is easier to bump with your knees while pedaling
  • No bottle cage bosses or rack bosses on either the Comfort or Premium models, you might have to bring a little backpack along to carry supplies
  • This electric bicycle is only available in one frame size but the stem is adjustable angle and the seat tube has quick release so it’s actually quite versatile
  • I noticed that the cadence sensor starts quickly but doesn’t always shut the motor down when you stop pedaling (I was told this was a choice made to smooth out the ride with inconsistent pedaling), it alarmed me at first because I thought maybe the throttle was stuck on but you can always cut power by pulling either brake lever so that’s nice

Resources:

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More Ariel Rider Reviews

Ariel Rider W-Class Review

  • MSRP: $2,350
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

A beautiful, custom designed cruiser electric bike drawing from vintage motorcycle designs with a springer fork, chopper bars and wider top tube. Powerful 500 watt geared hub motor by Dapu paired with a 556 watt hour battery…...

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Mountie111
21 hours ago

Nobody has bothered me yet but I could see somebody who doesn't know what the bike is seeing the lights and saying it isn't allowed when I know the class 1 pedelects are allowed on local bike paths and trails. I think I'd like to be able to turn the lights off without loosing assist.

mrgold35
1 day ago

I seen a few smaller vehicles with the 1Up single bike rack starting at $300. It is designed for both Class I and II hitches and you can add a 2nd bike tray down the road. It is a very compact and sleek design with mount/dismount of the bikes only takes seconds to do. The only downside is it has a 50 lbs limit per bike on the rack.

1Up: https://www.1upusa.com/product-quikracksilver.html

bob armani
2 days ago

Hi everyone,

I really don't want to spend money on a bike rack solution if i can help it to carry my single e-bike.

Here is my current situation:

- Class I hitch 1 1/4 in. mounted on a Corolla (max 200 tongue weight for the hitch)
- Bike that weighs 63 pounds all in, with the battery.
- I already own a 2 bike ball mounted bike rack, very similar to this one:
https://www.amazon.com/Swagman-64095-2-Bike-Ball-Mount/dp/B0009NZL2K/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8
- I can't find the max weight for my rack, but most like it are usually either 2X35lb bikes or up to max 90lb depending on the manufacturer
- I used to carry 2 regular inexpensive bikes on there, so I assume about 50ish pounds.

Can I safely assume that it will not be an issue at all to carry my 1X50ish pounds e-bike on that rack (battery removed)?

The real question I wonder about actually is this: if you have let's say a 4 bike rack, stated at max 35lb per bike (= 140lbs), can you actually consider carrying 2 x 70lb bikes?

To make matters worse, I am in Canada! so as always, we have a lot less selection than the US, and pretty much nothing under an insane price.

thanks in advance for your help!

american94-

My 2 cents- I have a Sport Rack fitted on a 1 1/4 inch receiver for my ebike with the same weight ratings as you have mentioned. My rack has hoop holders for the tires. I did not want to keep lifting the bike on and off, so I jimmy rigged a ramp system using a plastic gutter Down Spout Splash and attached some metal conduit hooks on the end of it. I then hook it on the end of the tire hoop and it allows me to roll the bike on and off of the bike rack. So far, a very efficient system. The rack looks very stable and very well built, so I do not have any concerns st this point. I do not drive on the highway or very far distances, just to city local trails. Hope this may help!

GuruUno
2 days ago

$999!!!!!

only 350 miles

Great deal and opportunity to get a great deal for a fantastic price.

Cash sale only, local pickup Metuchen, NJ 08840

Interested parties reply to this posting via methods here within, as me posting my e-mail and/or phone number only encourages spammers.

Also posted on Craigslist (CNJ)
https://cnj.craigslist.org/bik/6188270957.html
Back problems, getting a different style bike.

Although I love this, I'm too old for a mountain bike.

Hardtail trail-ready electric bike with powerful center-drive motor for effective climbing and balanced weight, ~28 mph top speed
Removable battery pack for convenient charging and reduced transport weight, lockout suspension fork by RockShox for improved efficiency on flat terrain, upgraded 180 mm hydraulic disc brakes with motor cutoff, quick release wheels for easy maintenance

MAKE: IZIP
MODEL: E3 Peak
MSRP PRICE: $3,100 USD
BODY POSITION: Forward
SUGGESTED USE: Urban, Trail
ELECTRIC BIKE CLASS: Speed Pedalec (Class 3)
MODEL YEAR: 2015

Bicycle Details
TOTAL WEIGHT: 49 lbs (22.22 kg)
FRAME MATERIAL: 6061 Aluminum Alloy
FRAME SIZES: 19 in (48.26 cm)
GEOMETRY MEASUREMENTS: (Wheelbase 1125 mm and 1150 mm, Stand Over Height 753 mm and 791 mm)
FRAME TYPES: High-Step
FRAME COLORS: Black with Orange Accents
FRAME FORK DETAILS: RockShox XC30 TK 27.5" Suspension with 100 mm Travel
ATTACHMENT POINTS: Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses
GEARING DETAILS: 10 Speed 1x10 SRAM X7, 11-36T
SHIFTER DETAILS: SRAM X7 Triggers on Right Bar
CRANKS: Lasco, 38T Sprocket
PEDALS: Wellgo Aluminum Alloy Platform
HEADSET: VP Semi-Integrated Ahead
STEM: Zoom 3D Forged Aluminum Alloy
HANDLEBAR: Tranz-X ATB, Low Rise
BRAKE DETAILS: Tektro Auriga E-Sub Hydraulic Disc with 180 mm Rotors, Tektro Levers with Motor Inhibitor
GRIPS: Velo Locking, Flat Rubber
SADDLE: Velo Racing
SEAT POST: TranzX Alloy with Micro Adjust
SEAT POST LENGTH: 350 mm
SEAT POST DIAMETER: 31.6 mm
RIMS: Alex Volar 2.1 Doublewall
SPOKES: Stainless Steel
TIRE BRAND: CST Patrol 650b, 27.5" x 2.25"
WHEEL SIZES: 27.5 in (69.85cm)
TUBE DETAILS: Schrader Valve
ACCESSORIES: Aluminum Alloy Bash Guard and Chain Guide
OTHER: Quick Release on Front and Rear Wheels, Locking Removable Battery Pack, KMC X10eRB High Torque Rust Proof Chain

Electronic Details
MOTOR BRAND: TranzX
MOTOR TYPE: Mid-Mounted Geared Motor
MOTOR NOMINAL OUTPUT: 350 watts
BATTERY VOLTAGE: 48 volts
BATTERY AMP HOURS: 8.7 ah
BATTERY WATT HOURS: 417.6 wh
BATTERY CHEMISTRY: Lithium-ion
CHARGE TIME: 5 hours
ESTIMATED MIN RANGE: 25 miles (40 km)
ESTIMATED MAX RANGE: 35 miles (56 km)
DISPLAY TYPE: Backlit Monochrome LCD, Fixed with Adjustable Angle
READOUTS: Speed, Odometer, Battery Capacity, Assist Level (1-4), Range Estimation
DISPLAY ACCESSORIES: Independent Button Pad on Left Bar
DRIVE MODE: Advanced Pedal Assist, Twist Throttle (Measures Speed, Cadence and Torque)
TOP SPEED: 28 mph (45 kph) (6 mph Throttle Only, 20 mph Throttle with Pedaling)

1/1
mams99
4 days ago

Hi there,
just a few comments. It seems like a longtail cargo bike could work well for you. Certainly the xtracycle with a bafang will work well with regard to the drive assist, but I wonder if the low deck (where your son would sit) would be problematic as he is so tall. Usually the low decks are nice because they lower the center of gravity helping with stability and because it is easier for young kids, but in your case it might be a problem with long legs.
Have you considered the Radwagon from Rad Power Bikes? It is very nicely priced and it is a long tail with the deck at a regular height. Depending on the maximum grade of the hills in your neighborhood, it could work very well for you. I have one and I use it to haul my two kids (3 and 4.5) to daycare and errands (anywhere from 1 to 10 miles). Let me know if you have any questions about it.

Antia

The height is my worry too. It has not been a gift to be a early growing (he's always been huge) high functioning autistic boy. People have expected him to act older than he is when really, he's a few years behind in all that physical ability development.

I looked at the Radwagon bike. Problem is the max load - that is also 350, right? For the price of new... I just don't know if that would work. But I have looked.

And my hill out of my neighborhood isn't HORRIBLY steep, just fairly long - like 3/4 of a mile. I was so discouraged when I was doing high impact step aerobics 3 times a week, strength training twice a week - being the woman in class who could lift the most, and then some other aerobic class 1-2 times a week - and I STILL had to walk the bike up the hill the last bit. I FINALLY ditched the 7 speed comfort bike and got a 21 speed road bike and could get out of the neighborhood - huffing and puffing, but then I got an injury, followed by another overuse injury and stopped riding/exercising and now I know NOTHING would allow me to get out of the neighborhood without electric assist. Plus... I'm all for fitness and such, but having some help on hills - especially with cargo would be wonderful.

Shannon
1 week ago

Just wondering if anyone has had any first hand experience with the Ariel Rider bikes? I have been looking at getting an EBike and due to my weight have been looking at the C Class Ariel Rider or potentially the ODK U500 v3 from Juiced Bikes.

I would appreciate any feedback anyone has with these bikes or even other options.

Thanks.

Dewey
1 week ago

Some good statistics and info on the website of the Bicycle Helmet Safety Institute with the pros and cons weighed up. As a teenager I fell off a BMX at 0mph on the road on loose gravel under a nearly bald tire, I wasn't wearing a helmet and my head hit the curb stone - hurt like hell at the time and I still have the scars from the road rash on my elbow. Nowadays I sometimes commute into work on a Class 1 ebike wearing a helmet, but sometimes when I take the DC Metro and it craps out I bail and take Capital Bikeshare the rest of the way into work and don't wear a helmet. I've been thinking about carrying a folding helmet but most of the designs I've seen are relatively expensive (>$100) or too bulky to fit in my backpack with my work gear. I like the concept of a disposable folding helmet for bikeshare systems, but cardboard doesn't work when it gets wet.

JRA
1 week ago

I ride a bike that will maintain 28+ on level ground and am 195.

While it is possible to get to 28 just by putting a Vado, or the equivalent EU-US spec class III bike, in turbo getting it in the highest gear ratio and pedaling to activate the PAS I don't see how one could maintain that speed for very long given that their peak power output is at the most 700 or so watts. And at that you are going to be burning wh's much like as represented above. Few that I have seen have a final drive ratio high enough also that won't have both the motor and your legs rpm's maxed out. My setup does however allowing for a comfortable cadence at speed while adding as much wattage of my own as desired.

In comparison there is a big difference between going 20 mph and 28 in regards to pushing though the air and how much power that takes. This is from a more typical ride

Both were done with active but no sweat pedaling in similar terrain although the longer ride had one decent climb, another wh drain. Almost twice the distance and half the wh/mi at the slower average pace is a substantial gain and why most of my riding is done averaging in the high teens to lower 20mph.

Although motorcycles get decent gas mileage I have always thought they should do better given their power to weight ratio, but now I think it is because of the poor aero dynamics of the human form at speeds over 25mph.

1/2
Barkme Wolf
2 weeks ago

That sure is a lot of stuff. I took a backpacking class recently that did a great job teaching to me leave all the "just in case" stuff behind, pack less and enjoy the trip without so much stuff! Here's my most recent rig for ebike camping. I'm able to get way out in the sticks with the Felt Outfitter either on fire roads or single track bike trails and get to some really nice secluded fishing/swimming spots that most bikes can't get to. This was 10 miles in at Henry Coe State Park recently:

[/QUOTE
About the same amount of stuff as I have. Except no ukulele.

motostrano
2 weeks ago

That sure is a lot of stuff. I took a backpacking class recently that did a great job teaching to me leave all the "just in case" stuff behind, pack less and enjoy the trip without so much stuff! Here's my most recent rig for ebike camping. I'm able to get way out in the sticks with the Felt Outfitter either on fire roads or single track bike trails and get to some really nice secluded fishing/swimming spots that most bikes can't get to. This was 10 miles in at Henry Coe State Park recently:

JohnT
2 weeks ago

Coincidentally, a few days ago, my wife was leading a group ride, mostly with people who rented Pedegos from us, and one had a flat. Everyone got a class on dealing with a hubmotor.

Most Pedegos have 15mm axle nuts on the front and 19mm on the rear, so we keep an adjustable wrench in our kit. For air, we carry CO2 instead of a pump, and we usually bring a first-aid kit. Most of the rest of the stuff we carry has been mentioned.

When we fix a flat at our store, we usually use a thicker thorn-resistant tube, plus a tire liner, and we add Slime.

I've heard bad things about airless tubes. I think they said they ride rough, are heavy, and don't last long.

JRA
2 weeks ago

Once in awhile you have to blow out the cobwebs.

This was including pushing a 140" gear at about 80 rpm on level pavement. Hovering right around 900 + watts for the most part. Stiff cross wind for most of it with some tail wind which is where the MaxS came about I guess.

Usually my rides look more like this:

And that included a 4 mile hill climb and averaging more like 300w. Really shows how much it takes to push through the air trying to maintain Class III speed.

1/2
Dewey
2 weeks ago

It’s been said that when 'climbing' with hub motors, 50% of their rated top speed should be their minimum speed. That means you’ll need to maintain 7.5mph with a 15mph 250w and 10mph with a 20mph 350w...the 350w will assist you up to about an 8% climb before the work gets challenging...front hub motors less than 500w do not need a torque arm.

Thanks for the information, that jibes with my experience with the 24v 250W kit which ran out of energy half way up a 6% hill, the extra weight of the motor and battery on my already heavy steel bike made it a slog standing on the pedals to get the rest of the way up, so I'm glad the 36v kit provides enough power to properly assist up moderate hills, but it is that extra power that prompted my suggestion for Clean Republic to include a torque arm. Justin LeMire-Elmore conducted torque stress experiments on hub motors and reported a Crystalite 400 series 36v hub motor generated an axle torque of 35-40 NM, about the same as the 38.7 NM drop-out spin-out torque with hand-tightened nuts - fitting a 1/8" steel torque arm increased drop-out spin-out torque to 48 NM with hand tightened nuts. As it is now the kit comes with tabbed c washers, the instructions recommend only installing it on a steel fork, and to tighten the axle nuts with a torque wrench to 28lb/ft. It would add safety redundancy for CR to include an inexpensive universal hose clamp torque arm with instructions to install it with the pivot arm along the back of the fork so force would be directed up to pull the front wheel into the drop-outs in the event they were spread and the axle spin-out, but if it were installed incorrectly the other way round with the pivot arm along the front of the fork that would have the opposite effect and direct force down so perhaps it's better off as it is - they are marketing it as an easy to install Class 2 throttle ebike kit.

JayVee
2 weeks ago

I know there was another thread about adding wider tires and what the bike could accommodate w/out changing fenders and/or rims. Did you stick with the 38C? Do you know how wide you can go on your bike w/out modifying fenders etc? Its odd that (at least in the US), Haibike put the Super Moto X tires on their 20mph bike but 38C on the speed pedelec. Seems like it should be the other way around. If I end up buying the 5.0, I'd definitely want to add a wider tire if possible.

Currently I like the Bulls Cross Lite E as my 2nd (backup) e-bike which also has 38C but is a class 1. Court's reviews of the bike have been pretty favorable (he indicates that it wasn't too hard to sustain 23mph on the bike). Unfortunately I have no local Bulls dealers and I wanted to buy my 2nd bike from a local dealer this time.

Thus I'd default to my 2nd choice which is the Haibike XDuro Trekking 5.0 (my local Trek shop is also a Haibike dealer) but I'd want to add a wider tire even if I can only go to 40C. Distant 3rd and 4th choices are the Specialized Vado 6.0 (local dealer) and the R&M Roadster (no local dealer).

There's not really a lot of clearance with the fenders. I suspect you could put on 42Cs or maybe even 45Cs. I suggest you get a Thubuster. If you want to keep the same panniers, and be able to swap between bikes, you can use the XLC Carrymore adaptor plate & surrounding O ring. Look up Piper109's posts for the adaptor. He found it on eBay, I think. But he had to search a while for a supplier willing to ship to the US. The O ring is even more difficult to find. If you use the adaptor plate for a trunk bag, you can no longer use the panniers with the original rack (even if you have the right size hooks). I tried in the store: doesn't work. With the external O ring it might work, but needs to be tested.

But first check that you'll get the same rack as us (strongly suspect you will). In the EU there are very little differences between the 5.0 and 6.0, except for the drive. You should be aware that Haibike's S-Pedelec models have the lights on constantly and they can't be turned off. It's a nice safety feature, but uses up about 1.5 to 2% battery per hour. That's according to tests performed in my Kitchen, but it's probably fairly realistic.

Edit: Check this thread for the adaptor plate:

https://electricbikereview.com/forum/threads/two-new-trekkings-need-advice-on-a-few-things.13372/

JRA
3 weeks ago

"and breaking the rules."

Calling a spade a spade what you are talking about is a throttle, right? Albeit one that is limited in speed which makes sense for a walking mode and easy enough to do electronically. But one that take better advantage of all those nm of torque that they are always on about. The concept is not new or without precedent, BionX had an assist lever in their early kits years ago distributed world wide, and that was about all they did was a light assist and wear out the battery real fast if you kept it pinned but I digress.

On Speed Pedelecs they can not have a throttle with the Class III laws as written. But Class I bikes can have a throttle but then would fit in to the Class II throttle allowed as well as all the other rules allowing for their use. So what rule would they be breaking if they put a decent walk assist on 20 mph bikes, still advertise the whole PAS thing and move on. Strictly talking the US market btw. Probably the majority of the people who would benefit from walk assist are in the lower mph market anyway.

Heck be generous and make it so that someone can start off with it also. I use my throttle for that all the time, a little blip goes a long way. Three mph with some torque would do the job.

Over50
3 weeks ago

...The 700C x 38C tires on the Trekking don't absorb much, and the Suntour fork only helps with the really big bumps. There are a lot of small country roads here which are poorly paved, and the bike rattles a lot....

I know there was another thread about adding wider tires and what the bike could accommodate w/out changing fenders and/or rims. Did you stick with the 38C? Do you know how wide you can go on your bike w/out modifying fenders etc? Its odd that (at least in the US), Haibike put the Super Moto X tires on their 20mph bike but 38C on the speed pedelec. Seems like it should be the other way around. If I end up buying the 5.0, I'd definitely want to add a wider tire if possible.

Currently I like the Bulls Cross Lite E as my 2nd (backup) e-bike which also has 38C but is a class 1. Court's reviews of the bike have been pretty favorable (he indicates that it wasn't too hard to sustain 23mph on the bike). Unfortunately I have no local Bulls dealers and I wanted to buy my 2nd bike from a local dealer this time.

Thus I'd default to my 2nd choice which is the Haibike XDuro Trekking 5.0 (my local Trek shop is also a Haibike dealer) but I'd want to add a wider tire even if I can only go to 40C. Distant 3rd and 4th choices are the Specialized Vado 6.0 (local dealer) and the R&M Roadster (no local dealer).

mrgold35
3 weeks ago

Congrats on the new ride! I've put over 2200 miles since Sept/16 on my Radrover ebike and taken trips to the Grand Canyon and Sedona, AZ. Trailriding can be a ton of fun (especially at night). Helmet, eye protection, suspension seatpost, and very bright lights is all your need to 4X your fun when traveling.

I'm not sure how an average law enforcement or park ranger would know if your bike is Class I/II/III, 250w-3000w, or 20-35 mph unless you tell them? I only know if an ebike has a mid-drive or hub motor and some ebikes have those components well hidden within the frame. I got into the habit of double-checking the city, state, and federal laws on ebikes if I plan to travel. Places like Sedona, AZ, don't allow any ebikes where MTB/road bikes on bike only trails because they consider them to be motor vehicles. The Grand Canyon has a little more flexibility and you can ride on the trails away from the main south rim viewing area.

I've even thought about the option of riding in ebike restricted areas without my battery inserted turning my Radrover into a +60lbs regular bike. Unfortunately, the gearing would make it hard to pedal out of 3rd gear unless I have a tailwind or going downhill.

JeffDG
3 weeks ago

Hello!
WOW! I knew e-bikes were emerging, but until my research research I had no idea the number of brands and offerings! Cost is still a factor, so I'm looking to merge the capabilities of a mountain bike with a commuter. Right now, I have a Trek 29er but because of the hills around here and asthma I don't go out much. That and I'm not overly sold on the 29er concept...

So...here is a rundown of my "must haves" and my "like to haves" followed by a couple options that seem to fit the bill.

Price: $2k (give or take)
Wheel size: strongly prefer 27.5"
Tires: not particularly relevant as I'd probably have to change to something amenable to both activities.
Drive: prefer a mid-drive
Suspension: Must have 100mm front suspension... full suspension would be wicked!!... could do front rack in that case (e.g., Thule pack n pedal)?????
Method of drive: prefer torque sensing with throttle
Accessories: needs to have the ability for a rack, fenders, and lights; prefer if they come pre-installed with lights integrated into the electric system
Class: Must be class III (20mph throttle / 28mph assist)

So far I found two that fit these criteria and two more that, well, might just be shooting for the stars:
1. Magnum Peak: a geared hub-driven mountain bike with bolt ons for racks etc.
2. M2S XC Sport - there is a dearth of info on this brand - but this site has done a review of the impressive drive system. The range seems low... are they just a conservative bunch?

is there an option for a 500W motor upgrade
is there an option for battery upgrades
Possible to add a throttle?
is there a gear-shift sensor?
Are the head/tail lights integrated into the electric system?

3. M2S Dual Sport - this is a full-suspension mountain bike...not sure it would work, but it would be incredibly cool if it could!
4. M2S All Go - this looks so cool! And so light! 37 lbs! What!?!?! Looks like there's an option for front suspension based on their photos, but it's not listed on the drop down menus.

It seems that Magnum has been around for at least 7 years...which is a good sign. The M2S fits more criteria but they seem to be an incredibly new company, which has its risks...on the other hand... the parts seem to be all available elsewhere (Bafang Max drive system... shimano shifters, etc.)... M2S' website, while looks great and is nicely navigable, does leave some questions.

I'm open to other options and/or input on the ones above...

THANKS!!

EDIT: Add to the short list the Biktrix Monte 1000... that also seems to fit the criteria. Has a BBS02 motor, hard tail, etc etc.

Over50
3 weeks ago

It doesn't quite meet your criteria of not looking like an ebike but the battery does blend pretty well: I've got my eyes and am considering (as a 2nd commuter) the Bulls Cross Lite E. Bosch system, class 1 and carries some pretty nice specs according to Court's recent review. My preference is the high step although there is a low step (Court's review) and the wave:

JRA
3 weeks ago

My advice is go with the E8. Belt drive/Internal hub is a good call for the PNWet. Get some full coverage fenders too.

28mph e bikes technically aren't legal to operate in the PNW as there are no class 3 laws in effect here so 20mph should be fine for your commute and shopping trips especially if you can use MUP's as much as possible. Plus it saves $400!

Borque
3 weeks ago

I am a person weight around 300 lbs and i use regular e-bike for commuting. Actually my weight go down from 340 lbs to 300 in short time. I will advise you Ariel Rider W-Class or if you want for commute and daily use Ariel Rider C-Class . If you contact i am sure can get a better price if you explain your situation.

James Sorenson
3 weeks ago

Is that a throttle attached to it? Does that mean it turns your bike into a Class 2 bike? I'd prefer to keep mine Class 3 if possible.

elyhim
3 weeks ago

Just because you don't see signs doesn't mean much of anything. I don't know what the rules are where you ride, but it might be worth looking into. I've never seen any no ebike signs on Forest Service or BLM trails even though I know they aren't allowed.

North Carolina defines a class I pedelec as a bicycle. So until I see the "no e-bike" allowed I'll ride with assist. Now US forestry is different..... for now.

Ravi Kempaiah
3 weeks ago

It is legal.
In California and few other states that have embraced the eBike classification (Class I, II, III), riding a bike that has 28mph top speed is perfectly legal. You may not ride it on certain mountain trails.
If you are respectful of the fellow trail users and not drawing too much attention, it should not be a problem. What instigates the authorities and other MTB riders is loud noise and high-speed dirt bike-like riding.

Maggie Tang
4 months ago

My boyfriend has one of those and heis so much in love with the bike. He said it is one of the fastest and most comfortable e-bike .

Helena Wolfenstein
7 months ago

I bought my ariel rider last month. Really happy with performance. Also i ordered a customized covers. Really love riding and getting all the looks.

Ariel Rider Ebikes
5 months ago

Aaron she bought online from us as there wasn't a dealer nearby her.

Aaron Zane
6 months ago

Helena Wolfenstein nice! did you buy it locally or did you have it shipped?

Leamon Miller
9 months ago

I am saving up to get my first ebike. Can I get some help?

Chemtrail Dreams
4 months ago

Leamon Miller radpower bikes has great financing

Liz Seelbach
5 months ago

i can advise this e-bike as works perfect for me.

EnhancedNightmare
1 year ago

I dig the design very much. Those guys know how to do a good looking cruiser type bike. I especially like the old-school suspension in the front. Reminds me of the bikes from the 1930's.

Adolf Shitler
1 year ago

Lovely looking bike. You review a lot of e-bikes mate. Do you have a personal fave?

Fred Brands
1 year ago

These bikes are different from the ones we see here in Holland. These are more fun. I would buy one immediately

Ariel Rider Ebikes
5 months ago

Fred sorry for late reply but we have a warehouse in Amsterdam. So contact us if you looking for one. we can help you about it.

Helena Wolfenstein
1 year ago

schön fahrrad .

Kyle Sherman
1 year ago

sweet bike dudes...please make a dual shock version people

Michael Caffey
1 year ago

I don't see myself buying an electric bike for at least a couple more years, just because of money. That being said, I really appreciate your enthusiasm and detail you put into your videos. I have been watching them for over a year now, just to check out whats new out there.

Thanks!

Liz Seelbach
5 months ago

seems they offer discount now you can check it.

Aaron Zane
6 months ago

Michael Caffey i feel you man. just started saving up for an e-bike and take it slow if you need to. in time, you'll get there. one thing that helps me to keep saving is the fact that some bicycles cost even more than some e-bikes out there. I have a modified Trek urban/touring bike that was roughly $800 new when it was a mountain bike, and i've seen e-bikes as low as $600. i wish you luck!

Adolf Shitler
1 year ago

+Michael Caffey You could make do with many of the no-name chinese bikes. They're all the same motor tech etc. That's what I've done. My bike arrives this week ;-)

ForbinColossus
1 year ago

Has nice quality details. Love that the throttle can deliver full power at any setting. Huge feature to me that makes an ebike fun. I am still more a haibike FS MTB preferrer.

HYPERSHADNIC
1 year ago

How long, fast, and does it last from Featherstone to Manassas?

Face less
1 year ago

The red bike reminds me of an early Indian motorcycle

Maggie Tang
4 months ago

Exactly and love that one.

EnhancedNightmare
1 year ago

Spot on!

DrZarkloff
1 year ago

it looks really cool but the gas tank screams cop magnet.

Casey Neistat
1 year ago

As the road bike with drop bars is the most aerodynamic I would like to see more road bikes as I can only see just a few for sale world wide.

difflocktwo
1 year ago

Road bikes are far from aerodynamic. Look into recumbent bikes for true performance.

Casey Neistat
1 year ago

+THE LOST Ref e bikes.

Dean Botton
1 year ago

Until the bike falls over & snaps that key in half

Ariel Rider Ebikes
1 year ago

Hi Dean, thank you for raising your concern on the key location.
Actually even if the bike falls, since the front fork can only turn to a certain angle, the only contact with ground on a side fall would be the edge of the handle bar grips.
So the keys would stay safe at all times :)

EnhancedNightmare
1 year ago

Yeah the key placement isn't very fortunate.

HYPERSHADNIC
1 year ago

Um, are you the type to leave keys in your car too?

minnie saab
1 year ago

the guy with strange accent is really cute !

cigaro
1 year ago

frankly its stupid not to offer a product online in this day and age

Henrijs Rozenkopfs
1 year ago

And even more stupid is to use the leather seats in this day and age...

Mark Elford
1 year ago

Nice machine.