Ariel Rider N-Class Review

Ariel Rider N Class Electric Bike Review
Ariel Rider N Class
Ariel Rider N Class Avid Bb7 Mechanical Disc Brakes
Ariel Rider N Class Ebike Battery Charging Port Ignition Key
Ariel Rider N Class Cruiser Bars Twist Throttle
Ariel Rider N Class Ebike Display Panel Backlit Fixed
Ariel Rider N Class 42 Tooth Chainring Bash Guard
Ariel Rider N Class Custom Leather Saddle Sprung
Ariel Rider N Class Custom Springer Fork Cst Maxxis Balloon Tires
Ariel Rider N Class Spanninga Vena Brake Light
Ariel Rider N Class Electric Bike Shimano Altus 7 Speed
Ariel Rider N Class Beige Black Red Cover Colors
Ariel Rider N Class Custom Battery Box Cover
Ariel Rider N Class Ebike Battery Charger
Ariel Rider N Class Electric Bike Review
Ariel Rider N Class
Ariel Rider N Class Avid Bb7 Mechanical Disc Brakes
Ariel Rider N Class Ebike Battery Charging Port Ignition Key
Ariel Rider N Class Cruiser Bars Twist Throttle
Ariel Rider N Class Ebike Display Panel Backlit Fixed
Ariel Rider N Class 42 Tooth Chainring Bash Guard
Ariel Rider N Class Custom Leather Saddle Sprung
Ariel Rider N Class Custom Springer Fork Cst Maxxis Balloon Tires
Ariel Rider N Class Spanninga Vena Brake Light
Ariel Rider N Class Electric Bike Shimano Altus 7 Speed
Ariel Rider N Class Beige Black Red Cover Colors
Ariel Rider N Class Custom Battery Box Cover
Ariel Rider N Class Ebike Battery Charger

Summary

  • A powerful electric cruiser with unique battery box design reminiscing of vintage motorcycles, three color choices for the box, fenders and chain guard including red, black and beige
  • Integrated LED lights by Spanninga, comfortable CST balloon tires with reflective sidewall stripes and a generic flick bell are included standard which improve visibility and safety
  • Powerful 500 watt geared motor, large 48 volt battery and adjustable speed settings (password protected) make this a versatile platform, solid 160 mm mechanical disc brakes with motor inhibitors stop well
  • The battery pack is not designed to be removable for charging off the bike or reducing weight during transport and the weight is a bit higher than a downtube or seat tube pack

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Ariel Rider

Model:

N-Class

Price:

$2,899 (Premium Model $3,099)

Body Position:

Upright Relaxed

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Cruising

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2), Moped or Motorcycle (Class 4)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Battery, 2 Year Motor/Controller, 5 Year Frame

Availability:

United States, United Kingdom, Germany, Holland, Singapore, China, Taiwan, Japan, South Korea, Turkey, Spain, Italy, Switzerland, Portugal, Austria, United Arab Emirates

Model Year:

2016

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

62.5 lbs (28.34 kg)

Battery Weight:

7 lbs (3.17 kg)

Motor Weight:

8.37 lbs (3.79 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy, Double Heat Treated T4 and T6

Frame Sizes:

20 in (50.8 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

20" Seat Tube, 26" Reach, 32" Stand Over Height, 74" Length

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

Beige, Red, Black

Frame Fork Details:

Custom Made Springer Style, 10 mm Bolt Skewer

Frame Rear Details:

10 mm Bolt Skewer

Attachment Points:

Fender Bosses

Gearing Details:

7 Speed 1x7 Shimano Altus, CS HG20-7, 11-36T

Shifter Details:

Shimano SIS Index

Cranks:

Prowheel 244A-2, 42T Chainring with Alloy Bash Guard

Pedals:

Wellgo Aluminum Alloy Platform, B087DU

Headset:

Neco 3510

Stem:

Promax MA-525 Adjustable Angle

Handlebar:

Zoom Cruiser, 25" Width

Brake Details:

Avid BB7 Mechanical Disc with 160 mm Rotors, Easy Adjust Calipers, Artek Levers with Motor Inhibitors

Grips:

Custom Hand Stitched Leather with Lockers

Saddle:

Custom Leather, Sprung (Optional Velo Extra-Wide Plush Plus, Sprung)

Seat Post:

Promax Aluminum Alloy, Tapered

Seat Post Length:

300 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

27.2 mm

Rims:

Double Walled Aluminum Alloy

Spokes:

Stainless Steel 13G

Tire Brand:

CST Maxxis, 26" x 2.35"

Wheel Sizes:

26 in (66.04cm)

Tire Details:

Reflective Sidewall Stripe, 22-60 PSI

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Paint-Matched Full Length Composite Fenders with Mud Flaps, Paint Matched Composite Chain Guard, Flick Bell on Right, Integrated LED Lights Front: Spanninga Swing 40 LUX Back: Spanninga Vena, Aluminum Alloy Bash Guard

Other:

2 Amp Charger 1.1 lb with Cell Balancing, IP56 Water Resistant Controller, Honeycomb Battery Cell Layout (Avoids Short Circuits and Stays Cool)

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Dapu

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Motor Peak Output:

700 watts

Motor Torque:

48 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Samsung 29E

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

11.6 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

556.8 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

4 hours

Estimated Min Range:

25 miles (40 km)

Estimated Max Range:

40 miles (64 km)

Display Type:

Fixed, Backlit LCD Console on Left

Readouts:

Speed, Battery Capacity (5 Bars), Assist Level (0-6), Trip Meter, Odometer, Average Speed, Max Speed (Hold Plus Button to Activate Lights)

Drive Mode:

Twist Throttle, Torque Sensing Pedal Assist (12 Magnet Sensor)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph) (Up to 28 MHP Unlocked)

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Written Review

The N-Class is Ariel Rider’s top of the line offering with the most integrated aesthetic and a special option to customize the top tube battery box. I struggled to grasp what the bike would be like before seeing it in person, the top part is all plastic (aside from the surrounding tubing), is dyed completely through and is made from durable scratch resistant polycarbonate. This approach strikes a balance between reduced weight, increased strength and a nice aesthetic reminiscent of the popular Sondors bikes but much higher quality. This platform is very strong, fast, offers pedal assist with twist throttle override and even has integrated lights. You get a seven speed Shimano Altus drivetrain (a step up from entry level) and an impressive two year warranty on most of the bike with one year on the battery. My only complaint or question mark is that the battery is not removable. Considering the 62.5 pound (28 kg) weight this would have been a nice feature for transporting the bike as the pack weighs ~7 lbs on its own. Also, not having a removable battery means you’ll have to park the N-Class near an outlet every time it needs a fill-up and that could be difficult if you’re using it to commute.

In practice, the Ariel Rider N and W Class electric bikes I tested were more geared towards neighborhood “fun” riding. They don’t have racks or even rack bosses and you don’t even get a bottle cage mounting point. It wouldn’t be an ideal commuting platform but that’s not what it’s about and frankly, with a backpack on you’d fare pretty well because of the power and range on offer. The motor is a 500 watt internally geared hub mounted in the rear wheel. It’s made by Dapu that’s a solid brand in my experience and the battery is 48 volt 11.6 amp hours for more than a half kilowatt of capacity. It’s arranged to support more power and speed than efficiency but if you ride in a lower assist level there’s no reason it won’t take you 30+ miles. The best features of this bike for me were how it looks, the speed adjustability built into the display (password protected) and how comfortable it rides. With large balloon tires, a custom sprung saddle and cruiser bars (with padded leather grips) the strain of bumps and cracks are significantly reduced. Note that the custom springer fork really doesn’t travel much so if you’re willing to trade style for more comfort then consider the Comfort model vs. Premium I reviewed. It costs less and uses a different (but still comfortable) saddle and comes with a basic oil suspension fork.

Ariel Rider is a company that dates back to 2010, having been rebranded after 2014 as the founding team expanded internationally. Today their products are sold in 26 countries which is very impressive to me. The N-Class is being used by some businesses and fancy hotel chains due to its brandable customizable battery box. The company name “Ariel Rider” is a nod to Ariel Motorcycles, a company dating back to 1870, which was an innovator in British motorcycle design that eventually spun off into cars. Interestingly, the Ariel name has been taken up by a modern sports car producer called Ariel Ltd in much the same way that Ariel Rider uses it. So the point here is that these are all distinct entities, each building on a long heritage of innovation and style, paying homage if you will. Aesthetics are a huge draw with the W-Class and touch points like the custom leather saddle, locking leather grips, color matched fenders, chain guard and sturdy black pedals bring it home for me. I went into this review impressed but curious about the width of the oversized top tube battery bay and came away convinced that it all works together well for a good ride experience… though I wish the key did not have to be left in when riding.

To operate the bike you charge the battery using a nice, light weight 2 amp charger then press the power button on their LCD console for a couple of seconds. It blinks to life and you see speed, assist level and battery level among range and other ride details. From here you can arrow up or down exploring six levels of assist and a level zero which keeps the display and lights going while also allowing for throttle on demand operation. It’s setup very well and really makes you feel like you’re in control of the bike. Having six levels of assist vs. 5 or even 3 as I see on other electric cruisers means that you have more control over top speed when pedaling and as mentioned earlier, you can go deeper by double clicking the power button to adjust other settings and even cap the top speed or allow it to reach ~25 mph for private and off-road use. The bike grew on me and I actually went through a sort of wave of emotions at first expecting it to be more like the Tracker from Vintage Electric Bikes then seeing the plastic and wondering if it would rattle (it stayed very quiet and felt sturdy) then gaining an appreciation for the power but also the control of operation and the finer touches like the saddle and protected wires on the rear light. For the price, it’s a unique looking bike that really puts you in control. There are sacrifices in terms of utility but it keeps you dry and safe which I love.

Pros:

  • Beautiful touch points on the Premium model, the saddle is large and comfortable but also has the Ariel Rider name on it in cursive which looks classy, same thing with the display, I love the wing logo on the battery box and the ability to custom print onto the box for ~$350
  • I like the quick release seat tube collar and front wheel, this helps to reduce weight and make the bike easier to move since the battery is not easily removable
  • I’m a fan of the Avid BB7 mechanical disc brakes because they offer tool-free rotor adjustment, you can use your fingers to twist the little red discs to fine tune the calipers as your pads wear down
  • Depending on where you live it’s wonderful to have full length fenders and the color matching on the Ariel Rider ebikes is spot on, the chain guard also matches and is a sort of custom thin guard which looks great
  • The chainring has an aluminum bash guard on it which also acts as a chain guide to some extent making the drivetrain more robust (useful at higher speed riding and on bumpy terrain), I like that the spokes they went with are a bit larger at 13 gauge vs. 14G given the heavier build of the bike
  • You get three color choices (for the fenders, chain guard and battery box cover) including red, black and beige and the box plastic is scratch resistant
  • I absolutely love the integrated LED lights, both are made by Spanninga and the tail light is wired in so it lights up when you pull the brake levers
  • Nice display panel and control unit, it’s compact but the buttons are large and easy to reach without taking your hand of the left grip, you can get into settings by double clicking the power button and change your speed when the passcode is entered (up to ~25 mph in the USA)
  • The controls default to 0-6 pedal assist and you can override with twist throttle at any level! This is awesome for people who want a more scooter-like experience, the cadence sensor uses 12 magnets making it pretty responsive
  • The Ariel Rider N-Class uses a custom designed hydroformed Aluminum alloy frame that feels solid and all of the wires and cables are internally routed to reduce snags
  • Upgraded Wellgo Aluminum alloy platform pedals offer lots of surface area and feel stable and stiff, the saddle is completely custom with leather imported from Australia… it feels firm at first but should soften over time (you can request the comfort saddle from Velo if you’d like and that comes stock on the Comfort trim level which costs less), even the brake levers are upgraded and have a nice rubberized grip on the leading edge, you get a basic bell to top it all off

Cons:

  • The battery pack is mounted inside a polycarbonate box that isn’t designed to be removable or opened easily… so the battery stays with the bike making it heavier to transport and less versatile to charge
  • The springer fork on the Premium model looks cool but doesn’t offer much travel and adds weight, Ariel Rider offers a more traditional suspension oil fork on the Comfort model but it doesn’t have lockout
  • The battery box is pretty wide (widest towards the head tube) which looks cool like a motorcycle gas tank, but is easier to bump with your knees while pedaling
  • No bottle cage bosses or rack bosses on either the Comfort or Premium models, you might have to bring a little backpack along to carry supplies
  • This electric bicycle is only available in one frame size but the stem is adjustable angle and the seat tube has quick release so it’s actually quite versatile
  • I noticed that the cadence sensor starts quickly but doesn’t always shut the motor down when you stop pedaling (I was told this was a choice made to smooth out the ride with inconsistent pedaling), it alarmed me at first because I thought maybe the throttle was stuck on but you can always cut power by pulling either brake lever so that’s nice

Resources:

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More Ariel Rider Reviews

Ariel Rider W-Class Review

  • MSRP: $2,350
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

A beautiful, custom designed cruiser electric bike drawing from vintage motorcycle designs with a springer fork, chopper bars and wider top tube. Powerful 500 watt geared hub motor by Dapu paired with a 556 watt hour battery…...

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scrambler
10 hours ago

It is most likely limited by software so it would follow the requirement of a Class 1 (or 2) E-bike. Read the article below to learn more about these.
https://electricbikereview.com/guides/electric-bike-classes/

The first thing is to ask the manufacturer if here is a way to lift the limitation. Some will allow it and give you the details on how to change the programming.

If not, the limitation is often triggered by a speed sensor that is somewhere on the rear wheel and frame. If so, some ways around the limitation can be to deactivate the sensor (you wont see your speed anymore), or mount some gizmo that changes the reading of the speed (your speed will be inaccurate).

read more on E-bike Tuning below
http://ebike-mtb.com/en/back-issue-e-bike-tuning/
https://www.ebiketuning.com/

Court
19 hours ago

Hey guys, I though this was pretty neat. A fellow named George shared this article with me announcing that the Contra Costa Canal Regional Trail in Contra Costa County California, the Alameda Creek Trail in Alameda County California and the Iron Horse Trail running through both Contra Costa and Alameda Counties California will be open to Class 1 and Class 2 electric bikes for a pilot program through July 2018. For those who don't know about electric bike classes, I wrote an article here a while back... but basically, it means pedal assist and throttle operated electric bicycles capable of reaching up to 20 mph.

This announcement was exciting to me because it talks about how many different types of people use e-bikes and are already riding on the trails for commuting or recreational purposes. It is my understanding that the pilot program is designed to assess how the bikes get and possibly expand to other trails in the future. It could be used as a model for other counties around the state and nation to integrate e-bikes and regular bikes more officially. Here are a couple of choice quotes from the article:

On Wednesday, July 5, 2017, the East Bay Regional Park District Board of Directors voted unanimously to implement a one year E-Bike Pilot Program on three regional trails in the Park District.

There has already been an increase in bicycle commuting via our trails and E-Bike users will likely continue the trend, which will help reduce traffic congestion on roadways, advance green transportation modes, and improve access for those with physical limitation. E-bikes are not just used by commuters, however. Many seniors and individuals with disabilities are opting for a bicycle that can do the pedaling when they can’t. These types of bikes provide new mobility opportunities to people who need extra assistance.

1/1
Thomas Jaszewski
1 day ago

E-Mtb should be able to be used on trails. I find myself giving way for other cyclists and hikers because It's easier to gain momentum. I often turn assist off if wishing exercise or on for riding with my much faster friends. I use a class I pedelec, I agree throttle e-bikes should not be allowed.
Unfortunately the lack nes berween motorcycle and ebike are being blurred. The 72w 3kw 45 mph "ebike" have no place on mtd trails deveoped, paid for and maintained by mtb clubs.

Timpo
1 day ago

I have a question about Juiced CrossCurrent S https://shop.juicedbikes.com/products/crosscurrent-s

I've seen their YouTube channel and the bike is well capable of reaching 30+mph, but is this street legal?
It has 4 modes. Class 1, Class 2, Class 3 and OFF ROAD.

Obviously this bike was intended for use on the road.
(What kind of "off road use only" bike comes with fenders, lights, rear racks, kicks stand, reflective panel on pedals, USB port for your phone/GPS, etc)

Although it varies state by state, I thought the general rule of being street legal was 500W max & 28mph max(with pedalling).

So as long as you have mode selector, you can just ride it in Class 3 or whatever and allowed to have "off road" button?

elyhim
2 days ago

E-Mtb should be able to be used on trails. I find myself giving way for other cyclists and hikers because It's easier to gain momentum. I often turn assist off if wishing exercise or on for riding with my much faster friends. I use a class I pedelec, I agree throttle e-bikes should not be allowed.

rich c
2 days ago

Two of my ebikes have body floats with comfort saddles. The springs in the comfort saddles add another 1 inch of travel on top of the body float's travel. The comfort level is as good as my full suspension ebike. On the really rough successive bumps, I am still comfortable on the saddle while my feet are already bouncing off the pedals.

I must be doing something wrong, but my suspension seat post and spring front fork is not close to being in the same class as my air shock full suspension emtb. Must be the suspension saddle!

BernieS
2 days ago

I just did a demo ride of a 2016 Misceo IE in Missoula (I live in Hamilton) today. What a nice bike! It's very quiet and smooth. The gears shift nicely and quietly. I didn't have a chance to get it out to try anything other then ECO mode. The guys at the shop didn't know anything about the auto shifting but it probably would have needed a software update anyway. I plan to give it some thought over the weekend but I think I'll get it. I just want it for riding around Hamilton running errands. I'm 78 so I'm not going to go conquer mountains anymore . I understand the issue with the front fork and lack of suspension but it's a class 1 pedelec so probably can get away without the front suspension but I will get a ThudBuster suspension seat post straight away. With a nice Topeak rack and MTX trunk bag, fenders, kickstand, larger size pedals, and Ergo grips, it should be a great commuter/urban bike. I'm sorry there are no bosses for a bottle cage and/or pump.

Oops! Just did a little more research and discovered that the Misceo IE that I test rode was actually a 2015 model. The Raleigh dealer didn't know the difference. No bottle bosses, no kickstand, narrower tire (I think), and smaller diameter seat post. Won't be buying a Misceo IE. Raleigh says that it's the end of the model. I'll have to keep an eye out for what's shown at the upcoming InterBike expo.

BreakAes
3 days ago

Tomorrow I'll be going to Seattle to check out the bikes. I personally haven't heard of the Magnum e-bike.

I realized it'll cost around $750/year in registration and insurance costs for a class B camper van, so I'm back to the idea of a truck and truck camper. I don't want to pay those costs for 2 vehicles every year. I think I should be able to get a good setup for under $10,000.

Jonathan55
4 days ago

Thanks, I made a post at Radpower's Facebook page.

I have yet to try it, but I had the thought that if the bike has a good kickstand, then I might be able to put my right hand on the seat, then grab my right knee or shin with my left hand, to help lift my right leg over the main tube. I think I could get over a tube 18" in height.

It looks like that little tube on the Big Cat is about 14 or 15" above the ground. I'll email them and ask. And I'll ask somebody at the Sondors Facebook group about the Fold X's main tube height, and lowest seat height.

Yeah, I'm definitely going to try before buying. I did ride my roommate's cheap Chinese scooter the other day though. It was more nerve-wracking than I would have liked, but it was wonky, wouldn't start properly, and had what seemed like really bad torque. That coupled with the fact that the Fold X is 50 pounds makes me feel like being able to ride an e-bike is promising. Regardless, I should be able to try at least the Rad Mini soon.

I forgot to mention, I'm considering buying an RV like a class B camper van. So for that reason, I think it would be better if I could store the bike inside the RV. A folder should make that a lot easier.

I have some back problems and have been considering the Rad Mini or the low step over version of the Magnum Premium. I think the Magnum has a 10 or 12 inch step over. EBR did a video of it. It has fork suspension and seat post too.

Can anyone say anything about the Magnum vs the others?

I drove a Class B (Travato) around the country with a Trek Conduit on the back but now want more than just pedal assist.

Timpo
6 days ago

Hello everyone, I'm thinking about buying an Amego Elevate, it's a Canadian bicycle.
https://www.amegoev.com/buy-electric-bikes/electric-bicyles/amego-elevate.html

As you can see, the speed(with pedal, non throttle) is limited to 40km/h (25mph)

But if you look at Magnum Peak, it goes up to 45km/h (28mph)
https://www.magnumbikes.com/product/magnum-peak/

They look very similar, probably come from same manufacture, anyways, what do I need to make Amego Elevate a full Class 3 ebike? Is it just as easy as swapping the display?

I called Amego and they said they can't raise it to 45km/h(28mph)...also I don't want to buy Magnum Peak since the shipping & US/Canada conversion rate won't be cheap.

Thanks

dsvogel
7 days ago

It IS possible to make head/tail lights that are wired into the battery turn OFF and STAY OFF. I wanted to take some time before posting an update to make sure my assessment of the functioning of lights on the Raleigh Redux IE was accurate. I purchased a Light & Motion Nip 800 headlight and Tuck tail light, and wired them into the existing female blade connectors that come with the bike. The headlight connector is coming out of the top of the downtube, and the other was located on the left chainstay of my bike.

I had emailed Raleigh's electric bike division about this issue, eventually communicating with President Larry Pizzi, who was extremely helpful and interested in this problem. I also emailed Light&Motion support, Brose GmbH who couldn't help and suggested I contact BMZ GmbH (the battery manufacturer)... but got nowhere with them.

I ultimately discovered that my propensity to always turn the bike off at the battery was causing the erratic blinking light behavior. So to make this a quick explanation, here are the three things to know about turning off your lights on this particular bike:

The Light button on the computer doesn't work. Like you, I really wanted this to work. Larry indicated that they were following the European standard of having the lights always on for Class 3 eBikes, and therefore the Light button on the computer would not have any effect on the lights at all. There won't be a firmware update or any kind of "fix" to make this button work on the bike. I find it pretty easy to reach down and adjust the Nip 800 light directly without looking. I did let Larry know that the Brose manual that comes with the bike has a section about the functionality of this Light button that they need to be aware of.

You must turn the computer off FIRST. So the trick is to turn off the computer first. Hitting the power button at the top of the computer also turns off the lights. When you then turn off the battery (if you are so inclined) the lights stay off. No more blinking. This is the only way to get the lights to stay off, short of removing the battery altogether.

Moving the bike can cause the lights to blink. You get the lights turned off, move your bike, and now what the heck?! They are blinking again!! I think this may be triggered by the wheel magnet on the back tire moving past the sensor. When this happens, you have to turn the bike ON at the battery, and then turn the computer off again.

Not the most ideal solution, but I'm happy that it no longer looks like I'm keeping an aircraft parked in my garage at night. I've been VERY happy with the Nip/Tuck system and the amount of light they both provide. I also rather like that the lights come on without me thinking about it.

Lastly, if you are interested in using proper male blade connectors to fit the female connectors know that these are 2.8mm or 0.110 inch wide connectors. I purchased item #MST1620 from Cycle Terminal (link to the 0110 connectors page), and wound up snipping the ends of the blade to shorten it a bit. Worked like a charm! They are so cheap that I got a few extra in case I screwed one up. And I did. I also used dielectric grease and heat shrink tubing for the ultimate weather proofing. There are ample videos you can find that show you how to properly crimp a blade on a wire.

Let me know if you have questions, or "Like" this post if you found it helpful. ;)

BreakAes
1 week ago

Thanks, I'll also have to remember to fold the Rad Mini, and try to pick it up when I test it out. Does anybody know if the Fold X has the "auto-walk up the stairs mode" that the Rad Mini has?

I was going to go for a truck and truck camper, but it seems so much more expensive than an older class B van. And I think the roomier ones are the ones with the slide-outs that I'd want to avoid. I think it would be better if I owned a commuter vehicle and a camper van.

Alex M
1 week ago

I have yet to try it, but I had the thought that if the bike has a good kickstand, then I might be able to put my right hand on the seat, then grab my right knee or shin with my left hand, to help lift my right leg over the main tube. I think I could get over a tube 18" in height.
On these folders the height of the top tube is about 25-26". And they weigh ~60 lbs if you have to lay it down and lift. Be careful with your back.

Yes, in Class B you'll have a hard time storing any rigid bike. Truck camper with cabover would be slightly roomier (and cheaper if you already have a truck). Not much roomier.

BreakAes
1 week ago

Thanks, I made a post at Radpower's Facebook page.

I have yet to try it, but I had the thought that if the bike has a good kickstand, then I might be able to put my right hand on the seat, then grab my right knee or shin with my left hand, to help lift my right leg over the main tube. I think I could get over a tube 18" in height.

It looks like that little tube on the Big Cat is about 14 or 15" above the ground. I'll email them and ask. And I'll ask somebody at the Sondors Facebook group about the Fold X's main tube height, and lowest seat height.

Yeah, I'm definitely going to try before buying. I did ride my roommate's cheap Chinese scooter the other day though. It was more nerve-wracking than I would have liked, but it was wonky, wouldn't start properly, and had what seemed like really bad torque. That coupled with the fact that the Fold X is 50 pounds makes me feel like being able to ride an e-bike is promising. Regardless, I should be able to try at least the Rad Mini soon.

I forgot to mention, I'm considering buying an RV like a class B camper van. So for that reason, I think it would be better if I could store the bike inside the RV. A folder should make that a lot easier.

Ron Friedman
1 week ago

I believe you are correct. You can't turn off the lights on motorcycle either, which a Class 3 e-bike sorta is.
Makes sense.

Charlie Rohlfing
1 week ago

Maybe the lights are forced to be on because of you need to ride in traffic etc and not on specific bikeroads. Class 3
I believe you are correct. You can't turn off the lights on motorcycle either, which a Class 3 e-bike sorta is.

JayVee
2 weeks ago

Good luck shipping class 9 hazardous materials... The cost will be prohibitive.

Did the bike come with an EU C.O.C. ? You'll need that document for type approval no matter what country you go to. If you don't have it, it's going to be excessively difficult to register.

See here for requirements per country:

https://electricbikereview.com/forum/threads/e-mtbs-excluded-from-type-approval.13425/#post-106537

Bengt A
2 weeks ago

Ref VADO 5.0; Is there any way to turn the headlamp OFF? Not referenced in manual (page 25). (Without using the missing Mission Control App) Thanks.

Maybe the lights are forced to be on because of you need to ride in traffic etc and not on specific bikeroads. Class 3

fredi
2 weeks ago

This is my first ebike and my decision to buy her was based on getting the best ebike for me at the best price. First a little about me, I’m 60 years old, 6’1” and 230 lbs. A have a 34” Class-A RV and travel the east coast. On long trips I normally tow a Jeep Wrangler with a tray-style bike rack loaded with two or three mountain bike from a big box store. On short trips I leave the Jeep at home and mount the bike rack to the RV. Typical use of the bikes is for recreational riding in National and State parks. I thought it was time for a better bike and was intrigued with the idea of using ebikes and leaving the Jeep at home more.

I originally looked at Evelo because of their mid-drive with the NuVinci hub. They didn’t offer any local sales but work with local bike shops to provide service in conjunction with their 4-year/20,000-mile warranty. I was drawn to the Delta with the 750 watt mid-drive since all I’ve ever owned was mountain bikes and I wanted to make sure that it would get me up the hills. I soon discovered that where I live they only allow 500 watts and mid-drives are more efficient using the power, so while a 750 watt hub drive may struggle to get me up the hill, a 350 watt mid-drive should have less problems because they have higher performance, more torque and use less battery power. I also have always hated not being in the right gear at the right time and gnashing the gears and an Internally Geared Hub (IGH) like the NuVinci would solve those problems. Since I was planning on adding lots of comfort accessories like a plush seat, road tires, rear rack, fenders, lights, etc. and the Galaxy comes with all of those so I felt it was a better fit for me.

The Galaxy is billed as a comfort cruiser with an upright riding position, 27.5″ wheels and 2” tires on a ridge frame. Evelo makes two models the Galaxy, the GT with a step-through frame and the TT a traditional top tube frame. Each model comes in two versions, Premium or Fully Loaded. The Fully Loaded version upgrades the NuVinci N380 transmission to the Harmony fully automatic transmission and adds hydraulic brakes. So I ordered the Fully Loaded Galaxy TT version with a list price of $3899.

The bike came in about a week. She was double boxed and very well packed. The hardest part was getting the bike out of the box. I recommend having a little help here. Evelo isn’t kidding when they say the bike come almost fully assembled. Install the brake caliper, front wheel and fender, handlebars, headlight, and you’re done. They recommend charging the battery for 12 hours before the first use, so I plugged it in to charge overnight and then set about the process of assembling the bike which took about 30 minutes. They provided several allen wrenches, a couple of “real” boxed end wrenches and armed with the step by step instructions it was much easier to assemble than any bike I’ve ever bought from a big box store. My recommendation is that you put the fender on before you install the front wheel and then attach the brake caliper. The front wheel comes with a “Quick Release” so it’s really not a big deal.

The Galaxy is one of a small number of electric bikes that offer the NuVinci Harmony Automatic Transmission which allows me to enjoy the ride while it takes care of the shifting. In automatic it finds the proper gear while I dial in a comfortable cadence and set the assist level for my perfect ride. No more gnashing the gears and getting stuck on a hill because I was in the wrong gear. A simple button press changes the hub to manual mode, but I mostly I keep it in automatic on the lowest setting. The brushless motor combined with the Gates belt drive and the Harmony makes the ride smooth and virtually silent. I set the tire pressure to 50 lbs for a softer ride.

She comes with a 350 watt Bafang Max mid-drive motor (peak 600 watts) and uses a torque sensor (internal to the motor) and speed to determine how much power is drawn from the battery. The torque sensor uses a strain gauge inside the motor to measure pressure on the pedals. This allows for quick engagement and better sensitivity. I was concerned about the Galaxy’s uphill performance but found that she can easily climb hills at 8-12 mph that would normally bring me to a crawl. On level roads I can quickly reach the 20+ mph limit. At those speeds it’s nice to have the Tektro 180mm hydraulic disc brakes that provide great stopping power and simultaneously cut power to the motor. Once you stop there is a double fork kickstand to keep her upright.

The large backlit LCD display panel (made by King) is mounted center of the handlebars and can swivel forward or back to reduce glare. It’s easy to read and offers information about speed, distance, pedal assist, watts and a five segment battery charge level indicator. The control pad is located near the left grip, from there you can turn the bike on/off and select the level of assist. I really liked that holding the UP button turns on/off the backlight and holding the DOWN button activates “Walk” mode which moves the bike forward at about two mph. Pressing both the UP and DOWN buttons for 3 seconds puts you in the settings menu where you can increase the maximum speed to 25 mph, set the backlight level, and miles or kilometers. I set the wheel diameter to 27.5 inches since it defaulted to 26.

The bike has a thumb throttle but as a safety feature it doesn't engage unless the bike is moving. I originally thought I would need the throttle to get across an intersection or when starting up a hill, but the bike's torque sensor measures pressure on the pedals, so it quickly engages. It is so responsive and natural feeling that I haven't used the throttle much but I certainly have used “walk” mode several times.

The rear tail light is mounted directly beneath the battery rack so it isn’t blocked by my pannier and is powered by a couple of AA batteries. The LED Head Light has five modes and is USB rechargeable. It quickly installs on the handlebars with a rubber strap and the single large button on top makes it easy to turn on and change modes while riding.

Powering the bike is a 36 volt, 13 amp (468 wh) battery pack with an advertised 50 miles of range. I rode for over twenty miles before the charge indicator dropped from five to four bars. The battery weighs 8 lbs, can be charged on or off the bike and has its own level indicator. The small rubber cap protecting the charge terminal opens easily and stays closed. The battery is nicely protected in the full-size cargo rack and has a key lock which keeps it there and provides anti-theft security. You don’t need to leave the key in while riding and there’s a built-in handle to help remove the battery and carry it. Removing the battery makes it easier to lift the 46 lb bike onto my tray style carrier. The battery placement in the rack makes the bike a little heavy in the back, but frees up space for bottle cage bosses on the seat tube and allowed me to mount my folding lock on the down tube. All I did was add my Cloud-9 seat, bottle cage, pannier and a suspension seat post and I was ready to go.

After about a week of riding I took her to a local dealer for a full checkup. They did a minor adjustment to the brakes and gave her a clean bill of health, no charge. They were impressed at how well “I” put the bike together (LOL) and they loved the belt and throttle. I’ll be sure to make the checkup an annual event and return to that dealer.

Let me know if you have any questions

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mrgold35
2 weeks ago

I have the same restrictions to yield to horses and hikers/walker/joggers in the areas I like to ride around the Rio Grande river in ABQ. I always slow down around walking to jogging pace if I'm passing someone on a narrow dirt trails. I try to acknowledge them with a head nod, wave, or saying "Hi". I usually keep up with bike traffic on the paved bike trails. I've only received two negative comments in 10 months and 3000 miles and only on my work commute (get out of the F***in' road, and someone tossed a Sonic cup full of ice at me and hit the frame). I think I've had +20 positive comments and countless conversation starters riding my ebike (mostly because of the 4" fat tires). I'll say 95%-99% of drivers are respectful of pedestrians and bikers on main roads (moving over to pass them, yielding at stops to let you proceed, not pulling out in front of you on a side street, or they don't cut you off to make a right hand turn, etc...).

Albuquerque is trying to become more bike friendly and they are in the process of building a 50 mile bike loop around the city. They always put marked bike lanes with new road construction or put an extra wide bike/walk/jog paved path that parallels the higher mph main roads and interstate. I live in a new-ish housing area on the far side of town with no public trans within 2 miles. Drive or ebike are my only options to get to work. I was lucky to adjust my work schedule to leave early to/from work to avoid heavy rush hour traffic.

I'm starting to see a lot of familiar bike commuters in the morning and weekend rides around the Rio Grande river paved/dirt paths is really starting to look like weekday rush hour traffic at mid morning. Albuquerque is starting to become more bike friendly every year. I see more vehicles with bike racks on them compared to a few years ago. Unfortunately, I have yet to see another ebike during my rides in Albuquerque and Santa Fe in the last few years. I've only seen one other ebike at the Grand Canyon last November when the wife and I took our Radrovers for a little vacation.

I don't think local or state laws know what to do about ebikes yet? As far as I can find out; I have the same restrictions/rights with my Class II ebike as any road bike or MTB would have on paved/dirt paths and regular roads. I figure I will just "act like a biker", "ride like bike" and "quack like a bike" and fly under the radar until I see otherwise.

No issues riding on sidewalks because:
- hardly no-one is on the sidewalks because it can be too hot outside
- too far to walk anyplace other than the mailbox on the corner
- not a lot of bike only lanes and a very small shoulder if I rode in the streets (I would have to ride in the concrete gutter). I would get rear ended at +50 mph if I did ride in the streets in certain spots if I wasn't on the sidewalk.

Paul Marin
2 weeks ago

Can I ask what you had to pay for a Vado 5.0? Did yours come with the tft touch screen? Gps and all those goodies?
What class is it? Throttle and all?
Ron. $4600 before tax at my lbs. Yes tft screen. You will eventually be able to load maps to the display but none of that stuff works yet so it will just show you mph and trip info. Class 3 no throttle but does have walk assist which could be used as a really slow throttle.

Garhurd Jung
2 weeks ago

Hello dear experts,

My Worm Gearbox Installation process:

1. Checking that there are no damages at the gear unit.
2. Checking that the gear unit and the motor name plate, matches the requirements of the machine the unit is to
be installed into.
3. Thoroughly cleaning the gearbox mounting surfaces that are to be used and the shafts of paint and anti-corrosion
agents, using a commercially available solvent. Ensure solvent does not make contact with the oil seals.
4. Fitting of components to either the unit input or output shaft.

The input or output shaft extension diameter tolerance is to ISO tolerance j6 (for shaft diameter =40 mm) and k6
(for shaft diameter >40 mm). Fitted components should be to ISO tolerance K7.
1. cleaning shaft extensions, bores & keys.
2. Items (such as gears, sprockets, couplings etc.) should not be hammered onto these shafts since this would damage
the shaft support bearings.
3. Items being fitted may be heated to 80/100°C to aid assembly. ( an example from here http://www.powerjackmotion.com/product-category/gearbox/worm-gearbox/ )

Lifting
The gear motor must never be lifted by the lifting eye on the motor alone.

Foot mounted or flange mounted units
1. The base foundation mounting surface is flat1, vibration absorbing and torsionally rigid.
Mounted on the same bedplate as the prime mover.
2. If a chain sprocket is fitted to the output shaft, the direction of pull should be chosen so that the gear housing is pressed
against the foundation.
3. Align unit: It is important to ensure when aligning unit on baseplate that all machined mounting points are supported over
their full area.
If steel packings are used, these should be placed either side of the foundation bolt as close as possible.
During final bolting ensure the unit or baseplate is not distorted as this would cause strains in the gear case resulting in
errors of alignment of shafts and gearing. All mounting points are fully supported and adjust if necessary by using steel packings.
4. Secure unit, or base plate if fitted, to a rigid foundation using heavy duty bolts to ISO grade 8.8 minimum or Class 8.
1) Maximum permissible flatness error for mounting surface is 0.12 mm.

Screw size:
M4 - 2.8 Nm = 25 Lbf.in
M5 - 5.5 Nm = 49 Lbf.in
M6 - 10 Nm = 89 Lbf.in
M8 - 25 Nm = 221 Lbf.in
M10 - 50 Nm = 442 Lbf.in
M12 - 85 Nm = 752 Lbf.in
M16 - 200 Nm = 1770 Lbf.in

The gear housing for BS40-BS71 with a vertical secondary shaft will have separate feet.
When fitting the angle feet for BS40-BS71, locking washers (DIN 6797) must be fitted to the bolts between
the gear housing and the angle feet. When tightened, the gear housing should be pressed against the mating
surface of the feet.

Flange Mounting
When installing with a secondary flange, no stress is exerted on the gear unit when the flange mounting bolts are tightened.

Following the mounting procedure below:
1. Fit the flange or flange adaptor without tightening the bolts.
2. Fit the locking ring for the extra bearing on the shaft.
3. Fix the bearing on the shaft with Loctite 641 or an equivalent before sliding it up against the locking ring.
4. Fit the keys and all locking rings except the outermost locking ring on the shaft.
5. Lubricate the shaft with Molykote BR2 corrosion inhibitor or equivalent before mounting.
6. Fit in the rear locking ring and tighten the bolts to the correct torque.
fit shims between the flange and gear housing. Alignment tolerances must comply with DIN 42955.
7. Fit the connecting ring, if used.

Could you please suggest me that I'm the right way to install the Worm Gearbox Installation process?

Any better idea would be highly appreciated.

Thanks

ron more
2 weeks ago

Just an FYI - I got the 5.0 a couple of weeks ago. I've been able to get it to 28MPH assisted. I still have the Imperial vs. Metric issue but the speed is not an issue on this model.

Can I ask what you had to pay for a Vado 5.0? Did yours come with the tft touch screen? Gps and all those goodies?
What class is it? Throttle and all?

emco5
2 weeks ago

I sometimes wonder who the real elitists are. If/when national intervention happens, you will likely still be able to have your Moped but will need to register it, attach a plate and buy a tab, and be restricted where you can ride it.

The current California Class-I, II and III power-assist regulations are the beginning.

wb6uce
1 week ago

Show the )(*&^%## bike. we know what the breaded guy looks like!

Richard Day
2 weeks ago

Really ugly and old fashioned .

Maggie Tang
6 months ago

My boyfriend has one of those and heis so much in love with the bike. He said it is one of the fastest and most comfortable e-bike .

Helena Wolfenstein
8 months ago

I bought my ariel rider last month. Really happy with performance. Also i ordered a customized covers. Really love riding and getting all the looks.

Ariel Rider Ebikes
6 months ago

Aaron she bought online from us as there wasn't a dealer nearby her.

Aaron Zane
8 months ago

Helena Wolfenstein nice! did you buy it locally or did you have it shipped?

Leamon Miller
11 months ago

I am saving up to get my first ebike. Can I get some help?

Chemtrail Dreams
6 months ago

Leamon Miller radpower bikes has great financing

Liz Seelbach
6 months ago

i can advise this e-bike as works perfect for me.

EnhancedNightmare
1 year ago

I dig the design very much. Those guys know how to do a good looking cruiser type bike. I especially like the old-school suspension in the front. Reminds me of the bikes from the 1930's.

Adolf Shitler
1 year ago

Lovely looking bike. You review a lot of e-bikes mate. Do you have a personal fave?

Fred Brands
1 year ago

These bikes are different from the ones we see here in Holland. These are more fun. I would buy one immediately

Ariel Rider Ebikes
6 months ago

Fred sorry for late reply but we have a warehouse in Amsterdam. So contact us if you looking for one. we can help you about it.

Helena Wolfenstein
1 year ago

schön fahrrad .

Kyle Sherman
1 year ago

sweet bike dudes...please make a dual shock version people

Michael Caffey
1 year ago

I don't see myself buying an electric bike for at least a couple more years, just because of money. That being said, I really appreciate your enthusiasm and detail you put into your videos. I have been watching them for over a year now, just to check out whats new out there.

Thanks!

Liz Seelbach
6 months ago

seems they offer discount now you can check it.

Aaron Zane
8 months ago

Michael Caffey i feel you man. just started saving up for an e-bike and take it slow if you need to. in time, you'll get there. one thing that helps me to keep saving is the fact that some bicycles cost even more than some e-bikes out there. I have a modified Trek urban/touring bike that was roughly $800 new when it was a mountain bike, and i've seen e-bikes as low as $600. i wish you luck!

Adolf Shitler
1 year ago

+Michael Caffey You could make do with many of the no-name chinese bikes. They're all the same motor tech etc. That's what I've done. My bike arrives this week ;-)

ForbinColossus
1 year ago

Has nice quality details. Love that the throttle can deliver full power at any setting. Huge feature to me that makes an ebike fun. I am still more a haibike FS MTB preferrer.

HYPERSHADNIC
1 year ago

How long, fast, and does it last from Featherstone to Manassas?

Face less
1 year ago

The red bike reminds me of an early Indian motorcycle

Maggie Tang
6 months ago

Exactly and love that one.

EnhancedNightmare
1 year ago

Spot on!

DrZarkloff
1 year ago

it looks really cool but the gas tank screams cop magnet.

Casey Neistat
1 year ago

As the road bike with drop bars is the most aerodynamic I would like to see more road bikes as I can only see just a few for sale world wide.

difflocktwo
1 year ago

Road bikes are far from aerodynamic. Look into recumbent bikes for true performance.

Casey Neistat
1 year ago

+THE LOST Ref e bikes.

Dean Botton
1 year ago

Until the bike falls over & snaps that key in half

Ariel Rider Ebikes
1 year ago

Hi Dean, thank you for raising your concern on the key location.
Actually even if the bike falls, since the front fork can only turn to a certain angle, the only contact with ground on a side fall would be the edge of the handle bar grips.
So the keys would stay safe at all times :)

EnhancedNightmare
1 year ago

Yeah the key placement isn't very fortunate.

HYPERSHADNIC
1 year ago

Um, are you the type to leave keys in your car too?

minnie saab
1 year ago

the guy with strange accent is really cute !

cigaro
1 year ago

frankly its stupid not to offer a product online in this day and age

Henrijs Rozenkopfs
1 year ago

And even more stupid is to use the leather seats in this day and age...

Mark Elford
1 year ago

Nice machine.