Ariel Rider N-Class Review

Ariel Rider N Class Electric Bike Review
Ariel Rider N Class
Ariel Rider N Class Avid Bb7 Mechanical Disc Brakes
Ariel Rider N Class Ebike Battery Charging Port Ignition Key
Ariel Rider N Class Cruiser Bars Twist Throttle
Ariel Rider N Class Ebike Display Panel Backlit Fixed
Ariel Rider N Class 42 Tooth Chainring Bash Guard
Ariel Rider N Class Custom Leather Saddle Sprung
Ariel Rider N Class Custom Springer Fork Cst Maxxis Balloon Tires
Ariel Rider N Class Spanninga Vena Brake Light
Ariel Rider N Class Electric Bike Shimano Altus 7 Speed
Ariel Rider N Class Beige Black Red Cover Colors
Ariel Rider N Class Custom Battery Box Cover
Ariel Rider N Class Ebike Battery Charger
Ariel Rider N Class Electric Bike Review
Ariel Rider N Class
Ariel Rider N Class Avid Bb7 Mechanical Disc Brakes
Ariel Rider N Class Ebike Battery Charging Port Ignition Key
Ariel Rider N Class Cruiser Bars Twist Throttle
Ariel Rider N Class Ebike Display Panel Backlit Fixed
Ariel Rider N Class 42 Tooth Chainring Bash Guard
Ariel Rider N Class Custom Leather Saddle Sprung
Ariel Rider N Class Custom Springer Fork Cst Maxxis Balloon Tires
Ariel Rider N Class Spanninga Vena Brake Light
Ariel Rider N Class Electric Bike Shimano Altus 7 Speed
Ariel Rider N Class Beige Black Red Cover Colors
Ariel Rider N Class Custom Battery Box Cover
Ariel Rider N Class Ebike Battery Charger

Summary

  • A powerful electric cruiser with unique battery box design reminiscing of vintage motorcycles, three color choices for the box, fenders and chain guard including red, black and beige
  • Integrated LED lights by Spanninga, comfortable CST balloon tires with reflective sidewall stripes and a generic flick bell are included standard which improve visibility and safety
  • Powerful 500 watt geared motor, large 48 volt battery and adjustable speed settings (password protected) make this a versatile platform, solid 160 mm mechanical disc brakes with motor inhibitors stop well
  • The battery pack is not designed to be removable for charging off the bike or reducing weight during transport and the weight is a bit higher than a downtube or seat tube pack

Search EBR

Video Review

Trusted Advertisers

Introduction

Make:

Ariel Rider

Model:

N-Class

Price:

$2,899 (Premium Model $3,099)

Body Position:

Upright Relaxed

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Cruising

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2), Moped or Motorcycle (Class 4)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Battery, 2 Year Motor/Controller, 5 Year Frame

Availability:

United States, United Kingdom, Germany, Holland, Singapore, China, Taiwan, Japan, South Korea, Turkey, Spain, Italy, Switzerland, Portugal, Austria, United Arab Emirates

Model Year:

2016

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

62.5 lbs (28.34 kg)

Battery Weight:

7 lbs (3.17 kg)

Motor Weight:

8.37 lbs (3.79 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy, Double Heat Treated T4 and T6

Frame Sizes:

20 in (50.8 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

20" Seat Tube, 26" Reach, 32" Stand Over Height, 74" Length

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

Beige, Red, Black

Frame Fork Details:

Custom Made Springer Style, 10 mm Bolt Skewer

Frame Rear Details:

10 mm Bolt Skewer

Attachment Points:

Fender Bosses

Gearing Details:

7 Speed 1x7 Shimano Altus, CS HG20-7, 11-36T

Shifter Details:

Shimano SIS Index

Cranks:

Prowheel 244A-2, 42T Chainring with Alloy Bash Guard

Pedals:

Wellgo Aluminum Alloy Platform, B087DU

Headset:

Neco 3510

Stem:

Promax MA-525 Adjustable Angle

Handlebar:

Zoom Cruiser, 25" Width

Brake Details:

Avid BB7 Mechanical Disc with 160 mm Rotors, Easy Adjust Calipers, Artek Levers with Motor Inhibitors

Grips:

Custom Hand Stitched Leather with Lockers

Saddle:

Custom Leather, Sprung (Optional Velo Extra-Wide Plush Plus, Sprung)

Seat Post:

Promax Aluminum Alloy, Tapered

Seat Post Length:

300 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

27.2 mm

Rims:

Double Walled Aluminum Alloy

Spokes:

Stainless Steel 13G

Tire Brand:

CST Maxxis, 26" x 2.35"

Wheel Sizes:

26 in (66.04cm)

Tire Details:

Reflective Sidewall Stripe, 22-60 PSI

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Paint-Matched Full Length Composite Fenders with Mud Flaps, Paint Matched Composite Chain Guard, Flick Bell on Right, Integrated LED Lights Front: Spanninga Swing 40 LUX Back: Spanninga Vena, Aluminum Alloy Bash Guard

Other:

2 Amp Charger 1.1 lb with Cell Balancing, IP56 Water Resistant Controller, Honeycomb Battery Cell Layout (Avoids Short Circuits and Stays Cool)

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Dapu

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Motor Peak Output:

700 watts

Motor Torque:

48 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Samsung 29E

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

11.6 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

556.8 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

4 hours

Estimated Min Range:

25 miles (40 km)

Estimated Max Range:

40 miles (64 km)

Display Type:

Fixed, Backlit LCD Console on Left

Readouts:

Speed, Battery Capacity (5 Bars), Assist Level (0-6), Trip Meter, Odometer, Average Speed, Max Speed (Hold Plus Button to Activate Lights)

Drive Mode:

Twist Throttle, Torque Sensing Pedal Assist (12 Magnet Sensor)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph) (Up to 28 MHP Unlocked)

Trusted Advertisers



Written Review

The N-Class is Ariel Rider’s top of the line offering with the most integrated aesthetic and a special option to customize the top tube battery box. I struggled to grasp what the bike would be like before seeing it in person, the top part is all plastic (aside from the surrounding tubing), is dyed completely through and is made from durable scratch resistant polycarbonate. This approach strikes a balance between reduced weight, increased strength and a nice aesthetic reminiscent of the popular Sondors bikes but much higher quality. This platform is very strong, fast, offers pedal assist with twist throttle override and even has integrated lights. You get a seven speed Shimano Altus drivetrain (a step up from entry level) and an impressive two year warranty on most of the bike with one year on the battery. My only complaint or question mark is that the battery is not removable. Considering the 62.5 pound (28 kg) weight this would have been a nice feature for transporting the bike as the pack weighs ~7 lbs on its own. Also, not having a removable battery means you’ll have to park the N-Class near an outlet every time it needs a fill-up and that could be difficult if you’re using it to commute.

In practice, the Ariel Rider N and W Class electric bikes I tested were more geared towards neighborhood “fun” riding. They don’t have racks or even rack bosses and you don’t even get a bottle cage mounting point. It wouldn’t be an ideal commuting platform but that’s not what it’s about and frankly, with a backpack on you’d fare pretty well because of the power and range on offer. The motor is a 500 watt internally geared hub mounted in the rear wheel. It’s made by Dapu that’s a solid brand in my experience and the battery is 48 volt 11.6 amp hours for more than a half kilowatt of capacity. It’s arranged to support more power and speed than efficiency but if you ride in a lower assist level there’s no reason it won’t take you 30+ miles. The best features of this bike for me were how it looks, the speed adjustability built into the display (password protected) and how comfortable it rides. With large balloon tires, a custom sprung saddle and cruiser bars (with padded leather grips) the strain of bumps and cracks are significantly reduced. Note that the custom springer fork really doesn’t travel much so if you’re willing to trade style for more comfort then consider the Comfort model vs. Premium I reviewed. It costs less and uses a different (but still comfortable) saddle and comes with a basic oil suspension fork.

Ariel Rider is a company that dates back to 2010, having been rebranded after 2014 as the founding team expanded internationally. Today their products are sold in 26 countries which is very impressive to me. The N-Class is being used by some businesses and fancy hotel chains due to its brandable customizable battery box. The company name “Ariel Rider” is a nod to Ariel Motorcycles, a company dating back to 1870, which was an innovator in British motorcycle design that eventually spun off into cars. Interestingly, the Ariel name has been taken up by a modern sports car producer called Ariel Ltd in much the same way that Ariel Rider uses it. So the point here is that these are all distinct entities, each building on a long heritage of innovation and style, paying homage if you will. Aesthetics are a huge draw with the W-Class and touch points like the custom leather saddle, locking leather grips, color matched fenders, chain guard and sturdy black pedals bring it home for me. I went into this review impressed but curious about the width of the oversized top tube battery bay and came away convinced that it all works together well for a good ride experience… though I wish the key did not have to be left in when riding.

To operate the bike you charge the battery using a nice, light weight 2 amp charger then press the power button on their LCD console for a couple of seconds. It blinks to life and you see speed, assist level and battery level among range and other ride details. From here you can arrow up or down exploring six levels of assist and a level zero which keeps the display and lights going while also allowing for throttle on demand operation. It’s setup very well and really makes you feel like you’re in control of the bike. Having six levels of assist vs. 5 or even 3 as I see on other electric cruisers means that you have more control over top speed when pedaling and as mentioned earlier, you can go deeper by double clicking the power button to adjust other settings and even cap the top speed or allow it to reach ~25 mph for private and off-road use. The bike grew on me and I actually went through a sort of wave of emotions at first expecting it to be more like the Tracker from Vintage Electric Bikes then seeing the plastic and wondering if it would rattle (it stayed very quiet and felt sturdy) then gaining an appreciation for the power but also the control of operation and the finer touches like the saddle and protected wires on the rear light. For the price, it’s a unique looking bike that really puts you in control. There are sacrifices in terms of utility but it keeps you dry and safe which I love.

Pros:

  • Beautiful touch points on the Premium model, the saddle is large and comfortable but also has the Ariel Rider name on it in cursive which looks classy, same thing with the display, I love the wing logo on the battery box and the ability to custom print onto the box for ~$350
  • I like the quick release seat tube collar and front wheel, this helps to reduce weight and make the bike easier to move since the battery is not easily removable
  • I’m a fan of the Avid BB7 mechanical disc brakes because they offer tool-free rotor adjustment, you can use your fingers to twist the little red discs to fine tune the calipers as your pads wear down
  • Depending on where you live it’s wonderful to have full length fenders and the color matching on the Ariel Rider ebikes is spot on, the chain guard also matches and is a sort of custom thin guard which looks great
  • The chainring has an aluminum bash guard on it which also acts as a chain guide to some extent making the drivetrain more robust (useful at higher speed riding and on bumpy terrain), I like that the spokes they went with are a bit larger at 13 gauge vs. 14G given the heavier build of the bike
  • You get three color choices (for the fenders, chain guard and battery box cover) including red, black and beige and the box plastic is scratch resistant
  • I absolutely love the integrated LED lights, both are made by Spanninga and the tail light is wired in so it lights up when you pull the brake levers
  • Nice display panel and control unit, it’s compact but the buttons are large and easy to reach without taking your hand of the left grip, you can get into settings by double clicking the power button and change your speed when the passcode is entered (up to ~25 mph in the USA)
  • The controls default to 0-6 pedal assist and you can override with twist throttle at any level! This is awesome for people who want a more scooter-like experience, the cadence sensor uses 12 magnets making it pretty responsive
  • The Ariel Rider N-Class uses a custom designed hydroformed Aluminum alloy frame that feels solid and all of the wires and cables are internally routed to reduce snags
  • Upgraded Wellgo Aluminum alloy platform pedals offer lots of surface area and feel stable and stiff, the saddle is completely custom with leather imported from Australia… it feels firm at first but should soften over time (you can request the comfort saddle from Velo if you’d like and that comes stock on the Comfort trim level which costs less), even the brake levers are upgraded and have a nice rubberized grip on the leading edge, you get a basic bell to top it all off

Cons:

  • The battery pack is mounted inside a polycarbonate box that isn’t designed to be removable or opened easily… so the battery stays with the bike making it heavier to transport and less versatile to charge
  • The springer fork on the Premium model looks cool but doesn’t offer much travel and adds weight, Ariel Rider offers a more traditional suspension oil fork on the Comfort model but it doesn’t have lockout
  • The battery box is pretty wide (widest towards the head tube) which looks cool like a motorcycle gas tank, but is easier to bump with your knees while pedaling
  • No bottle cage bosses or rack bosses on either the Comfort or Premium models, you might have to bring a little backpack along to carry supplies
  • This electric bicycle is only available in one frame size but the stem is adjustable angle and the seat tube has quick release so it’s actually quite versatile
  • I noticed that the cadence sensor starts quickly but doesn’t always shut the motor down when you stop pedaling (I was told this was a choice made to smooth out the ride with inconsistent pedaling), it alarmed me at first because I thought maybe the throttle was stuck on but you can always cut power by pulling either brake lever so that’s nice

Resources:

Trusted Advertisers

More Ariel Rider Reviews

Ariel Rider W-Class Review

  • MSRP: $2,350
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

A beautiful, custom designed cruiser electric bike drawing from vintage motorcycle designs with a springer fork, chopper bars and wider top tube. Powerful 500 watt geared hub motor by Dapu paired with a 556 watt hour battery…...

Be the First to Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

mrgold35
20 hours ago

You get a few more upgrades with the Radcity over the Radrover like:
- choice of frame sizes
- standard rear rack that can support panniers
- front and rear fenders
- urban tires (less noise+longer treadlife). The tires can do some trail riding (on improved and maintained dirt trails you might find a large tire stroller, wheelchair, comfort/cruiser bikes would go)
- public transportation friendly with the thinner tires
- smaller footprint for storage or with bike rack
- will fit 99% of bike racks as-is that can support ebikes extra weight (I had to purchase 4 fat tire trays for $80 on top of my +$550 Saris platform rack)

The Radrover has the added capability ride where you mostly see MTB, hikers, or horses on single track (or make your own) trails, sandy, rocky, or uneven terrain. The Radrover and Radcity weight about the same. Because the Radrover is so (tail) heavy, it can't climb/hop over obstacles like a balanced and lighter MTB. I end up stopping and lifting/pushing my Radrover over fallen tree trunks on the trails or making my own trail and going around.

I would only go for the Radrover if you plan to do trail riding and you have the means to transport with personal vehicle. I have two (his/her) Radrovers and I mostly use them for Work Commuting around 13 miles roundtrip. The fat tires are very comfortable at +20 mph on the main roads and they transition smoothly from concrete, on/off curbs, dirt lots, uneven dirt paths, and sandy trails. I sometimes take detours before or after work to ride the +30 miles of paved and single track dirt trials available near the Rio Grande river halfway into my commute without missing a beat. The 4" fat tires really come in handy with the wet, muddy, rocky, and deep sand in some of the trail spots. I think the Radrover would be overkill if you ride in a 85%-100% urban environment. Most folks change out the tires to something like Hookworms to lower tire noise and increase the treadlife on paved roads (I only got 800-900 miles from the rear knobby tires with 65-75% paved road riding).

A plus with having two Rad products are the batteries are interchangeable. You can double your range if riding alone with the extra battery handy. Hard to do with a different brand of ebike. Another advantage with Rover or City is they are Class II ebikes limited to 20 mph, 750w of power, and have PAS+throttle. "Most" state allow Class I & II ebikes everywhere regular bikes are allowed (parks, bike paths, sidewalks, wrong way down a one way street, etc...) unless posted to exclude ebikes. The 28 mph Class III ebikes (mostly PAS only with this class) are very close to motorized vehicle territory for some local and state governments because of their top speeds. They sometimes have more restrictions with requiring helmets, minimal age restrictions, must stay on roadways (no sidewalks), and sometimes 100% no-go on bike paths depending on local/state laws.

Another little secret with either bike is you can adjust the motor cutoff speed from 20 mph to a little under 25 mph in the LCD set-up screen in about 15-20 seconds. Both bikes don't really have the gearing for 25 mph (might have to use PAS 5 and fake pedal or 100% throttle to maintain that speed). The downside is you battery range will most likely be in the low double-digits.

dr3131
2 days ago

Looking to purchase an E-bike for my son as he will be attending Univ. of Michigan
140lb male
Use- To and from class and to athletic complex (student athlete) (1-2 miles)
Budget 2000-4000

We have no experience with E-bikes but I like the idea of being able to park among the bikes rather than purchasing a scooter or waiting for the bus.

Thanks in advance

Ravi Kempaiah
2 days ago

After reading and watching the reviews for both of these bikes, they seem identical. The IZIP is less expensive. I am an out of shape, short, overweight woman who has always loved bikes, but cannot handle even the slightest incline. I will need to be able to get it onto my bike rack so I can putter around the state park while we are campground hosting there. I would like a class 2 bike. Appreciate any input on these, or other similar models. Thanks from hilly northeastern PA!

Both will work fine for your use. If you remove the battery, it's easy to lift up the bike and place it on your camper rack.
You could also add a Boost button for $50 and make use of that "throttle" feature and then it will be true class 2 bike.

1/1
Camperlinda
2 days ago

After reading and watching the reviews for both of these bikes, they seem identical. The IZIP is less expensive. I am an out of shape, short, overweight woman who has always loved bikes, but cannot handle even the slightest incline. I will need to be able to get it onto my bike rack so I can putter around the state park while we are campground hosting there. I would like a class 2 bike. Appreciate any input on these, or other similar models. Thanks from hilly northeastern PA!

JRA
4 days ago

Much the same here in that state regs vary from Federal regs.

I still don't see any provisions at the Federal level and most of the states for class 3 pedelecs so one should not assume that their state will recognize it.

JRA
5 days ago

To be fair here in the US Mopeds do enjoy their own classification on the Federal and state level but the big thing is that they come under the regulation of the DOT instead of the CPSC that set the guidelines for e bikes. The DOT is involved because they are registrable for use on the road and DOT type approval is much more comprehensive that what the CPSC requires. VIN #, approved rims/tires, full lighting package, licensing and insurance are the big ticket items in order to convert an e bike to a Moped to take advantage of the faster 30 mph speed limit. While the SpeedPedelec/ CA Class 3 is a 28 mph limit there really is no Federal law for e bikes that correlate to it in the US as the cap is 20 mph.

Apparently the Germans are not too keen on e bike tuning and putting the clamp on that process.

http://www.bike-eu.com/laws-regulations/nieuws/2017/3/german-industry-calls-for-measures-against-e-bike-tuning-10129213

This reinforces my belief that you won't see any development of more powerful systems for the EU manufacturers and instead their US distributors will keep lobbying for laws here that more closely resemble those across the pond. Like the CA law does in effect by separating PAS from Throttles, even though there is no distinction as to their use at the Federal 20 mph level.

mrgold35
5 days ago

There have been threads on upgrading to hydraulic brakes and I don't know if they did the conversion? Most upgrades for the Radrover are usually:
- tires for smoother commuting or knobby tires for better snow and off road fun
- upgrading front rotors to 203mm and/or brake pads
- suspension seat posts like thudbuster, Suntour, or bodyfloat
- upgrade of battery to plug-n-play Luna Cycles 48v/13.ah or 52v/13.5ah Dolphin battery packs
- upgrade of seat for more comfortable long distance riding
- adding adjustable handlebar stem to move handlebars to more comfortable position (Radrover is one size to fit most)
- hard wiring a brighter front lights into battery
- adding fenders, rear rack, or accessories for cell phones, locks, beer bottle openers, water bottle cages, etc...

Only being $1500+shipping+ 1 year full warranty for a complete 4" fat tire ebike give you a lot of wiggle room to make improvements. Volt Yukon 750 bike is another 4" fat tire bike that is in the same price range with very similar specs and capabilities. The Radrover is basically a 4" fat tire bike with ebike components. It would be feasible to converted the Radrover into a 1000w mid-drive down the road and reuse the battery to cut down conversion cost.

The Radrover is a jack of all trades and master of none type of bike. I can work commute very comfortably at +20 mph on main roads with all my gear (work cloths, lunch, riding gear, etc...) and detour off the road and ride single track dirt trails without missing a beat before heading back to work or home. Since the Radrover is a Class II ebike limited to 750w, I can go everywhere and on any trail/sidewalk/street a regular bike is allowed (a lot more restrictions on +750w and/or Class III ebikes). The all terrain capabilities and utility for commuting fits perfectly into the way I use my ebike.

fxr3
5 days ago

The kind of attitude that discriminates against an entire class of ebike users. Should they only be for fit riders in your estimation? Please enlighten us all.
Same as that. Need a motor? Get a motorbike. Duh.

Joe Remi
5 days ago

The kind of attitude that discriminates against an entire class of ebike users. Should they only be for fit riders in your estimation? Please enlighten us all.
That dumb comment was a response to me saying months ago that mid-drives don't need a throttle, which he interpreted as "shouldn't have one." That wasn't what I was saying (I still don't think mid-drives NEED throttle), and I mentioned later in the thread that I now have a BBS02 with one. To say that anybody with a throttle should buy a motorcycle is just silly: I pedal most of the time, and occasionally use the button as an assist in certain situations. I like having both, and much prefer it to my days on motorbikes when all rides required being in the car lane doing car speeds. Forget that jazz.

RoadWrinkle
5 days ago

Same as that. If you need a throttle, buy a motorbike.
The kind of attitude that discriminates against an entire class of ebike users. Should they only be for fit riders in your estimation? Please enlighten us all.

James Kohls
7 days ago

Damn @James Kohls , being all reasonable and s*it, lol. I saw earlier that you're a Minnesota rider as well. This is a bit off-topic, but I was under the impression a Class 3 ebike would still be legal (no license / VIN required) as long as the motor is 1000W or less and had a top speed of 20. I was just assuming I'm riding in a gray area by getting a Class 3 capable of speeds above 20, but limiting that speed to 20 using the controller. I know the Rad and Volt are Class 2, and I'm assuming Teo is also a Class 2, but this system is still somewhat new to me as well.

Here is Minnesota law:

Subd. 27.Electric-assisted bicycle.
(3) has an electric motor that (i) has a power output of not more than 1,000 watts, (ii) is incapable of propelling the vehicle at a speed of more than 20 miles per hour, (iii) is incapable of further increasing the speed of the device when human power alone is used to propel the vehicle at a speed of more than 20 miles per hour, and (iv) disengages or ceases to function when the vehicle's brakes are applied.

So if you limited it to 20MPH, it would be legal under MN law.

Provided the HyperFat lives up to its....wait for it....hype, I think it will be well worth your wait. I really think Juiced is one of the better budget providers out there. That said, I think Rad Power has show users on this forum an admirable level of support as well.

MysticalFists
7 days ago

Damn @James Kohls , being all reasonable and s*it, lol. I saw earlier that you're a Minnesota rider as well. This is a bit off-topic, but I was under the impression a Class 3 ebike would still be legal (no license / VIN required) as long as the motor is 1000W or less and had a top speed of 20. I was just assuming I'm riding in a gray area by getting a Class 3 capable of speeds above 20, but limiting that speed to 20 using the controller. I know the Rad and Volt are Class 2, and I'm assuming Teo is also a Class 2, but this system is still somewhat new to me as well.

Thanks as well for reconfirming your opinion that the HyperFat is worth the wait though. As I've continued to look at close to 50 or more eBikes, I keep coming back to these select few, and yeah, because of my desire for a full throttle option, it seems to limit which kind I'm looking at. I am finding myself looking more and more at the Luna 4 Season series (500, 1000, and 3000), but when you add in the warranty, the prices just look wild, and the 500 zip ties holding everything on kinda look like s*it (think I could get over that, lol).

Again, the Hype keeps sounding like the one to wait for. Although Rad was originally my first choice, I'm really having to think long and hard before their bikes are back in stock next week, as I'm starting to realize that for about the same cost, I'm really giving up a lot of awesome options just to be able to get the bike sooner.

James Kohls
1 week ago

@Riogrand He just posted throttle is not optional.

It wasn't until I read all of this, that I realized how much the throttle option means to me for the purchase. My only reason for even looking at ebikes is my daily commute to work, and point blank, there are days I'm tired and don't want to pedal. Throttle of at least 18-20mph is a requirement for my pick.

Keeping everything else people have said in mind, I'd love to get a HF1000 (With upgrades there's front fork suspension, hydraulic breaks, torque sensor, huge battery (21ah), the ability to go road legal at 20mph or jack that up to 30). I still don't love the idea of waiting 2 months to get the bike though, and even then, as stated, I'd like to see reviews of how it's worked for people.

With this mindset, I looked back at the other bikes that had interested me. RadRover is slowly moving down the list. I could get a bigger battery that would increase amp hours, but that's an additional $500-600 cost, and it lacks nice hydraulic breaks.

This brings me back to the M2S All Terrain R750 and Teo S Limited, giving the suspension, 17ah battery, hydraulic brakes, street legal 20 and off road modes. Like the HF, these two give me almost all the options I want, except that none of these offer a torque sensor. Are there options, such as the rear dropout torque sensor offered by Juiced Bikes available that work with something like a Rad Rover, R750, or Teo? Am I locked out of being able to use a torque sensor getting one of these? Are there any similar bikes (even expanding the budget to around $3k) that offer these options, but are available now instead of having to wait another 1-3 months? I would also look at mid-drive or BBSHD options, but most I had seen are Class 1 and don't offer throttle.

Tho, you probably knew this, class 1 & 2 are the only legal ebikes in Minnesota. I ride a class 3, but if ever in an accident on a street/trail, just let it be known you are riding a vehicle that is not legally a bicycle and cannot legally be registered as a motor vehicle (no VIN).

The M2s, Teo, VoltBike, among others are basically all the same family of bikes with slightly different kit/accessories. They are splattered all over Alibaba. The biggest difference will be the level of support you get from the distributor. How long has the company been around? Do they stock extra parts or will you be waiting for them to be shipped from china to the distributor and then to you? Do they offer phone support? Check user forums. Are they responsive to support requests? Even $9,000 Stromer ST2s break down. So the biggest question to ask is what will you do when yours does?

Have you checked out the BBSHD options from Lunacycle? https://lunacycle.com/e-bikes/ Biggest downside is you have to pay extra for a replacement parts warranty and it is up to you to do the work. If it is the motor, are you willing to disassemble and replace parts in the motor or remove/replace it all together? Also, with most any BBSHD option, the bicycles were not specifically designed to be eBikes—just regular bikes converted. If you go the BBSHD route, my recommendation is to build the bike yourself. That way you know how it is put together, will have the necessary tools and will be far better prepared to support and repair the bike yourself.

Per your desires, my recommendation would still be the HyperFat. Waiting for something that will make you happy instead of settling for something right now is the common sense choice when it comes to parting with thousands of dollars.

MysticalFists
1 week ago

It wasn't until I read all of this, that I realized how much the throttle option means to me for the purchase. My only reason for even looking at ebikes is my daily commute to work, and point blank, there are days I'm tired and don't want to pedal. Throttle of at least 18-20mph is a requirement for my pick.

Keeping everything else people have said in mind, I'd love to get a HF1000 (With upgrades there's front fork suspension, hydraulic breaks, torque sensor, huge battery (21ah), the ability to go road legal at 20mph or jack that up to 30). I still don't love the idea of waiting 2 months to get the bike though, and even then, as stated, I'd like to see reviews of how it's worked for people.

With this mindset, I looked back at the other bikes that had interested me. RadRover is slowly moving down the list. I could get a bigger battery that would increase amp hours, but that's an additional $500-600 cost, and it lacks nice hydraulic breaks.

This brings me back to the M2S All Terrain R750 and Teo S Limited, giving the suspension, 17ah battery, hydraulic brakes, street legal 20 and off road modes. Like the HF, these two give me almost all the options I want, except that none of these offer a torque sensor. Are there options, such as the rear dropout torque sensor offered by Juiced Bikes available that work with something like a Rad Rover, R750, or Teo? Am I locked out of being able to use a torque sensor getting one of these? Are there any similar bikes (even expanding the budget to around $3k) that offer these options, but are available now instead of having to wait another 1-3 months? I would also look at mid-drive or BBSHD options, but most I had seen are Class 1 and don't offer throttle.

Ravi Kempaiah
1 week ago

Hype Bikes / HF1000 2017 $1,499.00
- Pros:

Class 3 (Pedal Assist w/ Trigger Throttle)
Front Fork Suspension
Shimano Altus,
Shimano BR-M375 mechanical 180mm w/ motor inhibitor
1000w MAC motor w/ 48v 13.2ah LG battery

- Cons:

1 year warranty
Non-Integrated
30mph would need a license
Not a lot of reviews on this bike or company that I could find
Better battery and torque sensor are optional upgrades raising the price.

Good to see your analysis. I wonder if you have test ridden any eBike?

My vote would go to Juiced HyperFat because it has a good torque sensor and the ride quality with a T sensor would be vastly different (+ve) compared to any bike a cadence sensor.
Also, the DIY community holds MAC motor as one of the best.

If you just wanted a good bike, RadRover works fine but if you're looking for bike-like feel, T sensor is a must. The fact that you could upgrade the battery to 48V, 21Ah and charge it to 80% is a tremendous advantage. It will improve the longevity of the battery 3-4 fold.

Douglas Ruby
1 week ago

What about type 2 e-bike? My bike is an Turbo Vado 4.0 (sweden) class 2 in usa if i'm correct.
The Vado 3.0 and 4.0 are both Class 1 (20 mph non throttle) in the USA. The Vado 5.0 is Class 3 as are all of the earlier Turbo models.

Bengt A
1 week ago

Ha. Of course in California it would be unlawful to ride a type 3 e-bike on a class 1 bike path, like the one on the Golden Gate Bridge shown in the video.

What about type 2 e-bike? My bike is an Turbo Vado 4.0 (sweden) class 2 in usa if i'm correct.

MysticalFists
1 week ago

Howdy,
First time poster, although I've been watching Court's videos and reading all your reviews for like 2 months now, and I'm getting closer to biting the bullet. Hell, I'd already have bought my RadRover if they were still in stock, but I'm still having to wait a week. Since I'm waiting, I've continued to look at more and more fat tire bikes and I'm curious what everyone else's thoughts are on 26x4 Fat Tire ebikes.

About Me:

I'm a daily bike commuter, 35 years old with a learners permit, so biking is my only form of transportation (I hate driving cars).
I also live in Minnesota, so this bike will be facing harsh conditions 24/7/365. We're also the land of 10,000 lakes, and I plan to ride this thing on whatever trail necessary to visit em all, LoL!
Minnesota state law requires 1000 watt or less motor, 20mph or less speed (although I have been looking at ones that go higher).
I'm mostly looking at bikes in a $1500 range, but am not against reviews of higher priced bikes.
Looking for class 2 or 3 (I like both pedal assist and some form of throttle)
Would like at least a front fork suspension.

Rad Power Bikes / RadRover 2016 $1,499.00
- Pros:

Class 2 (Pedal Assist w/ Twist Throttle)
Integrated design
Front Fork Suspension
Shimano Acera
Tektro Aries mechanical 180mm w/ motor inhibitor
750w Bafang motor w/ 48v 11.6ah Panasonic battery
20mph

- Cons:

1 year warranty
I have to wait a week before it's back in stock, lol

VoltBike / Yukon 750 2017 $1,499.00
- Pros:

Class 2 (Pedal Assist w/ Trigger Throttle)
Integrated design
Front Fork Suspension
750w Bafang motor w/ 48v 10.4ah Sanyo battery
20mph

- Cons:

1 year warranty
Shimano Tourney
Tektro Novela mechanical 160mm w/ motor inhibitor

Hype Bikes / HF1000 2017 $1,499.00
- Pros:

Class 3 (Pedal Assist w/ Trigger Throttle)
Front Fork Suspension
Shimano Altus,
Shimano BR-M375 mechanical 180mm w/ motor inhibitor
1000w MAC motor w/ 48v 13.2ah LG battery

- Cons:

1 year warranty
Non-Integrated
30mph would need a license
Not a lot of reviews on this bike or company that I could find
Better battery and torque sensor are optional upgrades raising the price.

M2S / All Terrain R750 2017 $1,550.00
- Pros:

Class 3 (Pedal Assist w/ Button Throttle)
2 year warranty
Integrated design
Shimano Acera
Tektro Hydrolic w/ motor inhibitor (no clue what size break rotors are though)
750w Bafang motor w/ 48v 17ah Panasonic battery

- Cons:

Suspension is optional raising the price
28mph would need a license
Appears this company simply orders bulk bike shipments from China and rebrands them, but I couldn't find a lot of first hand reviews either.

While doing these reviews, I've actually collected together specs and stats of nearly 50 fat tire ebikes in a spreadsheet (I'm a very analytical person) so if anyone's interested in that information, you can find it here:

Thoughts?

rmachin
1 week ago

OK confirmed with them that htese racks *are* supported for ebikes -- there's some issue around 'class 1' and ebikes, but these are fine. BTW Kuat NV2 can current;y be had for 430.

jwb
2 weeks ago

Ha. Of course in California it would be unlawful to ride a type 3 e-bike on a class 1 bike path, like the one on the Golden Gate Bridge shown in the video.

JRA
2 weeks ago

Federal regulations allow up to 750w motor as long as the 20 mph and 28 mph limiters are used; the law is the same in all 50 states.

Federal law does regulate 750w/20 mph (level ground) but there is no Federal statute for 28 mph, only in the states that have adopted the CA Class III law. Also there is no Federal law that states PAS is required for operating an e bike. And some states have 1000w limits and some have none at all. Always best to check what your states regulations are before operating an e bike and where you can ride it.

Addmotor
2 weeks ago

The sensor was not the problem it was the connections inside the black box. The wire loom around the sensors port faded off and I bet a drizzle of water touched it. Removed. Rewired, new harness connectors. Done. Ive taken electrical class's. Thanks again!

Thank you for your reply and your hint with the black box connections. Of course the Error 25 can have a lot of reasons, but the best known is that the sensor is lose. But we will pay attention on the one you told us from now on.

Jim Kraul78
2 weeks ago

The "Error 25" issue is a well known problem and we are working on it to improve the mistake for future bikes. "Error 25" means a brake problem. When the brake is used, the controller will cut acceleration. That is probably why you do not get any response from the motor. It is actually easy to handle. Most of the time it is the sensor that is a little lose. You find it near the rear wheel, as you can see on the picture below.

Please try to fasten the sensor. The Error should not appear again. If nothing changes, please let us know, then we will give you more options.

PS: Have you contacted support@addmotor.com for the issue?

The sensor was not the problem it was the connections inside the black box. The wire loom around the sensors port faded off and I bet a drizzle of water touched it. Removed. Rewired, new harness connectors. Done. Ive taken electrical class's. Thanks again!

Nutella
3 weeks ago

Agree, but many of us carry around a "worse case scenario" thing. "What if I run over some kid on bike path when I'm on my st2"? No problem on st1.
Fortunately, those odds are long shot enough, I ride the bike paths on st2 without a thought. Getting a ticket for it is even more remote.

For sure, the class restrictions are also there to cover the butts of the city in the case of an accident.

Maggie Tang
3 months ago

My boyfriend has one of those and heis so much in love with the bike. He said it is one of the fastest and most comfortable e-bike .

Helena Wolfenstein
5 months ago

I bought my ariel rider last month. Really happy with performance. Also i ordered a customized covers. Really love riding and getting all the looks.

Ariel Rider Ebikes
3 months ago

Aaron she bought online from us as there wasn't a dealer nearby her.

Aaron Zane
5 months ago

Helena Wolfenstein nice! did you buy it locally or did you have it shipped?

Leamon Miller
8 months ago

I am saving up to get my first ebike. Can I get some help?

Chemtrail Dreams
3 months ago

Leamon Miller radpower bikes has great financing

Liz Seelbach
3 months ago

i can advise this e-bike as works perfect for me.

EnhancedNightmare
12 months ago

I dig the design very much. Those guys know how to do a good looking cruiser type bike. I especially like the old-school suspension in the front. Reminds me of the bikes from the 1930's.

Adolf Shitler
12 months ago

Lovely looking bike. You review a lot of e-bikes mate. Do you have a personal fave?

Fred Brands
1 year ago

These bikes are different from the ones we see here in Holland. These are more fun. I would buy one immediately

Ariel Rider Ebikes
3 months ago

Fred sorry for late reply but we have a warehouse in Amsterdam. So contact us if you looking for one. we can help you about it.

Helena Wolfenstein
1 year ago

schön fahrrad .

Kyle Sherman
1 year ago

sweet bike dudes...please make a dual shock version people

Michael Caffey
1 year ago

I don't see myself buying an electric bike for at least a couple more years, just because of money. That being said, I really appreciate your enthusiasm and detail you put into your videos. I have been watching them for over a year now, just to check out whats new out there.

Thanks!

Liz Seelbach
3 months ago

seems they offer discount now you can check it.

Aaron Zane
5 months ago

Michael Caffey i feel you man. just started saving up for an e-bike and take it slow if you need to. in time, you'll get there. one thing that helps me to keep saving is the fact that some bicycles cost even more than some e-bikes out there. I have a modified Trek urban/touring bike that was roughly $800 new when it was a mountain bike, and i've seen e-bikes as low as $600. i wish you luck!

Adolf Shitler
12 months ago

+Michael Caffey You could make do with many of the no-name chinese bikes. They're all the same motor tech etc. That's what I've done. My bike arrives this week ;-)

ForbinColossus
1 year ago

Has nice quality details. Love that the throttle can deliver full power at any setting. Huge feature to me that makes an ebike fun. I am still more a haibike FS MTB preferrer.

HYPERSHADNIC
1 year ago

How long, fast, and does it last from Featherstone to Manassas?

Face less
1 year ago

The red bike reminds me of an early Indian motorcycle

Maggie Tang
3 months ago

Exactly and love that one.

EnhancedNightmare
12 months ago

Spot on!

DrZarkloff
1 year ago

it looks really cool but the gas tank screams cop magnet.

Casey Neistat
1 year ago

As the road bike with drop bars is the most aerodynamic I would like to see more road bikes as I can only see just a few for sale world wide.

difflocktwo
1 year ago

Road bikes are far from aerodynamic. Look into recumbent bikes for true performance.

Casey Neistat
1 year ago

+THE LOST Ref e bikes.

Dean Botton
1 year ago

Until the bike falls over & snaps that key in half

Ariel Rider Ebikes
12 months ago

Hi Dean, thank you for raising your concern on the key location.
Actually even if the bike falls, since the front fork can only turn to a certain angle, the only contact with ground on a side fall would be the edge of the handle bar grips.
So the keys would stay safe at all times :)

EnhancedNightmare
12 months ago

Yeah the key placement isn't very fortunate.

HYPERSHADNIC
1 year ago

Um, are you the type to leave keys in your car too?

minnie saab
1 year ago

the guy with strange accent is really cute !

cigaro
1 year ago

frankly its stupid not to offer a product online in this day and age

Henrijs Rozenkopfs
1 year ago

And even more stupid is to use the leather seats in this day and age...

Mark Elford
1 year ago

Nice machine.