Batch Bicycles E-Commuter Review

Batch Bicycles E Commuter Electric Bike Review
Batch Bicycles E Commuter
Batch Bicycles E Commuter Bosch Active Line Mid Drive
Batch Bicycles E Commuter Powerpack 400
Batch Bicycles E Commuter Cockpit View
Batch Bicycles E Commuter Display Controls
Batch Bicycles E Commuter Plastic Fenders
Batch Bicycles E Commuter Rear Rack
Batch Bicycles E Commuter Shimano Altus System
Batch Bicycles E Commuter Stock High Step Silver
Batch Bicycles E Commuter Electric Bike Review
Batch Bicycles E Commuter
Batch Bicycles E Commuter Bosch Active Line Mid Drive
Batch Bicycles E Commuter Powerpack 400
Batch Bicycles E Commuter Cockpit View
Batch Bicycles E Commuter Display Controls
Batch Bicycles E Commuter Plastic Fenders
Batch Bicycles E Commuter Rear Rack
Batch Bicycles E Commuter Shimano Altus System
Batch Bicycles E Commuter Stock High Step Silver

Summary

  • A down-to-business commuter ebike with a Bosch mid-drive, hydraulic disc brakes, all the necessary features, and a fantastic price point at just $1,999
  • A lot of included features like plastic fenders with mud-flaps, rear rack, bottle cage bosses, efficient tires, locking grips, and front rack provisions
  • Reliable Bosch Active Line mid-drive motor, PowerPack 400 battery, Intuvia display, 180mm Tektro hydraulic disc brakes, Shimano Altus 7 speed system
  • Purion display is a more basic Bosch display, grips and saddle may want to be swapped out as they are uncomfortable, and there are no lights of any kind

Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Batch Bicycles

Model:

E-Commuter

Price:

$1,999

Body Position:

Forward

Suggested Use:

Urban, Commuting

Electric Bike Class:

Pedal Assist (Class 1)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

2019

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

47 lbs (21.31 kg)

Battery Weight:

5.8 lbs (2.63 kg)

Motor Weight:

5.4 lbs (2.44 kg)

Frame Material:

Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

15 in (38.1 cm)17.5 in (44.45 cm)20 in (50.8 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

(Large Size Reviewed) 20" Seat Tube, 24" Reach, 30" Stand Over Height, 35" Minimum Saddle Height, 26" Width, 75" Length

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

Matte Gray

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid Aluminum, Color Matched, 100mm Hub Spacing, with Quick Release Skewer

Frame Rear Details:

135mm Hub Spacing, 9mm Axle with Quick Release Skewer

Attachment Points:

Water Bottle Bosses on the Seatpost Tube, Front and Rear Fender Bosses, Rear Rack Bosses

Gearing Details:

7 Speed 1x7 Shimano Altus Rear Derailleur, 11-32 Tooth Cassette

Shifter Details:

Shimano Altus Trigger Shifter on Right

Cranks:

FSA Forged Aluminum Alloy Arms, 175mm Length, Bosch Interface, 38 Tooth Steel Chainrings with One Sided Guard

Headset:

Threadless, Sealed Cartridge Bearings, Tapered 1" to 1-1/8"

Stem:

Aluminum Alloy, Slight Rise, 70mm Length, 28.5mm Clamp Diameter

Handlebar:

Aluminum Alloy, 45mm Rise, 650mm Width, 5º Backsweep

Brake Details:

Tektro T-275 Hydraulic Disc with 180mm Rotors, Two-Finger Levers

Grips:

Flat Rubber with Locking Rings

Saddle:

Generic, Active

Seat Post:

Rigid, Aluminum, Quick Release Collar

Seat Post Length:

350 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

30.9 mm

Rims:

Aluminum Alloy, Double Walled, 24.5mm Outer Width, 32 Hole, Black

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 14 Gauge Front 14 Gauge Rear, Black

Tire Brand:

Kenda Kwick Seven.5, 26" x 1.95" (50-599)

Wheel Sizes:

27.5 in (69.85cm)

Tire Details:

50 to 85 PSI, 3.5 to 5.9 BAR, K-Shield Puncture Protection

Tube Details:

Presta Valve

Accessories:

2.5" Plastic Fenders, Rear Mount Kickstand (40mm Mount), Rear Pannier Rack with Spring Clip

Other:

Locking Removable Downtube Mounted Battery Pack, 1.2 lb 2 Amp Charger

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Bosch Active Line

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Geared Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

250 watts

Motor Peak Output:

500 watts

Motor Torque:

40 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Bosch PowerPack 400

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

11 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

400 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

3.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

30 miles (48 km)

Estimated Max Range:

80 miles (129 km)

Display Type:

Bosch Purion, Fixed, 1.75" Backlit Grayscale Display, Buttons: Power, +, -, Walk, (Hold - to Cycle Through Readouts, Hold - and Press Power to Change Units, Hold + and - to Reset Trip, Hold + to Activate Lights) (Removable, Symmetrical Integrated Buttons for Right or Left Handed Users)

Readouts:

Speed, Assist Level (Eco, Tour, eMTB, Turbo), Battery Level (1-5), Odometer, Trip Distance, Total Distance, Estimated Range, Lights

Display Accessories:

Micro-USB Port for Diagnostics and Software Updates Only, Hold - to Cycle Readouts, Hold + and Press Power to Change Units

Drive Mode:

Advanced Pedal Assist (Measures Wheel Speed, Pedal Cadence and Pedal Torque, Over 1,000 Readings Per Second, Power Output Relative to Pedal Input: Eco 40% 30Nm, Tour 100% 35Nm, Sport 170% 38Nm, Turbo 250% 40Nm)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

To run the forums, host the website, and travel, I charge a universal service fee for my reviews. This review was sponsored by Batch Bicycles. My goal is to be transparent and unbiased, this video and written review are not meant to be an endorsement of Batch Bicycles products.

Batch Bicycles is a new brand to me, but I am intrigued by their offerings and business model. They are sold through dealers only, which allows you to really have the bike built, assembled, configured, and setup with the accessories you might want. I think it works great, especially given the bike we are looking at today; the E Commuter. The E Commuter is a down to business commuting ebike with a Bosch mid-drive motor. It has all the necessary features you might expect, but one of the real standouts here is the price point. The bike has an MSRP at just $1,999. Now while there may be a couple of accessories you might want to think about adding (which we will get into in a moment), that is an extremely low price point for a Bosch powered ebike. As a matter of fact, just a few years ago, you couldn’t get into a Bosch ebike for less than $4,000. So even if you find yourself adding a couple things here and there, the price is still extremely attractive considering you get one of the best mid-drives in the industry. As I mentioned before, it does have all the necessary features here, like these Kenda Kwick tires. These are 27.5” x 1.75” and offer this great efficient tread for commuting with a higher air volume to keep you comfortable. The fork is rigid, but not bad, probably to keep cost down, but I do notice some front rack provisions which is great. Surrounding the wheels are these nice plastic fenders with these rubberized mud flaps. Not only do these add an additional element to keep you clean, but it can help alleviate toe strikes to the fender if you are making a tight turn. On top of front rack provisions, there are bottle cage bosses here too to add any number of accessories you might want. And of course, I have to mention this rear rack. It is a bolt on rack which I love since it is easy to replace or fix should the bike take a spill. It uses standard gage tubing to fit most panniers pretty well and there is even a spring latch for other type of items you may want to secure. The bike also includes a kickstand in the rear. It is nice to have it back there since having it near the crank arm can produce ‘pedal lock’; an annoying occurrence that locks the pedals when you reverse a bike with the kickstand down. Luckily, this bike eliminates that by having it positioned further back. There are some locking grips, but they are flat rubber. The seat too is on the more basic side, so I personally would think about upgrading these at the dealership. In total, the bike weighs just under 47lbs, which is pretty impressive given that we are testing the large size bike.

The E Commuter is driven by the Bosch Active Line motor, which is the entry level Bosch motor, not to be confused with the Bosch Active Line Plus. While it is somewhat more limited than the other Bosch motors, it still bears the brand name extremely well. It offers 40nm of torque and is lighter (6.3lbs) and quieter than the others in the line up. The it still has shift detection and feels very efficient while maintaining that gentle and responsive Bosch feeling. I did notice a bit of drag when you stop sometimes… you can kind of feel a slight clunk with a little bit of pressure which seems to be common in the Active Line setup. Mechanically, the bike has a 11-32 tooth 7 speed Shimano Altus as well as a 38 tooth chain ring. I love the trigger shifters here, it really gives you a sporty feel, much better than the thumb shifters other bikes in the price range sometimes use. For stopping power, I was pleased to see that they matched the smooth Bosch motor with a set of hydraulic disc brakes. It uses a 180mm rotor setup in both the front and the back from Tektro and I think this is a big win!

Powering the motor and backlit display panel, is an interchangeable battery pack from Bosch. The battery, a PowerPack 400, clicks neatly onto the downtube from above. You can charge the pack off of the bike frame or plug into the battery while mounted to the bike. Lithium-ion cells, including the 18650 cells used in these packs, tend to be very reliable if you maintain them at 20% to 80% capacity when not in use and store in a cool dry environment vs. extreme heat or cold. I frequently store my electric bike indoors because it isn’t as heavy or smelly as a moped or motorcycle, and this keeps it clean and safe while also protecting the battery from extreme temperatures. Charging uses the lighter weight 2amp charger that Bosch offers. There is also a 4amp charger available as well, this is speedy, but weighs more. In closing, the PowerPack weighs less than the PowerTube at 5.4lbs vs. 6.3lbs, but you’ll want to make extra sure to hear it click into place on the frame when mounting before rides. If you have another PowerPack battery like the 500, it will work with the same interface as the PowerPack 400, so you can swap packs or rent and borrow if you travel frequently.

Activating the drive systems on this ebike is fairly straightforward. You charge and mount the battery then press the power button on the top edge of the little display panel, which is mounted within reach of the left grip. The Bosch Purion display/control pad is compact and easy to navigate. It keeps the handlebars open, and may not get damaged as easily if the bike tips or is parked at a crowded rack… but it’s not removable and lacks some of the deeper menus found on the Bosch Intuvia. Even though the display is a bit smaller than some competing models, it’s intuitive enough that you might not look down that often to read it and the really important readouts are fairly large (speed and assist level). I have grown to accept the Purion, but do have a few tips for use as follows. The + and – buttons, which raise and lower assistance, are designed to click in at an angle towards the right. They are attached near the left edge of the control pad and pivot in towards the LCD. With practice, I have found that the right edge is really the sweet spot for consistent clicking. Sometimes the lower left and middle areas can be inconsistent or non-responsive. The screen itself glows faint white at all times, which shouldn’t draw much power. Holding the + button would normally turn lights off and on if this bike had them. By comparison, the larger Bosch Intuvia display has a dedicated light button. Holding the – button will cycle through trip distance, odometer, assist level, and range. And, the range menu is dynamic, so you can see the bike calculate how far it thinks you can go before the battery completely drains based on the last mile of riding, your current state of charge, and the chosen level of assist. This helps to make up for the very basic 5-bar charge indicator on the left side of the battery and the display which isn’t as precise as a 10-bar or percentage readout seen on some competing displays. On the lower edge of the control pad is a walk-mode button. Press it once and then hold the + button to have the motor slowly assist you when walking the bike (you must be in Eco, Tour, Sport, or Boost for walk mode to work). It’s useful for crowded non-bikeable areas like parks, or if you get a flat tire, and not all companies have it enabled, so props to Haibike for this. I’ve created an in-depth Bosch Purion review in the EBR forums for more information :)

In conclusion, the bike preformed well. I really enjoyed the quick, agile, and nimble feel of the Bosch motor working in tandem with the efficient tires and lightweight frame. I would like to go over the tradeoffs here for a moment. Some may not like that is is only available at dealers, perhaps there is not one near you, or they don’t carry the bike. The Purion display is for sure a good display, just more basic than the other Bosch displays. And finally, for a bike at such a low price point, you will want to consider swapping out some components. I found the seat very uncomfortable, while the grips were locking grips, they were not very ergonomic, and the bike could use a seat post suspension. All these are things I would consider swapping out at time of purchase to get the bike feeling cozy for longer rides. The bike is hard to fault though. The price point is great, its always nice to have dealer support, and I love that sweet Bosch motor and hydraulic brakes. I want to thank Batch Bicycles for letting me check out the E Commuter and I look forward to their other offerings.

As always, I welcome questions and feedback in the comment section below. Whether you own the bike, have taken a test ride, or are brand new to the space, my goal is to provide an objective and honest resource. You can also join the Batch Bicycles forums and share your own photos, videos, and review updates to help others! Have fun out there, and ride safe :)

Pros:

  • A down-to-business commuter ebike with a Bosch mid-drive, hydraulic disc brakes, all the necessary features, and a fantastic price point at just $1,999
  • $1,999 is an extremely low price point for a Bosch powered ebike, just a few years ago, you couldn’t get into a Bosch ebike for less than $4,000, even if you find yourself adding a couple things here and there, the price is still extremely attractive considering you get one of the best mid-drives in the industry
  • Kenda Kwick tires are included at 27.5” x 1.75” and offer this great efficient tread for commuting with a higher air volume to keep you comfortable
  • The bike includes both front rack provisions and bottle cage bosses, to add any number of accessories you might want
  • I love the nice plastic fenders with these rubberized mud flaps, these add an additional element to keep you clean and it can help alleviate toe strikes to the fender if you are making a tight turn
  • The rear rack is a bolt on rack which I love since it is easy to replace or fix should the bike take a spill, it uses standard gage tubing to fit most panniers pretty well and there is even a spring latch for other type of items you may want to secure
  • Features a rear mounted kickstand to eliminate annoying pedal lock when reversing
  • Lightweight at just under 47lbs with the battery attached and everything, this was on the large size, it comes in 2 other sizes, medium and small
  • Driven by a Bosch Active Line motor, smooth power delivery and it even has shift detection so you don’t wear down the drive train
  • A big win here are the 180mm Tektro hydraulic disc brakes in the front and rear, the stopping power is absolutely great for city riding
  • Powerpack 400 battery means it is easy to swap and change with other Bosch PowerPack batteries, or even get a replacement if needed
  • Sold exclusively through dealers so you get not only dealer support, but it is easy to test drive before purchase or even get the bike dialed in exactly the way you want it

Cons:

  • Unfortunately, for a commuter bike, there are no lights here of any kind in the front or rear, definitely something you might want to think of adding for city riding
  • I found the seat much more on the active side, great for standing and pedaling, but not so much for sitting, you may want to swap it out at the dealership and perhaps add a suspension seat post too
  • In addition to the lights and seat, you may want to change the grips too, I like that they are locking, but the flat rubber setup is less cozy for longer rides
  • The Bosch Purion display and Active Line motor are both entry level for Bosch, they work fantastically well and are very reliable, but you do miss out on some of the nicer Bosch features

Resources:

Comments (3) YouTube Comments

Johnny Law
2 months ago

This bike appears super similar to the 2018 Trek Verve+. Just $400 between the 2. Any observable/experiential differences to point out?

  Reply
TL
2 months ago

I think the tire specs are incorrect… you may want to check the size? Tire Brand: Kenda Kwick Seven.5, 26″ x 1.95″ (50-599) Wheel Sizes: 27.5 in (69.85cm)

  Reply
Court
2 months ago

Hmm, thanks for this tip, I will pass it along TL!

  Reply

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