Elby City Review

Elby City Electric Bike Review
Elby City
Elby City Bionx D Series Gearless Hub Motor
Elby City Battery With Cover Removed Locking Core And Handle
Elby City Locking Ergonomic Grips Internally Routed Cables
Elby City Supernova E3 E Bike Headlight Custom Shell Led Blades
Elby City Tektro Auriga E Sub Hydraulic Brake Levers
Elby City Comfort Saddle With Integrated Handle Extra Wide Seat Post
Elby City Sram X5 Nine Speed Drivetrain
Elby City Aluminum Alloy Bash Guard Chain Guide Vp Grip Tape Pedals
Elby City Fender Integrated Pannier Bar 180 Mm Disc Brakes Kickstand
Elby City Bionx 3 45 Amp Compact Charger
Elby City Electric Bike Review
Elby City
Elby City Bionx D Series Gearless Hub Motor
Elby City Battery With Cover Removed Locking Core And Handle
Elby City Locking Ergonomic Grips Internally Routed Cables
Elby City Supernova E3 E Bike Headlight Custom Shell Led Blades
Elby City Tektro Auriga E Sub Hydraulic Brake Levers
Elby City Comfort Saddle With Integrated Handle Extra Wide Seat Post
Elby City Sram X5 Nine Speed Drivetrain
Elby City Aluminum Alloy Bash Guard Chain Guide Vp Grip Tape Pedals
Elby City Fender Integrated Pannier Bar 180 Mm Disc Brakes Kickstand
Elby City Bionx 3 45 Amp Compact Charger

Summary

  • A highly polished, purpose-built electric bicycle with easy-to-mount frame, adjustable bars and ergonomic touch points, available in five colors, additional $99 shipping with assembly by Velofix
  • Custome extra-wide Aluminum fender that don't rattle, integrated Supernova LED lights with a custom light blade up front, large hydraulic disc brakes, internally routed cables
  • Available in a single speed or nine speed configuration, BionX D-Series motor is an excellent climber and near silent, throttle on demand and torque sensing assist, removable color LCD and USB charger for phone with optional Bluetooth app
  • Regen and motor cutoff switch is only built into the right brake lever, the bike is well balanced and surprisingly stiff for a wave frame, higher price tag here but you get nicer parts and a great warranty

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Elby

Model:

City

Price:

$3,699 ($3,499 for Single Speed, $99 Extra for Shipping + Velofix)

Body Position:

Upright Relaxed

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Cruising, Urban, Commuting

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Year Comprehensive, 3 Year if Registered

Availability:

United States, Canada, Europe

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

56.8 lbs (25.76 kg) (55 lbs for Single Speed)

Battery Weight:

7.8 lbs (3.53 kg)

Motor Weight:

8.8 lbs (3.99 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 T6 Aluminum Alloy, Plastic Covers

Frame Sizes:

16.5 in (41.91 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

16.5" Seat Tube, 25" Reach, 18.5" Stand Over Height, 72" Length

Frame Types:

Step-Thru

Frame Colors:

White, Silver, Black, Orange, Blue

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid Aluminum Alloy, 9 mm Axle with Nuts

Frame Rear Details:

10 mm Axle with Nuts

Attachment Points:

Fender Bosses, Pannier Rack

Gearing Details:

9 Speed 1x9 SRAM X5, 11-34T (Single Speed Uses 15T Cog)

Shifter Details:

SRAM X5 Triggers on Right Bar

Cranks:

Lasco Aluminum Alloy, 170 mm Length, 38 Tooth Chainring with Alloy Guide

Pedals:

VP Composite Plastic Platform with Grip Tape

Headset:

Custom Cane Creek, Sealed, 1-1/2"

Stem:

Adjustable Angle -20° to 40°, 31.8 mm Clamp

Handlebar:

Swept Back, 620 mm Length, 31.8 mm Clamp Diameter, 33 mm Rise, 45.8° Bend

Brake Details:

Tektro Auriga Hydraulic Disc with 180 mm Rotors, Tektro Auriga E-Sub Levers with Motor Inhibitor and Regen Activation on Right Lever, Adjustable Reach Levers

Grips:

Ergonomic Rubber, Locking

Saddle:

Elby Branded, Velo Comfort with Integrated Handle

Seat Post:

Custom Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

500 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

39.9 mm

Rims:

Alex Rims, Double Wall, 32 Hole, Reinforcement Eyelets

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 14 Gauge, Silver with Nipples

Tire Brand:

Continental CruiseCONTACT, 26" x 2.2"

Wheel Sizes:

26 in (66.04cm)

Tire Details:

SafetySystem Puncture Protection, Reflective Sidewall Stripe, 35 to 65 PSI

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Adjustable Length Kickstand, Wide Aluminum Alloy Fenders with Support Struts, Pannier Hanger Bar (Max Weight 11 kg / 24 lbs Per Side, 22 kg /48 lbs Total), Flick Bell, Integrated Supernova E3 E-Bike V6s LED Headlight (165 Lumens) with Side Accent LED Blades, Integrated Supernova 3-LED Rear Light, Sturdy Bash Guard Chain Guide, Fully Enclosed Plastic Chain Cover on Single Speed

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, 1.5 lb 3.45 Amp Charger, Internally Routed Cables, 3 Minute Auto-Off, Automatic Deep Sleep Battery Protection, 273 lb Max Weight

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

BionX, D-Series

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Gearless Direct Drive Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Motor Peak Output:

1000 watts

Motor Torque:

50 Newton meters (Nominal 25 Nm)

Battery Brand:

Panasonic

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

11.6 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

556.8 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

4 hours

Estimated Min Range:

25 miles (40 km)

Estimated Max Range:

70 miles (113 km)

Display Type:

BionX DS3 Removable, Backlit, Color LCD

Readouts:

Speed, Battery Level (10 Bars), Battery Percentage, Assist Level (1-4), Regeneration Level (1-4), Odometer, Trip Timer, Trip Distance, Average Speed, Clock, Setup, Lights Indicator, Assist Level Gauge, Assist Percentage

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad, Phone Mount Adapter, 5 Volt Female USB Charging Port, Bluetooth Application (iOS or Android)

Drive Mode:

Torque Sensing Pedal Assist, Trigger Throttle

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

Elby is a special creature, an electric bicycle designed from the ground up to be approachable, comfortable and responsive. Seriously, the drive system on this city/cruiser is also used on e-mountain bikes! It packs a lot of power and zip along with some cool power regeneration features and is near silent. The drive systems are all produced by BionX, a fixture in the industry and partner to other premium manufacturers like Mercedes SMART. The only real complaint I have is that the motor looks large, it’s like a gray pizza stuck in the middle of the rear wheel… but at least the other gray plastic accents on the bike (like the battery box) are matched. This is a nod to Elby and their attention to detail. You can choose from five glossy frame colors including white and silver (for increased night riding visual footprint) and I love that some of the plastic accents and fork are color matched for a cohesive visual appearance. Yeah, aside from the motor, the battery, compact control system and even the wires ae mostly hidden. And while the Elby City only comes in one frame size, it’s designed to be highly adjustable, accommodating riders from 5 foot to 6.5 foot tall. The extra-long 500 mm seat post is thick and sturdy, the stem swivels up and down, even the swept-back “gull wing” handle bar can be swiveled to raise or lower and change reach. I love the ergonomic grips and slightly large but active saddle. Between these touch points and the thicker tires, you end up with a comfortable ride despite there being no suspension hardware. This keeps the bike lighter, cheaper and stiffer. Many wave style deep step-thru frames used for electric bikes have this bendy feeling about them, as you pedal, turn and stop the frame flexes. That is not the case with the Elby thankfully and I’m glad because it honors the motor and premium hydraulic braing systems. This is an awesome ebike, it’s just more expensive than some. And that’s interesting considering the direct to consumer model being tried out. You order online then pay an additional $99 for shipping/assembly and if you’re in a city where Velofix operates, they deliver it to your doorstep and set it up just right… even returning 30 days later for a free tuneup and adjustments.

Driving the Elby is one of the most unique and effective hub motor systems I’m aware of. Yes BionX is an advertiser for EBR so you may interpret some of this as bias… but I invited them after having tested a number of systems across a range of electric bikes. This thing is years in the making and only compromises on visuals in my opinion. By designing something extra wide, they were able to achieve higher torque and better heat dissipation. The casing for the D-Series is plastic, keeping it light and durable, and it has an internal torque sensor that works well consistently. It’s one of the quietest high powered motors and I love how they tucked the power cable leading to it on the left side low and out of the way for snags or tips. Notice also that the rear wheel spokes connect to the hub and rim of the wheel, not to the hub motor casing. This provides a more natural ride and a bit of flex… so spokes don’t tend to loosen as much or break. I was told that the max weight for the Elby was 280 lbs by the rep but believe it’s actually 273 based on some literature at their site and some quick math. That’s still above average where many ebikes say 250. This allows for the addition of bags on the rear rack or for larger riders, tall, boxy and overweight. In my opinion, it has the power needed to move larger loads effectively, something people ask me about regularly. You get 500 watts nominal peaking around 1,000 with 50 Newton meters of torque that can be controlled with a throttle… that’s very unique in a world where more electric bikes are using mid-drive systems that require pedaling.

Powering the motor, backlit color display and premium ebike specific lights is a high quality, custom designed, Lithium-ion battery pack. It offers 48 volts and 11.6 amp hours which is above average and the cells inside are produced by Panasonic, one of the top brands in the space. You can charge it on or off the bike and it locks securely with a key… but is kept hidden and perhaps protected by a plastic shell with stylized metal step pad. Now, I’m not sure I’d actually want to step on that, it looks too nice and might scratch over time. The downtube is low enough that most people should be able to step over easily. However, if you do scratch this plastic part or end up losing it (as you have to take it off for battery removal) I was told the company does sell replacements. One unique and semi-confusing aspect of the battery is that it interfaces with the bike using an EnergyBus Rosenberger plug (very high quality, magnetically connected). The plug is floating so it self-aligns easily and can transfer data and power… it’s like top of the line as far as plugs go :P but on the outside of the batter pack, the charger plug is more basic. It’s not magnetic and could get bent or pull the bike over like other more basic plugs. At least it’s kept mostly clear of the left crank arm and pedal but why not use the magnetic port there too? Yes, it would add to the already high cost of the bike and perhaps would have required a larger heavier charger. That’s one thing I love about the Elby and other BionX e-bikes, the charger is fast at 3.45 Amps but also super small and light weight making it very easy to take along to work or a friend’s house for a quick fill. One other grip I have about this mid-section of the bike is that the kickstand is mounted very near the left crank arm and will collide if you back the bike up or try to spin the cranks when parked. Many ebikes manufacturers are moving to a rear mounted kickstand but some feel these don’t look as nice (sticking out towards the back). I guess it’s just a small note and consideration.

So the motor and battery are great, the display system and control pad follow along as being some of my favorite. The bike powers on with one click on the control ring (near the left grip) and the color backlit display blinks to life. The really neat thing here is that if you didn’t have the display, the control ring functions just fine on its own! It has an LED charge level chart and LED assist level chart that blinks when you go into regen (by pulling the right grip). It’s slim so it doesn’t block the shifters or brake lever, mounted close so you can reach it easily, and intuitive with a plus and minus for assist level navigation and forward back for changing menu readouts. There’s a separate button just for the lights and that power button to turn it off again. But if you forget to turn it off, no worries… it powers down automatically after a few minutes on its own. We went in-depth on video above showing all of the settings and I listed them as well but this shouldn’t be overlooked. The button pad is great and the display is also awesome. I love being able to take the fancy pieces off of electric bikes when parking in the elements or sketchy neighborhoods. Nobody wants their fancy bike scratched or tinkered with and you might be wondering about the button ring… Couldn’t someone turn it on and press the throttle at the bike rack? Yes, they could turn it on and turn the lights on maybe but the throttle won’t activate until the bike is moving 5 km/h (for safety reasons) so this has the fortunate side effect of making it tamper resistant as well. So you get a bike only mode, four levels of assist, four levels of regen (which can slow you when coasting down hills or act as a fun workout mode) and regenerative braking activated by the right brake lever. As mentioned earlier, the brakes on the Elby are wonderful… You get 180 mm hydraulic disc brakes with adjustable reach levers that are ebike specific. Or, at least the right one is, the left one does not have a motor inhibitor regen switch in it unfortunately. This is another area that I’d like to see upgraded. You’d pay slightly more and have one tiny more wire but it would also add a bit more complexity to the control system. The way it is now is fine, but many other ebikes have two levers with motor inhibitors and I like that.

It may seem like I’m gushing over the Elby City and that’s probably true. I’m a huge fan of the drive system and can see the care that went into its custom frame, light interface, optional phone mount and Bluetooth app. They give you basically everything here, the fenders are custom and oversized but still tight and out of the way when pedaling (specifically the front one which is pushed forward thanks to some rake in the fork which also stabilizes the ride). I’m excited about the experience and quality here but recognize that you really are paying for it. I wish the price was lower considering the Velofix delivery model. Perhaps some dealers will have the bike as well and it is available to test ride at the traveling ebike expo so check it out for yourself. Other highlights for me are the reflective and puncture resistant tires, upgraded Alex rims with reinforcement eyelets, reflective saddle with built in handle for easy lifting and moving. You may need a platform rack to move this electric bike with a car and in that case check out the Thule EasyFold Carrier with ramp which makes loading easier.

Pros:

  • The Elby City looks beautiful and comes in five colors which all include reflective tires and accents on the saddle and pedals, I’d opt for white or silver to stand out even more during night or early morning rides… I love how the fork and plastic covers are perfectly paint matched
  • You get to choose a nine speed or single speed drivetrain (which saves weight and cost), in both cases there’s an excellent guide system so the chain shouldn’t fall off easily
  • I love how smooth and immediate pedal assist feels, the BionX torque system is very natural and shouldn’t ever surprise you or make you strain your knees the way some delayed cadence sensors do
  • Throttle mode is awesome, the throttle is easy to reach and offers variable speed response depending on how far you press it, I hit the top speed of 20 mph quickly and felt smooth bursts to maintain me at that speed as I held it down
  • Not only do you get four levels of assist, you also get four levels of regen (extremely unique in the world of electric bikes), I love how you can immediately activate regeneration by pulling the right grip too
  • Comfort touch points like the ergonomic grips and wider (but still active) saddle make the bike ride comfortably even though there are no suspension points, I like the wider tires and might run at a lower PSI to improve comfort further (I believe the range is 35 to 65 PSI)
  • I really like the idea of their Velofix partnership, it’s a way to reach a wider audience and ensure the bike is built well, it’s not available everywhere but does give them a jump start over dealer networks and you get a 30 day tuneup… in some ways I would have expected a lower overall price for the bike since there is no middleman, or maybe free shipping at least?
  • Considering the pedals are plastic, they felt stiff and grippy, I usually complain about flexy small pedals but these ones were unique and might not scrape your shins the way metal spiked ones cand
  • Beautiful color display that’s easy to remove on a solid adjustable angle mount, it’s cool that they also provide a phone mount adapter and 5 Volt USB port so you can use their app and completely replace the stock display if you want
  • The display panel gives you a lot more feedback than basic ones and is intuitive to use (left and right bars change views or enter setup if you hold the left one while on setup, the up and down bars raise or lower assist/regen, there’s an independent light button and power button too… I believe the control ring works even without the display panel if you want (it has two LED light strips that indicate charge level and assist/regen setting
  • Super small, lightweight charger would be easy to toss into a backpack or perhaps pannier bags if you get them, it’s one of the most compact I’ve seen from any company but still delivers a whopping 3.45 Amps for fast charging! Most chargers just put out 2 Amps
  • The display automatically shuts down after three minutes and if you stop using the bike to conserve battery, there’s also a Deep Sleep feature whereby the battery limits power draw after weeks or months of non-use (great for winter or times when you’re on a trip) to protect itself
  • Given the extra-long seat post (500 mm long) the Elby website says this e-bike can accommodate riders from 5′ to 6’5″ tall which is great
  • The power cable for the motor is tucked away nicely, most cables are internally routed but the motor cable is especially important and potentially vulnerable if the bike tips… for the Elby it seemed well protected
  • I like that they positioned the charging port on the battery towards the front of the bike, mostly out of the way of the left crank arm and pedal… many other ebikes have the port situated where it could get bumped or snagged easier

Cons:

  • Given how deep and wide the step-thru portion of this frame is, it’s fairly stiff but there’s still a touch of frame flex, I like the metal accent on the downtube but some other curved parts are plastic and I’m guessing they could get kicked and scratched easier when mounting (so be careful)
  • The rear rack pannier bar thing is cool but only holds up to 40 lbs vs. a traditional platform rack which is usually rated at 55 lbs, it’s also a bit thick so I’m not sure all clip-on bags will work and there’s nowhere to put a trunk bag on top and no bottle cage bosses on the frame
  • At $3,700 for the 9-Speed version, this electric bike is on the expensive side but you do get a premium drive system, in addition to the price of the bike you also pay $99 for shipping and Velofix assembly
  • While I love how powerful the BionX D-Series motor is, the casing is large and stands out on most bikes, the rest of the systems are all mostly hidden however
  • The seat post is unnecessarily large and I’m told that was due to a previous design goal (to have a pump built in) but the company that makes that accessory went out of business so they were stuck with this really large post, I’d like it if they included a 39.9 mm to 27.2 mm shim so people could use their own seat posts with suspension perhaps
  • If you back the bike up with the kickstand down, the left crank arm will collide because it’s mounted near the center of the bike, this also limits ground maintenance like chain lubing if you want to pedal backward
  • When you add the bike to your shopping cart on the website, I think it should take you to the cart… instead you’re left on the same page you were before and have to look around to actually buy, they could make that easier (especially given this will be sold online mostly)
  • The battery charging port is a more traditional plug even though they use the magnetic EnergyBus interface from the battery to the bike… I wish they kept the magnetic design on the side of the pack too so the plug would pop off easily and not get bent or tip the bike as it is designed now

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Pamelae
7 months ago

Thank you so much for reviewing the Elby – I have been waiting anxiously to see this! The one statistic remaining that I need is the height from the top of the saddle seat, in its lowest position, to the ground – do you have that please?

I have had a test ride on the 2017 Electra Townie Go 8i and found that it fit me very well and felt good riding however the two negatives (brakes and lack of Throttle-on-demand) keep me from taking the plunge. I do feel that I need the “flat-foot technology” though.

I am a female senior citizen living in a ski-resort town with many groomed/paved bicycle trails but not a level one in sight near my home or anywhere else in the area for that matter. There is a fairly long and steep hill leading to my home so I worry about getting back up the hill after a long ride especially if I only have pedal-assist. I need a step-thru bike. I am a casual/cruiser style rider and not particularly interested in speed but must have hill climbing power when I need it. I also like the idea of regen to slow the bike down when going down-hill. The Elby specs seem to fit all my needs except that I don’t know whether the seat will go down low enough for me to reach the ground when seated (28″ inseam) – I can adjust the seat to a more appropriate height if needed as I become more comfortable with the bike.

Do you have any thoughts/guidance about making a choice between the Elby and the Electra?

Reply
Court Rye
7 months ago

Hi Pamelae, I just reached out to the Elby rep and asked him to do the measurement for you (top of the saddle when it’s in the lowest position down to the ground), he said it’s 33.5″ high. I do think this ebike would be a good fit for you as it’s one of the very few with step-thru and a fairly powerful motor and throttle mode. I usually post stand over height as the top of the frame to the ground because I tend to start standing up and kicking off then pushing myself up to the saddle. With this approach I think you’d be able to get into the saddle and use the throttle for near-instant power. I do love the Electra Townie Go! but can see how the lack of throttle might be a big decision point. That ebike does have “flat foot” technology, meaning the cranks are slightly forward, but the ride isn’t substantially different from Elby and some others due to their more angled seat tube. In fact, you can see how the cranks on the Elby actually are positioned slightly forward imitating the Electra design here.

Reply
Pamelae
7 months ago

Thank you, Court, for finding out that information for me. Looks can certainly be deceiving – it looks as if the seat would slide down lower so that the height would be in the 29-30″ range . I will have to give it a test ride to see how it feels. Thanks again for your help and great reviews.

Reply
Court Rye
7 months ago

Sure thing Pamelae! I’m glad we were able to get you this info quickly and hope you’re able to take one out. I realize it can be tricky locating the proper size ebike in some cases… I’m excited to see more brands coming with versitile frames and even multiple frame sizes to explore :)

Reply

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Mark Peralta
1 day ago

Hey everybody. I'm looking to dip my toes into ebikes and I have a couple I'm interested in.

There is a good condition Koda locally for $900, a 2015 Emotion EVO City for $1100 and a haibike trekking SL for $1300. All of them seem to be in good condition. I like the idea of the mid drive, but the Koda has mo power, right? or do I not know what I'm talking about.

I would like a bike that will allow me to get exercise but have a little help on hills. I would like to do some light trail riding as well.

What would you pick and why?

Thanks.
Accept the reality that on a used ebike, you have to eventually get a new battery since the battery is the number one wear and tear component of any ebikes. So consider the accessibility and cost of the battery. Second is you really have to ride it yourself to have a subjective test to which best fit your style and needs.

In general, mid drives have better battery range (per charge), excellent climber on really steep hills, lighter, and has excellent weight distribution. On the other hand, the Hub drives, have longer lasting drive train, easier to shift gears, easier to accelerate even if you are in the wrong gear, OK for moderate hills but not OK for really steep hills (you have to test it yourself).

Rincon
2 days ago

“The route is a grueling 1.3 miles with 112 punishing feet of climbing.”

“Consider my own example. I live in a hilly part of New York City. If even I, a supremely fit and highly expert cyclist, am complaining about riding up hills with my kids...”

I had to check if that article was written on April 1st. It wasn’t. But it is supposed to be satire. The problem is, it isn’t funny.

You’re right Captain Slow, the author is a wanker of the first water. I’ve pulled my two kids all over creation in a Burley, even on dirt trails, and I am neither supremely fit or a highly expert cyclist. One point three miles is nothing, and 112 “punishing” feet is a joke, but not the funny kind. The author is an expert whInger who has just contributed to the many misconceptions associated with ebikes.

The only point he inadvertently makes is that he needs an ebike due to his unacknowledged yet dilapidated physical state. I ride an ebike for the one reason he seems unable to comprehend: they are fun.

Rincon
3 days ago

Did you read the electricbike-blog report from the Playa?
That is a great post on why not to bring an ebike to Burning Man. I attended Burning Man for the first time this year. I rented a beach cruiser for the burn, delivered straight to the playa, and thought I wanted my ebike--until I actually arrived at Black Rock City and started seeing the sights. We spent 8-10 hours a night in the saddle, riding around the deep playa looking at the incredible artworks, and still didn't see half of the ~200 jaw dropping installations. That was just three weeks ago.

Now that I'm back home, I would never bring an e-bike to Burning Man, and not for the reasons given in the blog post--which are all true and correct. I wouldn't bring an e-bike there because you only ride at 3-5 mph, you're barely peddling, the ground could not be flatter, and you're constantly stopping to see the next incredible attraction. The slower you go, the more you will see. You just don't need an ebike. And you don't ride in straight lines from one attraction to the next. You start out in a straight line, but then immediately get sidetracked because you see another amazing artwork just to the right, that you can't believe you didn't see before. So your short ride to the next installation gets shorter by stopping at something in between. Most of this exploration happens at night by the way. Many of the illuminated artworks can only be discerned in the dark when you are close, so you zigzag your way through the warm desert evening.

The distance from once side of Black Rock City to the other is about 3.5 miles, with an infinite number of distractions between the edges. You need a cheap combination lock for Burning Man, not an e-bike. (Don't bring a keyed lock. If you drop that key in the playa dust, you'll never see it again.) My bike was stolen the one time I left it unlocked to grab a quick look at the Mayan Warrior Mutant Vehicle blasting out 70,000 watts of dance music in the deep playa. I was wandering around forlorn, thinking of the long walk back, when this dude rode up on the bike and handed it back to me. He said, "Sorry, I needed a ride." Then the jerk hugged me and walked away. That's Burning Man.

If you love riding bikes and would enjoy spending several days absolutely gobsmacked from dawn to dusk, then leave the ebike at home, rent a beach cruiser for playa delivery and pickup, and head to Burning Man next August.

1/3
mrgold35
4 days ago

Mr gold these few places you visited the past few months where ebikes were not allowed were most of them open to regular bicycles?

Most of time; the signs had regular bike restrictions posted and I just assumed the restrictions applied for ebikes also. Most of the federal parks I visit in the southwest have posted sign on the motor vehicle roads to make room for bicycles when passing (again, assuming Class I and II ebikes also on share the road areas). The only time I seen posted "no ebikes" and regular bike welcomed on walking/hiking/mtb trails was in the parks within the city limits of Sedona, AZ. You can only ride ebikes the same areas A-OK for motor vehicles only.

From what I can figure the city, local, state, or Federal agencies can't agree on where the line begins and ends on the difference between a motorized vehicle and ebike? I can see it taking a few more years for the laws to catch-up to the technology.

George S.
1 week ago

Mike (Mikey) at Blue Monkey is going to interview Yamaha, post something on their YT channel.

Court reviewed the Voltbike Enduro with the Bafang Max. That bike has a torque sensor and is a nice basic mid-drive. They are at $1800. Voltbike is an impressive company, coming out of nowhere. Bafang has a legal limit torque sensor mid-drive in the works, the Max Ultra. The Max are frame integrated, not bolt on. Bafang has a low cost model, the Modest, and they have some sort of battery factory in the works.

In other words, here's a company that owns the DIY mid-drive market, with a decent reputation. They are aiming for the low end, but production type bikes. I could see Yamaha going into that Civic market, but it may not be that easy. Bosch has talked about a cheaper drive system.

I have two Bikes Direct bikes and a Trek 820, all converted to ebikes with hub motors. Since I have 2-3 years on all the bikes, I'm not that concerned about the quality of the frames. The cheapest bike was $270, the most expensive $420. Each bike has at least 2,000 miles, trouble free miles. You can get a BBS02 mid-drive from Luna for $400, or a MAC or Golden hub, beefy hubs, for about that. You can go with a Bafang hub for a lot less.

With a direct model you could sell a decent frame, a very good motor, and some sort of 48v battery, real cells, around $1200. I expect bikes like the Voltbike to put an end to mainstream DIY. It just isn't really worth it. Does Yamaha really bring anything to the party, jammed between Bosch and Bafang? Shimano is a huge company, the biggest of the 'names', but they've done little with ebike motors.

I think Yamaha should make a light motorcycle, something with speeds and range for in city use, but registered and licensed.

It's an endlessly fascinating world and right now there is a lot going on, but most of it is not seen.

Alex M
1 week ago

How would $1000 to $2500 strike you? A city foldable to a city street model.

A foldable $1,000 - maybe, though not likely from expensive brand like Yamaha.

$2,500 - possibly, at least that much. On automotive scale that would be the price slightly above Civic or Corolla, i.e. not the cheapest one. There are quality ebikes with other motors that cost from $1,800-1,900, though quality drops abruptly if you go below this mark.

Quality frame costs less than $800 retail, probably $400 wholesale - again, I'm talking Civic level, something that works but not meant to impress. Adding $200 hub motor (not Yamaha) and $300 battery (wholesale) for a total $900 results in $1,900 retail - $1,000 markup. Maybe low production volume is to blame, i.e. "Civic"-level of ebike frame costs them more than $400. After they've barely sold a few hundred bikes, they scrap the model and start making something new.

PTFC Brian
3 weeks ago

The problem is to have good infrastructure to bike 100 miles a day without worrying about getting hit by a truck or a car.
I have traveled fair bit and I was appalled to see the dilapidated bike infrastructure across the US. Only few pockets of safe trails exist but most city roads are not designed with a cyclist in mind.
product development and the social aspect go hand in hand.

I do have some concerns about Stromer though. Once the market reaches a tipping point, if they don't have enough market share, they will be forced to get out of the game. Right now, the sweet spot for ebikes is $2K but Stromer starts at $5K.
I understand they are not making bike for everyone and I really admire their guts for pushing the envelope. They were the first to introduce 814Whr battery when most products were shipped with 400's, they were the first to introduce a working model of digital connectivity (OMNI) but they consistently pushing things forward.

Regarding your point about rapid charge, it is not in the hands of Stromer. If the cell chemistry, welds, BMS can't handle pumping in 100A, then Stromer can not do anything. Ebike batteries have a constraint of weight which is not existent in electric cars.
Most EV car batteries are hidden in the chasis floor but ebike batteries have to blend in and has to be removable. This puts a lot of constraint. I am sure in 5 years, 1hr charging would be possible or the bike infrastructure in certain parts of the world would be such you just swap the battery and keep moving...
This is exactly where the conversation should go. Road infrastructure, both highways and interstates, are in great need of replacement. EV's and autonomous vehicles will be at the table to help create the vision for smart road design. As eBike enthusiasts, we need to understand the deficiencies (safety and charging), and work towards a better future. Imagine having the freedom to go on eBike treks on any given week or weekend. eBike technology will continue to improve. Our task should be expanding the opportunities to use them.

Rapid recharge will be possible.

Ravi Kempaiah
3 weeks ago

Great design for the ST5! If they could have included the Pinion drive, it would been even better (ultra smooth/quiet). I'm sure they're working on it.

The other feature that no eBike has (that I'm aware of), is rapid recharge. If Stromer could get their battery to recharge in 20 minutes, it would make riding long distances a lot of fun, and would eliminate the need for extra batteries. Riding 100 miles per day with max assist could be common. Imagine if we started thinking about infrastructure to rapid recharge on bike routes?

The problem is to have good infrastructure to bike 100 miles a day without worrying about getting hit by a truck or a car.
I have traveled fair bit and I was appalled to see the dilapidated bike infrastructure across the US. Only few pockets of safe trails exist but most city roads are not designed with a cyclist in mind.
product development and the social aspect go hand in hand.

I do have some concerns about Stromer though. Once the market reaches a tipping point, if they don't have enough market share, they will be forced to get out of the game. Right now, the sweet spot for ebikes is $2K but Stromer starts at $5K.
I understand they are not making bike for everyone and I really admire their guts for pushing the envelope. They were the first to introduce 814Whr battery when most products were shipped with 400's, they were the first to introduce a working model of digital connectivity (OMNI) but they consistently pushing things forward.

Regarding your point about rapid charge, it is not in the hands of Stromer. If the cell chemistry, welds, BMS can't handle pumping in 100A, then Stromer can not do anything. Ebike batteries have a constraint of weight which is not existent in electric cars.
Most EV car batteries are hidden in the chasis floor but ebike batteries have to blend in and has to be removable. This puts a lot of constraint. I am sure in 5 years, 1hr charging would be possible or the bike infrastructure in certain parts of the world would be such you just swap the battery and keep moving...

George S.
3 weeks ago

They are very much in business and thriving.

https://www.espokes.com/

Ravi,

Not exactly. David Rasmussen started with a store in St. George. Then he opened a store in the Salt Lake City area (South Jordan). The St. George ebike store could not make it in the small market, but the Salt Lake City store, apparently, can. A lot of miles to SLC. My point was simple. A high cost store won't make it in this area. His did not, and I don't think any other would. I've ridden by the old store. It was on a nice bike path. It isn't there. The store where I bought my ebike is not there.

Dewey
4 weeks ago

The Reddit ebikes forum has a lot of information about the first generation Schwinn ebikes, including links to service manuals, battery pack teardowns, etc.

The Schwinn Tailwind is a good option for converting to a city/commuter ebike with a replacement 36v or 48v front hub kit motor/battery in a 700c wheel. Someone in Texas is selling them on eBay for $325 with free shipping. The Nexus IGH, full chain case, front suspension fork, swept back handlebars, and upright riding position are desirable features on a city bike, the front rim brake ought to be replaced with a disk brake or hydraulic rim brake as the rear only uses a roller brake, and you would need to remove the original 24v tongxin front hub motor and toshiba rack battery, but as these were lashed to the bike with zip ties the wiring should be easy to cut off. This would be a good donor frame for a front hub kit motor/battery like a Dillenger 36v kit in a 700c wheel although there are no bottle cage bosses on the frame so you would need to tie the battery pack to the rack.

bob armani
1 month ago

I have a Hilltopper 250W 24V front wheel on my 7-speed Schwinn. I don't use it for sport, just for day-to-day transportation. (I almost never use my car any more.) My terrain is flat city roads, and my typical trip is 2 to 4 miles one way.My kit has no throttle, just a push button to kick in the motor.

Most of the time I pedal in gear 5, and just use the motor for assist when I get below 10 MPH, and usually only goose myself until I'm back up to 12-14 MPH. Even pulling a bike trailer loaded with 20 pounds of groceries, I have no trouble cruising along at 12 MPH or so, although I do use the motor more when I'm fully loaded. (I'm only 150 lbs myself.) I don't need more speed than that since, at age 72, my reaction time isn't as quick as it used to be, and I find 15 MPH to be very comfortable, and 20 MPH to be a little on the "break-neck" side for me. hehe.

So as far as power is concerned, I seem to have all I need. What I'm wondering is, is there any efficiency advantage to a higher voltage, or higher power motor? Could I maybe get more range, or less battery wear by using a system that has more power than I really need, rather than pushing my 250W motor harder? I see that so many bikes use higher voltages and wattages, even when they are still topped out at 20MPH, so I assume there must be some advantage.

I'm also looking into these issues because I'm thinking about making a home-built trike just for fun, and as a better grocery-getter.

Gary-I agree with Mark's comment. You are only 150lbs and with a 250 watt motor, sounds like it is pushing you just fine. I asked the same question when purchasing my ebike. I am at 135lbs and my 350 watt motor on my ebike pushes me along at fast and furious speeds that are more than adequate. I can top out at 22.5 mph without a whole lot of exertion I asked about a 500 watt motor and they indicated it is too much power for someone in my weight class.

I like the concept of the Hilltopper. I was thinking on making one of my mtn bikes into an electric with the kit. Sounds like it is performing well! Ride safe!

Alberto Orchansky
1 month ago

If the problem is not resolved after they did all the "tightening" of the ebike's integrity, then you have to get your money back! The problem is real and if they don't acknowledge it then go to the media, make a lot of noise. After that, fight it in court as a defective product. I don't know if lemon law also applies to ebikes. Make sure you video the actual shimmy from different angles so we can watch it at youtube.

This morning I had the bike checked -again- at a different bike shop. The third inspection and in this case, to get another independent opinion.
They were NOT able to find anything out of order, including checking the torque on everything 'torquable' and particularly in reference to Bull's last request, to have the front spokes checked.

I am NOT blaming anybody but myself. However, one of the main considerations for the selection was the fact that it was rated as the Number 1 by EBR in Best City Electric Bikes for 2016/2017 category And yes, I rode it, I compared it with other bikes and this one was by far the one that, for me, offered the best riding position given my physical limitations.

I posted the same letter that initiated this thread on EBR review. I got a response from the reviewer that, to make it short, I am not quoting here (you can see it in the review). However, I am quoting here a paragraph from my response to the reviewer:

..... I didn’t mention this before but just minutes after my first ‘wobble encounter’, I took the bike to a highly recognized bike shop. I live in a very particular place, on the Sunshine Coast of British Columbia, Canada. Mountain biking is VERY sophisticated here all year, and those guys work only with mountain bikes. The first thing they saw was my terrified face, the only one I could’ve to have after being so close to smashing 260 lbs at 30 miles/h against a boulder or a tree (no difference). Then they looked at my bike and both mechanics said: no wonders you didn’t get killed already with that *sh&%@y* fork. Well…, I became quite disappointed. Having paid a fortune for this bike I thought the components were equivalent -kind of- to having a Porsche class bike. True, just a Boxster, but a Porsche nevertheless. Then, I started to look at all the other components and, frankly, they are quite low-level. So what did I pay for? a battery? technology? Wobbling excitement?

I appreciate your comment and suggestions, and this is precisely the reason of why I initiated this thread in this forum and the title I gave to it: "RECALL and DISCONTINUE LACUBA EVO E8 WAVE"

I am packing the bike and shipping it back to the vendor. I'll keep you posted.

Cheers,

Alberto

Dewey
1 month ago

It seems like not many electric bicycles have belt drives. Motorcycles have more engine vibration but still, are there not noise, weight, and vibration advantages to a belt drive that would benefit electric bicycles? But if so, why do they seem rare?

Belt drives don't work with derailleurs.

The cheapest belt drive ebikes would be either an IKEA Sladda 2-speed, or a Priority Classic single speed or 3-speed, converted with a front wheel hub motor.

eVox is a Quebec subsidiary of Miele, a German washing machine company with experience designing belt driven motors, their Dyname drive uses a flywheel and belt on the left side separate from the chain and gears and is considered robust enough to have found application in some bikeshare systems. Court reviewed the City and KAB models.

Gates has a list of pedal bicycles and ebikes that use their belt drive, and earlier this year boasted their technology is used by 500 bicycle manufacturers. If you wanted to convert a belt drive equipped pedal bicycle some might be suitable for front wheel hub motor conversion which would be the simplest way to do it, otherwise I don't know how easy it is to find parts to make a belt drivetrain work with a mid-drive or rear hub motor. Typically a mid-drive replaces the front chainring while rear wheel hub motors accept an IGH chain sprocket, you would need to find belt adapters to work with the motor and rear hub plus the right length belt. A more radical conversion involving cutting the frame on a standard IGH bike has been attempted by some belt drive conversions.

Ravi Kempaiah
1 month ago

Ebike love or our conflicted love/hate relationships with them? I love Ebike commuting but Ebikes are ruining my finances. I bought a second bike because I liked the experience so much. I just had to buy several pairs of new jeans because my waist size has dropped an inch as I'm hitting 1300 commuting miles for the year. It just goes on and on: better bike bags, commuting clothes, lights etc.

Sounds like a good marketing idea and particularly for the industry events like the expos. Open up people's minds to the various applications for ebikes (commercial, cargo, commuting, exercise etc) and get them to make connections and open up their minds to possibilities not previously realized.

I like your "day in the life of a commuter" idea: it can really get bizarre to the point the stories sound like fiction. The other day on one commute I encountered two deer feeding at the side of the road, a block later I had to avoid a skunk crossing the road, and about a mile after that, deeper into the city, I passed three dudes with baseball bats walking down the street at 6am. On the ride home I almost crashed into a policeman who was crossing the street but changed his mind and reversed direction suddenly. Every commute something odd seems to occur.

E-bike commute is the best kind of commute. The freedom is unparalleled.
Re: Jeans, that's a good I suppose. You know the amount of money we spent on hospital treatment for my dad when he had stroke = 100's E-bikes. So, if investing in E-bikes helps someone stay healthy, avoid cardiovascular degeneration or keep their bones, knees and hips in great shape, then its a no-brainer.

I am glad you're having awesome fun on these bikes.

Over50
1 month ago

Ebike love or our conflicted love/hate relationships with them? I love Ebike commuting but Ebikes are ruining my finances. I bought a second bike because I liked the experience so much. I just had to buy several pairs of new jeans because my waist size has dropped an inch as I'm hitting 1300 commuting miles for the year. It just goes on and on: better bike bags, commuting clothes, lights etc.

Sounds like a good marketing idea and particularly for the industry events like the expos. Open up people's minds to the various applications for ebikes (commercial, cargo, commuting, exercise etc) and get them to make connections and open up their minds to possibilities not previously realized.

I like your "day in the life of a commuter" idea: it can really get bizarre to the point the stories sound like fiction. The other day on one commute I encountered two deer feeding at the side of the road, a block later I had to avoid a skunk crossing the road, and about a mile after that, deeper into the city, I passed three dudes with baseball bats walking down the street at 6am. On the ride home I almost crashed into a policeman who was crossing the street but changed his mind and reversed direction suddenly. Every commute something odd seems to occur.

Mike Nemeth
1 month ago

Hi. I'm new to e-bikes and highly value many posted replies on various subjects. I think the EBR reviews have turned me on. I'm 75 years old but still very active. Weigh 175 lbs at 5'9". I test rode my first ebike today and came away very excited. It was the Pedego city commuter, which suits me as most, if not all of my riding will be on the many bike paths here in northern CA. The Pedego is around 3k but I came across the E-Glide with similar equipment at $1700 plus shipping. After doing a specs comparison, I'm trying to figure why such a price difference. Does anyone care to comment?

Hi, I just saw your comment. When I was looking for my first E-bike I also noticed the huge difference in prices. There are a few E-bike stores in my city and most of the bikes also started at 2700.00. I think E-Glide keeps their price down by offering only two models and also you are buying it straight from the manufacturer with no middleman. The ST had the features I wanted and you want a nice size 500 watt motor if your going to do any hills. I have not had a single problem since purchasing it and I usually ride 18-25 miles every morning before it gets two hot. It's an amazing feeling riding along at 22 mph! Most of the time I keep the speed at level 3 and ride at about 16 mph. EBR has a video on the bike and also another on Dave and his shop in Santa Monica. Good luck. I hope you find the bike you'll be happy with.

Nutella
1 month ago

There have been plenty of conflicts elsewhere in the world with ebike riders going too fast or riding like idiots, which I agree is a behavior issue more than an ebike issue. As far as enforcement goes, it all comes down to money, if the city has it, it's a good way to keep bad behavior from happening, if not, there won't be any. I have a friend who worked at a shop in Breckinridge where they rented ebikes and he told me it was common that tourists would come back all road rashed because they underestimated how fast they could go on an ebike and would dump it in a corner. That might have something to do with why they don't allow them on that bike path.

Dewey
1 month ago

I'm hoping to find dealers to test ride these suggestions.

Trek have recently expanded their shop network and can order bikes from other stores for you to test ride. Kalkhoff is harder to find, I know of dealers in CA, NY, and DC but the motor can be serviced by a Bosch certified technician of any brand using their motors. The Gazelle Arroyo is similar to the Kalkhoff Agattu and Gazelle have dealers in Chicago and across the US. The Daymak EC1 is lightweight for an ebike at 38lb but the diamond frame forward leaning design is not a townie/city upright style, the dealers are in Canada, and the 24v hub motor on their base model is modest. I first tried a 24v hub motor before I switched to a 36v mid-drive motor because I found the smaller motor could not pull me up hills unloaded whereas I can now go grocery shopping and tow a child trailer.

Zach Kadletz
2 months ago

Taipei, Taiwan, August 2nd 2017 – Urban transportation specialist Tern Bicycles unveiled the GSD — an ebike that defines a new category: ‘compact utility’. The GSD is designed to carry two kids, a week’s worth of groceries, or 180 kg of cargo, but it’s only 180 cm long—shorter than a Dutch city bike. With Tern’s best-in-class folding technology, it packs down small enough to fit in a VW Touran or an urban apartment. It adjusts to fit riders from 150 – 195 cm—so mom, dad and the kids can all use it. A Bosch Performance motor, with up to two batteries, powers the GSD for up to 250km. It comes fully equipped with integrated lighting, rack, mudguards, double kickstand, two XL panniers, and even retractable passenger foot pegs – everything needed to shift to a bike-centric lifestyle.

“Most of the ebikes on the market today basically look like standard bicycles with motors and batteries grafted on,” said Josh Hon, Tern Team Captain. "That means that all of the valid compromises that were made in designing a muscle-powered vehicle are carried over to the ebike, where they don’t make as much sense. The Tern GSD is the result a fundamental insight: when you design a bicycle around an electric drivetrain, you don’t need to compromise key functionalities like comfort and cargo capacity to optimize for speed. With a Bosch drivetrain, 20” wheel bikes ride just as fast as 700c bikes but thanks to smaller wheels, deliver punchier acceleration. The smaller wheels also allow us to maximize cargo capacity. And with top speed removed from the optimization equation, we were free to design the GSD with a comfortable Dutch-bike riding position. Best of all, we were able to fit all this goodness into a package that’s only the size of a standard city bike.”

“One of our guiding insights was that cargo bikes are most useful in city centers, but they’re correspondingly difficult to manage and store,” according to Galen Crout, Communications Manager at Tern. “Dense urban centers bring cargo bikes to life—where groceries, schools and work are all within a bikeable distance—but they’re also where houses are small, and where bike theft is a persistent problem. We’re creating the compact utility ebike category to let people in cities enjoy the benefits of cargo bikes without the limitations.”

Fits the Family
The GSD is an ebike that everybody in the family can ride. Tern’s patented adjustable stem, special cockpit geometry, and super low step frame make the bike easy to handle and ride, even for very small riders. Taller riders will appreciate the expanding cockpit and handlebars that can be adjusted for height and reach. Heavier riders will appreciate the massively buttressed frame and fork, and components that are designed to handle loads of up to 180kg.

Super Stable
Just as a scooter is easier to ride than a motorcycle, the GSD rides and handles better than many ebikes on the market today. The GSD’s smaller wheels, low frame, and centrally mounted motor and batteries give the bike an extremely low center of gravity. Coupled with an extended wheelbase, the GSD is remarkably stable and easy to handle. This extra stability is critically important and appreciated when the GSD is fully loaded with cargo, especially with the wriggling child variety. And since ebikes are typically ridden at higher average speeds, this extra stability adds to safety.

Capacious Capacity
The GSD is built to carry stuff, lots of it. The frame, fork, and components have been tested to exceed 180kg of total weight for the rider and cargo. The GSD comes standard with an 80cm integrated rear rack and side panniers with a total capacity of 62L. The GSD fits two children in Thule Maxi child seats or one adult passenger. Additional carrying capacity can be added with lower deck supports, a rear tray, and a front tray. Tern will open source the frame attachment point dimensions so riders with an interest can also design and build their own custom cargo accessories.

Portabilty, Storability
Despite its extra large cargo capacity, the GSD packs small to fit into tight urban environments. Since the GSD is no longer than a standard bike, it will work with standard bike racks on cars and buses. But even better, patented Tern folding technology lets the GSD pack even smaller – three seconds is all it takes to reduce its height by 1/3rd and its width by 40% so the GSD can fit INSIDE mid-sized cars like a VW Touran. With two GSD’s packed in the back of the car, family bike adventures will never be the same again. The GSD is even designed to fit into small elevators with a specially designed rack that allows it to stand vertically.

Component Quality
Whereas many cargo-oriented bicycles use mostly standard bicycle parts, the GSD goes a step further with some of the most robust parts available. Examples include Magura 4 piston disc brakes, custom 2.4" Schwalbe Super Moto-X tires, Boost thru-axle hubs, and custom 36mm width double-joined rims.

The GSD, designed as the ultimate car replacement or small business utility vehicle, launches together with a collection of accessories, including Eurocrate-standardized front and rear racks, a passenger kit with KLICKfix adapters, and optional foot supports. The rear rack, sized for up to four Ortliebs, is designed for optimal compatibility with up to two Thule Yepp Maxi Seats. The base price of 3,999 EUR (3,999 USD) includes a pair of 62 L Cargo Hold panniers, a Bosch Performance mid-drive, and a 400 watt hour Bosch battery.

“It’s a bike that fits a family, but it’s also a bike that the whole family can share” said Hon. “When you’re investing $4,000 in a new electric bike, fundamental versatility makes a world of difference. Fit any riders, passengers, or cargo, and fit anywhere.”

Tern will debut the GSD at the Fall trade shows, starting with Eurobike 2017. Dealers and consumers can stop by the Tern booth at B4-405, or the Tern demo booth at DA-417 to test ride the GSD.

mrgold35
2 months ago

I've been ebike work commuting around 13-14 miles round-trip since Sept of 2016. I only have about 1/4 mile of bike lanes and under a mile of a walk/job/bike only path that parallels the hwy over the Rio Grande river. I have to share the road with vehicles the rest of the time. I feel safer in the morning at 5:30 am on regular streets because my light are extremely bright and reflective clothing. Our city is trying to build a 50 mile bike only loop around the city. Still a few years away from that and the older neighborhoods can be barely car friendly because of the narrow streets and sidewalks.

Coming home after work is a different story because of rush hour traffic and the lack of bike lanes. I only ride in the street if there is enough space to park a car. I see a lot of folks driving 10-25 mph over the posted speed limits and their side mirrors would hit me in the back because they hug the lanes so close if I didn't have a car width space as a buffer. I ride a lot slower and I actually see more bikes on the sidewalks than people. It takes me longer to get home; but, I feel safer on the sidewalks. Pretty much all the sidewalks are double wide and connect to asphalt bike paths in the newer neighborhoods for two way walk/jog/bike/stroller folks. I always slow down and usually acknowledge folks on sidewalks with a wave or head nod.

Roland
2 months ago

Hi. I'm new to e-bikes and highly value many posted replies on various subjects. I think the EBR reviews have turned me on. I'm 75 years old but still very active. Weigh 175 lbs at 5'9". I test rode my first ebike today and came away very excited. It was the Pedego city commuter, which suits me as most, if not all of my riding will be on the many bike paths here in northern CA. The Pedego is around 3k but I came across the E-Glide with similar equipment at $1700 plus shipping. After doing a specs comparison, I'm trying to figure why such a price difference. Does anyone care to comment?

art newcomer
2 months ago

I'm looking for a bike that is good in the city, mid-drive that can do 28MPH and also handle some light off road or trail riding, mainly dirt roads. Does anyone have suggestions for such a bike?

I bought the Lacuba EVO 8, it's governed at 20MPH. The EVO 45 is the 28 mph versio. The tires are the same, they have some sort of Kevlar lining. I use my bike on dirt 75% of the time. It does well.
Loose sand with an my eBike has been my only source of concern.

bob armani
2 months ago

For all of you followers, the Electric Bike Expo is making its second stop in the Midwest! this time we are heading to the Burnsville Center Mall outside of Minneapolis on July 21-23, 2017.

This location offers us a well-known place where locals shop in the more than 1.1 million square feet, with ample flat surface and free parking. The track design will offer a number of straightaways and a large outside loop for the speed pedelecs.

Because so many of the attendees that came to the Chicagoland event had never ridden an electric bike prior to the event (more than 66%) we have adjusted our marketing and are working with the largest classic rock radio station in the city to market this to the non-cycling community. KQRS will be promoting the event for 2 weeks prior to the Expo and Lisa Miller (afternoon DJ) will be riding a new electric bike for a week prior to the event to report on how it works and where she went on the bike. Then the KQRS team will be broadcasting love from the event on Saturday morning from 10 am to 12 noon.

At this event, NBDA will be jointly hosting our industry peer-to-peer roundtable conversation with dealers from the surrounding area and manufacturers. As with these events in the past, the attendance gets up to 20+ and the discussion is lively. This will happen on Friday afternoon. If you are going to be near the Burnsville area and are involved with the industry and would like to participate, reach out to Melissa Balmer and let her know you would like to participate. There will be some food and beverages and of course, test rides right after!

In Chicago, we ended up with more than 150 different bikes to test ride and we had one individual that was recorded test riding 40 bikes over the weekend.

if you plan to come (it's free), register in advance to cut through the line: www.ebikeexpos.com will take you right to the page.

I know I test rode quite a few at the Chicago Expo, but I lost count. Perhaps not 40 bikes, but at least half of that. You want to be in ebike heaven? Go to this Expo and you will not be disappointed! Great group and a fun crowd running it IMHO. So many models to choose from, you would need Jay Leno's Garage to fit them all and to have them in your own personal collection. Hope the Expo is a big success in the Midwest region. We really need to get the word out here in this neck of the woods. I am now ebike riding here on a regular basis and the general biking community are intrigued by the look and whole concept. Most riders are oblivious to the fact that they even exist. It is great to get the word out to the locals. Such a gas without having to burn any! LOL :D

Denis Shelston
2 months ago

Peddling while pedaling an ebike is a new career path (not a multi use path or city bike path). It opened up since ebikes went mainstream a couple years ago. Oh sorry, ebike isn't a word.

:eek::confused:o_O.....;)

From the Oxford dictionary

e-bike, noun. A bicycle that can be run on electric power as well as by pedaling

Donandnan Elmore
3 months ago

Cort, would you consider giving the price of the bikes at or near the start of your reviews? It would help to put all the features and performance of the bike in perspective as the video is watched.

Chris Hazell
3 months ago

Hi I'm Chris from the uk at only 5 feet tall I was wondering what E bike with fat wheels might suit my needs any help would be appreciated

minnie saab
3 months ago

like it

simchad613
4 months ago

I own an Elby. Pros, extremely well built,very quiet motor, easy to ride, it feels like a regular bike and with multi speed with the different power levels there is always a level that's just right. Cons, I wish the bell would be electric, and that would have some type of an alarm system for this money. But after every time I ride it, I tell myself it's worth every penny.

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 months ago

Cool, thanks for sharing your experience so far, the only electric bell/horn I have seen on an ebike so far is the new Specialized Vado, interesting concept: https://electricbikereview.com/specialized/turbo-vado-6-0/

andy lebbon
4 months ago

The ball at end of brake lever is to stop lever stabbing rider in accident for 30mph ebikes in Europe same as motorcycle learnt a lot from this channel thank you

David Jenkins
6 months ago

You need to let me test it, from my house in Pittsburgh's South Hills to the grocery store a mile away and return. Leaving the house, three blocks steep uphill including one brick street, then stop at a light (always red when I get there), start uphill through the light and down to the store. Return with groceries, uphill again to that light, down to home. Any bike can coast around flats, it's hills that make the difference and it's overcoming those hills while dressed for work or carrying a load that is the reason for buying an electric assist bike in the first place.

milliamp
6 months ago

Regen mode might be useful if you are going a really really short distance and need to put in a bit of extra work. I could see using it as maybe downhill assist too but it would probably be close to useless as a method to actually recharge the batteries manually.

JustCurtis FromCanada
6 months ago

I'm looking forward to a test ride next month, thanks for reviewing this bike, it looks like there will be quite a crowd on my street corner. I've had an ebike before (the A2B Metro) and I'm looking for something more reliable and hopefully this is it. I have my eye on the single-speed this time as I've found changing gears to be quite distracting and unneccesary when the bike is going top speed. ALSO, I've always wondered how ebikes are expected to endure weather in less than ideal conditions ie. anywhere outside California. How are these bikes in the spring-slush Canadian weather in March?

Dale Wildey
7 months ago

My Schwinn meridian trike is a step through. I think step is the way to go. I'm getting more joint pain in the hips, the older I get.This is a very nice bike. Thanks for the review.

Zeev Kirsh
7 months ago

saw this in manhattan last year. bike is heavy as shit but it looks awesome. also, the truly low stepover is amazingly practical, however, you cannot detach the battery so you have that issue........but then again, it looks sweet in person. better than even on video........styling is unmatched.

Martian Megafauna
7 months ago

The metal fenders look cool and seem ultra sturdy but there are some downsides to metal fenders...
if a stick or branch or big piece o' junk gets run over and picked up by a tire, it might lock up the tire and
send you flying...@ 28 mph!

This is why, for once, I would prefer plastic, which will usually break and shatter, but is less likely to crash you.

BikeByVideo
7 months ago

you're not supposed to take this bike off roading!

anticommie51
7 months ago

Would you buy an e-bike from this ear guy? really?

milliamp
6 months ago

You don't live where he lives though or it probably wouldn't seem as strange. The thing about face jewelry, earrings like this, and neck/face tattoos is you have to go the extra mile to be respected as a professional with these things. When you do encounter a professional that looks like this you can probably assume they wouldn't be there if they weren't good.

terry oneill
7 months ago

awesome i missed the price thank you from the u/k

Joe Pan
7 months ago

i like the look

Ramon McNally
7 months ago

have you considered reviewing the xtreme Baja electric bike?

stan
7 months ago

Talk about low center of gravity, I don't you can get any lower - good for flicking the bike from side to side.

cha billy
7 months ago

Don't take any wooden nickles, my friend.

George Herman
7 months ago

Strange looking bike and strange looking Rep for the bike. I'll pass.

Hohum
7 months ago

That bike rep's ear rings is a deal breaker. Sorry no buy. LOL.

Olivier Sourie
4 weeks ago

Hohum this guy is stretching until a BionX hub motor fits in :-)

Donandnan Elmore
3 months ago

They're not ear rings. They're gauges that they put in a hole in their ear lobes and gradually increase the diameter of the gauges. I guess that guy has been increasing the diameter for a while.

robmanueb2
7 months ago

Bionx suck. https://electricbikereview.com/forum/threads/disappointing-service-from-bionx-and-its-48v-battery.5058/