ElectroBike Seal Review

Electrobike Seal Electric Bike Review
Electrobike Seal
Electrobike Seal 500 Watt Hub Motor Gearless
Electrobike Seal Mid Frame Battery Integrated Brake Light
Electrobike Seal Lcd Display Ergonomic Grips
Electrobike Seal Platform Pedals Chain Guide
Electrobike Seal Seat Post Suspension Comfort Saddle
Electrobike Seal Shimano Tourney Drivetrain Mud Guard
Electrobike Seal Suspension Fork Preload Adjust
Electrobike Seal Electric Bike Review
Electrobike Seal
Electrobike Seal 500 Watt Hub Motor Gearless
Electrobike Seal Mid Frame Battery Integrated Brake Light
Electrobike Seal Lcd Display Ergonomic Grips
Electrobike Seal Platform Pedals Chain Guide
Electrobike Seal Seat Post Suspension Comfort Saddle
Electrobike Seal Shimano Tourney Drivetrain Mud Guard
Electrobike Seal Suspension Fork Preload Adjust

Summary

  • The most expensive and heaviest model from ElectroBike with a single-tube frame design that's unique in appearance and lower to stand over but less stiff
  • The 500 watt motor is gearless which should make it durable but it's not fully utilized with the more average 36 volt battery pack
  • Suspension fork, seat post shock, Selle Royal gel saddle and ergonomic grips offer a nice ride given that this is a more forward frame with flat bars
  • Basic fenders and pedals, low-end derailleur, no rack mounts, throttle power is limited by pedal assist mode, keys must be left in the battery while riding

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

ElectroBike

Model:

Seal

Price:

$1,899

Body Position:

Forward

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Urban, Trail

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive, 7 Year Frame

Availability:

United States, Mexico, Worldwide

Model Year:

2016

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

63 lbs (28.57 kg)

Battery Weight:

6.5 lbs (2.94 kg)

Frame Material:

Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

16 in (40.64 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

16" Seat Tube, 21.5" Reach, 29.5" Stand Over Height, 75" Length

Frame Types:

Mid-Step

Frame Colors:

Matte Black, Gloss White, Gloss Red

Frame Fork Details:

SR Suntour XCM 30 Suspension with Preload Adjust

Attachment Points:

Fender Bosses

Gearing Details:

7 Speed 1x7 Shimano Tourney TX, MF TZ-21

Shifter Details:

Shimano SIS

Cranks:

Lasco

Pedals:

Aluminum Alloy Platform, FP-992

Handlebar:

Flat Aluminum Alloy

Brake Details:

Tektro Novela Mechanical Disc with 180 mm Front Rotor and 160 mm Rear Rotor, Tektro Levers with Motor Inhibitors

Grips:

Ergonomic Stitched

Saddle:

Selle Royal Freedom

Seat Post:

EXA Form 525 Suspension

Seat Post Length:

300 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

27.2 mm

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, Black

Tire Brand:

CST Traveller City Classic, 26" x 2.125"

Wheel Sizes:

26 in (66.04cm)

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Plastic Mud Guards, Single Side Kickstand on Left, Integrated LED Brake Light (Brake Lever Activated), Plastic Chain Guide

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack

Electronic Details

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Gearless Direct Drive Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

10 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

360 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

4.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

15 miles (24 km)

Estimated Max Range:

30 miles (48 km)

Display Type:

Key-Disp KD58C Fixed Backlit LCD

Readouts:

Speed, Trip, Odometer, Ride Time, Average Speed, Max Speed, Battery Level (5 Bars), Assist Level (0-5)

Drive Mode:

Trigger Throttle, Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist (5 Magnet Disc)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

The ElectroBike Seal is my least favorite model in the Electro Bike family because it’s the most expensive but doesn’t deliver the performance it could. It offers a gearless direct drive motor that’s louder than I expected (given that there are no moving parts inside) and the battery powering it is average in terms of both power and size so you’re missing out on the potential and really just adding weight (gearless motors are larger and heavier than gearless). The frame is eye catching but not my favorite because the single-tube design sacrifices in the way of stiffness and again adds weight because it’s reinforced, not having supporting tubes.

This isn’t a bad electric bike, I just feel it’s overpriced and have many gripes about things like having to leave the key in the battery while riding, being fitted with basic more slippery pedals, short fenders that stick out more (and in fact block the rear light) and not having any rack mounting points or bottle cage bosses. You get pedal assist and throttle mode here but the throttle power output is pegged to the pedal assist levels and there is no throttle-only mode. The cadence sensor that activates the motor only uses five magnets making it slow to respond when you start and stop pedaling and the drivetrain uses a very basic Shimano Tourney derailleur. This thing is almost $2k and there are lots of other choices with similar entry-level parts that deliver a better experience.

In the video I talked about the rear light which activates when you pull either brake lever and it also responds to a daylight sensor so it will be constantly on when it’s dark out or covered. I took a moment to share some cool bar end signal lights from a company called CYCL which you can visit at http://www.cycl.bike/. The product is called WingLights and I feel like they would be useful on a bike like this that seems to be setup for city riding… the downside is that the handle bar was too narrow so the Wing Lights didn’t fit in (their smaller mounter might solve this). I also interviewed a couple of customers at the ElectroBike store in Santa Monica who were impressed with the Seal model (because it is more powerful) but said it was a bit tall for them. This bike only comes in one frame size which I’d call medium and the top tube is slightly lower but still may be uncomfortable for petite riders. You get three color choices (white, black or red) and I like that the battery matched.

Pros:

  • I like the color matched battery pack, it looks better than a shiny metal pack that I see frequently in similar orientation but might not be as tough since the casing is plastic
  • The hub motor, spokes, fenders and other accessories are all black which blend in nicely, the power cables running from the console up front are also black but they are strung through the frame for an even nicer look (and less chance of snagging)
  • The integrated rear brake light is pretty cool… it activates when you pull either brake lever and runs off the main battery! It even has a light sensor built in so it should come on automatically when it gets dark outside. The downside here is that it’s partially blocked by the rear fender and you don’t get a headlight to go with it, consider something affordable and rechargeable to attach on the handlebar like this
  • The tires are awesome, they felt thick and oversized like they would hold up against thorns better than standard tires (but they probably add weight to the bike)
  • I love that you get a quality gel saddle, suspension fork and seat post shock plus ergonomic grips because the body position is a bit more forward and that can lead to a stiff neck and back over longer rides, I’m surprised the suspension fork doesn’t have lockout adjust because this is more of an urban style bike
  • ElectroBike has been around since 2012 and has dealerships in both Mexico and the United States, you can test ride and even rent their bicycles and they offer a solid one year warranty, they also sell online and shipping is only $50 in the continental USA
  • The frame is more of a mid-step vs. true high-step triangle shape so it’s easier to mount and stand over at stop lights or stop signs
  • You get seven speeds to pedal with which is enough for cruising around town and climbing hills, I like that the front chainring has a plastic guide to reduce chain drops and keep your pants clear of grease and snags
  • The Seal features one of my favorite LCD displays from the Electro Bike family of e-bikes because it’s small but easy to read and reach while riding and it’s backlit
  • I love that they chose to use larger 180 mm mechanical disc brakes vs. 160 mm on the Cross model because this is a heavier and slightly more powerful bike

Cons:

  • I’m usually not a huge fan of this frame style because it can flex side to side and tends to be heavier, it looks cool as a single tube but the trade offs aren’t worth it for going on trails or off-road, since the Seal is more of a city ebike it’s less of an issue
  • Despite being a gearless, direct drive motor, I noticed zinging (possibly the disc brake) and more whirring while operating the Seal than with other motors like those from Pedego, Stromer or Specialized
  • The fenders or “mud flaps” as I’ve heard them called, are more basic and don’t offer the same protection against water that tighter full-length fenders would, the front fender actually sticks out a bit and might be easier to clip with your toe when turning and pedaling simultaneously
  • No bottle cage bosses or rack mounts on this ebike… you might be able to use a beam rack on the seat post but keep in mind, this will push the seat up given the integrated suspension element which also takes room and you’ll have to swivel the rack or completely remove the rack whenever you want to take the battery off for charging so a quick release beam rack like this might make the most sense
  • The cadence sensor for pedal assist is very basic with only five magnets for the sensor to activate with, this means that you have to pedal more before the motor starts and wait longer for it to stop… thankfully the brake levers appear to have inhibitors to stop the motor more quickly in moments of urgency
  • I’m not sure if the pedals are plastic or what but they felt slippery to me, the surface area is great and they look nice in all black but I’d probably replace them with something like this that actually has metal set screws for use in wet environments especially
  • Even though this is a 500 watt bike (the motor is 500 watts so it’s supposed to be stronger) the battery is average sized at 36 volts 10 amp hours so you’re not getting the power or range that the price would lead you to believe, in my opinion it’s kind of expensive at nearly $2k
  • Lots of generic parts being used on this electric bike including the grips which feel very firm, the pedals, the motor and even the battery cells are kind of unknown and the drivetrain is Shimano Tourney which is entry level
  • Throttle power is limited by the level of pedal assist you choose (0-5) and there’s no throttle-only drive mode, in my experience this leads to uncomfortable moments where you forget about assist and unintentionally activate the motor at full power because of a few pedal sub conscious strokes
  • The key has to be inserted into the battery pack in order to operate the electronic systems which means they might jingle or get in the way, at least the key folds in this case and there is only one slot vs. some of the other ElectroBikes which have two locks (added weight and complexity)

Resources:

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JC
8 months ago

Which electrobike would you say is the best?

Reply
Court Rye
8 months ago

Hi JC! I think I liked the Magnos and Cross the best. They offered some unique features like folding or hidden battery design and the prices were still relatively low. I’m less a fan of the Seal due to frame flex issues… but I’m not sure that’s a big deal if you’re staying mostly on road :)

Reply
Gerard
6 months ago

I know one of your concerns for this ebike was its price – if it was half the price on sale ($850), how would you find it in terms of value for money compared to other good value ebikes? Thanks!

Reply
Court Rye
6 months ago

Hi Gerard! I think it depends on the condition of the bike, even if it just sat in a shop “brand new” for a year or two, the battery could be slowly degrading. I don’t enjoy flexy frames and tend to lift my bikes so weight is a factor. In my life today, as someone with space for only one electric bike, I have found that I save up and get something that will last and ride well. I would put the money towards something of higher quality personally… but at that pricepoint, I feel like the ElectroBike Seal could be a good value. I don’t know much about the company at this point and cannot say whether replacement batteries or other parts would be easy to comeby. In recent weeks, some people have commented that the Populo (another affordable ebike) has had some battery and controller issues and they are upset that the bike has caused more time and financial challenges than they expected. Like so many things, I guess it all depends on how you intend to use it. Thousands of people in China ride ebikes less nice than this on a daily basis, but they may also have access to parts and they definitely pay a lot less than even $850. I guess it’s all relative :)

Reply
Gerard Vong
6 months ago

Thanks very much for the quick reply (and for your great reviews)! The Electrobike near me is currently running a sale on this, the Alfa+ and the Light, with any two of the bikes (new) going for $1500 + tax. The sale has been popular, so they are new bikes, rather than those that have been sitting around. They also said they’re offering a 5 year warranty on the batteries. I also saw online the Alfa+ going for $600, but I don’t know if that has the same battery warranty as they were offering me in store.

I’m trying to decide if I should go with any of these. Your reviews are definitely helpful! I’ve taken the Alfa+ and the Light for a spin (both of which you seem to prefer to the Seal), but they’re putting together new Seals so I haven’t had the chance to ride that yet. Any further advice for me?

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newfydog
1 week ago

My experience with tubeless is that it is nearly invincible. As in riding cactus on the Arizona trail which shredded the knobs but didn't give us a flat. Stans no Tubes.

We have not had a flat in three years.

As far as ease goes, the early versions were ghetto conversions which sometimes cooperated, often were nightmares to get the initial seal. Recent wheels with tires and rims made to be tubeless are fantastic.

JRA
2 weeks ago

Have you tried reducing the psi? My analog mtb has 2.3 tires that are set up tubeless on i35 rims and I run 15psi in them all the time. They do really well in the desert environment, sand especially. My e bike has narrower 1.75 tires on i25 rims set up tubeless and I run 35psi in them and also have had good luck in desert terrain.

Going tubeless really helps to be able to run lower psi as they take away the risk of pinch flatting plus self seal when necessary. At the very least trying to find the lowest psi you can run without flatting, even with tubes, will result in a better ride than I feel you are experiencing currently it you think a wider tire will be any help.

1/1
ChasA
3 weeks ago

I'm having a problem with the battery plug-in rubber cap. It broke off easily during the 1st week and its nearly
impossible to fit it in. Sometimes 15 minutes to get it to seal. Is there a replacement or a fix? Don't want to ride
without that spot sealed. Don't want to keep using tape. Have the metro+.
I also emailed magnum,
the response I got was:
"Thanks for contacting Magnum. I'm sorry to hear about your rubber cap breaking off but we don't carry any replacement caps. It isn't a terribly important port to keep covered. At the very most you might get some dust build up that you would need to blow out."

TntE3+
3 weeks ago

I recently got my second Bulls bike and wanted to give you my comparison between the RS 3 and the evo45.
Both came with bottom line Nobby nics and both bikes the tires failed in first 50 miles. Tried to go tubliss right away on 45 and the tires will not seal well and rear had to put the tube back in only to have side wall fail on first test run.
The pike fork on 45 is a much nicer more stable feel in stock form over the Yari on the RS 3. The brakes on the 45 are much larger and are solid on any decent, the brake levers on 45 are monsters and belong on a motorcycle.
As far as form and feel the bikes are quite similar, exept the RS3 climbs better even with 100 less watts power and has better battery life.
On the flats the 28mph assist is quite fun.
I suffered from stability and fork dive horribly on both bikes and ended up converting both to 160mm travel up front and added a token on both.
The rear shock on the 3 is slightly stiffer valved and has better rebound valving and i find myself running it primarily with rebound adjust closed to 3 Click from closed.
On the 45 the rear shock is absolutely pathetic, you have to run it in peddle mode all the time to get any real dampening force at all. If you try to sprint out of the saddle the bike wallows like a true DH bike without a pedal mode in suspension.
The 45 on a flat ground ride running between level 2-3 the battery went 33 miles and had one bar left.
On RS 3 on same ride it had 3+Or over 50% bars on battery left but also averaged slower speed
45 i averaged 24.8mph, RS3 average 17.9mph.
Both mine loose assist 2mph bellow the advertised max speed ratings.
RS3 shits down 18mph
45 at 26mph.
Rider review vs magazine reviews.
Every test i have read has rated these bikes fairly poorly in a few catagorys.
Climb and DH.
After hundreds of miles testing on single track, chunky, hiro dirt, loose, leaf covered, fast, pro level Gnarly, cruiser pace to 28 STRAVA DH KOM’s I have come to this conclusion.
The RS3 27.5+is hands down best bang for the buck. Few key misses on factory setup lead to failed reviews.
Grid or good snake skin tires, 160mm front, 1 add token, bigger brakes,dropper seat, 35mm stem and it’s a true enduro bike that can run with top of the line enduro bikes and feel as comfy as your couch in hands of a novice rider.

Evo45, add the additional cost of the bike and the bang for the buck deminishes. The inability to climb better with 100 additional watts, shorter battery life, 27.5 tires and the lower bottom bracket leads to increased pedal strikes, the light valving in rear shock and steep head jangle make for nervous bike that really isn’t enduro capable and this bike belongs on fire roads and entry level to novice level riding.
If the 45 was 1,000 less the RS3 27.5+ i wouldn’t feel it was an equal bang for the buck.
Maybe they build a 29er out of it and address its major short sides and it will improve its bang for buck.
Stay tuned i have a 29er front end I’m gonna put on in next few weeks see how that affects the review.

ChasA
3 weeks ago

I'm having a problem with the battery plug-in rubber cap. It broke off easily during the 1st week and its nearly
impossible to fit it in. Sometimes 15 minutes to get it to seal. Is there a replacement or a fix? Don't want to ride
without that spot sealed. Don't want to keep using tape. Have the metro+.

andre starr
1 month ago

Not real sure how you got water into your system... I live in Florida our humidity is very high just about all the time. Just about daily we ride our two Radwagons down to the salty beach so I have been exposing the entire bike to this "harsh" environment almost daily for almost a year now and we've never had any issues. I've also been forced to ride home four or five times in fairly heavy rain and never had an issue. I'd hate to have an issue like you do, but I'm not sure how you got water into the electrical system unless there was a defect. If there's a seal problem why would Rad void your warranty?
guess they don't like me for being honest as I should have lied as to the cause of my problem yup they think it's wiring harness or controller and want to charge me to get these parts and I am not interested in getting it going again just a lesson learned about buying JUNK...and dealing with a really lame company

Al_R
1 month ago

Well I am totally bummed and not happy with rad rover at all... so right away I would get error messages but then a reboot would clear them then after a very high humidity couple of days the bike would start then just take off instantly when started NOT GOOD that seemed to go away when it dried out finally when i returned from the beach I washed it off and wala Broken again this time no recovery just a error code after 15 seconds (30) and the shut off tried another battery same issue so its broken and since it was exposed to H20 the company... VOIDED the warranty and now I'm stuck with a 1500$ piece of JUNK!! yup not happy and recommend that no one trust these guys or waste their money on this shoddy product!

Not real sure how you got water into your system... I live in Florida our humidity is very high just about all the time. Just about daily we ride our two Radwagons down to the salty beach so I have been exposing the entire bike to this "harsh" environment almost daily for almost a year now and we've never had any issues. I've also been forced to ride home four or five times in fairly heavy rain and never had an issue. I'd hate to have an issue like you do, but I'm not sure how you got water into the electrical system unless there was a defect. If there's a seal problem why would Rad void your warranty?

Brant Huddleston
2 months ago

What do you guys think of the following idea? How would you improve upon it?

Establish a trusted, non-profit third party entity modeled on the same principles as the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), which was established in the Great Depression to restore public trust in US banks. I will call this new entity LBIC, for the LEVA Battery Insurance Corporation. Here’s how LBIC would work:

— Manufacturers would voluntarily submit specifications of their batteries (form factor, interface specs, etc) to an LBIC battery bank, where they would be stored in escrow for at least 50 years. In return, the manufacture would get a “Insured by LBIC” certificate they can use to market their bikes, similar in purpose to the “Insured by FDIC” seal we see on US Banks. Manufacturers would otherwise not be required to comply with any battery standards — they would be free to build battery packs in any way, shape, or form, and compete in the open market based on their inventiveness and delivered value.

— The promise to the consumer would be this: If at any time during the life of your e-bike you are unable to purchase a replacement battery from the original manufacturer, or from the aftermarket, LBIC will release the specifications of your bike’s battery to an LBIC certified battery manufacturer who will fabricate and sell the battery to you at market rates determined by dollars per Wh.

— LBIC would be funded by an annual fee paid by each participating manufacturer.

Thoughts?

EddieJ
2 months ago

Hi Ann, the fully enclosed cover as on the black FS bike, are actually surprisingly good at keeping the mess out. If maintenance was neglected, you could gradually get a build of mud inside, but the electrics have never once had mud or water on them.

The motor on the white hardtail is far more exposed, but the electrics are still very protected.

An area that does get a build up of mud, is inside of the battery housing block. The connectors frequently get wet, but this has never presented any issue for me. The build up inside of the block is surprisingly fast.

If using an Intuvia display, the up/down remote switch can get mud behind the outer facia/bezel. You wouldn't be aware of this until it becomes tricky to switch between modes. No water gets into the electrics.

Water can get between the console and mount on the Intuvia display, but again it has never presented an issue or problem.

The down fall of the Bosch motor (or any ebike motor) when used in regular off road European conditions such as above, is the outer bearing on the chainset side. Just as with a normal/analogue mtb, this is a vulnerable area. Here in the UK, any mtb is going to require bottom bracket bearings at least once a year, and this seems to be something that many people forget, or don't understand. The Bosch outer bearing seal mod, is to my mind a bodge, it does help, but won't prevent bearing failure. The key to preserving the outer bearing is to never get any form of detergent or oil any where near it when cleaning or detailing the bike, and never ever use water to via hose or pressure washing to wash the motor down. The best way of cleaning is to unhook the chain from the front sprocket, and clean the area by hand with a cloth, and nothing more. I also remove the outer bearing seal at least once a month, remove the grease and any unwanted particles, regrease, and reinstall, applying a little extra grease over and above. It might sound like a pain, but in reality it takes very little time to complete, and is the best safe guard that yo can have.

ace20ri
2 months ago

@ace20ri Correct me if I'm wrong, but I'm guessing with going tubeless it will be easier to plug a tire puncture than having to go through the hassle of removing the wheel to replace a tube. My commute is 16 miles round-trip and 100% paved surface (asphalt/concrete). In Hawaii, a street sweeper would be a truck with a broom caught underneath the frame. In all fairness, I did see a street sweeper here once, but I haven't seen it since. We probably only have one.

That's the thought, whether that turns out to be true I'll eventually find out. The 30TPI Juggernauts on the Yukon are a bear to remove. I have the process down now but I break a tire lever every time I had to remove the tires on the Yukon. I have been checking tire for punctures and have not found any yet. The tires have been holding pressure at 18 psi. The day after I converted them to tubeless I had to add a few psi, which I read is pretty normal after going tubeless, especially on a rim that is not tubeless ready. One thing to know is the rim used on Yukon's purchased around October/November of 2016 have a seem that I found leaks. Eventually Stan's sealant did it's job but it took about a day to seal so keep that in mind if you go that route. Nice joke about the street sweeper. Seems like there is probably only one in Silicon Valley as well ;)

Gogogordy
2 months ago

Gogogordy,

Basically, I went east around the top side of Forrest Lawn and the LA Zoo, followed the river south to around Dodgers Stadium, then Google "Bike Routes" took me East basically following the 60 (but South 2-8 blocks depending on the roads) where I wound up on Whittier, took that about 3 miles to the 605, 605 bike trail South to Seal Beach, South to Newport Beach, up the Santa Ana River a few stops then home.

The entire San Gabriel river portion had brutal wind, but then the coast home was pleasant. 5.5 hours totalish.
Thats some commuting.
Bravo sir!

Eric Kuyper
2 months ago

Gogogordy,

Basically, I went east around the top side of Forrest Lawn and the LA Zoo, followed the river south to around Dodgers Stadium, then Google "Bike Routes" took me East basically following the 60 (but South 2-8 blocks depending on the roads) where I wound up on Whittier, took that about 3 miles to the 605, 605 bike trail South to Seal Beach, South to Newport Beach, up the Santa Ana River a few stops then home.

The entire San Gabriel river portion had brutal wind, but then the coast home was pleasant. 5.5 hours totalish.

Dark Blue was trip up in Car, light blue trip back down (ignore circle down south, that was earlier in the day riding)

1/1
Bona Fide
3 months ago

After several attempts of different methods, I finally got it done today. All you need is a 24 x 3 inch schrader valve tube (I got mine on Ebay) and 8 oz bottle of Orange Seal. (and ratchet strap to help tire be inflated)

Remove tire and existing tube, install 24 inch tube on rim and pump up so it is centered and seam is along the top.

Now use blade to start and scissors to cut around the top seam so it will open up and lay across the rim.

Clean off all the white powder.

Install tire back on, little trick getting the tube pulled back out as tire goes on.

Use a bit of soapy water or windex around tire to help it set the bead

Use a ratchet strap around the tire to make a tighter fit so it can be inflated with a regular tire pump.

Loosen ratchet strap as tire starts inflating.

If all went well, remove valve core, add half bottle (4 oz) of Orange seal (I has to use a smaller hose inside Orange Seal filler hose). Reinstall ratchet strap to aid in inflating again.

Shake tire back and forth and around to get sealer to fill and air leaks, go for a quick ride.

Use scissors to cut tube excess along the rim.

Nirmala
3 months ago

And once more, another delay:

Hello ShareRoller Indiegogo backer:

September is here and we continue to make progress towards shipment, but unfortunately design iterations for the waterproof Battery Pack seal have taken 4 weeks longer than expected. As a result, our pack supplier is now promising us that production packs will ship by the end of October, instead of the end of September.

We're as frustrated as you are by this one, as it's completely out of our control, and this is the third significant timeline delay we've been hit with. However, we have a lot of faith in this supplier (they are used by several highly-respected industry players), and we're confident the final packs will be of the highest quality. And to be fair, this is likely not uncommon when creating a feature-packed entirely custom pack from the ground up...

Here's a photo montage from our supplier showing all the key features of our custom packs in the latest production prototype - please note that these are still 3D-printed plastics, and the production packs with injection-molded plastic will have a much smoother finish (similar to the production retractor shown below, which already uses injection-molded plastics):

Outside of Battery Pack development, the good news is that this delay has given us more time to test other components, in particular our new production Drive Motors. You'll be pleased to hear that we've confirmed that the new motors can provide solid power all the way to 28mph (45 km/h) on flat ground. Now, we do need to comply with the US Federal E-Bike law (15 U.S. Code § 2085), specifically:

"maximum speed on a paved level surface, when powered solely by such a motor while ridden by an operator who weighs 170 pounds, is less than 20 mph"

But, rather than simply cutting all power above 20mph, we can just reduce power output above 20mph such that it's not enough to push a 170lb rider above 20mph without some pedaling assistance from the rider (this equates to a ~300W cap).

(Note: In the EU, these limits are more restrictive (no assistance allowed above 15.5mph), and this will be the default software setting for EU shipments. We are looking into how best to implement an 'off-road only' mode for EU customers.)

So, with light pedaling you'll be able to easily cruise at 28mph on flat ground. We've even tested this for 10-mile continuous stretches at 27-28mph on hot August days, and motor temperatures remained within our target limits.

And it's a very good thing we were able to do this prolonged high-speed durability testing, as we discovered that our Urethane Drive Belts stretch just a little too much when they reach maximum temperature and maximum RPM simultaneously, causing some minor slippage with respect to the motor rotor. So we've already worked with our urethane supplier to improve the stiffness of the belts (but without changing the incredibly grippy compound). We're glad we caught this early, and these revised belts will be ready before the battery packs, so at least some good will come out of this delay!

We'll keep you posted on further progress and we're hoping it's all good news from here on.

Thank you again for your patience and support.

Jeff Guida & The ShareRoller Team

Nirmala
3 months ago

And once more, another delay:

Hello ShareRoller Indiegogo backer:

September is here and we continue to make progress towards shipment, but unfortunately design iterations for the waterproof Battery Pack seal have taken 4 weeks longer than expected. As a result, our pack supplier is now promising us that production packs will ship by the end of October, instead of the end of September.

We're as frustrated as you are by this one, as it's completely out of our control, and this is the third significant timeline delay we've been hit with. However, we have a lot of faith in this supplier (they are used by several highly-respected industry players), and we're confident the final packs will be of the highest quality. And to be fair, this is likely not uncommon when creating a feature-packed entirely custom pack from the ground up...

Here's a photo montage from our supplier showing all the key features of our custom packs in the latest production prototype - please note that these are still 3D-printed plastics, and the production packs with injection-molded plastic will have a much smoother finish (similar to the production retractor shown below, which already uses injection-molded plastics):

Outside of Battery Pack development, the good news is that this delay has given us more time to test other components, in particular our new production Drive Motors. You'll be pleased to hear that we've confirmed that the new motors can provide solid power all the way to 28mph (45 km/h) on flat ground. Now, we do need to comply with the US Federal E-Bike law (15 U.S. Code § 2085), specifically:

"maximum speed on a paved level surface, when powered solely by such a motor while ridden by an operator who weighs 170 pounds, is less than 20 mph"

But, rather than simply cutting all power above 20mph, we can just reduce power output above 20mph such that it's not enough to push a 170lb rider above 20mph without some pedaling assistance from the rider (this equates to a ~300W cap).

(Note: In the EU, these limits are more restrictive (no assistance allowed above 15.5mph), and this will be the default software setting for EU shipments. We are looking into how best to implement an 'off-road only' mode for EU customers.)

So, with light pedaling you'll be able to easily cruise at 28mph on flat ground. We've even tested this for 10-mile continuous stretches at 27-28mph on hot August days, and motor temperatures remained within our target limits.

And it's a very good thing we were able to do this prolonged high-speed durability testing, as we discovered that our Urethane Drive Belts stretch just a little too much when they reach maximum temperature and maximum RPM simultaneously, causing some minor slippage with respect to the motor rotor. So we've already worked with our urethane supplier to improve the stiffness of the belts (but without changing the incredibly grippy compound). We're glad we caught this early, and these revised belts will be ready before the battery packs, so at least some good will come out of this delay!

We'll keep you posted on further progress and we're hoping it's all good news from here on.

Thank you again for your patience and support.

Jeff Guida & The ShareRoller Team

JRA
4 months ago

AD, you have it right. The plasticky tape is generally what you want to see. Not unusual to have to add a bit of air now and then and it is good practice prior to any bike ride to check your psi, as well as your chain for proper lubrication and generally going over everything before heading out for a ride.

EJ, I use my truing stand for the same effect. Overlapping the valve hole is definitely recommended and I even go a bit more than you. The big problem I have with the tape is getting it to seal in the center well without a lot of bubbles. Taking the time to work them out during initial application works best I find as well as keeping a good amount of tension on the tape. Additional pressure on both sides of the tape also helps with the seal.

For the valve an employee friend of a tire company that I consulted with suggested making a small x with a sharp knife point in the tape over the valve hole, inserting the valve and tightening the valve ring well.

I also will initially pump air, usually with just a floor pump, into the assembly with the core removed. It should blow up and start the bead setting process and show if there are going to be any major air leaks. Sometimes an air compressor works best for this and sometimes it is necessary to add another layer of tape to build it up in there a bit. This is why I don't add the sealant right away,

Release the air and add the sealant through the coreless valve stem with the valve at 6 o'clock, put the core in and re-inflate with the tire not resting on the ground until the tire is completely seated, usually signified by some rather loud pops!

I have my analogue mtb and two ebikes and 5 of the wheels are tubeless. The only one that isn't has a regular style rim and I could go ghetto with it but find it works fine with some sealant in the tube. Otherwise like Eddie I have no issues with flats, knock on wood, although I run pretty low psi and over varied terrain.

EddieJ
4 months ago

I have long had a passion for hardtail mtb’s be them analogue or pedal assist, and have found the eMTB version through ownership of the superb KTM Macina Race, to make the perfect bike for wet weather/winter use.

With the Macina Race now sold, it is time to introduce the replacement bike, a KTM Fogo 271
Click to enlarge

I decided a long time ago that whatever the next bike was going to be, that it needed to be 27.5” Plus size, and just as the Macina Race, it also needed to have a good component specification. I was also keen to stay with both the KTM marque and Bosch drive unit system.

As things stand the KTM Fogo 271 exceeds my requirements by a significant margin, so I am more than happy with my choice.

The Magura Boltron T-20x110 front forks is an interesting one for me, as I have read so many reports both good and bad, which made me keen to own a bike that had them fitted, just so that I could come to my own conclusion about them. I have also previously been asked privately about the forks and what I knew about them, so at least I finally get to discover for myself, and can offer opinion accordingly, and not just based from hearsay. I shall post more about the front forks as time passes, but from handling them off the bike, and checking them over thoroughly, it is a promising start. Clearly performance in use and durability are key, so time will tell, but from research that I have completed, I have already worked out that poor set up from end users, plays a major role in reported seal failure.
Click to enlarge

My preferred choice of front mudguard has long been the Rapid Racer Neoguard, (thanks guys) but after discussion, there are currently no plans to introduce a guard for USD front forks. There is no way that I could bring myself to install a guard that utilizes the steerer tube, and with that in mind I already have my own neoprene design waiting to fit to the bike.

The full bike/component specifications are detailed below, but as things stand, there is very little that I intend to change. I shall be replacing Intuvia with Purion, fit a Ragley Tracker saddle, Ritchey Foam grips, a 70mm Easton stem, and change what I believe to be a KS LEV Integra dropper post, in favour of a Rockshox Reverb Stealth. These four listed items are just personal preference and nothing more. The dropper post is simply being changed as I have one that I removed from the Macina Race, so the rebadged KS can be squirreled away.

I have chosen 27.5” Plus for a very specific reason, but just as with the front forks, I shall detail how things work out, as time passes. Briefly though, as many will be aware, I ride throughout the year and in all conditions. I treat my bikes very much as tool to do a job, and to date KTM bikes have filled this role very well, but with slight limitation. I now want to go one stage further and 27.5” plus is going to enable this. The plus size will fulfill the role of providing superb low-pressure grip in respect of riding wooded knarly terrain and also over rocks etc, then come the winter months, I intend to drop the tyre size down to 2.25-2.3 to optimize rear chain stay clearance. Running 2.25 for example, will give me a full 27mm of clearance all round, so close to zero issue of potential mud/leaf build up.

Having received the bike today, I cannot yet add ride specific details and data, but as with any bike that I receive, the first job is to strip the bike down to the component stages, then re assemble studying parts and construction as I go. By doing so I gain a greater insight into the construction of a bike, and can see what if anything in my opinion could or should be changed. Also, if anything fails whilst riding, having already stripped and rebuilt the bike, I have a head start on how to repair things. I get as much pleasure from working on bikes, as I do riding them.
Click to enlarge

This is where it gets interesting for me, as after having pulled the bike down, I am already very impressed by the frame. The build quality and paint finish is superb, but it is what is behind all that, that I am interested in. The shape and tube sizing has been improved, and just turning the first screw to remove the motor covers, revealed the first thought out design feature. A small banana shaped cover which when removed, gives clear and easy access to main connectors of the Bosch CX drive unit. That in itself was a simple, but welcome change. KTM have also now chosen to use an additional two motor mounting points. This again impressed me, not because the standard three wasn’t enough, but more from the potential that it may prevent any motor creaking, as the loading on the mounts is now more equal.

Turning the frame upside down gave the biggest and most pleasant surprise from the point of view of working on a bike. KTM have chosen to redesign the cable routing and internal cast mounts to the frame. Routing cables, wiring, hydraulic brake and dropper post hose, is now effortlessly easy and simple to do. I’m very impressed that such R&D has been put into this side of things, but I guess that it must save valuable seconds during the factory assembly stage. Speaking of cable and hose routing, I was also pleased to note that the frame entry points for routing, are now fractionally larger as well. A lot of thought has gone into the production of this frame.

Removal of the two tyres was next on the list, and it was yet another pleasant surprise to see that the rims are tubeless ready, not just compatible. That’ll save a bit of time and money when setting them up to run tubeless. Once the wheel set has been returned from a friend’s bike shop, after giving them to him to check and adjust spoke tension should it be required, it’ll then just be a simple job to install Stans valves and Effetto Mariposa CaffeLatex sealant. A sealant that I have no hesitation in using or recommending.

Whilst in its knock down stage, I decided to take advantage of the situation, and fitted an AMS XL Honeycomb frame guard kit. It seemed silly to pass up the opportunity to test a kit, so time will tell as to how effective that it is. It was certainly easy enough to apply, although the frame colour doesn’t really mask any slight air bubbles very well. I have also added 3M clear film to several areas of the frame as well.

Finally, the lad that purchased the Macina Race hardtail has indicated that he wants to start to ride off road as well, so that being the case, I should be able to format some interesting bike comparisons.

As well as regular updates to this forum, further updates and photographs will be posted at the following places.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/313908402329634/permalink/451984891855317/

https://www.facebook.com/edwardpeterjefferies/posts/474559259568509

https://www.instagram.com/eddiejefferies/?hl=en

Thanks to KTM Bike Industries, The Little Bike Shop, Bikegoo, Effetto Mariposa, Fork Juice, and Magicshine UK.

Full component specification

2017 KTM Macina Fogo 271 8s EX1Frame

:- Macina MTB 27.5"+ BOOST, Alloy for Bosch, with semi-integrated battery
Frame sizes :- 43cm, 48cm and 53cm.
Bike colour :- Matt light grey, black + toxic orange.
Front fork :- MAGURA Boltron inverted, T-20x110 120mm travel, weight 2,200g
Headset :- KTM Team B303AM drop/in-tapered, +10
Headset bearing numbers :- MH-P28 and MH-P08M
Stem :- KTM Team KT-6 7° 95mm Weight 133g
Handlebar :- KTM Team HB-RB12L riser, rise 15°, Width 720mm
Handlebar grips :- KTM Team VLG--775-12D2 Diamond fin with end Clamps
Brake rotors :- Shimano RT86 6-bolt, 180mm front, 180mm rear. 260.4g pr
Brakes :- Shimano Deore XT M8000 Weight 554g pr including caliper/hose/lever assembly
Trigger shifter :- SRAM SL EX1 8speed Weight 122g
Rear derailleur :- SRAM RD EX1 8speed. Weight 289g
Front sprocket size as supplied 16T
Cassette :- SRAM XG899 11-48 ( 11, 13, 15, 18, 24, 32, 40, 48) Weight 360g
Chain :- SRAM EX1 Weight 273g
Pedal cranks :- SRAM EX1, ISIS for Bosch. Length 170mm. Weight 510g pr
Pedals :- VP components VP-539 black platform, with replaceable pins. Weight 370g pr
Wheel set :- KTM Line 27-5" plus B/B Tubeless ready
Wheel rims :- Ryder edge 35, 32 spoke hole, suitable for 2.3 to ‘plus’ size of 3.0. Weight 580g
Front hub :- 20mmThrough axle DT Swiss 350 classic-6-bolt 20/110/TA BOOST. Weight 239g
Rear hub :- 12mm Through axle DT Swiss 350 classic-6-bolt 12/148/TA BOOST. Weight 305g
Tyres :- Schwalbe Nobby Nic 70-584 TL-easy, Snake skin, Apex. Weight 910g per tyre.
Saddle :- Fizik Gobi M7 with Manganese rails. Weight 255g
Seat post :- KTM Comp JD-YSP12L hydraulic adjustable 100-370, diameter 30.9mm Weight 560g
Display :- Intuvia LCD, with Walk assist
Drive unit :- Bosch Performance Line CX 36V-250W, 25km/h 75NM of torque, four assist levels,
Eco giving 50% Tour giving 120% Sport giving 210% Turbo 300% Maximum torque available
per assist level, Eco 40Nm Tour 50Nm Sport 60Nm Turbo 75Nm
Battery :- Bosch Powerpack 13.8Ah - 500WH
Motor weight :- 4kg
Battery weight :- 2.6kg, dimensions 325mm x 92mm x 90mm
Overall Bike weight :- 21.4kg

https://www.instagram.com/eddiejefferies/

And now 'Electric Mountain Bike Collective' on Facebook.

.

1/3
Nirmala
4 months ago

Another email and another delay:

Hello ShareRoller Indiegogo backer:

Now that August has arrived, we wanted to share a quick update, as we know you are more than ready for your ShareRoller(s) to arrive. We continue to get closer to assembly kick-off, with 4 of 7 key supplier sub-components now received or shipped, and 2 in final supplier production testing. But unfortunately our battery packs have been delayed another month, as production sample testing revealed further weatherproofing requirements for an IP54 rating (see below for detail).

We do expect to begin assembly of the main motor modules this month, but the battery packs will now delay shipment until September. We're terribly sorry to keep you waiting longer, but we absolutely want to be sure ShareRoller's battery packs can stand up to any amount of rainy weather!

On a more positive note, in preparation for our production launch we have moved into a much larger assembly facility here in lower Manhattan. This new space will allow us to both expand the ShareRoller Team and to produce the significantly higher volumes we hope ShareRoller will achieve once full launch occurs. It's a very exciting step for ShareRoller and we look forward to sharing photos of the new space soon!

And for those who want to read further, here is additional detail below on all key subcomponents:

Drive Motors: Our supplier has completed and shipped the first production run of our incredible custom Drive Motors. Since we managed to incorporate a few performance enhancements vs our earlier production samples (slightly thicker magnets for one), we can't wait to test out the optimized production version!

Heatsinks: With our diecast molds complete, our supplier has manufactured and shipped the first production run of our heatsink set (shown below is the smaller of the pair).

Gearmotors: Our custom designed ultra-high torque gearmotors+encoders have been received and are awaiting assembly here in our new space.

Retracting battery cables: We had to make a small unexpected change to the tooling last month, but that is now complete and the final plastic shells are in production (samples below). Assembly and shipment of our first production run should be complete within 2 weeks.

Wireless throttles: Since we had the time, we made one last change to a button position on the custom PCB, and expect to receive our production batch before the end of the month. We'll share pictures of our ultra-versatile and ultra-functional throttle design then.

PCBs: We had to make a few more tweaks to the design before doing a volume run, but still expect to receive production units before the end of the month.

Battery Packs: Below is a picture of a production prototype pack being assembled by our supplier - the BMS board has yet to be installed, hence the gap between the cells and the retracting battery cable (also a sample).

The issue with waterproofing had to do with the joint between the top and bottom halves of the battery pack shell. Initially our supplier felt we could meet IP5X level waterproofing without a rubber seal between the shells, but testing proved otherwise. So we had to design the custom seal below, and have another mold made to produce the seal, which takes several weeks, hence the one month delay.

At least with the rubber seal in place, the battery packs should have no trouble exceeding the IP54 standards, meaning you'll never have any problems riding in the rain.

Again, we're terribly sorry for these further delays and we really wish there were some way we could deliver sooner. Fortunately, we continue to get closer and closer to the goal (despite the fact that the goalposts keep moving on us!), and we're confident the ShareRoller SR4 we finally deliver will far exceed all expectations.

Thank you again for your patience and support.

Jeff Guida & The ShareRoller Team

Nirmala
4 months ago

Another email and another delay:
Hello ShareRoller Indiegogo backer:

Now that August has arrived, we wanted to share a quick update, as we know you are more than ready for your ShareRoller(s) to arrive. We continue to get closer to assembly kick-off, with 4 of 7 key supplier sub-components now received or shipped, and 2 in final supplier production testing. But unfortunately our battery packs have been delayed another month, as production sample testing revealed further weatherproofing requirements for an IP54 rating (see below for detail).

We do expect to begin assembly of the main motor modules this month, but the battery packs will now delay shipment until September. We're terribly sorry to keep you waiting longer, but we absolutely want to be sure ShareRoller's battery packs can stand up to any amount of rainy weather!

On a more positive note, in preparation for our production launch we have moved into a much larger assembly facility here in lower Manhattan. This new space will allow us to both expand the ShareRoller Team and to produce the significantly higher volumes we hope ShareRoller will achieve once full launch occurs. It's a very exciting step for ShareRoller and we look forward to sharing photos of the new space soon!

And for those who want to read further, here is additional detail below on all key subcomponents:

Drive Motors: Our supplier has completed and shipped the first production run of our incredible custom Drive Motors. Since we managed to incorporate a few performance enhancements vs our earlier production samples (slightly thicker magnets for one), we can't wait to test out the optimized production version!

Heatsinks: With our diecast molds complete, our supplier has manufactured and shipped the first production run of our heatsink set (shown below is the smaller of the pair).

Gearmotors: Our custom designed ultra-high torque gearmotors+encoders have been received and are awaiting assembly here in our new space.

Retracting battery cables: We had to make a small unexpected change to the tooling last month, but that is now complete and the final plastic shells are in production (samples below). Assembly and shipment of our first production run should be complete within 2 weeks.

Wireless throttles: Since we had the time, we made one last change to a button position on the custom PCB, and expect to receive our production batch before the end of the month. We'll share pictures of our ultra-versatile and ultra-functional throttle design then.

PCBs: We had to make a few more tweaks to the design before doing a volume run, but still expect to receive production units before the end of the month.

Battery Packs: Below is a picture of a production prototype pack being assembled by our supplier - the BMS board has yet to be installed, hence the gap between the cells and the retracting battery cable (also a sample).

The issue with waterproofing had to do with the joint between the top and bottom halves of the battery pack shell. Initially our supplier felt we could meet IP5X level waterproofing without a rubber seal between the shells, but testing proved otherwise. So we had to design the custom seal below, and have another mold made to produce the seal, which takes several weeks, hence the one month delay.

At least with the rubber seal in place, the battery packs should have no trouble exceeding the IP54 standards, meaning you'll never have any problems riding in the rain.

Again, we're terribly sorry for these further delays and we really wish there were some way we could deliver sooner. Fortunately, we continue to get closer and closer to the goal (despite the fact that the goalposts keep moving on us!), and we're confident the ShareRoller SR4 we finally deliver will far exceed all expectations.

Thank you again for your patience and support.

Jeff Guida & The ShareRoller Team

bob armani
5 months ago

I've used Stans sealant in my 700X40C pedal bike for +4 years and never changed it out. I added a 2oz bottle to my old pedal bike when I got my first flat from a goathead thorn and it has been working ever since.

I've use Stans with my 4" fat tires on my Radrover since Sept/2016 with about 3000 miles between them now (two 2oz bottles per tire, Mr. Tuffy liner, Kenda tubes, Vee8 120tpi tires). My current set-up work very well for goathead thorns (usually picking out 1-8 from tires after every ride). I leave the thorns in the tires until I get home. If the tire starts to leak when removed, I just rotate the tire down until Stans does it job and check the PSI.

The combo let me down twice when I ran over road debris of metal or glass that put a 1/8" slash in my tires and when I ran over a 4" wood screw with about 3 1/2" in the rear tire.

Over time, I now keep all the tools I need from patching to replacing the tube in my flat kit:
- hand pump
- tire gauge
- tools to remove rear hub tire
- zip ties
- 2oz bottle of Stans
- knife
- latex gloves
- handy wipe package (for hands and cleaning tire for patch kit)
- spare tube
- flat kit with valve stem remover
- a couple shop towels (4oz of Stans makes a hell of a mess inside the tire if the hole is too big to seal)
- 4 velcro straps (used to wrap around the 120tpi tire to keep the soft bead in place when airing up)
- cell phone handy to call wife to pick me up if I just don't feel like dealing with the flat right then (used this option twice already)

Mr. Gold-Thanks for the great tips. You are very well prepared. I have been riding for a very long time and never carried anything for the exception of a hand pump. Not many flats though, on paved tarmac throughout my biking experience. No liners either, just regular inner tubes. Just lucky I suppose!

With all of these handy tools, how long does it take you to fix a flat? Many steps. Just curious. Thanks!

bob armani
5 months ago

I run Orange Seal (simular to Stans) in my emtbs with tubeless tires which works great. I seemed to have a flat on just about every ride when I used to run inner tubes. Downside it that you have to renew the sealant every couple of months.
On my pavement/multiuse trail ebikes I have been using tire liners with inner tubes and carry spare tubes and the tools needed to repair a flat. The probably I found with the Slime type sealants is that they work only on very small "pin prick" type of puncture (maybe) and nothing else. It won't seal and nail, tack, or a puncture from glass, and instead makes a big mess with the green slime spewing everywhere. You then can't patch the tube as the stuff will continue to ooze and you can't get a patch to stick. I found it so much better to carry a patch kit, spare inner tubes, and the necessary tools to fix it correctly rather than try to take an easy shortcut that rarely ever works. Sure, its a bit of a hassle on the side of the road, especially with a rear hub drive motor, but it works. And knowing that you can fix a tire anywhere gives you so much more confidence to ride further and explore different places.

Thanks Alphbetadog! I never thought about the slime oozing out causing your inner tube to be totally beyond repair. A wealth of information here. I have been very lucky with minimal roadside flats. Called my wife to come get me when it happened LOL!:D

I have 700c X 38c tires on my ebike with a rear hub motor. Some of the canned sealants may not have the pressure to fill them @ 50psi. Perhaps only 30psi with skilled hands?? My LBS claimed that Flat Att is a better product at sealing than the Slime.

mrgold35
5 months ago

I've used Stans sealant in my 700X40C pedal bike for +4 years and never changed it out. I added a 2oz bottle to my old pedal bike when I got my first flat from a goathead thorn and it has been working ever since.

I've use Stans with my 4" fat tires on my Radrover since Sept/2016 with about 3000 miles between them now (two 2oz bottles per tire, Mr. Tuffy liner, Kenda tubes, Vee8 120tpi tires). My current set-up work very well for goathead thorns (usually picking out 1-8 from tires after every ride). I leave the thorns in the tires until I get home. If the tire starts to leak when removed, I just rotate the tire down until Stans does it job and check the PSI.

The combo let me down twice when I ran over road debris of metal or glass that put a 1/8" slash in my tires and when I ran over a 4" wood screw with about 3 1/2" in the rear tire.

Over time, I now keep all the tools I need from patching to replacing the tube in my flat kit:
- hand pump
- tire gauge
- tools to remove rear hub tire
- zip ties
- 2oz bottle of Stans
- knife
- latex gloves
- handy wipe package (for hands and cleaning tire for patch kit)
- spare tube
- flat kit with valve stem remover
- a couple shop towels (4oz of Stans makes a hell of a mess inside the tire if the hole is too big to seal)
- 4 velcro straps (used to wrap around the 120tpi tire to keep the soft bead in place when airing up)
- cell phone handy to call wife to pick me up if I just don't feel like dealing with the flat right then (used this option twice already)

Alphbetadog
5 months ago

I run Orange Seal (simular to Stans) in my emtbs with tubeless tires which works great. I seemed to have a flat on just about every ride when I used to run inner tubes. Downside it that you have to renew the sealant every couple of months.
On my pavement/multiuse trail ebikes I have been using tire liners with inner tubes and carry spare tubes and the tools needed to repair a flat. The probably I found with the Slime type sealants is that they work only on very small "pin prick" type of puncture (maybe) and nothing else. It won't seal and nail, tack, or a puncture from glass, and instead makes a big mess with the green slime spewing everywhere. You then can't patch the tube as the stuff will continue to ooze and you can't get a patch to stick. I found it so much better to carry a patch kit, spare inner tubes, and the necessary tools to fix it correctly rather than try to take an easy shortcut that rarely ever works. Sure, its a bit of a hassle on the side of the road, especially with a rear hub drive motor, but it works. And knowing that you can fix a tire anywhere gives you so much more confidence to ride further and explore different places.

smitty
6 months ago

My rear tire is bald ! Time for a new set . Happy almost 12k miles and celebrate with some nice tires for my ST 2. I am running 26x2.00 . The choices seem to be Schwalbe Marathons or the Continetals which come on the S. I am leaning towards the Schwalbe Marathon Deluxe HS 420 based on the description of "luxury version of the Marathon". The different Marathons are Marathon HS 420, Marathon Deluxe HS 420 and Marathon Plus HS 440

My riding is over 90% paved bike path, 5% compact dirt/gravel (C&O canal) 5% bike lanes in the country. I wore out Big Apples w/either 1 or no flats .so I don't need the ultimate puncture proof but I can't change the rear tire myself , too heavy for my back no matter how I would try.

Lastly any recommended dealer to purchase from?

Thanks in adavance

I purchase direct from Schwable, takes a little more time, but they do a god job of getting the tires to one. I also use their tubes which I generally buy on the internet. Often they can be purchased with the more expensive caps which are metal and have a rubber seal to help keep in the air; work really well with schrader valves.

Charles Ledbetter
1 week ago

I just bought this bike last week at a pawnshop for 900 hundred bucks , I got it home and it won’t charge up runs very good I was just wondering if you know where I can get assistance on maintenance , I can’t seem to find a dealer for this bike in LOS Angeles help! Please 🤓

Marc Arrowitz
1 month ago

I don't know what you are talking about... I love this Bike, especially the one which is black with orange stripes. The one painted in white is also cool ... You chose the wrong combination of colors ;)

Javierm0n0
1 year ago

i like the frame design but the colours make it look cheap, too many and the contrast is a bit extreme.

Rob02150
2 years ago

Doesn't look like you can lock it up properly...

ForbinColossus
2 years ago

Most folks want a traditional diamond frame or a step-thru (girls' bike). The unusual designs appeal to few and would only coonvince me if there was some technical advantage - which i don't believe there is.

JustBanter
2 years ago

Not a fan of this frame either, it's not as aesthetically pleasing as others - and that eye glaring red color does it no favors either (reminds me of the seventies!). The rear light behind the mudguard gets me thinking that not much thought went into this. Too Pricey for the package also.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+The_ Pentaquark. I agree completely, well said.

DrZarkloff
2 years ago

the bike looks like it requires a tag.

DrZarkloff
2 years ago

+ElectricBikeReview.com a licence plate under the seat like a moped.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+DrZarkloff Um... a tag?! What do you mean

Back home Campagna
2 years ago

cool light

guy idel
7 months ago

The noise is from the rear disc brakes

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Back home Campagna Yeah! I thought it was pretty neat... They do sell little adapters for narrower bars but I didn't have them for this review

Edit name
2 years ago

I rode something like this on Venice beach was a good time

Ricardo Vergara
2 years ago

Hello! I live in México city and here there are two brands that are promoted as mexican made, electrobike and bikeon, i hope you could review bikeon as well. Thank you

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Ricardo Vergara Cool! Thanks Ricardo, I'll keep an eye out for them definitely, looks like they sell a folding model and a little trike, do you have a favorite?

Anony Mouse
2 years ago

cool

bryphi77
2 years ago

That may very well be the most un aesthetically pleasing bike I have ever seen. Its like reverse feng shui... it makes me anxious to look at it.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+bryphi77 Everyone was really cool, fun to get user input but most people seem to shy away from video, even in LA :P

JustBanter
2 years ago

+bryphi77 agreed - I'm getting bad feng shui with this too

bryphi77
2 years ago

+Ron Sebastian The best thing about this vid is the black girl at the end...

Ron Sebastian
2 years ago

+bryphi77 Amen...that graphics needs a serious redo if you ask me.

Jone Gomez
2 years ago

Funny but I don't love the look but kind of would like to have it. Good review as usual.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Juan Nieve Thank you! Had a little fun with this review, I'm also mixed on the look and not huge on the weight

Clinton Baltazor
2 years ago

That looked like Wally World made a bike. Hard to believe that is there most expensive ebike. I think you said it best by saying you didn't like the frame. I would definitely rent that before buying. Another quality review! Your opinion is valued greatly. What in your opinion are the top 5 things you should look for in an electric bike?

Clinton Baltazor
2 years ago

+ElectricBikeReview.com Durability and functionality, Bang for the buck/price, warrenty/customer service! I ride a bike for all my transportation needs year round. I'm not picky about the sound the motor makes, or the paint job, what pedals or if it comes with lights and mirrors. It needs to be all weather capable, something that can take a beating! I don't need crazy power, but I am 180lbs 6ft. 4in and regularly carry 20-30lbs of gear so 350-500 watts should be plenty. I am finding that you are almost better off buying a kit or designing your own ebike. At the end of the day I don't need an ebike but I sure would like one! Thank you for your time, and I look forward to your next review!

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Clinton Baltazor Cool, I look for comfort and performance first... not everyone has the same performance needs but I love responsive motor systems and go for suspension with larger tires, from there I like to be able to try and buy from a local shop and it has to look cool as well (unless I'm planning to buy a beater for city use). How about you? What are your thoughts on top things to look for in an ebike?

MotorheadRedo
2 years ago

You should take a break and review Santa Monica's Ride Share bicycles......"Breeze" Or just go for a ride.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+MotorheadRedo That sounds fun, I took a break and hit the Ebike Expo in San Diego this past weekend, we rode bikes all the way around the bay and I got to see the Wave House at Mission Beach :D