eZip Trailz Review

Currie Ezip Trailz Review 1
Ezip Trailz Electric Bike
Ezip Trailz Commuter Cassette Motor Chain
24v Currie Lead Acid Battery
Ezip Grip Shifter
Ezip Trailz Chain Drive Motor
Ezip Trailz Chain Guide Plastic
Ezip Trailz Lead Acid Battery Pack
Womens Currie Ezip Trailz Pink
Ezip Motor Drive Chain
Ezip Throttle Pas Tag
Ezip Trailz Battery Lock Key
Ezip Trailz Chain Stabilizer
Ezip Trailz Pedal Assist Sensor
Ezip Trailz Second Battery Attachment
Ezip Trailz Side Motor
Trailz Ebike Facts
Trailz Ebike Flier
Currie Ezip Trailz Review 1
Ezip Trailz Electric Bike
Ezip Trailz Commuter Cassette Motor Chain
24v Currie Lead Acid Battery
Ezip Grip Shifter
Ezip Trailz Chain Drive Motor
Ezip Trailz Chain Guide Plastic
Ezip Trailz Lead Acid Battery Pack
Womens Currie Ezip Trailz Pink
Ezip Motor Drive Chain
Ezip Throttle Pas Tag
Ezip Trailz Battery Lock Key
Ezip Trailz Chain Stabilizer
Ezip Trailz Pedal Assist Sensor
Ezip Trailz Second Battery Attachment
Ezip Trailz Side Motor
Trailz Ebike Facts
Trailz Ebike Flier

Summary

  • Steel frame is heavy but absorbs some vibration along with the entry level suspension fork
  • External side-mounted chain driven 450 Watt brushed motor offers good torque but is loud and more difficult to work with when servicing the rear wheel, rim and tire
  • Entry level, inexpensive, sold at some Walmart stores and online through Amazon
  • Lead acid batteries are heavy and endure fewer charge cycles before needing replacement but you can use two packs and they are less expensive to replace than Lithium-ion

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

eZip

Model:

Trailz

Price:

$699 USD

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Urban

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

6 Month Comprehensive, Original Owner

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

2013

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

68 lbs (30.84 kg) (Step-Thru Frame ~66 lbs)

Battery Weight:

16 lbs (7.25 kg)

Frame Material:

Steel

Frame Sizes:

17 in (43.18 cm)

Frame Types:

Step-Thru, High-Step

Frame Colors:

Black, Blue, Silver, Metallic Red

Frame Fork Details:

Basic Suspension

Gearing Details:

7 Speed 1x7 Shimano

Shifter Details:

Grip Twist on Left Bar

Pedals:

Plastic Platform

Handlebar:

Mid-Rise

Brake Details:

V-Brakes

Grips:

Rubber

Wheel Sizes:

26 in (66.04cm)

Tire Details:

Puncture Resistant

Tube Details:

Pre-Slimed

Accessories:

Rear Carry Rack, Chain Guide, Kickstand, Optional Extra Battery Pack ~$100, Optional Upgraded Real Force Lithium Iron Phosphate LiFeP04 (Reduced Weight, Increased Lifespan and Extended Range)

Other:

Estimated 300 Charge Cycles for SLA vs. 800+ for Lithium-ion, Motor is Side-Mounted (Left Side) and Drives a Chain Connected to Rear Hub, Offers PAS (Pedal Assist) Mode and TAG (Twist and Go) Mode

Electronic Details

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

450 watts

Battery Voltage:

24 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

10 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

240 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Sealed Lead Acid

Charge Time:

6 hours

Estimated Min Range:

10 miles (16 km)

Estimated Max Range:

15 miles (24 km)

Display Type:

LED Console

Readouts:

Battery Voltage (Full, Half, Low)

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist, Twist Throttle

Top Speed:

15 mph (24 kph)

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Written Review

The Currie eZip Trailz is one of the most affordable entry level ebikes around. I’ve ridden all of the major brands out there and tried varying levels of ebikes but the Trailz is one of the most common and enduring models I’ve come across. Sure, it’s sold at Walmart and seems so much more basic than other bikes but that’s actually one of its strengths. I found myself riding it more often and feeling less protective due to the low price and basic non-glamorous feature set.

The external side-mounted motor performs great and isn’t that loud but will still be heard over something like a hub motor or mid-drive system. Picture this, on the left side of the rear wheel is the motor which is attached via chain and on the right side of the wheel are the normal chainrings attached to the pedal and cranks system. This sort of balances out the bike and allows the rider to stop pedaling without disrupting the motor which turns its very own chain. It does mean there are more chains to deal with though, more rust, more noise and friction, and it also makes changing a flat harder.

The eZip Trails features a 450 Watt motor which is pretty powerful for an entry level bike (most are just 250 or 300) but it’s necessary for the heavier Lead acid battery and steel frame, especially if you add a second Lead Acid battery. The motor provides a decent amount of torque and works well in PAS (pedal assist mode) and TAG (twist and go mode). Sometimes when I ride cheaper bikes in this “low end” category I feel myself wondering if simply riding a lighter, faster bike would be as efficient and fast as going electric… but then I find myself passing road cyclists going up hills and I remember just how much work the motor is actually doing for me! This motor and drive system, as with most ebikes, is electronically limited at 20mph.

Because the motor is connected to the rear wheel and drives independently from rider pedaling action, you can pedal at any speed you want, fast or slow, and pick gears that fit your desired level of effort and speed. This is a huge benefit over some fixed mid-drive systems that require you to work with the motor at set gear ratios. Also, since all of the drive energy is going into the rear wheel the front of the bike is easier to handle; light for popping up curbs and making quick turns. Bikes with front drive systems require heavy duty forks and the shocks are less fluid.

The brakes on the Currie eZip Trailz bikes are old style v-brakes that also serve to cut power to the motor when squeezed. They won’t last as long as disc brakes before you have to get new pads but that’s super cheap (less than $10) and easy enough for nearly anyone to install with just a screwdriver and wrench. They perform well and stop the bike very effectively, sometimes faster than disc brakes because they are mounted on the rim instead of the hub which provides more mechanical leverage. The downside to v-brakes is riding in wetter conditions because if your rim gets wet it will create a bit more slip in the system and can also scratch the rims if you’ve gone through mud.

The eZip Trailz is one of the few bikes out there designed to accommodate two batteries right from the get-go. You’ll still have to buy that second battery, and most people don’t need that extra distance, but it’s a nice built in feature. You can also switch which side of the bike the battery is on and balance your ride out! The pannier style side mount also let’s you balance out your own cargo with groceries on one side and the battery on the other. The battery locks directly to the frame which is great for security. Over time, this bike will become more rattly sounding than some other ebikes because the rear rack is bolt-on verses welded.

There’s a reason this bike has been around so long and why so many used models are available and still running. It’s inexpensive, relatively solid and offers several upgrades and replacements. It’s also backed by one of the largest ebike manufacturers around so parts and service are easier to come by. I especially like the addition of a shock, even if it is lower end and does not include a lock-out. The front chain ring only offers one gear but centers the chain with guides on both sides so it’s nearly impossible to have the chain fall off when riding on bumpy terrain. The extra thick tires with smooth rolling tread pattern perform very well on pavement and help you avoid flats in a way that can only truly be appreciated when changing the tires on a 50+ pound machine.

Pros:

  • one of the least expensive electric bikes out there
  • simple and tough, solid steel frame doesn’t vibrate as much as aluminum but is heavier
  • intuitive twist throttle and grip shifter
  • throttle mode or pedal assist for extended range
  • less of a liability if it gets stolen or vandalized because it’s so cheap, you may use it more as a result
  • thick, smooth rolling tires resist flats and coast well
  • built in pannier rack with space for second battery and saddle bag
  • decent front shock considering the low price, not overly firm or sticky
  • stronger 450w motor provides good torque
  • Lead acid batteries are less expensive, more environmentally friendly and easier to recycle than lithium but won’t last as long
  • both batteries lock to rack to deter theft and secure in place, don’t lose the key!

Cons:

  • heavy, heavy, heavy… hard to cary up stairs, rear of bike is especially unweildly and could do some real damage if tipped over
  • lower end brakes, still stop well but are susceptible to slippage when rims are wet vs. disc brakes
  • external side motor and side battery make bike non-semetrical, and potentially less balanced if not riding with a pannier on the other side
  • external motor and motor-chain more susceptible to damage and water issues, not sealed like some hub motors
  • a bit louder than hub motors, not terribly noisy though
  • rear rack and batteries can wiggle and create noise over time, especially if ridden off road, they are bolt-on vs. welded permanently
  • range and power of batteries diminishes over time, sooner than lithium

Resources:

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More eZip Reviews

eZip Trailz Commuter Review

  • MSRP: $999
  • MODEL YEAR: 2014

Affordable entry level electric bike with a unique side-mounted chain drive motor that can make truing wheels, replacing tires and fixing flats more difficult. Offers seat post shock, suspension fork, fenders, chain guard and ergonomic grips for comfort...

eZip Skyline Review

  • MSRP: $899
  • MODEL YEAR: 2014

Affordable entry level ebike that's one step up from the eZip Trailz, available in low-step and high-step frame designs. Lithium-ion battery provides good range, durability and is mounted mid-frame for improved balance...

eZip Tri-Ride Review

  • MSRP: $1,399
  • MODEL YEAR: 2013

Affordable, entry level electric trike is well designed and gets the job done. Lead-acid battery pack is very heavy and won't get as many cycles as a Lithium…...


Ronald Boykin
3 years ago

I think the trails line of ezip bike is a better buy than the E3 Vibe line because you get a more powerful motor for less money! I could barely get going on the E3 Vibe when in throttle mode and if there’s a slight hill, forget it, you’ll have to use peddle assist mode! Interms of power I’d go with trsils line over the E3 Vibe even though it’s noisier and harder to service.

Reply
Thomas Rogers
3 years ago

I bought mine from a neighbor for $200. Very good investment

Reply
Court Rye
3 years ago

Not too bad! I’ve seen this bike on sale used before and at yard sales and you can easily get replacement batteries online for under $150 (depending on SLA or Lithium and which year). How is it working for you so far?

Reply
Thomas Rogers
3 years ago

I don’t have an owners manual or anything…the motor makes a clicking sound as it runs,maybe the bracket is bent. But other than that it is great, gets me to and from work as long as I charge the battery often.

Reply
DrkAngel
2 years ago

Clicking sound is the crappy motor side freewheel! – at wheel speed. Can be confirmed by releasing throttle while cruising and very slowly re-engaging. Might take a few tries, but can usually make sound lessen-disappear. Alternately – Inspect sprockets and chain for damage or foreign material.

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Great tip! Thank you so much for sharing :D

Court Rye
3 years ago

Hmm… hard to say? You could always take some video and post it in the eZip forums to see if anyone knows what the noise is and how to fix it? I have no idea off the top of my head but if it runs, maybe the clicking isn’t a big deal.

Reply
AuricTech
3 years ago

One thing to keep in mind when dealing with lead-acid batteries is that, if you don’t keep them charged when not in use, you’ll permanently reduce their capacity due to sulphation of the lead plates. It’s also a good idea to avoid drawing them down more than about 50% of their rated capacity. I learned about this on a solar power forum at http://forum.solar-electric.com/forum.php

Reply
Dwight Glenn
2 years ago

Both my wife and I have e-zips, battery is tricky, have had to replace yearly. I think not drawing them down more than 50% is interesting idea. We have passed up a lot of cyclist on this bike, funny to see the look on their faces when 2 older folks who are not all thin like those hard core cyclist fly by them. We like the pedal assist feature and the flat out full throttle. Bike is very heavy and wish the frame was lighter. Gears on mine vary from down right too hard to use, to light. Have to find that sweet spot for use with gears. Price is good. After about 5-6 years still works ok. Though the left side battery slot does not work anymore on mine, I just use the right side. I suppose it is repairable, but as long as it still works and I only use 1 battery, I’m good with it. Nice looking bikes and where we live in all the years we have had them. We have not seen anyone else with e-zips. You can order new batteries through target. Walmart does not carry them which seems strange since we got them online from Walmart. Good bike for those with COPD like my wife and anyone who wants an electric bike for a good entry level price.

Reply
Anonymous
2 years ago

You can fix your bike with terminals, ring terminals 14 to 16 guage.

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PhilRW
2 months ago

Update: I've posted pictures and updated the review here.

I had test ridden and researched quite a few ebikes lately in search for a bike that had most (if not all) of the following specs (much like scrambler's thread):

mid-drive, class 1
traditional high-step frame for extra stability
upright seating posture for comfort, keep weight off my hands as much as possible
front suspension
hydraulic disc brakes
NuVinci transmission with Harmony or H|Sync automatic shifting
Gates belt drive for long term durability, quiet/smooth, and (potentially) lower long-term maintenance
integrated light(s), if possible

I happened across a 2016 Tempo Carmel at a small local bike shop and gave it a test ride. I wasn't expecting or even looking for the bike, but there it was. And it was a lot of fun. After testing out a few more bikes, I decided the Carmel was the bike for me, so I purchased it for what I felt was a very good price and rode it 11 miles home, the last couple up a relatively long hill. Google Maps says it's 262 feet over 1.5 miles, which makes it a 3.3% grade. I currently weigh 98 kg and I was carrying at least 5 kg on my back. For the steepest part of the hill (4.8% grade over 0.4 miles), the bike kept up a solid 7 mph in maximum assist. I am 5'10" and the large/48cm frame fits me nicely. Granted, I still had to work, too, but it didn't kill me and I'm not in great shape (yet). I wasn't sweaty by the top of the hill.

I believe the motor is the MPF 6c, which the spec sheet says is 75 Nm of torque and 250 W nominal, 500W peak. The motor itself is incredibly responsive and quiet, about as quiet as the Brose motor on the Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 I tried. I believe it might be limited to the international 25kph standard? (More ride research is needed here.) The bike doesn't have brake inhibiters but doesn't need them because the motor stops a fraction of a second after you stop pedaling. Also, the belt drive makes this bike very quiet and smooth. Honestly I couldn't hear the bike that much at all working up the hill in 100% assist mode. The motor was responsive enough to highlight my own faults as a cyclist: inconsistent delivery of power to the pedals. I'll get better over time. :)

The bike came with the N360 hub and the 3-button base controller (H3). The preprogrammed cadence speeds are approximately 40, 55, and 70 rpm (see here for more details on the system). I have not tried a bike with the advanced controller yet (H8), but so far I am happy with the three speeds. I might eventually change out the controller. I typically stayed with the middle 55-rpm mode and was pleasantly surprised how steady my cadence was. One time after I decelerated more rapidly than normal, I started pedaling again and was in a much "lower gear," or faster cadence, than I expected. I think I fooled the controller into believing I was going to come to a complete stop. It quickly recovered. Since I had several stops and intersections on my route home, I was glad not to have to constantly shift down. In fact, It was nice not thinking much about shifting at all, and even though I am totally capable of managing that part of the ride, I was able to spend my mental energy elsewhere.

The handling of the Tempo was quite nice on dry pavement and I felt more confident with this bike than my previous bikes (of course, that's not saying much given my previous models). It corners nicely and is stable at 30+ mph downhill. The tires have a nice hybrid tread pattern for pavement and packed gravel trails, and they have a reflective sidewall as well.

On to the controls: There is a five-button controller near the left grip with +, -, light, mode, and walk. The MPF-branded computer doesn't give an estimated range remaining display, but it does have odometer, trip distance, trip time, average speed, max speed, and clock. Always on the display, from left to right, are assist level (10 levels!), speed, cadence rpm, and 5-segment battery meter. There is a backlight and a micro-USB port on the controller, and the only button on the display unit is the power button. It is detachable and has its own coin cell backup power supply.

There are hydraulic disc brakes on both wheels and the front light is wired into the controller and runs off of the main battery. The rear light is battery powered and only blinks (at least I can't get it to do anything else). It's probably more energy efficient to blink a battery-powered LED anyway. Walk mode works by holding down the dedicated walk button. There are the typical bosses for fenders and racks, although it might be tough fitting a fender to the front fork since there is little clearance between it and the tire. Also, the front suspension is a single-spring system with pretension adjustment and no lock-out. I figure it's fine for my purposes and may even be more reliable long-term than a more sophisticated dual-piston system. The seat post also has suspension on it. I found myself sinking into it after riding for a while. Maybe there's an adjustment on it, I'll have to look.

My other top contenders were the Felt Verza E 10, the Bulls Lacuba Evo E8, and the Wallerang. The Felt uses the Bosch system and both the local dealers that I tried were having trouble with some of the the display/head units. The Bulls is a nice bike but I really wanted the NuVinci automatic shifting for a truly brain-dead biking experience. :) Also the Wallerang Di2 auto-shifting with the Alfine 8 was really cool.

Please ask away any question(s) you may have about this bike! I'm excited to have a more modern and responsive ebike. My last one is/was a Currie eZip Trailz that I converted from SLA to Lithium.

1/1
kauaikit
3 months ago

Can anyone please help me? Would like to know what year and approximate value of this E-V Global ebike. I have looked but cannot find it anywhere. Thanks. If you want you can email me at banjer0250@gmail.com.

This isn't a 2000 range EVG ebike, but looks like an early iZip....I have a 2009 range iZip Trailz that uses the same rear electric motor and had SLA in a rear rack battery box, though I've replaced it with 7s/10ah lipo. It works great with the rear wheel gear upgrade for 20mph, and for running the dogs!

Try your questions here.....

https://www.facebook.com/izipusa/?hc_ref=PAGES_TIMELINE

Rick LaPraim
6 months ago

For long treks you need the lithium upgrade batteries. I have a schwinn with the Izip Trailz type kit ,a Ezip Trailz Commuter and an Izip Trailz AL. love them all for around town. Two batteries can make it to any destination in town. Since we have three the battery systems rock we just grab a battery and go. if one goes dead we have more just grab one and go. The SLA Batteries are easy and cheap to rebuild. If you crash the bike and tweak your rack you can just unbolt it and replace it for about $100.00 dollars. On other Ebikes you crush your weld on rack your screwed. It is heavy but who cares I live in an hilly area and have made it up just about every hill that i need to. wont climb a mountain but I didnt buy it to climb a mountain.
What i use it for is concerts in the park, Car show days , Parades "no parking issues", Trader Joe shopping, going to the post office, going to the park and trips to the bank. You get the Idea.
I also have seven grand children so the get to play on the bikes very very cheap fun.

As far as repairing one it does not get any simpler. Bad moter or gear reduction box just unbolt and replace no hub motor nightmares. hub motor loosen spokes and useually require a shop repair doubleing repair cost no thanks a new motor is only a hundred dollars. thanks for reading and I recomend these bikes for those on a budget

harryS
7 months ago

Looking up the Izip Mountain Trailz, that appears to be a brushed 2 wire DC motor. OK. I see how you ran it off a battery to verify that the motor works.

By the way, Currie does keep some old files around. I suppose what you had was very close to this.
http://www.currietech.com/dealers/wiki/index.php/File:Wiring_Diagram_-_RMB_with_SLA_Batteries_Bikes_(2008_USA).png

There's a pedal sensor and a throttle that connect to a "white box" that goes to the Currie controller. Sounds like what you had.

I suppose that you bought a generic scooter controller off ebay. I'm sorry but I doubt that you will be able to interface the Currie throttle and pedal assist to a generic controller. I look at the above schematic and infer that the Currie controller has proprietary inputs to read that white box.

I also think that no one makes brushed motor controllers that have pedal assist. The best you can do is to go with a brushed controller that has a throttle input, and they probably use the kind of throttle I was showing, although it should be possible to make the Currie one work.

Finally, unless you can provide a link to what you bought and more info, you're on your own in the internet world.

If you're in the UK, there's a really smart group of people on http://www.pedelecs.co.uk/forum/ that might know where you can get replacement Currie parts.

Ann M.
7 months ago

@Ashley, can you upload a picture or 2 of the old controller and wiring set up along with pics of the replacement one and the bike itself. We've worked on a number of those bikes and some of the older ones have very odd wiring. Currie Tech does still have some parts for those bikes; however, there are several versions of the wiring, so not just one diagram. You should be able to follow the wires from the old controller and see where they go.

Not sure about that ebay controller; but here's a link from izipelectric.com for service on several versions of the rack mounted battery TrailZ bikes and info about basic troubleshooting for these bikes.

Where are you located, Ashley? Perhaps we can help you find tech help. Remember, you can call Currie Tech /Raleigh for tech support at 800-377-4532.

Ashley
7 months ago

disabled oap here, been using the bike for a few years but had total electrics failure, have tested motor, runs perfect so bought new control box and throttle, these I have fitted but not yet attempted to wire up, I think I know what I am doing! but lack of wiring diagram, different colour cables etc, plus fact I don't speak chinese has me worried! can anyone do me a wiring diagram etc? am not bothered about brake isolators, and peddling sensor (blue/brown wires running from crank set) nor brake light wiring, Have ridden and wired up push bikes and motorcycles all my life and live out in the sticks so road traffic/danger not a worry
the controller/throttle I have fitted in this one ebay number ( 232211808685 ) if you look at the ad you will see mistake on motor wires! and lack of labels as to what goes where, thankful for any help, am assuming key switch on throttle isolates low voltage power to control box? just seen bit re supporting local shops too, I would but no one wants the job, just try to sell me a new bike!

dislikesquad
2 months ago

review the ebike kit walmart is selling for $170 48v 1000w 35mph+

Adam M
1 year ago

3:01 rip ears

ScottyKeyboardTV
1 year ago

rip ears indeed

thequickredfoxjumped overthelazybrowndog
1 year ago

it's a great bike,I have put alot of miles on mine,rebuilt the battery pack twice, has enough power to go up a decent hill without pedaling ( Appalachia), yes,it's heavy,and I wish I could find( not sure how to put this) a motorcycle,moped,made for "heavy operations" tire because of the double sided chain system, make it a bleeping nightmare to change the rear tube or tire if needed,at least for me,I take it to a shop for that.but overall, the 17mph is livable, the quality was good, and to top it off,I got it from Wal Mart, but now it seems it's been discontinued, but Currie still has all parts available, with an understanding staff to get what you need.

Mike Dempsey
1 year ago

It gets you from point A to point B...has good features and you can buy 4-5 of these for the price of the bikesnob pricybikes.....its a good option for some people

dislikesquad
2 months ago

Mike Dempsey check the walmart ebike kits for $170 48v 1000w 35mph 50 miles on one charge

Greg Williams
1 year ago

How to check
Brush speed control with test
Zip elec trouble with transport on bicy rack damage wire ,fix two wire still not working check battery are ok

Myth Tobias
2 months ago

Greg Williams^ same problem

WorldRecordvideos
2 years ago

Is the motor on this bike an example of unsprung weight or do you feel it because of its location?

Arctic coons airsoft
2 years ago

What is the top speed and what is the mileage on this bike

VideoNOLA
3 years ago

Really love your excellent reviews .... but, dude, BUY A WIND SCREEN for your microphone!

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

Ha! Yeah, thanks for the feedback... All of the newer reviews are being shot with a better camera and wind screen. This one was taken over a year ago and I was still using my smart phone to save money :)

Chuck Wuthrich
3 years ago

I see the rack that holds the battery and the motor have a slide. Will this rack work with a Topeak MTX trunk bag? 

TheSilentCartographer
3 years ago

It's great for popping wheelies

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

Ha! Yeah... though maintaining them is another story :P

Xellos14
3 years ago

I seriously lucked out when I got mine. The exact same make and model, but walmart in town was selling it for 350 since no one wanted to buy it for so long. They put it on overstock sale, and I had never even heard of the bike before but knew it could be a good investment. I'd still whole-heartedly recommend this bike though at the standard price, it's saved me on gas for town use enough for the entry price three times over. Great review, and I plan to upgrade mine with lithium battery packs after while.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

Awesome! That's a sweet deal and it's great to hear how useful the bike has been. Sure, it's a bit more basic than some but Currie offers decent support and the replacement batteries are easy to find on Amazon, even for the older models with SLA packs: http://amzn.to/1obATmg

sergeymakeev
3 years ago

Aww...you're such a cutie))
So handsome!

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

Ha! Thanks... If you know any smart, kind, healthy ~30 year old ladies around Colorado let me know ;)

Frank Blackcrow
3 years ago

I was just watching a man on you tube who says he had to change the batteries, he said it was cheap to do as the lead acids are cheaper, Which makes me ask the question about the lithium battery that can "replace the lead acid", how much more do they cost over the lead acid and do you think they would be worth it if people like that man says, only got a year out of the lead acid, maybe they were run flat,, as lead acids don't like to be run flat.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

Hi Frank, you're correct about completely discharging Lead Acid (and even Lithium), I believe that can be hard on the battery. It's why cell phones give you a warning when they get low and electric cars have a battery management system to keep the charge sort of in the middle between 50% and 90%. Ideally you want to store batteries around room temperature and always keep them full... I charge after each ride and top my packs off ever couple of months if I haven't used them. Regarding replacements... Sounds like the guy got a pretty good run out of his sealed lead acid pack, they usually offer 500 to 700 cycles and no more than a couple of years even if don't use them much. Lithium by comparison will last several years and get more like 1,000 to 1,500 cycles. It's also much lighter and tends to have more energy for the same size but is more expensive. You can compare the two on Amazon with SLA for ~$120 http://amzn.to/1lCfjLp and Lithium for ~$400 http://amzn.to/1pKB6j6 or a large Lithium pack for ~$520 http://amzn.to/VwoPpH

DWH BOI
3 years ago

I really enjoy your reviews !! That said you did this review in the old Brentwood neighborhood in Austin Tx. It was awsome sauce to see the familiar houses and then see the Northwest Center sign...you had to be going to Alien Cycles<3!! So here is my question,some of your videos are shot in Austin but I don't believe all of them are so where do you shoot them if not Austin...?

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

+DWH BOI Happy to help, good luck choosing one! I think Walmart mostly sells the eZip Trailz online and can have it shipped to store. It's also on Amazon but if you can spend a bit more there are some other really great ebikes out there.

DWH BOI
3 years ago

+Electric Bike Review Howdy from Austin Tx!! First off I was doing my research and I must say I was impressed with the eZip E3 Path and I bet the Path+ will impress me more as the bike for this fair city..The only other bike is the Motiv Spark,it would be the perfect Seawall Cruiser for my hometown of Galveston...decisions, decisions!! I noticed Wally does not carry the eZip Trailz here but thanks to your affordable list it really aimed me to the different types of bikes I would like without the starter bike...thanks again!!

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

+DWH BOI Thanks! Doing my best here. As far as a mid level first electric bike goes (trying to keep it affordable) I like the Volton Alation 500 but that's because I like mountain bike style with suspension. I you're more into cruisers the e-Joe Anggun is nice and there s whole list of other "affordable" ebikes in this section of the site: http://electricbikereview.com/tag/affordable/ if you share more about your price range, size and intended use I could maybe narrow in a bit more :)

DWH BOI
3 years ago

Thanks for the response! I live just a few blocks from Alien Scooters in this fair city of Austin and have met Ann,she is such a nice lady! I will certainly be buying an ebike there sooner or later but I am deciding on either buying a Wally eZip Trailz as a starter ebike first or go full-on. Any suggestions for a first ebike,or best all round ebike for that matter? This may take a while anyway since I need a hip(s) operation first. I enjoy the scenic background as well as the informative narration of your videos on the kinds of ebikes the rest of us 99%er's would be able to buy and use as realistic,health conscience, ecological commuters... Electric Bike Reviews!

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

Great question, you're correct! I love Alien Scooters and Ann is such a sweet owner there (I'm sure you've met her right?) to get reviews I travel all over the US and Canada. When I began the site two years ago I would just drive around Texas on the weekend and visit bike shops but last year I left my full time job (in part to spend time with my family, Grandpa has cancer) and have now been doing EBR full time. I bought a car and have taken road trips all around to actually visit manufacturers, just got back from a two month trip along the East Coast. Do you live in Austin? Beautiful city :)

4TheJoe
3 years ago

so should i avoid rain considering its electric? dumb question but yeah lol

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

+4TheJoe Yeah, that's one way to deal with it. Most higher quality bikes are tested against rain and light water so they should hold up but using a plastic bag to cover the sensitive parts on the LCD controller and twist throttle may be a good idea. I'm not an engineer and have only limited experience with rain riding but I hope this advice helps!

4TheJoe
3 years ago

+Electric Bike Review but if i wanna ride it and it happens to be raining, just use a plastic bag?

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

+4TheJoe To cover the twist throttle, display or battery you could just use a plastic grocery sack or those ones they give you with food at Taco Bell etc. but if you want a larger cover to completely protect the bike Amazon has some good ones that are pretty inexpensive like this http://amzn.to/1jyfw17

4TheJoe
3 years ago

Gotcha. Thanks bro and where would I get a plastic sac? N also what's the ride time on this when it's charged

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

Good question, with a cheaper bike like this I'd definitely be careful about rain and water. The external motor and second chain mean that sensitive bits are exposed. The twist throttle can be vulnerable as well as the control panel. Consider using a plastic sack to cover those bits if it is raining and ride safe :)

Mr. Officer
4 years ago

Some people think you have A.D.D. oh look, a kitty.

Mr. Officer
4 years ago

 That's pretty nice.

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 years ago

+rod garrett Wow! That's like an electric motorcycle... I'm sure you've heard of the ZERO? That bike doesn't have pedals, it's truly a motorcycle. You could check out the Stealth electric bikes, the Hurricane can have pedals or pegs and the Fighter is my favorite but it costs quite a bit: http://electricbikereview.com/stealth/fighter/

Mr. Officer
4 years ago

I'm looking around for one that will go up to 50mph.

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 years ago

+rod garrett Thanks! I like to keep it fun and go with a stream of consciousness review style. Are you thinking about an electric bike?!

Mr. Officer
4 years ago

Just messing with you.  Actually,  I thought you were adorable, and made an excellent vid.

Habib Resek
4 years ago

We biked around Mission Bay in San Diego with my wife as my passenger (our combined weight is 260 lbs) on the back (just put some thick towel for cushion) and we were able to bike around for about 20 miles. I used the motor only when its uphill. It was fun and we love it.. I bought it from here: http://astore.amazon.com/bestbuy026-20/detail/B004QHG17O Amazon offer a great price.

Michelle Salemka
4 years ago

I was already pretty sold on this bike, but your review (and especially the kitty :D) sealed the deal for me. Thanks man :)

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 years ago

Ha! That's awesome :D Cats love electric bikes you know, I'm constantly having to edit and crop them out of scenes and I've actually started carrying around MeowMix as a bargaining tool. Sometimes when entire prides come around I'll bust out the cat nip but it's a slippery slope with that stuff...

Hope the Trailz works great for you! Feel free to share your thoughts, questions etc. back in the forums. Another woman was asking about the Trailz recently and a few people chimed in to share ideas http://electricbikereview.com/community/forums/ezip/

Mitch Vigil
4 years ago

If you have a modicum of ability, you can wire up your own lithium battery pack. It is not a big deal.

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 years ago

+thesashworth You're right on... I do try to include as many details as possible but still keep it short (and go deeper back at the site). Sometimes I have limited time with the bikes and did try a scale a few times but it was tough to weigh and film at the same time and my hands got full. Lately I've been doing better video and trying to improve audio. Will continue to get better ;)

thesashworth
4 years ago

+Electric Bike Review  Bro you do some good informative reviews. However  you could make them even better by including the bike weight, top speed (if you have a smart phone you can buy an app with gsp or 1 of those litlle digital speedo's are'nt expensive & distance on the battery (apologies in advance if you have this info on your site where you do advise to go for more info - I realise this is the brief/shortened review).

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 years ago

Cool, I've definitely wondered what would happen if/when the battery expires and you want to replace it but maybe the company doesn't offer them anymore (which is not the case here, I think Currie has them and you can also find on Amazon pretty cheap http://amzn.to/1eUz5hU)

Gilbert Arciniega
4 years ago

I am planning to buy one of those kits. They also sell these as kits instead of the whole bike for $279 on Ebay including the economy battery. I'm still researching which kit is better for me. The Hill topper or this Currie. The Currie kit is much cheaper and provides 15 miles, but I can see that it's heavier and more noisy and has the cheaper battery. While the comparable Hilltopper with the 20 mile lithium battery (the better one)  is about $800. But it's much lighter weight, quieter, and looks more professional.

FOR ME, I have to decide what's right for me. I have cheap Schwinn mountain bike from Walmart. I would plan on using my bike to commute to work and back. Say 10 miles each way, but really though, it probably would be more for local transpo and play.  I don't think looks is important to me. But range is more important than power IMO. What do you think?

Gilbert Arciniega
4 years ago

When you say "pre built" kits. Are you talking about the whole bike with the kit "pre installed"? That eZip commuter I saw at Walmart.com for $799 for the whole bike. I saw that the basic difference from the $444 one is the lithium battery. 

Gilbert Arciniega
4 years ago

Thanks for your replies! 

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 years ago

Hi Gilbert, I responded to your other comment on the Hill Topper review to explain motor power and battery size and range. For me it is worth buying a pre-built kit vs. trying to make my own because I appreciate the warranty and help from a shop. The eZip Trailz is one of the lowest end electric bikes available. It is heavy, rear heavy and lower quality in my opinion. I recommend checking out the eZip Trailz Commuter if you're very tight on money as it will offer lighter battery and is a bit higher quality but still very affordable. Also, there are some ProdecoTech bikes that are okay but I don't like their designs very much.