Giant Quick-E+ Review

Giant Quick E Plus Electric Bike Review
Giant Quick E Plus
Giant Quick E Plus Syncdrive Yamaha Mid Drive Motor With Cover
Giant Quick E Plus Energypak 36 Volt Battery
Giant Quick E Plus Lcd Display Panel Bars Stem
Giant Quick E Plus Locking Grips Button Pad
Giant Quick E Plus Axa Blueline30 Led Headlight
Giant Quick E Plus 20 Speed Shimano Deore Shadow
Giant Quick E Plus Composite Plastic Fenders
Giant Quick E Plus 3 Amp Battery Charger
Giant Quick E Plus Electric Bike Review
Giant Quick E Plus
Giant Quick E Plus Syncdrive Yamaha Mid Drive Motor With Cover
Giant Quick E Plus Energypak 36 Volt Battery
Giant Quick E Plus Lcd Display Panel Bars Stem
Giant Quick E Plus Locking Grips Button Pad
Giant Quick E Plus Axa Blueline30 Led Headlight
Giant Quick E Plus 20 Speed Shimano Deore Shadow
Giant Quick E Plus Composite Plastic Fenders
Giant Quick E Plus 3 Amp Battery Charger

Summary

  • A highly-polished electric city bike with sleek battery integration, full-protection fenders, premium LED lights running off the main battery and a minimalist pannier rack for hauling gear
  • Available in four frame sizes but only one traditional high-step diamond style, the bike is extremely efficient with a rigid alloy fork and slick hybrid tires, 20 speed Shimano Deore drivetrain
  • The Yamaha motor is extremely quiet but offers some of the highest torque output, this is a speed model that can reach 28 mph assisted, beautiful display and button pad with USB charging port for portable electronics
  • The display is not removable, the battery can be charged on or off the bike but is heavier and doesn't have a handle so be careful, great price and leading warranty with lots of dealers offering good support

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Giant

Model:

Quick-E+

Price:

$3,000

Body Position:

Forward

Suggested Use:

Urban, Commuting

Electric Bike Class:

Speed Pedalec (Class 3)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Year Comprehensive, Lifetime Frame

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

50 lbs (22.67 kg)

Battery Weight:

7.5 lbs (3.4 kg)

Motor Weight:

7.6 lbs (3.44 kg)

Frame Material:

ALUXX SL-Grade Aluminum

Frame Sizes:

17 in (43.18 cm)19 in (48.26 cm)21 in (53.34 cm)23 in (58.42 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

Large: 21" Seat Tube, 22" Reach, 31" Stand Over Height, 73" Length

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

Charcoal Fighter Grey

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid ALUXX SL-Grade Aluminum, OverDrive, 9 mm Skewer with Bolts

Frame Rear Details:

9 mm Skewer with Bolts

Attachment Points:

Fender Bosses, Rear Rack Bosses, Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

20 Speed 2x10 Shimano Deore Shadow Rear Derailleur 11-36T, Shimano Deore Front Derailleur 36/48T

Shifter Details:

Shimano Deore Triggers on Left and Right

Cranks:

Custom Forged, 170 mm Length

Pedals:

Alloy Platform Cage

Headset:

Tapered 1-1/8" to 1-1/2"

Stem:

Alloy, 100 mm Length, 8° Angle, Three 5 mm Stacks, One 10 mm Stack

Handlebar:

Alloy Low-Rise, 31.8 Clamp Diameter, 29" Width

Brake Details:

Shimano M315 Hydraulic Disc with 180 mm Front Rotor 160 mm Rear Rotor, Shimano M315 Levers with Adjustable Reach

Grips:

Giant, Flat Rubber, Locking

Saddle:

Giant Contact Upright

Seat Post:

Alloy

Seat Post Length:

300 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

30.9 mm

Rims:

Giant Alloy, Double Wall, 32 Hole, Reinforcement Eyelets

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 14G Front, 13G Rear, Black with Nipples

Tire Brand:

Schwalbe Big Ben, 27.5" x 2.0"

Wheel Sizes:

27.5 in (69.85cm)

Tire Details:

Reflective Sidewall Stripe, Puncture Protection

Tube Details:

Schrader

Accessories:

Giant Composite Plastic Fenders, Rear Pannier Rack, Integrated AXA Blueline30 LED Headlight, Integrated Spanninga Vena LED Rear Light, Ursus Adjustable Length Kickstand

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, 1.8 lb 3 Amp Charger

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Giant SyncDrive by Yamaha

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Geared Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

250 watts

Motor Peak Output:

500 watts

Motor Torque:

80 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Giant EnergyPak

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

13.8 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

496.8 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

4.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

30 miles (48 km)

Estimated Max Range:

60 miles (97 km)

Display Type:

Giant, Fixed, Backlit, Monochrome LCD

Readouts:

Battery Info-Graphic, Battery Percentage, Speed, Assist Level (Off, Eco, Normal, Power), Cadence (RPM), Trip Time, Trip Distance, Average Speed, Max Speed, Odometer, Range,

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad on Right (On/Off, Up, Down, Light, i, Walk Mode), 5 Volt Micro USB Port on Left Side of Display

Drive Mode:

Advanced Pedal Assist (Wheel Speed, Pedal Torque, Pedal Cadence)

Top Speed:

28 mph (45 kph)

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Written Review

While traveling through Southern California I visited Fullerton Bicycles and met Trevor, the owner of the Quick-E+ electric bike you see here. He’s a 128 lb road biker who loves distance rides on the weekend but also commutes ~35 miles daily to his job. Trevor bought this bike to use as a recovery tool and make his commutes a little faster and had some great things to share about it in the video review above. One of my favorite aspects of mainstream electric bicycles like the Quick-E+ is that they tend to come in more sizes and be available to touch and demo at shops. This is truly a mainstream e-bike priced at $3k delivering a 20 speed drivetrain, perfectly integrated motor and battery pack. The thing looks amazing and comes with a two-year warranty that is honored on-site with expert bike technicians. Yes, there are less expensive ebikes on the market but with the Quick-E+ you’re getting a high capacity battery, fast charger, reliable motor from Yamaha, integrated LED lights, full-length fenders that don’t rattle… and a minimalist rack for hauling panniers. It’s an awesome product and it’s fast, topping out at ~28 mph in the highest levels of assist using the higher gears. There are a few compromises like the heavy battery that wasn’t designed with a handle or ridge to make it easier to carry and the fixed display that might get faded and scratched at racks… but the biggest consideration is the lack of suspension. When you’re going faster and further, an all-Aluminum frame and rigid fork transmit bumps and vibration more directly into your back and arms. One way to address this to ride on only the smoothest streets, and even if they take you way out of the way, that’s fine because you can go super far with battery support. Another possible solution is to wear padded cycling pants and gloves and perhaps the biggest improvement would be a 30.9 mm BodyFloat suspension seat post (or other less-expensive suspension post). This is an ebike that blends in, positions weight low and center for excellent handling, uses mid to high level components, like the Shimano hydraulic brakes, and really brings electric bikes into the mainstream into the USA which has historicaly lagged behind Europe and Asia in this industry. It’s exciting.

Driving the Quick-E is a 250 watt nominally rated Yamaha mid-drive motor. It’s branded as SyncDrive through Giant and has a nice skid plate on the bottom for protection. To me, it’s one of the cleanest most hidden looking systems around and it delivers a lot of power… Don’t let the 250 watt rating fool you, it peaks around 500 watts and delivers 80 Newton meters of torque vs. 40 Nm for a lot of hub motors and 63 Nm for the Bosch Performance line motor. What it does not have is shift sensing or the range of RPM output that Bosch does. That means you have to shift more frequently to get those higher speeds and you have to do it with a bit more care. The motor controller is measuring rear wheel speed, pedal cadence and pedal torque rapidly as you ride and if you simply reduce pedal pressure as you go to shift the motor will naturally back off and reduce the potential for mashing. It works a lot like a normal bicycle and is compatible with two front sprockets vs. just one on Bosch… the Quick-E+ takes full advantage of this with a 10×2 setup and Shimano Deore derailleurs on both. One of the Yamaha marketing highlights is “zero cadence start” which means you don’t have to pedal very far before the motor kicks in. In my experience “zero” is a bit misleading because the bike won’t go if you’re standing still but putting pressure on the pedal (and that’s a good thing), I’d say it’s more like “very fast start” and that’s just what you need going from rest at a traffic light, stop sign or heading up a hill.

Powering the motor, backlit display panel and integrated lights is a 36 volt 13.8 amp hour above-average sized battery pack. On an efficient city bike like this, expect 50 to 100 miles per charge depending on your weight, the terrain, wind conditions and most importantly, the level of pedal assist chosen. There are three levels to choose from and as you get to the highest and switch gears to reach 20+ mph speeds your efficiency will drop significantly. It’s fun to ride fast but I really loved how detailed the battery readout was (with percentage) along with the dynamic range estimator readout because it’s no fun getting stuck way out on a 50 lb bicycle. Yes, the bike still pedals fine unpowered, it’s actually not that bad, but climbing with it would be a chore… especially after knowing what the assist felt like. You could always get some clip-on panniers and bring the 1.7 lb charger along. It puts out 3 Amps for faster than average fills and has a nice metal end piece that fits into the battery pack on or off the bike. I just want to say, the plug interface on the battery is very nice, I like that the rubber flap seats easily and that the battery has an LED readout on it (for a quick look if you haven’t ridden for a while). The bit area of opportunity with this battery is how you’d hold and carry it. The pack is heavier than competing products at ~7.5 lbs and the exterior is slick and rounded… dropping it would be a $700+ mistake and even scratching it would be sad given the beautiful paint matched exterior. I think I’d probably leave mine on the bike and use the awesome kickstand to keep the whole thing secure while charging.

Operating the bike is a breeze with just one step on/off button at the control pad (near the left grip). The display panel is large enough to read but not so large that it dominates the cockpit which already has the brake levers and two sets of trigger shifters, a bell and the button pad. The display lights up when you press the light button on that pad along with the headlight and tail light. Both components are nicer than average and I LOVE that the headlight has little windows on the sides so you will be seen more easily. It’s not shown in my photos or the video but the standard Schwalbe Big Ben tires have reflective sidewall stripes to further increase your visual footprint. As mentioned earlier, this bike is pretty stiff and the larger high-quality tires are the one big comfort compromise. They aren’t as efficient or light as slimmer tires but I’d make the trade any day. So back to the display panel, it lists your speed, a bunch of trip stats including pedal cadence and the level of assist chosen. Arrowing up and down through the levels is easy with a few minutes of practice, it can be done by touch even without looking down once you get how it works.

Clearly I’m impressed with this bike, for the price (even if it sounds high to non-ebikers) you’re getting a LOT of value. The local dealer support cannot be overstated, Giant shops in the US are probably staffed by some reluctant service techs who think ebikes are cheating… but if Trevor is any indication, they are opening their minds and recognizing how useful the technology can be and that’s awesome because they know bicycles better than most. I love that Trevor found his own uses for this bike and was enjoying it. He still rides a normal unpowered bike but can have in-between days to recover without doing nothing and his commute got a lot more tolerable. Yes, I personally would swap the seat post for something more forgiving (and maybe even the stem) but I ride all over and have a sensitive back and neck to start. For most people, this will just be a blast to ride and it looks SO good. It blends in and uses components that will hold up for the long term… even if you don’t shift perfectly. It’s great to go fast without producing a lot of noise or compromising much on handling. Big thanks to Giant for partnering with me on this post and Fullerton Bicycles for having me into their shop all day getting in their way :P thanks for your patience and help Trevor!

Pros:

  • The bike looks beautiful, comes in four frame sizes for a good fit and rides solid, I’m glad they opted for larger tires to help smooth out some of the bumps given that it’s a speed pedelec capable of 28 mph assisted riding
  • Clean tight fenders extend way down and mostly stay out of your way, when turning sharp the front fender could collide with your toes if you have large feet, I like that the rear fender is secured by the pannier rack
  • Front and rear integrated LED lights keep you visible from all sides (notice the side windows on the headlight) and don’t require the hassle of being taking off to charge separately or keep secured when parking… they’re more permanently affixed to the frame, the bike also comes with reflective tires standard
  • Great kickstand, it’s adjustable length and positioned towards the rear of the bike so it won’t collide with your pedals, I like to move the cranks around when cleaning the bike and usually have my bike held up with the kickstand so it’s a nice little convenience to be able to do that without issue here
  • Nice extras including the rack, a flick bell and bottle cage bosses for bringing liquid, a folding lock or mini pump
  • Since Giant is using the Yamaha motor, they were able to custom design their battery and display… I think they did well because both are user-friendly and blend in, the remote button pad for the display is easy to reach and intuitive to use
  • The battery charger is very nice, way better than the huge and heavy charger that Haibike uses for their Yamaha powered models in years past, it’s small, light and faster than average at 3 Amp output, also, the plug interface is metal so it won’t crack as easily
  • At the bottom bracket you’ve got two cogs vs. just one on a lot of mid-drive electric bikes and that means more pedal cadence options and gearing range, I love that they created a shield to protect the motor down there
  • All of the shift cables and wiring are internally routed so the frame looks super clean and you shouldn’t have as many snags lifting or putting it on a rack
  • The pannier rack in the rear has protrusions along the inner top section of the tube to keep bags from sliding forward and back, it also keeps panniers lower to improve handling vs. lifting them way up high like regular aftermarket bolt-on racks
  • The rear wheel has thicker spokes to support the weight of panniers and cargo, both rims use reinforcement eyelets to keep them from cracking… just a good sturdy build overall that can handle higher speeds and more force from electric assist
  • I’m a big fan of hydraulic disc brakes, especially for ebikes, the added weight of the bike (this one is ~50 lbs) combined with assisted speed means that braking is important and hydraulic is just easier to pull and the Quick-E+ uses Shimano with adjustable-reach levers that would work better if you’ve got gloves on or have smaller hands
  • Awesome charge port cover… the rubber flap is large but easy to stick in and it’s mounted left to right so it closes in the direction of your bikes forward movement, you can charge this pack on or off the bike and I like that the battery has an LED charge level indicator on top where you can use it anytime for a quick update on how full it is
  • Considering how much power the battery offers, it’s awesome to have a USB charging port on the right side of the display to fill your phone (useful if you ride with Strava or other GPS apps)
  • To me, this electric bike offers amazing value because it comes frome one of the major manufacturers with a wide network of experienced dealers, comes in a range of sizes, has a two-year warranty and is using quality motor, battery and drivetrain systems
  • The display shows battery percentage and range estimation that dynamically changes as you arrow up or down through different levels of assist, you should never struggle to plan trips with this ebike because it gives you such great feedback… with the rigid frame and efficient tires the bike gets excellent range
  • The button pad is easy to reach and use while riding, even without looking down it’s possible to change assist levels, the rubberized top seemed well sealed against water, this bike should hold up very well in wet environments with the fenders and protected display sytems
  • I like that the bike has a functioning walk mode, it’s a bit heavier and might have bags on the rack so this feature is cool (just hold the walk button while in any of the three assist levels)

Cons:

  • The battery looks nice and works well enough but is heavier than average due to the high capacity and there isn’t a handle built in so just be careful when taking it off and carrying it around
  • All-Aluminum frame is sturdy and light but less forgiving than if the rigid fork were Carbon fiber or Steel… or had some sort of suspension, consider a 30.9 mm Thudbuster or BodyFloat to enhance your comfort (you might need a shim to fit the seat post diameter depending on which product you buy)
  • Both wheels are secured with nuts instead of quick release which requires tools… but also keeps them safer when locking in public, this isn’t a huge con, just something to consider if you have to do maintenance or like to transport the bike in the back of a car
  • The Quick-E+ only comes in one frame style, a very traditional high-step that looks good and feels solid but isn’t as easy to stand over for petite or inexperienced riders, you might have to use tippie toes if you get the wrong size frame but the upside is that it hangs on racks easier and has room for the bottle cage bosses
  • The motor is quiet, efficient and powerful (putting out 80 Nm of peak torque) but doesn’t offer shift sensing technology and has a more limited RPM output range so you have to shift frequently, if you’re not thoughtful about how you do it (ease off when shifting) it could wear the chain, sprockets and derailleur more quickly
  • The charge port on the battery is mostly out of the way but if you had the charger plugged in there’s a chance that it could get bumped by the left crank arm so be careful

Resources:

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Roman
1 year ago

Hey Court, thanks for the review, this is a bike I’ve been considering for a while. Can you talk about the sizing? What size did you test and what size do you usually ride? I’ve cross shopped this with the Specialized Turbo X, which do you think gets the nod for a 22 mile roundtrip commute with a bit of gravel?

Reply
court
1 year ago

Hi Roman! I believe I was on the larger frame size but cannot say for sure. Trevor is a taller guy and I remember the bike feeling large, it’s great to visit a dealer and try them out if you can. I believe Giant is requiring their dealers to bring a few ebikes into their shops. I love the efficiency of the Giant mid-drive and how beautiful it looks but the Turbo X suspension fork is a big deal for me given the speed produced. I have sensitive wrists, arms, shoulders, neck and back. For this reason, I usually only buy full suspension ebikes now so I’m a bit extreme ;)

Honestly, this is a great product at a great price. I’m being honest about my appreciation of suspension but that’s just me. Trevor seemed very happy with this bike for himself and I enjoyed test riding it!

Reply
Shaggy
1 year ago

Nice to see one of the big 3 (Trek, Specialized, Giant) make an ebike. Should help the consumer. Court, I am wondering if the Yamaha cuts out early due to the size of the front chainring or the software being set to stop assisting once the sensors indicate a certain pedal crank rpm? Thx.

Reply
court
1 year ago

Hi Shaggy! I think it’s just designed with a different RPM range… like it won’t go any faster up to a certain point whereas Bosch will. Bosch also stops but I find the bit of extra RPM at the higher end to be more comfortable and supportive of my ride style. I have hurt knees and the higher RPM requires less pressure on non-electric bikes so that’s how I prefer to ride now. It’s not a deal killer, I know my feedback on this characteristic has rubbed some people the wrong way and they get defensive. To me it’s just a fact and I’m trying to be open about it and show it on video. If you get onto one of these at a dealer and compare it to Bosch or Brose back to back and emphasize fast pedaling while in higher gears going for the top speed… I think you’ll see what I mean. I hope this helps!

Reply
Carter
1 year ago

This is very helpful. Your review just pushed the Quick-e (terrible name) into my top 3 ebikes to consider, along with the new Vado when it comes out and the Trek Super Commuter+ if I win the lottery (ha). Obviously I’m one of those who prioritizes name brand and dealer support– Giant’s 2 year warranty is a big plus as well.

Court, I have a suggestion for your reviews. The main reason I’m looking at buying an ebike is, at 55 and 185 lbs, I struggle too much getting up the hills around Seattle on my 20-50 mile fun rides. The steeper climbs are really the only times I need assist (tho I don’t pretend I won’t use it at other times.) I suspect I’m not the only prospective ebike buyer in this position. Towards that end, it’d be super helpful if you were able to speak to the relative performance of the bikes you review in providing assist on longer and steeper climbs. Of course I understand that may not be possible if you’re testing the bike in a flat region- still.

I rode my cousin’s Stromer in the San Francisco hills last summer and marveled at how I flew up the (steep!) hills, but was disappointed when the base model Specialized Turbo I test rode (twice) failed to provide the same amount of assist. If you were able to try out your review bikes on hills where possible and give some feedback as to how they performed I could really use that information. Thanks so much!

Reply
court
1 year ago

Good suggestion Carter, I do seek out hills and completely see how it helps people like you to get an understanding and see performance. I’m relatively light weight and active so even that can be misleading I suppose. Regarding the Quick-E+, I’d say it is a very capable climber given the mid-motor and high torque (80 Nm) that Yamaha delivers. I’d love to hear your thoughts on how it performs vs. a Stromer but would compare it favorably based on my own experiences. It’s different, being center-driven, but better if you shift accordingly… you don’t have to push as hard as with the newer Stromer ST1 X.

Reply
Nicholas
3 months ago

Hi Carter – I’m also in Seattle, I currently commute from West Seattle to SLU most days on an old fashioned SOMA doublecross. My top three are similar – Trek Supercommuter 8+, The Giant Quick-e, and I’ve been looking at the Specialized. The Quick-e is in the lead because for the price I can upgrade to the suspension post with a Brooks saddle and clip-in pedals and still be well below the Trek. I climb 550ft on the way home, and that’s the big impetus for going electric. Just gets exhausting after a long week or a 10 hour day. Did you pull the trigger? What did you choose?

Reply
Brian
1 year ago

I noticed that this US version speed pedelec comes with a relatively weak Axa Blueline 30 headlight…the European s-pedelec versions have the Supernova m-99, even the Quick-e+ 25 comes with the Axa Blueline 50 in the European models. I would think that a stronger light should be a safety feature for any s-pedelec. Any thoughts on this?

Reply
court
1 year ago

Interesting, thanks for noticing and sharing this detail Brian. I guess it’s a bummer that the US got downgraded… unless ours is also less expensive? We have a lot of electric bikes out here that bend the rules with speed and power which don’t have ANY lights. I don’t know enough about the situation to make a judgment call but I’m inclined to trust that Giant is making decent decisions? I felt that the rest of the product was well thought-out?

Reply
Emerson Moncure
1 year ago

Hey Court, I just discovered electricbikereview.com and I love it! The reviews on this channel are informed, thorough and extremely well communicated. Currently I commute to work on a Giant brand Seek 3 (non-electric) I bought back in 2012 for $700. Though I really like my bike, I’ve been feeling like its time for an upgrade. However, I never would have considered an e-bike (let alone a $3000 e-bike) until I watched the EBR review of the Giant Quick-E! To be honest, I’m not a particularly knowledgeable consumer when it comes to bikes, and I rely heavily on an informed sales person to help me find the right fit. The danger there is, I don’t always get an informed sales person! However after watching a number of EBR reviews I have a new understanding of the value of electric bikes, and particularly the value of specific products being offered! Considering my needs and compared to other e-bikes of this quality, $3000 really seems a good price vs. value for the Giant Quick E. It even has the same graphite grey/black color scheme as my old Seek 3. I’m sold! This newly informed rider thanks you for your top quality reviews!

Reply
court
1 year ago

Hey Emerson! You totally made my day, thanks for sharing a bit about yourself and what it’s like to be a consumer trying to navigate the space. I’m glad the site has helped you, that’s my goal! And, feel free to share or connect further in the forums. I do my best as an information source but have limited experience post-purchase. I feel like individuals connecting directly is an authentic way to identify issues, fixes, and best uses. Have a great time out there and thanks again!

Reply
Randy Emer
1 year ago

Hey Court, I love watching your reviews, they’re incredibly helpful and informative. I’m a very recreational rider in the market for an e-bike. I seem to have narrowed the choice down to two: the Giant Quick-E above, and the Trek Dual Sport +. They seem very similar. What are your thoughts? You are providing a tremendous service with your enthusiastic reviews!!!

Reply
court
1 year ago

Hi Randy! Great bikes… both companies are large and trustworthy but I prefer the Giant in this case because it has a streamlined battery, integrated lights, fenders and a basic rack. I guess it depends on the sort of rides you want to take, but I appreciate the added utility. Both drive systems are good and the 2017 Shimano batteries can be charged on-bike just like the Giant Quick-E+ Yamaha battery. I hope this helps! Would love to hear what you decide on and how it works for you. Feel free to poke around the forums too and ask for feedback from actual owners :)

Reply
Cristian
1 year ago

Hi, I’m interested in this bike but I read about the “cons” that both wheels are secured. I’m not from the US but I’ll be there in a couple of weeks, I would like to dismantle to transport by flight…. Would be easier for me to transport? Thanks!

Reply
court
1 year ago

Hi Cristian! First off, you might have to ship the battery separately from the bike because most commercial airlines do not allow you to bring large Lithium-ion batteries onboard. They won’t even let you check them… consider reaching out to a hazmat certified shipper like Propel Bikes in New York or ask your dealer. Second, it’s pretty easy to use a basic set of tools to get the wheels off of this bike. You might want to purchase a large padded bike box because checking these things could end up damaging them. This is just the start but I hope it helps you to reconsider the shipping plan… there’s a lot more than just taking the wheels off to consider :)

Reply
Samuel
12 months ago

Hi Court! Thank you for your excellent reviews, they will help me a lot in choosing an E-bike, bet on the future and leave the car aside.

Do you have something to say about the quality of the battery? I think that most bicycle brands use electrical components from manufacturers that have the experience and the technology to produce motors, controls and batteries. So I wonder how good quality is a battery from Giant and its lifespan.

I’m thinking about buying an E-bike for my daily commuting (which is 20 km) and stop using the car, but batteries are a big concern to me: how long they last, what to do when a battery has reached maximum cycle capacity (where to recycle?) and how long manufacturers will support an old model with replacement batteries. Would you consider this before choosing an e-bike?

Reply
court
12 months ago

Hi Samuel! Batteries are one of the most sensitive and expensive parts of electric bikes but if you get one that’s relatively new and provided by a large, trusted manufacturer like Giant, Specialized, Trek or any Bosch powered product, I think you’re doing great. These companies tend to cost a little more but have long-term customer service and replacement options. Most batteries, if not dropped and stored in cool dry locations and kept at ~80% for long term storage, should last for several years and maybe longer :)

Reply
Chuck
12 months ago

Hi Court,

Yet another excellent review from you! Thanks very much for that. One of those Giant Quick-e+ pluses passed through the bike shop I work at last week and unfortunately I was far too busy to give it a proper look-over so I have a few questions I hope you can answer. Giant didn’t cover enough in the specs on their site, hence me asking you. Beyond that, I have a few words. I’ve got to say, that bike really caught my eye. It looks like a really stout build and it’s just a good looking bike overall from the few minutes I had with it.

  • The fork looks to be tapered (1-1/8″ to 1-1/2″). Did you notice that?
  • Did the chainring spider look like a standard BCD? With what they spec I’m thinking it’s 104mm like a ‘cross bike.
  • I didn’t see any brake cutouts on the bike so I’m assuming the pedalec setup is sensitive enough to shut down power quickly. Did you notice anything lagging in power cut-off when braking or am I totally wrong about the lack of brake cut-outs?

Those first two questions may seem a bit nerdy but I’m going to want to tweak that bike some. Not much, just some. It seems just about perfect as-is. Oh and speaking of bike tweaks you often mention seatposts like the Cane Creek Thudbuster. I’d like to point out another one I think is worth considering. The Niner RDO carbon seatpost. It’s not going to have anywhere near as much give as a Thudbuster but it is intentionally built with some compliance and dampening in mind. I was pretty skeptical about the claim but after trying one I now run them on a couple of my bikes and they do make a very noticeable difference at far less weight and with a clean look. Other people who have ridden my bikes have remarked on how good they feel without me saying a word about them. They are a bit pricey but definitely worth it in my opinion. The setback model gives even a little more comfort if that’s something someone can properly fit on their bike.

I really like that the Quick-e comes out of the box with plump 650B wheels vs. 700c. 700c has its merits (I love my gravel bike!) but 650B I think is just best all around for something utilitarian like that bike. Far more stout and comfortable. Not only that but I think 650B wheels are a better choice than 700c for a class 3 ebike. For those not familiar with the terrifyingly sketchy fun of going 40+ mph on skinny little 23c tires (or 30+ on fat gravel bike tires) those 650B fatties will go a long way in adding safety and confidence in the 20-30MPH range. Also, I know those WTB tires the owner in the video upgraded to and they are very smooth and efficient. Probably a great upgrade. That’s not to say that the stock Schwalbe Big Bens are not good. They too are an excellent tire.

That pannier rack, the overall clean lines of the bike along with the highly functional lighting and clean, simple dashboard grabbed my attention right away as I was walking by it at my shop last week and I had to take a second look and prod n’ poke the bike for a couple of minutes. I think the price is perfect too. I’m thinking about one quite seriously. The days I don’t feel like commuting by bike I ride my motorcycle and I’d like to get away from that. For those days that I don’t want to deal with changing out of my kit, getting grimy or am just feeling lazy and just want to throw my leg over a bike and go without doing anything special then pedaling a little less hard seems to fit the bill. I’ve borrowed a few ebikes from my shop to try them out for commuting and I get it now. I think motos trump a car most of the time for personal transport here in SoCal. But I’m 70/30 bike/moto in my commuting habits now and the moto is getting a bit tedious. For my short travels I do most of the time I’d rather be on a bike. My family has been car-light for a few years now and I’m thinking something like that bike may just scratch my itch and keep me car-light for a few more years.

Thanks for all of your hard work on these great reviews!

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court
12 months ago

Hi Chuck! Happy to help with the specs… It does have a tapered head tube and no, there are not motor inhibitors built in. Most of the new advanced mid-drive ebikes do not use cutoff switches or have throttles, I guess they are quick enough that the inhibitor is not needed? Unfortunately, I cannot answer the last question about chainring but my guess is that it does use a standard BCD.

Good call on the carbon seat post, have you seen the one that Specialized made? Used to be called the “Cobl Gobl-R” but the official name is now CB-R :)

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Chuck
12 months ago

Oh yeah, I forgot about that one from Specialized! Looks like another good choice. It’s pretty interesting some of the carbon layups manufactures are trying these days and how they can control stuff like compliance and direction of flex. Much more advanced (and durable) than the old days of carbon.

Mike
11 months ago

Hey Court! Your website is awesome. I am a first time buyer and this is by far the best source I have found. A quick question, do you know (or know how I can determine) when the 2018 Quick-e+ will come out? I went to a local dealer and he seemed to think it will be the next few weeks. Thank you!

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court
11 months ago

Wow, that sounds crazy soon? I guess the 2017 model has been around for a while now but I feel like we are mid-season. Sometimes they get demo models for press events and shows like Eurobike and Interbike (many of their bikes are designed for a European audience and then brought to the US). I’ll ask my contacts at Giant and see if we get anything… Glad you like the site Mike!

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Mike
11 months ago

Great, thank you. I searched online and could not find any information about the expected release date.

giantbike
11 months ago

Court, if difference in price was not a factor, would you go with the Lacuba evo 45 or the Giant for a 30 mile total commute?

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court
11 months ago

Hmm… I’d probably go with the Lacuba EVO E45 in mid-step with that suspension fork. I care a lot about comfort and could see myself commuting with these bikes. Even though the Giant Quick-E+ looks nicer to me, the Bulls offers similar utility (lights, fenders) and even has that adjustable bar and ergo grips. One of the other factors I consider is motor type and I prefer the Brose drive vs. the older Yamaha with limited RPM because I like to spin fast. I really like the pricepoint and integrated look of the Giant but my priority is comfort, especially at higher speeds. One other factor might be if there was a dealer nearby, you could get the Giant, swap in a suspension fork, outfit it with nice accessories and maybe a riser stem or swept back bar and ergo grips for similar price as the Bulls. There are many ways to go with this. Hope my thoughts help you decide :)

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giantbike
11 months ago

Yeah, the huge 203mm brakes on the e45 and the 650w battery are nice adds too. I agree the Giant looks great. I’m a big fan of the Brose motor and have many hours on one, but I have limited experience with the Yamaha. It’s nice to see so much competition brewing in the motor department. It would be great if someone could come up with some common metrics on how to compare motors based on torque and efficiency as it gets quickly complicated when you add speed and cadence to the equation. Seems like the only way to get a feel is to ride the bike. It’s great to see so many class 3’s coming out, I agree with your opinion that class 3s are approaching the ability to replace a car, at least for commuting.

Robert Foote
9 months ago

The lack of a proper rear rack (one that extends above the fender and readily allows for a rear bag or purse to be carried without panniers) is absurd. It is sad that some Giant marketing weasel chose form over function on an accessory that will be used quite often. Another huge oversight is the lack of a guard for the large chain-ring. People using this bike are very likely to be wearing pants and should not have to put on a pants clip. These two items represent low-hanging fruit – how they could be overlooked is something that Giant should be very much ashamed of. One can only wonder if they can’t get the simple shit right, what about the really difficult stuff???

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court
9 months ago

I see where you’re coming from but feel that the minimalist pannier arms and multi-chainring setup make sense here. It can get cluttered and rattly with a big plastic chain cover that’s large enough to cover a front derailleur, and if they had a platform rack in the rear the bike just wouldn’t look as sleek and would definitely weigh more (maybe half a pound?) I see why they chose these things, there are definitely other e-bikes out there which do have full sized racks and protected chains, it seems like they did choose form over a bit of function, but it’s not as extreme as it could have been with no support arms or a single chainring and no cover.

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Robert Foote
9 months ago

Thank you for taking the time to respond, though I must respectfully disagree on one point. I do not believe it is even possible to purchase a bicycle rack that can only accommodate panniers. There is a good reason for this. The additional weight to provide the standard rectangular upper platform is insignificant (not even close to half a pound). If the utility of a proper rack upper platform justifies the additional weight on a typical 27 lb touring bike, it certainly is not a factor on a 50 lb e-bike. I simply find it annoying that after spending $3K on an e-bike, I would need to spend another $100 or more for panniers so that my wife can carry her purse. Panniers would also weigh far more than the additional aluminum tubing. Regarding my other complaint, I was unclear as to my suggested modification. I have no problem with the double chain-rings, and certainly wasn’t lobbying for a fully enclosed chain. What I was referring to is a bolt-on, aluminum alloy (not plastic) chain-ring guard. These guards are very light, robust, and practical. They have been used on single, double and triple chain-ring cranksets for decades.

Rob Withey
8 months ago

I’m in Canada and Giant have a new rack coming with a flat top for carrying things and pannier mounting. Hope to have mine soon.

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court
8 months ago

Very cool, thanks for the update Rob! We’d love to hear how it works out for you. Feel free to share even more details and pictures in the Giant Ebike Forums if you’d like.

Tim
2 months ago

I was just checking out the Quick E at the local bike shop and thought the same thing about that rack. That was a big concern with me for commuting. I was shocked they didn’t have a proper rear rack on there. I like to haul a lot of gear back there. As soon as the weather improves I intend to take it for a test ride.

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court
2 months ago

Cool, I’d love to hear your thoughts on the bike once you take a test ride Tim, good luck!

David
9 months ago

Just wanted to say thanks for your great reviews. Until about a week ago I hadn’t given electric bikes a second thought. Heard a passing reference on a radio station about a week ago and thought I’d take a quick look one after noon while cruising internet. I was blown away by the selection, capabilities and technology involved. I have since ordered a Giant Quick E+, was waffling between it and the IZIP Dash, but your reviews tipped me toward the Giant. Looking forward to my first commute, without burning fuel and getting some exercise and especially help at the end of the day on those hills. One quick question can you recommend a set of panniers that would fit this type of rack, encorporating room for labtop, change of cloths/lunch? Thanks again David.

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court
9 months ago

Hi David! Welcome to the ebike community :D these things are a blast and yes… there are so many to choose from now. I think you made a great choice with the Giant Quick-E+ and am assuming you found a local dealer to help get fitted and stuff? They might have some panniers or bag options for you to check out, but I like the clip-on style like this which are easy to take off and bring inside. Please note that I have not tested that specific bag and cannot confirm if it would fit for you… but Amazon has a good return policy and this might just get you thinking about options. Ortleib has some good stuff but they are more expensive usually. When using panniers, I often bring my charger and work stuff but may also wear a backpack to keep my laptop extra safe when commuting. There are lots of options and people in the forums might also have some ideas. I created this article about other good accessories to consider for ebikes that might get your gears turning ;)

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Alasdair
8 months ago

Thanks for the great reviews Court. I’ve had one of these for 4 months now and it’s been ideal for my 20 mile each way commute. The only thing lacking is the ability to mount a larger chainring (only has clearance for 48t which is too small), and the lighting which is too dim for my liking.

Do you know what lighting upgrade options are? I cant find the output voltage for the light. Id love to add something like the Supernova m99 pro.Thanks, Alasdair

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court
8 months ago

Hi Alasdair! Great insights there, thanks for sharing your feedback about the limited chainring clearance. Those are the types of things I am learning about and trying to share more but it’s wonderful to get comments like yours, especially since you have been riding now for four months. It sounds like you’re enjoying the bike, I do believe that the Supernova M99 Pro could be added but it might take a special shop to order and then install. I have seen this done by the folks at OHM on their Sport model (you can see it on Michael’s bike in the video review on this page).

Personally, I have found that the Cygolite rechargeable lights work well and provide flashing, bright, and dim modes. They offer combo packs like this or you can just get a bright headlight on its own. They are less convenient and secure than an integrated light (so more time turning on/off and removing them when parking in public). They offer some very bright models like this with 1,100 lumens! and there are many others on Amazon to explore, I’d love to hear back what you decide to do.

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Alasdair
8 months ago

Court – good tip but I already have a range or battery lights from Exposure and am looking for similar power but the simplicity of running it off the battery like the one installed. I heard back from AXA who make the OEM light and they do a bigger 50LUX model that runs off 6v (which I assume is the output). I’ll order it and swap out as its only $40.

I have quite a bit of experience with this bike now having ridden around 4000 miles and done a few upgrades/experiments so please anyone reach out if they have any questions. I know I really could have dome with this resource when I was shopping to understand the rack situation as well as a few others.

Court keep up the great work – I can see this as the future of daily transportations and your efforts are very instrumental to us getting there!

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court
8 months ago

That’s awesome Alasdair! How did you find out who to reach at AXA? The price is great… I’d love to see the finished product and maybe get some tips from you in the Giant forums as I am sure there are others out there who would love to do the same thing.

So glad to hear that EBR helped and appreciate your willingness to pay it forward by answering questions from anyone else about the bike. I agree that this technology is transformative and empowering, so glad to be part of sharing it with the world :)

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Andrew
8 months ago

Hi Alasdair – I actually own the bike that is in this review! Trevor hooked me up with a great price and am taking it in for a tune up this week. I have similar issues with the lights – I run a separate Knog Blinder in the rear at night for safety, but would for sure be interested in a brighter light setup. If you can link out to your solution that’d be awesome. I will do some research in the meantime. I really like/prefer having lights running off my battery so any aftermarket solutions for the head & taillights would be awesome.

I’d also echo the sentiments from others – the biggest gripe I have about this bike is how I spend almost ALL of my time in the top two gears. It’s not a deal breaker, but it just makes the other front chainring feel completely useless and unnecessary. Even on a big(ger) climb I’m still in the middle-top gears overall, so it is a little disheartening to learn that can’t be changed.

The pannier/rack thing also bothers me, as I have two rack trunk/dual pannier bags that can’t fit on this bike due to the lack of a flat platform. I knew that when I purchased the bike, so now I’m looking into basket options. I really like the look of the Blackburn Local basket, but I feel like if mounted on the front it would block my headlight, and if mounted on the back it wouldn’t clear the embedded pannier rack/bars. Any tips or solutions for a porter-style basket?

Thanks all!

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Alasdair
8 months ago

Hey Andrew, You bike was the reason I got mine then – especially with the WTB tires and your commute sounds just like mine (20 miles each way in LA right?). I’ve been fine so far with the rack. These Brooks Suffolk Panniers work great and are adjustable enough. I have mine loaded up with around 25lb of gear each day an they’re so low down I barely notice them.

Court – I just used the contact link on the AXA web page, someone responded within a day or two. Still struggling to find out what the output for the light is but this should work wither way. I’ll have it on the bike within a week, great as the light is fading earlier each day.

As Court suggests I’ll take this to the correct forum and post there.

Rob Withey
8 months ago

See my above comment. There is a new rack coming that will take panniers.

Steve
7 months ago

Hi Court – Great bike review! I have been looking at this bike for mile 20 mile each-way commute and I think it fits the bill pretty well. Do you know what the differences are between the 2017 and 2018 models?

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court
7 months ago

Hi Steve! I haven’t had an opportunity to look closely at the 2018 yet but I hope to review it later this year or early next. Maybe you could ask in the EBR Giant Forums or do a comparison with the official spec on the Giant website? If you discover anything, please share back here, I’d love to know but am just busy traveling right now so cannot dig in myself.

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Weston
4 months ago

Is this range accurate? It seems way too high at 50 miles minimum and 100 miles maximum range on a charge. That seems absurd. Anybody have any feedback on that?

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court
4 months ago

Hi Weston! I agree, and I don’t rememeber exactly how I came up with that estimate. It might have been suggested by Giant but the Yamaha system is indeed efficient and this bike doesn’t have knobby tires or suspension so it’s also going to coast well. My guess would be 35+ minimum on the highest level of assist going fast (because 20+ mph speeds do sap the battery quicker based on air resistance). Thank you for chiming in and I apologize that the stats I got seem misleading.

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Nate
4 months ago

Range is definitely not accurate (the only way you’re getting 100 miles on a charge is by coasting downhill in Eco mode most of the way). I’ve had this bike since August and have been commuting with it about half the time. Since I work out of two different offices, my commutes are either 2.5 miles or 5.5 miles and mostly flat with one good-sized hill on each route (I’m in Mountain View, CA and my route takes me over 85 or the 101). I mostly leave it in the normal setting, with the occasional switch to Eco mode if I’m trying to eke out a few more miles or sometimes up it to Power if I’m in a hurry on a hill or if I know I’m going to need to charge when I get home so I might as well use up some juice. Every time I take the battery off to charge, I first snap a picture showing the miles since I last charged and the % of battery remaining. Then I calculate the mileage capacity by taking (miles traveled)/(1 – % remaining). Over the course of ~520 miles and 15 charges, I’ve been getting a mean 41.4 miles per charge. Max was 45.6 miles, min was 36.6 miles.

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court
3 months ago

This is awesome feedback Nate, thank you so much for sharing your personal experience with the bike. I used to live in Mountain View and miss it, beautiful place! You sound like a smart person, someone who is detail oriented. I hope the bike holds up well for you and that this comment provides a more accurate perspective to other potential customers. Thank you.

Rob
3 months ago

I’m heading out west and realize that at close to 70 years of age – I can’t get up those multiple mile climbs anymore without a bit of assistance – I need and electric bike.

I visited with Chris over at Propel Bikes in Brooklyn – great shop, lots of e-bike inventory; and Chris like you Court, is very knowledgeable about e-Bikes.

So I narrowed down the field to the Giant Quick E+ and the Specialized Vado 3.0. Truth be told I like the high speed of the Giant but liked the feel of the Vado 3.0.

My biggest concern is which bike will hold up better and require the least amount of maintenance – getting spare parts and having the bike serviced quickly is important – I don’t want to be waiting for weeks to have parts delivered. Your thoughts, please!

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court
3 months ago

Great question Rob, I think you’re in good hands with Chris at Propel… I would defer to him, since you have spent more time together. Both of these are leading brands, it may come down to price, style, or what he has to say off record about what has held up best. I only get the brand new bikes and they all seem to work… but Chris would have deeper knowledge since he actually sells and services them. Perhaps he would even recommend some other brand you haven’t tried yet, like Kalkhoff or Focus with Bosch drive systems for a similar price (he mostly carries Bosch because they have been super reliable for him).

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Gary Peacock
3 months ago

I’ve spent a lot of time looking at your reviews and REALLY appreciate all the info! I’m in the Adirondack Mountains and plan on doing some hilly rides (I live on top of a 2+ mile hill with a 1,000 ft climb at the end of my ride) so I want a bike that will help me get home! I also plan on riding some dirt roads (logging roads), but not really Mtn bike riding. The Giant Quick E+ looks like the bike for me, but I’m a bit confused by the “Commuter” class. Most of the discussion is about commuting, but I’m not riding to work… just riding mostly on quiet country back roads. Should I be looking elsewhere for my needs? 80%-90% of my riding will be on pavement, but want the ability to ride occasionally on rougher dirt roads without hurting the bike. Thoughts? Also, is it possible to swap out the handle bar grips for the ergo type grips found on the Trek XM-700? Thanks so much for any suggestions!

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court
3 months ago

Hi Gary! Yes, grips are generally very easy and inexpensive to swap out. There are many choices at local shops and online, these Ergon GP1 grips are similar to the ones you saw on the Trek XM7000… but there are also ones like this with bar-ends for a different hand position, to reduce fatigue on longer rides. You could probably also purchase the exact same Bontrager grips from a Trek dealer if you like that red accent or the ribbed style. It appears that they might only have a black/grey combo being sold aftermarket right now.

Regarding your question about ride style… I tend to classify electric bikes based on their full potential here, and see commuter as an upgrade from mere neighborhood and urban riding. The commuter classification denotes fenders, lights, and a rear rack. The tires on the Giant Quick-E+ are also quite good, with reflective sidewalls and puncture protection. Yes, this ebike could definitely handle some light gravel streets, but it might not be very comfortable. It doesn’t have a suspension fork and the geometry is more sporty and active. You probably won’t damage the bike, the tubular fenders look pretty tough as well, but you might get a sore back, neck, shoulders, wrists, etc. and if you do a lot of trail riding, a ShockStop stem and 30.9 mm suspension seat post like this could reduce body fatigue and impact. I hope this helps! Giant seems to make good bicycle products and the Yamaha drive system here is one that I trust :)

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Hans der Dampfer
7 days ago

I still don't think it's a good thing to do one-hand test drive.
The bike has some good points but the not removable display is a minus because there are so many people touching it and try to rip of displays.. Plus the smaller chainring has absolutely no use.

David Davidson
4 weeks ago

I just test rode my first ebikes at sea otter! Now I want to buy one for my commute and wondered if you thought this Giant was the best overall value? I got a 15% off coupon only good to Friday...but I’m sold on the idea!

Ryan Davidson
2 months ago

$3,100 is way more reasonable than the Trek Super Commuter.

fcuenco
2 months ago

I own the 2018 model which I commute 17 miles on daily. My weight is 230lbs and I usually ride in power mode and get home with 25-32% battery left which I am pretty sure is because of my weight... I love this e bike but I have a concern ... My commute home has some rough areas and the battery seems to be clapping against the frame. Do any of you get this too? Anyone have any suggestions on how to fix this? When I take the battery off to charge I notice scuffing in the frame where it has the battery information and max speed label. Also a bit bummed there is no where to bolt a bottle cage in the small size frame.....

Benji Williams
4 months ago

Was this the Large or Extra Large?

Fahdy Salim
5 months ago

it appears that your video has been reposted here - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o9q2pAMXXEI

Weston G
6 months ago

He looks too big for this bike. Is this the large model? I'm his size and I am thinking about buying this bike. But if that is the largest model, it looks too small

Benji Williams
4 months ago

Is this large or XL?

Fahdy Salim
6 months ago

Hi Court,
Do you know how much does it cost if the battery ever need to be replaced?
Thanks

calvin cooke
7 months ago

Love this model or the new giant fastRoad model..but what's turning me off getting one your man in the shop was saying in Ireland it's limited to 25kph which is 15.5mph so wondering do you's in the USA get the better spec ones ! 🤔😉

M CAT
8 months ago

Any front or rear shocks?

Mike B
7 months ago

Open your eyes and look. ;)

givenhopkins
8 months ago

I recently bought one of these for my work commute in LA. I ride 16 miles each way with about 1200 feet of elevation gain on the return trip. So far I would say it's a phenomenal bike for my purposes, although I did upgrade the saddle and throw on some ergon grips for comfort on these rough streets. As far as e bikes go I was extremely pleased with the Yamaha motor and before I'd done a test ride I was about to pull the tigger on a Bosch pedelec. No regrets so far.

M CAT
8 months ago

$3,000 is super reasonable. How many upgrades are available? Can you upgrade the display to a Yamaha display with Giant' software?

M CAT
8 months ago

Your reviews are excellent !! 4 star ****

DiGiTaLGrAvEDiGGA
9 months ago

I'd rather get a Haibike, Bulls, Specialized.

Donandnan Elmore
10 months ago

I did over 30 miles on Thursday. When I got up the hill to my driveway on fumes (me not the bike). I decided to walk the bike up my very steep driveway. I didn't like the walk feature. The button is hard to push and hurts the thumb. After about 120', I gave up walking and road it the rest of the way up.

Donandnan Elmore
10 months ago

Did my first longer ride on my Quick-E somewhat over 23 miles. A couple of serious road bike riders pulled up next to me on the flats asking about the bike and then they just pulled away and I was doing near 20mph. I got caught at a light and they really put some distance between us. When I caught sight of them, they really started to fly pulling even further away. About I guess 5 miles later, I caught up to them on a long up hill grade. When I passed the guy, he kind of groaned. His wife had put some distance between them and was going pretty well. When I caught up to her, she said, "I could used one of those." Then I really started pushing to put distance between us and never saw them again on the following 3 up hill miles.

I did feel that, on the longer up hill climbs, the motor cut out from time to time for a second or two and I wasn't anywhere near 28mph.

CHAKRI KUMAR
11 months ago

hello i am indian where you buy this cycle

Inc Gohd
7 months ago

Basically use google and look it up yourself, yeah. In all honesty I really don't think he was aiming for those obvious answers. Sometimes a little more information will go a long way just fyi.

Mike B
7 months ago

Search for "Giant E bike dealer"

Mike B
7 months ago

Inc Gohd: OR you could not be oblivious.

Inc Gohd
9 months ago

now how is it relevant what you are instead of giving your area info, where you're from. Perhaps people might know a dealer nearby.

Rory McCabe
11 months ago

what are those tires

David Hyder
8 months ago

Rory McCabe WTB Horizon Road Plus

Martin Glaze
11 months ago

Good review. One thing it seems like all your reviews are about expensive Ebike's Not everyone looking at ebikes have that kind of money. There is a lot of other Ebike's out there that are easier on the pocket book that you could review. !!! Please don't give me the story that you have to spend $ 5000.00 to get a good bike, not true !

Marc Filion
11 months ago

Electricbikereview.com Nice review and probably looking to buy that exact bike I think its good value!

My ultimate wish list would be:
-Bosch motor 28mph
-IGH
-belt drive

Does such a bike exist?!!