Giant Quick-E+ Review

Giant Quick E Plus Electric Bike Review
Giant Quick E Plus
Giant Quick E Plus Syncdrive Yamaha Mid Drive Motor With Cover
Giant Quick E Plus Energypak 36 Volt Battery
Giant Quick E Plus Lcd Display Panel Bars Stem
Giant Quick E Plus Locking Grips Button Pad
Giant Quick E Plus Axa Blueline30 Led Headlight
Giant Quick E Plus 20 Speed Shimano Deore Shadow
Giant Quick E Plus Composite Plastic Fenders
Giant Quick E Plus 3 Amp Battery Charger
Giant Quick E Plus Electric Bike Review
Giant Quick E Plus
Giant Quick E Plus Syncdrive Yamaha Mid Drive Motor With Cover
Giant Quick E Plus Energypak 36 Volt Battery
Giant Quick E Plus Lcd Display Panel Bars Stem
Giant Quick E Plus Locking Grips Button Pad
Giant Quick E Plus Axa Blueline30 Led Headlight
Giant Quick E Plus 20 Speed Shimano Deore Shadow
Giant Quick E Plus Composite Plastic Fenders
Giant Quick E Plus 3 Amp Battery Charger

Summary

  • A highly-polished electric city bike with sleek battery integration, full-protection fenders, premium LED lights running off the main battery and a minimalist pannier rack for hauling gear
  • Available in four frame sizes but only one traditional high-step diamond style, the bike is extremely efficient with a rigid alloy fork and slick hybrid tires, 20 speed Shimano Deore drivetrain
  • The Yamaha motor is extremely quiet but offers some of the highest torque output, this is a speed model that can reach 28 mph assisted, beautiful display and button pad with USB charging port for portable electronics
  • The display is not removable, the battery can be charged on or off the bike but is heavier and doesn't have a handle so be careful, great price and leading warranty with lots of dealers offering good support

Search EBR

Video Review

Trusted Advertisers

Introduction

Make:

Giant

Model:

Quick-E+

Price:

$3,000

Body Position:

Forward

Suggested Use:

Urban, Commuting

Electric Bike Class:

Speed Pedalec (Class 3)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Year Comprehensive, Lifetime Frame

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

50 lbs (22.67 kg)

Battery Weight:

7.5 lbs (3.4 kg)

Motor Weight:

7.6 lbs (3.44 kg)

Frame Material:

ALUXX SL-Grade Aluminum

Frame Sizes:

17 in (43.18 cm)19 in (48.26 cm)21 in (53.34 cm)23 in (58.42 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

Large: 21" Seat Tube, 22" Reach, 31" Stand Over Height, 73" Length

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

Charcoal Fighter Grey

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid ALUXX SL-Grade Aluminum, OverDrive, 9 mm Skewer with Bolts

Frame Rear Details:

9 mm Skewer with Bolts

Attachment Points:

Fender Bosses, Rear Rack Bosses, Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

20 Speed 2x10 Shimano Deore Shadow Rear Derailleur 11-36T, Shimano Deore Front Derailleur 36/48T

Shifter Details:

Shimano Deore Triggers on Left and Right

Cranks:

Custom Forged, 170 mm Length

Pedals:

Alloy Platform Cage

Headset:

Tapered 1-1/8" to 1-1/2"

Stem:

Alloy, 100 mm Length, 8° Angle, Three 5 mm Stacks, One 10 mm Stack

Handlebar:

Alloy Low-Rise, 31.8 Clamp Diameter, 29" Width

Brake Details:

Shimano M315 Hydraulic Disc with 180 mm Front Rotor 160 mm Rear Rotor, Shimano M315 Levers with Adjustable Reach

Grips:

Giant, Flat Rubber, Locking

Saddle:

Giant Contact Upright

Seat Post:

Alloy

Seat Post Length:

300 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

30.9 mm

Rims:

Giant Alloy, Double Wall, 32 Hole, Reinforcement Eyelets

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 14G Front, 13G Rear, Black with Nipples

Tire Brand:

Schwalbe Big Ben, 27.5" x 2.0"

Wheel Sizes:

27.5 in (69.85cm)

Tire Details:

Reflective Sidewall Stripe, Puncture Protection

Tube Details:

Schrader

Accessories:

Giant Composite Plastic Fenders, Rear Pannier Rack, Integrated AXA Blueline30 LED Headlight, Integrated Spanninga Vena LED Rear Light, Ursus Adjustable Length Kickstand

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, 1.8 lb 3 Amp Charger

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Giant SyncDrive by Yamaha

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Geared Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

250 watts

Motor Peak Output:

500 watts

Motor Torque:

80 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Giant EnergyPak

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

13.8 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

496.8 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

4.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

50 miles (80 km)

Estimated Max Range:

100 miles (161 km)

Display Type:

Giant, Fixed, Backlit, Monochrome LCD

Readouts:

Battery Info-Graphic, Battery Percentage, Speed, Assist Level (Off, Eco, Normal, Power), Cadence (RPM), Trip Time, Trip Distance, Average Speed, Max Speed, Odometer, Range,

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad on Right (On/Off, Up, Down, Light, i, Walk Mode), 5 Volt Micro USB Port on Left Side of Display

Drive Mode:

Advanced Pedal Assist (Wheel Speed, Pedal Torque, Pedal Cadence)

Top Speed:

28 mph (45 kph)

Trusted Advertisers



Written Review

While traveling through Southern California I visited Fullerton Bicycles and met Trevor, the owner of the Quick-E+ electric bike you see here. He’s a 128 lb road biker who loves distance rides on the weekend but also commutes ~35 miles daily to his job. Trevor bought this bike to use as a recovery tool and make his commutes a little faster and had some great things to share about it in the video review above. One of my favorite aspects of mainstream electric bicycles like the Quick-E+ is that they tend to come in more sizes and be available to touch and demo at shops. This is truly a mainstream e-bike priced at $3k delivering a 20 speed drivetrain, perfectly integrated motor and battery pack. The thing looks amazing and comes with a two-year warranty that is honored on-site with expert bike technicians. Yes, there are less expensive ebikes on the market but with the Quick-E+ you’re getting a high capacity battery, fast charger, reliable motor from Yamaha, integrated LED lights, full-length fenders that don’t rattle… and a minimalist rack for hauling panniers. It’s an awesome product and it’s fast, topping out at ~28 mph in the highest levels of assist using the higher gears. There are a few compromises like the heavy battery that wasn’t designed with a handle or ridge to make it easier to carry and the fixed display that might get faded and scratched at racks… but the biggest consideration is the lack of suspension. When you’re going faster and further, an all-Aluminum frame and rigid fork transmit bumps and vibration more directly into your back and arms. One way to address this to ride on only the smoothest streets, and even if they take you way out of the way, that’s fine because you can go super far with battery support. Another possible solution is to wear padded cycling pants and gloves and perhaps the biggest improvement would be a 30.9 mm BodyFloat suspension seat post (or other less-expensive suspension post). This is an ebike that blends in, positions weight low and center for excellent handling, uses mid to high level components, like the Shimano hydraulic brakes, and really brings electric bikes into the mainstream into the USA which has historicaly lagged behind Europe and Asia in this industry. It’s exciting.

Driving the Quick-E is a 250 watt nominally rated Yamaha mid-drive motor. It’s branded as SyncDrive through Giant and has a nice skid plate on the bottom for protection. To me, it’s one of the cleanest most hidden looking systems around and it delivers a lot of power… Don’t let the 250 watt rating fool you, it peaks around 500 watts and delivers 80 Newton meters of torque vs. 40 Nm for a lot of hub motors and 63 Nm for the Bosch Performance line motor. What it does not have is shift sensing or the range of RPM output that Bosch does. That means you have to shift more frequently to get those higher speeds and you have to do it with a bit more care. The motor controller is measuring rear wheel speed, pedal cadence and pedal torque rapidly as you ride and if you simply reduce pedal pressure as you go to shift the motor will naturally back off and reduce the potential for mashing. It works a lot like a normal bicycle and is compatible with two front sprockets vs. just one on Bosch… the Quick-E+ takes full advantage of this with a 10×2 setup and Shimano Deore derailleurs on both. One of the Yamaha marketing highlights is “zero cadence start” which means you don’t have to pedal very far before the motor kicks in. In my experience “zero” is a bit misleading because the bike won’t go if you’re standing still but putting pressure on the pedal (and that’s a good thing), I’d say it’s more like “very fast start” and that’s just what you need going from rest at a traffic light, stop sign or heading up a hill.

Powering the motor, backlit display panel and integrated lights is a 36 volt 13.8 amp hour above-average sized battery pack. On an efficient city bike like this, expect 50 to 100 miles per charge depending on your weight, the terrain, wind conditions and most importantly, the level of pedal assist chosen. There are three levels to choose from and as you get to the highest and switch gears to reach 20+ mph speeds your efficiency will drop significantly. It’s fun to ride fast but I really loved how detailed the battery readout was (with percentage) along with the dynamic range estimator readout because it’s no fun getting stuck way out on a 50 lb bicycle. Yes, the bike still pedals fine unpowered, it’s actually not that bad, but climbing with it would be a chore… especially after knowing what the assist felt like. You could always get some clip-on panniers and bring the 1.7 lb charger along. It puts out 3 Amps for faster than average fills and has a nice metal end piece that fits into the battery pack on or off the bike. I just want to say, the plug interface on the battery is very nice, I like that the rubber flap seats easily and that the battery has an LED readout on it (for a quick look if you haven’t ridden for a while). The bit area of opportunity with this battery is how you’d hold and carry it. The pack is heavier than competing products at ~7.5 lbs and the exterior is slick and rounded… dropping it would be a $700+ mistake and even scratching it would be sad given the beautiful paint matched exterior. I think I’d probably leave mine on the bike and use the awesome kickstand to keep the whole thing secure while charging.

Operating the bike is a breeze with just one step on/off button at the control pad (near the left grip). The display panel is large enough to read but not so large that it dominates the cockpit which already has the brake levers and two sets of trigger shifters, a bell and the button pad. The display lights up when you press the light button on that pad along with the headlight and tail light. Both components are nicer than average and I LOVE that the headlight has little windows on the sides so you will be seen more easily. It’s not shown in my photos or the video but the standard Schwalbe Big Ben tires have reflective sidewall stripes to further increase your visual footprint. As mentioned earlier, this bike is pretty stiff and the larger high-quality tires are the one big comfort compromise. They aren’t as efficient or light as slimmer tires but I’d make the trade any day. So back to the display panel, it lists your speed, a bunch of trip stats including pedal cadence and the level of assist chosen. Arrowing up and down through the levels is easy with a few minutes of practice, it can be done by touch even without looking down once you get how it works.

Clearly I’m impressed with this bike, for the price (even if it sounds high to non-ebikers) you’re getting a LOT of value. The local dealer support cannot be overstated, Giant shops in the US are probably staffed by some reluctant service techs who think ebikes are cheating… but if Trevor is any indication, they are opening their minds and recognizing how useful the technology can be and that’s awesome because they know bicycles better than most. I love that Trevor found his own uses for this bike and was enjoying it. He still rides a normal unpowered bike but can have in-between days to recover without doing nothing and his commute got a lot more tolerable. Yes, I personally would swap the seat post for something more forgiving (and maybe even the stem) but I ride all over and have a sensitive back and neck to start. For most people, this will just be a blast to ride and it looks SO good. It blends in and uses components that will hold up for the long term… even if you don’t shift perfectly. It’s great to go fast without producing a lot of noise or compromising much on handling. Big thanks to Giant for partnering with me on this post and Fullerton Bicycles for having me into their shop all day getting in their way :P thanks for your patience and help Trevor!

Pros:

  • The bike looks beautiful, comes in four frame sizes for a good fit and rides solid, I’m glad they opted for larger tires to help smooth out some of the bumps given that it’s a speed pedelec capable of 28 mph assisted riding
  • Clean tight fenders extend way down and mostly stay out of your way, when turning sharp the front fender could collide with your toes if you have large feet, I like that the rear fender is secured by the pannier rack
  • Front and rear integrated LED lights keep you visible from all sides (notice the side windows on the headlight) and don’t require the hassle of being taking off to charge separately or keep secured when parking… they’re more permanently affixed to the frame, the bike also comes with reflective tires standard
  • Great kickstand, it’s adjustable length and positioned towards the rear of the bike so it won’t collide with your pedals, I like to move the cranks around when cleaning the bike and usually have my bike held up with the kickstand so it’s a nice little convenience to be able to do that without issue here
  • Nice extras including the rack, a flick bell and bottle cage bosses for bringing liquid, a folding lock or mini pump
  • Since Giant is using the Yamaha motor, they were able to custom design their battery and display… I think they did well because both are user-friendly and blend in, the remote button pad for the display is easy to reach and intuitive to use
  • The battery charger is very nice, way better than the huge and heavy charger that Haibike uses for their Yamaha powered models in years past, it’s small, light and faster than average at 3 Amp output, also, the plug interface is metal so it won’t crack as easily
  • At the bottom bracket you’ve got two cogs vs. just one on a lot of mid-drive electric bikes and that means more pedal cadence options and gearing range, I love that they created a shield to protect the motor down there
  • All of the shift cables and wiring are internally routed so the frame looks super clean and you shouldn’t have as many snags lifting or putting it on a rack
  • The pannier rack in the rear has protrusions along the inner top section of the tube to keep bags from sliding forward and back, it also keeps panniers lower to improve handling vs. lifting them way up high like regular aftermarket bolt-on racks
  • The rear wheel has thicker spokes to support the weight of panniers and cargo, both rims use reinforcement eyelets to keep them from cracking… just a good sturdy build overall that can handle higher speeds and more force from electric assist
  • I’m a big fan of hydraulic disc brakes, especially for ebikes, the added weight of the bike (this one is ~50 lbs) combined with assisted speed means that braking is important and hydraulic is just easier to pull and the Quick-E+ uses Shimano with adjustable-reach levers that would work better if you’ve got gloves on or have smaller hands
  • Awesome charge port cover… the rubber flap is large but easy to stick in and it’s mounted left to right so it closes in the direction of your bikes forward movement, you can charge this pack on or off the bike and I like that the battery has an LED charge level indicator on top where you can use it anytime for a quick update on how full it is
  • Considering how much power the battery offers, it’s awesome to have a USB charging port on the right side of the display to fill your phone (useful if you ride with Strava or other GPS apps)
  • To me, this electric bike offers amazing value because it comes frome one of the major manufacturers with a wide network of experienced dealers, comes in a range of sizes, has a two-year warranty and is using quality motor, battery and drivetrain systems
  • The display shows battery percentage and range estimation that dynamically changes as you arrow up or down through different levels of assist, you should never struggle to plan trips with this ebike because it gives you such great feedback… with the rigid frame and efficient tires the bike gets excellent range
  • The button pad is easy to reach and use while riding, even without looking down it’s possible to change assist levels, the rubberized top seemed well sealed against water, this bike should hold up very well in wet environments with the fenders and protected display sytems
  • I like that the bike has a functioning walk mode, it’s a bit heavier and might have bags on the rack so this feature is cool (just hold the walk button while in any of the three assist levels)

Cons:

  • The battery looks nice and works well enough but is heavier than average due to the high capacity and there isn’t a handle built in so just be careful when taking it off and carrying it around
  • All-Aluminum frame is sturdy and light but less forgiving than if the rigid fork were Carbon fiber or Steel… or had some sort of suspension, consider a 30.9 mm Thudbuster or BodyFloat to enhance your comfort (you might need a shim to fit the seat post diameter depending on which product you buy)
  • Both wheels are secured with nuts instead of quick release which requires tools… but also keeps them safer when locking in public, this isn’t a huge con, just something to consider if you have to do maintenance or like to transport the bike in the back of a car
  • The Quick-E+ only comes in one frame style, a very traditional high-step that looks good and feels solid but isn’t as easy to stand over for petite or inexperienced riders, you might have to use tippie toes if you get the wrong size frame but the upside is that it hangs on racks easier and has room for the bottle cage bosses
  • The motor is quiet, efficient and powerful (putting out 80 Nm of peak torque) but doesn’t offer shift sensing technology and has a more limited RPM output range so you have to shift frequently, if you’re not thoughtful about how you do it (ease off when shifting) it could wear the chain, sprockets and derailleur more quickly
  • The charge port on the battery is mostly out of the way but if you had the charger plugged in there’s a chance that it could get bumped by the left crank arm so be careful

Resources:

Trusted Advertisers

More Giant Reviews

Giant Full-E+ 1 Review

  • MSRP: $5,300
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

A full suspension electric mountain bike with capable hardware, excellent dealer support and impressive range, four frame sizes accommodate a range of riders, impressive pricepoint. 22-speed drivetrain with Shimano Deore XT Shadow Plus allows you to engage a clutch to…...

Giant Road-E+ Review

  • MSRP: $4,000
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

An aggressive road bike with 28 mph top electric-assisted speed, drop bars and sport saddle, you get Shimano Ultegra rear and 105 front derailleurs with 22 gear combinations to work with. Shimano hydraulic disc brakes offer powerful stops and tend to stay cleaner than rim brakes,…...

Roman
5 months ago

Hey Court, thanks for the review, this is a bike I’ve been considering for a while. Can you talk about the sizing? What size did you test and what size do you usually ride? I’ve cross shopped this with the Specialized Turbo X, which do you think gets the nod for a 22 mile roundtrip commute with a bit of gravel?

Reply
Court Rye
5 months ago

Hi Roman! I believe I was on the larger frame size but cannot say for sure. Trevor is a taller guy and I remember the bike feeling large, it’s great to visit a dealer and try them out if you can. I believe Giant is requiring their dealers to bring a few ebikes into their shops. I love the efficiency of the Giant mid-drive and how beautiful it looks but the Turbo X suspension fork is a big deal for me given the speed produced. I have sensitive wrists, arms, shoulders, neck and back. For this reason, I usually only buy full suspension ebikes now so I’m a bit extreme ;)

Honestly, this is a great product at a great price. I’m being honest about my appreciation of suspension but that’s just me. Trevor seemed very happy with this bike for himself and I enjoyed test riding it!

Reply
Shaggy
5 months ago

Nice to see one of the big 3 (Trek, Specialized, Giant) make an ebike. Should help the consumer. Court, I am wondering if the Yamaha cuts out early due to the size of the front chainring or the software being set to stop assisting once the sensors indicate a certain pedal crank rpm? Thx.

Reply
Court Rye
5 months ago

Hi Shaggy! I think it’s just designed with a different RPM range… like it won’t go any faster up to a certain point whereas Bosch will. Bosch also stops but I find the bit of extra RPM at the higher end to be more comfortable and supportive of my ride style. I have hurt knees and the higher RPM requires less pressure on non-electric bikes so that’s how I prefer to ride now. It’s not a deal killer, I know my feedback on this characteristic has rubbed some people the wrong way and they get defensive. To me it’s just a fact and I’m trying to be open about it and show it on video. If you get onto one of these at a dealer and compare it to Bosch or Brose back to back and emphasize fast pedaling while in higher gears going for the top speed… I think you’ll see what I mean. I hope this helps!

Reply
Carter
5 months ago

This is very helpful. Your review just pushed the Quick-e (terrible name) into my top 3 ebikes to consider, along with the new Vado when it comes out and the Trek Super Commuter+ if I win the lottery (ha). Obviously I’m one of those who prioritizes name brand and dealer support– Giant’s 2 year warranty is a big plus as well.

Court, I have a suggestion for your reviews. The main reason I’m looking at buying an ebike is, at 55 and 185 lbs, I struggle too much getting up the hills around Seattle on my 20-50 mile fun rides. The steeper climbs are really the only times I need assist (tho I don’t pretend I won’t use it at other times.) I suspect I’m not the only prospective ebike buyer in this position. Towards that end, it’d be super helpful if you were able to speak to the relative performance of the bikes you review in providing assist on longer and steeper climbs. Of course I understand that may not be possible if you’re testing the bike in a flat region- still.

I rode my cousin’s Stromer in the San Francisco hills last summer and marveled at how I flew up the (steep!) hills, but was disappointed when the base model Specialized Turbo I test rode (twice) failed to provide the same amount of assist. If you were able to try out your review bikes on hills where possible and give some feedback as to how they performed I could really use that information. Thanks so much!

Reply
Court Rye
5 months ago

Good suggestion Carter, I do seek out hills and completely see how it helps people like you to get an understanding and see performance. I’m relatively light weight and active so even that can be misleading I suppose. Regarding the Quick-E+, I’d say it is a very capable climber given the mid-motor and high torque (80 Nm) that Yamaha delivers. I’d love to hear your thoughts on how it performs vs. a Stromer but would compare it favorably based on my own experiences. It’s different, being center-driven, but better if you shift accordingly… you don’t have to push as hard as with the newer Stromer ST1 X.

Reply
Brian
4 months ago

I noticed that this US version speed pedelec comes with a relatively weak Axa Blueline 30 headlight…the European s-pedelec versions have the Supernova m-99, even the Quick-e+ 25 comes with the Axa Blueline 50 in the European models. I would think that a stronger light should be a safety feature for any s-pedelec. Any thoughts on this?

Reply
Court Rye
4 months ago

Interesting, thanks for noticing and sharing this detail Brian. I guess it’s a bummer that the US got downgraded… unless ours is also less expensive? We have a lot of electric bikes out here that bend the rules with speed and power which don’t have ANY lights. I don’t know enough about the situation to make a judgment call but I’m inclined to trust that Giant is making decent decisions? I felt that the rest of the product was well thought-out?

Reply
Emerson Moncure
4 months ago

Hey Court, I just discovered electricbikereview.com and I love it! The reviews on this channel are informed, thorough and extremely well communicated. Currently I commute to work on a Giant brand Seek 3 (non-electric) I bought back in 2012 for $700. Though I really like my bike, I’ve been feeling like its time for an upgrade. However, I never would have considered an e-bike (let alone a $3000 e-bike) until I watched the EBR review of the Giant Quick-E! To be honest, I’m not a particularly knowledgeable consumer when it comes to bikes, and I rely heavily on an informed sales person to help me find the right fit. The danger there is, I don’t always get an informed sales person! However after watching a number of EBR reviews I have a new understanding of the value of electric bikes, and particularly the value of specific products being offered! Considering my needs and compared to other e-bikes of this quality, $3000 really seems a good price vs. value for the Giant Quick E. It even has the same graphite grey/black color scheme as my old Seek 3. I’m sold! This newly informed rider thanks you for your top quality reviews!

Reply
Court Rye
4 months ago

Hey Emerson! You totally made my day, thanks for sharing a bit about yourself and what it’s like to be a consumer trying to navigate the space. I’m glad the site has helped you, that’s my goal! And, feel free to share or connect further in the forums. I do my best as an information source but have limited experience post-purchase. I feel like individuals connecting directly is an authentic way to identify issues, fixes, and best uses. Have a great time out there and thanks again!

Reply
Randy Emer
4 months ago

Hey Court, I love watching your reviews, they’re incredibly helpful and informative. I’m a very recreational rider in the market for an e-bike. I seem to have narrowed the choice down to two: the Giant Quick-E above, and the Trek Dual Sport +. They seem very similar. What are your thoughts? You are providing a tremendous service with your enthusiastic reviews!!!

Reply
Court Rye
4 months ago

Hi Randy! Great bikes… both companies are large and trustworthy but I prefer the Giant in this case because it has a streamlined battery, integrated lights, fenders and a basic rack. I guess it depends on the sort of rides you want to take, but I appreciate the added utility. Both drive systems are good and the 2017 Shimano batteries can be charged on-bike just like the Giant Quick-E+ Yamaha battery. I hope this helps! Would love to hear what you decide on and how it works for you. Feel free to poke around the forums too and ask for feedback from actual owners :)

Reply
Cristian
4 months ago

Hi, I’m interested in this bike but I read about the “cons” that both wheels are secured. I’m not from the US but I’ll be there in a couple of weeks, I would like to dismantle to transport by flight…. Would be easier for me to transport? Thanks!

Reply
Court Rye
4 months ago

Hi Cristian! First off, you might have to ship the battery separately from the bike because most commercial airlines do not allow you to bring large Lithium-ion batteries onboard. They won’t even let you check them… consider reaching out to a hazmat certified shipper like Propel Bikes in New York or ask your dealer. Second, it’s pretty easy to use a basic set of tools to get the wheels off of this bike. You might want to purchase a large padded bike box because checking these things could end up damaging them. This is just the start but I hope it helps you to reconsider the shipping plan… there’s a lot more than just taking the wheels off to consider :)

Reply
Samuel
3 months ago

Hi Court! Thank you for your excellent reviews, they will help me a lot in choosing an E-bike, bet on the future and leave the car aside.

Do you have something to say about the quality of the battery? I think that most bicycle brands use electrical components from manufacturers that have the experience and the technology to produce motors, controls and batteries. So I wonder how good quality is a battery from Giant and its lifespan.

I’m thinking about buying an E-bike for my daily commuting (which is 20 km) and stop using the car, but batteries are a big concern to me: how long they last, what to do when a battery has reached maximum cycle capacity (where to recycle?) and how long manufacturers will support an old model with replacement batteries. Would you consider this before choosing an e-bike?

Reply
Court Rye
3 months ago

Hi Samuel! Batteries are one of the most sensitive and expensive parts of electric bikes but if you get one that’s relatively new and provided by a large, trusted manufacturer like Giant, Specialized, Trek or any Bosch powered product, I think you’re doing great. These companies tend to cost a little more but have long-term customer service and replacement options. Most batteries, if not dropped and stored in cool dry locations and kept at ~80% for long term storage, should last for several years and maybe longer :)

Reply
Chuck
3 months ago

Hi Court,

Yet another excellent review from you! Thanks very much for that. One of those Giant Quick-e+ pluses passed through the bike shop I work at last week and unfortunately I was far too busy to give it a proper look-over so I have a few questions I hope you can answer. Giant didn’t cover enough in the specs on their site, hence me asking you. Beyond that, I have a few words. I’ve got to say, that bike really caught my eye. It looks like a really stout build and it’s just a good looking bike overall from the few minutes I had with it.

  • The fork looks to be tapered (1-1/8″ to 1-1/2″). Did you notice that?
  • Did the chainring spider look like a standard BCD? With what they spec I’m thinking it’s 104mm like a ‘cross bike.
  • I didn’t see any brake cutouts on the bike so I’m assuming the pedalec setup is sensitive enough to shut down power quickly. Did you notice anything lagging in power cut-off when braking or am I totally wrong about the lack of brake cut-outs?

Those first two questions may seem a bit nerdy but I’m going to want to tweak that bike some. Not much, just some. It seems just about perfect as-is. Oh and speaking of bike tweaks you often mention seatposts like the Cane Creek Thudbuster. I’d like to point out another one I think is worth considering. The Niner RDO carbon seatpost. It’s not going to have anywhere near as much give as a Thudbuster but it is intentionally built with some compliance and dampening in mind. I was pretty skeptical about the claim but after trying one I now run them on a couple of my bikes and they do make a very noticeable difference at far less weight and with a clean look. Other people who have ridden my bikes have remarked on how good they feel without me saying a word about them. They are a bit pricey but definitely worth it in my opinion. The setback model gives even a little more comfort if that’s something someone can properly fit on their bike.

I really like that the Quick-e comes out of the box with plump 650B wheels vs. 700c. 700c has its merits (I love my gravel bike!) but 650B I think is just best all around for something utilitarian like that bike. Far more stout and comfortable. Not only that but I think 650B wheels are a better choice than 700c for a class 3 ebike. For those not familiar with the terrifyingly sketchy fun of going 40+ mph on skinny little 23c tires (or 30+ on fat gravel bike tires) those 650B fatties will go a long way in adding safety and confidence in the 20-30MPH range. Also, I know those WTB tires the owner in the video upgraded to and they are very smooth and efficient. Probably a great upgrade. That’s not to say that the stock Schwalbe Big Bens are not good. They too are an excellent tire.

That pannier rack, the overall clean lines of the bike along with the highly functional lighting and clean, simple dashboard grabbed my attention right away as I was walking by it at my shop last week and I had to take a second look and prod n’ poke the bike for a couple of minutes. I think the price is perfect too. I’m thinking about one quite seriously. The days I don’t feel like commuting by bike I ride my motorcycle and I’d like to get away from that. For those days that I don’t want to deal with changing out of my kit, getting grimy or am just feeling lazy and just want to throw my leg over a bike and go without doing anything special then pedaling a little less hard seems to fit the bill. I’ve borrowed a few ebikes from my shop to try them out for commuting and I get it now. I think motos trump a car most of the time for personal transport here in SoCal. But I’m 70/30 bike/moto in my commuting habits now and the moto is getting a bit tedious. For my short travels I do most of the time I’d rather be on a bike. My family has been car-light for a few years now and I’m thinking something like that bike may just scratch my itch and keep me car-light for a few more years.

Thanks for all of your hard work on these great reviews!

Reply
Court Rye
3 months ago

Hi Chuck! Happy to help with the specs… It does have a tapered head tube and no, there are not motor inhibitors built in. Most of the new advanced mid-drive ebikes do not use cutoff switches or have throttles, I guess they are quick enough that the inhibitor is not needed? Unfortunately, I cannot answer the last question about chainring but my guess is that it does use a standard BCD.

Good call on the carbon seat post, have you seen the one that Specialized made? Used to be called the “Cobl Gobl-R” but the official name is now CB-R :)

Reply
Chuck
3 months ago

Oh yeah, I forgot about that one from Specialized! Looks like another good choice. It’s pretty interesting some of the carbon layups manufactures are trying these days and how they can control stuff like compliance and direction of flex. Much more advanced (and durable) than the old days of carbon.

Mike
2 months ago

Hey Court! Your website is awesome. I am a first time buyer and this is by far the best source I have found. A quick question, do you know (or know how I can determine) when the 2018 Quick-e+ will come out? I went to a local dealer and he seemed to think it will be the next few weeks. Thank you!

Reply
Court Rye
2 months ago

Wow, that sounds crazy soon? I guess the 2017 model has been around for a while now but I feel like we are mid-season. Sometimes they get demo models for press events and shows like Eurobike and Interbike (many of their bikes are designed for a European audience and then brought to the US). I’ll ask my contacts at Giant and see if we get anything… Glad you like the site Mike!

Reply
Mike
2 months ago

Great, thank you. I searched online and could not find any information about the expected release date.

giantbike
2 months ago

Court, if difference in price was not a factor, would you go with the Lacuba evo 45 or the Giant for a 30 mile total commute?

Reply
Court Rye
2 months ago

Hmm… I’d probably go with the Lacuba EVO E45 in mid-step with that suspension fork. I care a lot about comfort and could see myself commuting with these bikes. Even though the Giant Quick-E+ looks nicer to me, the Bulls offers similar utility (lights, fenders) and even has that adjustable bar and ergo grips. One of the other factors I consider is motor type and I prefer the Brose drive vs. the older Yamaha with limited RPM because I like to spin fast. I really like the pricepoint and integrated look of the Giant but my priority is comfort, especially at higher speeds. One other factor might be if there was a dealer nearby, you could get the Giant, swap in a suspension fork, outfit it with nice accessories and maybe a riser stem or swept back bar and ergo grips for similar price as the Bulls. There are many ways to go with this. Hope my thoughts help you decide :)

Reply
giantbike
2 months ago

Yeah, the huge 203mm brakes on the e45 and the 650w battery are nice adds too. I agree the Giant looks great. I’m a big fan of the Brose motor and have many hours on one, but I have limited experience with the Yamaha. It’s nice to see so much competition brewing in the motor department. It would be great if someone could come up with some common metrics on how to compare motors based on torque and efficiency as it gets quickly complicated when you add speed and cadence to the equation. Seems like the only way to get a feel is to ride the bike. It’s great to see so many class 3’s coming out, I agree with your opinion that class 3s are approaching the ability to replace a car, at least for commuting.

Robert Foote
7 days ago

The lack of a proper rear rack (one that extends above the fender and readily allows for a rear bag or purse to be carried without panniers) is absurd. It is sad that some Giant marketing weasel chose form over function on an accessory that will be used quite often. Another huge oversight is the lack of a guard for the large chain-ring. People using this bike are very likely to be wearing pants and should not have to put on a pants clip. These two items represent low-hanging fruit – how they could be overlooked is something that Giant should be very much ashamed of. One can only wonder if they can’t get the simple shit right, what about the really difficult stuff???

Reply
Court Rye
7 days ago

I see where you’re coming from but feel that the minimalist pannier arms and multi-chainring setup make sense here. It can get cluttered and rattly with a big plastic chain cover that’s large enough to cover a front derailleur, and if they had a platform rack in the rear the bike just wouldn’t look as sleek and would definitely weigh more (maybe half a pound?) I see why they chose these things, there are definitely other e-bikes out there which do have full sized racks and protected chains, it seems like they did choose form over a bit of function, but it’s not as extreme as it could have been with no support arms or a single chainring and no cover.

Reply
Robert Foote
7 days ago

Thank you for taking the time to respond, though I must respectfully disagree on one point. I do not believe it is even possible to purchase a bicycle rack that can only accommodate panniers. There is a good reason for this. The additional weight to provide the standard rectangular upper platform is insignificant (not even close to half a pound). If the utility of a proper rack upper platform justifies the additional weight on a typical 27 lb touring bike, it certainly is not a factor on a 50 lb e-bike. I simply find it annoying that after spending $3K on an e-bike, I would need to spend another $100 or more for panniers so that my wife can carry her purse. Panniers would also weigh far more than the additional aluminum tubing. Regarding my other complaint, I was unclear as to my suggested modification. I have no problem with the double chain-rings, and certainly wasn’t lobbying for a fully enclosed chain. What I was referring to is a bolt-on, aluminum alloy (not plastic) chain-ring guard. These guards are very light, robust, and practical. They have been used on single, double and triple chain-ring cranksets for decades.

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

mrgold35
3 hours ago

I would review EBR for both Voltbike and Radrover to look at the fine details of both bikes. I was on the fence a year ago trying to decide between the same two bikes for the same $$$ (cheaper shipping with Volt). What I liked about the Radrover was it was a fat tire bike with ebike components added. I could repair/replace as needed any parts once the warranty ran out. I can even transfer all the ebike components to another fat tire bike and convert the Radrover into a regular pedal bike. Because the battery is standard, I can also upgrade up to 52v/13.5ah version for more power and range from Luna Cycle because the standard Dolphin battery pack fits into the Radrover battery tray. What also pushed me towards the Radrover was:

- riding position was more upright with a shorter handlebar stem
- had ergonomic grips for added comfort
- has a twist throttle with on/off switch, later added an aftermarket thumb throttle attachment I use when trail riding
- throttle is available with full 750 watts of power in PAS 0-5, comes in handy if you need to walk your bike up inclines or stairs
- the controller is made to deliver full power you are set for until power is depleted (kinda like a car giving you full power until you run out of gas).
- front suspension has a lock-out feature
- 180mm brakes front and back
- neoprene slap guard for chain
- three built-in water bottle mounts (either side of upper top tube and one on down tube facing the ground)
- two different colors for his and her ebikes
- standard rack ready connections (went with Topeak fat tire rack)
- more comfy standard seat
- option for PAS 0
- quick release on front wheels
- I can add a triangle bag to cover the battery to dry, dust free, and warmer during winter rides
- you can adjust the motor cut off speed in the LCD screen setup, you can set the RR from 7 to 24.8 mph motor cut off.

This was a year ago and I'm sure Voltbikes has made upgrades since then.

Alexander T.
9 hours ago

I purchased a Townie Commute Go! 8i less than a week ago and have ridden approximately 10 miles on it. It rides nicely. One of the features of the bike is a built in frame lock for quick stops in relatively secure areas. The frame lock has the Abus brand name on it. I found the frame lock difficult to use the first 3 times I used it. It was a little difficult to insert the key and it has a spring loaded lever which is used as part of the locking process. The key was sticky in the lock and I would have to fuss with it to get the key to come out after loading the spring lever. This frame lock requires that the key stay inserted when unlocked, which means that the key (and key ring) dangle at your side as you ride. And this pretty much forces one to use the frame lock when stopped, even if using an external lock. Otherwise someone could come along, see the key hanging out, lock the bike, and then steal the battery after removing the key. The third time I went to use the frame lock, it failed in the locked position. It looks like the tumbler fell into the lock. This was incredibly inconvenient, as I couldn't roll the bike away after removing my external lock. It had to be transported to a bike repair shop by vehicle.

1/1
jharlow77
1 day ago

Ok thanks for the response. I ordered direct from them today and supposedly it would ship out by the end of the week so I'll update as it goes along. Out of curiosity again, what other ebikes were you looking at? I was about to get a Motiv stash but I was hesitant about the price, also the Voltbike Urban. Yes I was looking at folding bikes for a 2 mile commute but the CC with the upgrades sold me. That and Juiced email respsonses were pretty quick.
Man there were so many I looked at I can hardly remember them all but the main companies I considered were Rad Power Bikes, Easy Motion, and Giant. Nothing seemed to come close to the price per features of the Juiced bikes. I test rode an original CrossCurrent and decided to add the torque sensor to my AIR order. It feels so much more fluid than the cadence sensor only.

sucka free
2 days ago

Ok thanks for the response. I ordered direct from them today and supposedly it would ship out by the end of the week so I'll update as it goes along. Out of curiosity again, what other ebikes were you looking at? I was about to get a Motiv stash but I was hesitant about the price, also the Voltbike Urban. Yes I was looking at folding bikes for a 2 mile commute but the CC with the upgrades sold me. That and Juiced email respsonses were pretty quick.

dsvogel
3 days ago

It IS possible to make head/tail lights that are wired into the battery turn OFF and STAY OFF. I wanted to take some time before posting an update to make sure my assessment of the functioning of lights on the Raleigh Redux IE was accurate. I purchased a Light & Motion Nip 800 headlight and Tuck tail light, and wired them into the existing female blade connectors that come with the bike. The headlight connector is coming out of the top of the downtube, and the other was located on the left chainstay of my bike.

I had emailed Raleigh's electric bike division about this issue, eventually communicating with President Larry Pizzi, who was extremely helpful and interested in this problem. I also emailed Light&Motion support, Brose GmbH who couldn't help and suggested I contact BMZ GmbH (the battery manufacturer)... but got nowhere with them.

I ultimately discovered that my propensity to always turn the bike off at the battery was causing the erratic blinking light behavior. So to make this a quick explanation, here are the three things to know about turning off your lights on this particular bike:

The Light button on the computer doesn't work. Like you, I really wanted this to work. Larry indicated that they were following the European standard of having the lights always on for Class 3 eBikes, and therefore the Light button on the computer would not have any effect on the lights at all. There won't be a firmware update or any kind of "fix" to make this button work on the bike. I find it pretty easy to reach down and adjust the Nip 800 light directly without looking. I did let Larry know that the Brose manual that comes with the bike has a section about the functionality of this Light button that they need to be aware of.

You must turn the computer off FIRST. So the trick is to turn off the computer first. Hitting the power button at the top of the computer also turns off the lights. When you then turn off the battery (if you are so inclined) the lights stay off. No more blinking. This is the only way to get the lights to stay off, short of removing the battery altogether.

Moving the bike can cause the lights to blink. You get the lights turned off, move your bike, and now what the heck?! They are blinking again!! I think this may be triggered by the wheel magnet on the back tire moving past the sensor. When this happens, you have to turn the bike ON at the battery, and then turn the computer off again.

Not the most ideal solution, but I'm happy that it no longer looks like I'm keeping an aircraft parked in my garage at night. I've been VERY happy with the Nip/Tuck system and the amount of light they both provide. I also rather like that the lights come on without me thinking about it.

Lastly, if you are interested in using proper male blade connectors to fit the female connectors know that these are 2.8mm or 0.110 inch wide connectors. I purchased item #MST1620 from Cycle Terminal (link to the 0110 connectors page), and wound up snipping the ends of the blade to shorten it a bit. Worked like a charm! They are so cheap that I got a few extra in case I screwed one up. And I did. I also used dielectric grease and heat shrink tubing for the ultimate weather proofing. There are ample videos you can find that show you how to properly crimp a blade on a wire.

Let me know if you have questions, or "Like" this post if you found it helpful. ;)

EddieJ
3 days ago

Hi Ann, I have to say that in nearly four years of running a tubeless set up, I have yet to experience a single flat tyre. I have had many occasions where thorns or even flint have punctured or pierced the tyre, but on each occasion the sealant has filled the holes. I do carry a tubeless repair/plug kit, and it does look as though it would form a very quick fix. I should really play with an old set of tyres just to prove to myself that it does work.

One thing to watch when buying a bike, is that many are sold as being tubeless compatible, which often confuses owners into thinking that the bike is all set up run tubeless. Even I was once caught out with that one.

Tubeless compatible means exactly that, the wheel rim can be set up to run tubeless, but isn't actually ready to do so.

Tubeless ready, means that apart from fitting a valve, the wheel is ready to go, with no further prep required.

It might sound obvious, but it is an easy mistake to make.

Falken
4 days ago

Great! I'll have to take another look at that. I will give a quick report on forks/shipping etc. when they arrive.

noah
4 days ago

Sorry, Noah. Close, but no cigar :)

International rules from the post on page #2 of this thread:

"With the approval of the operator, portable electronic devices may contain lithium ion batteries exceeding 100 Wh, but not exceeding 160 Wh and no more than two individually protected lithium ion batteries each exceeding 100 Wh, but not exceeding 160 Wh, may be carried per person as spare batteries in carry-on baggage".

Translation: Airline "might" allow max 160 WH each, max 320 WH total of 2 batteries.

This is a minor variation from domestic US FAA rules, where they allow same 2*160WH but without the airline approval.

Hi!

Thanks for the quick reply friends!

Would it be possible then to just bring the body of the bike and get a new battery in the USA? Or do electric bikes need specific batteries made to fit them?

Thanks again for humouring a newbie!

Roxlimn
5 days ago

The Giant brand rear rack should work well. They can either attach to side frame eyelets, or to the center eyelet that also holds the fenders. The bottom of the rack mounts directly onto the rear quick-release axle - the rack comes with a longer replacement axle for the rear wheel.

J.R.
4 days ago

If my memory serves me correctly, Israel has different laws governing ebikes, than North America. I believe they're akin to E.U. laws. I assume that would include Israeli controlled territories of Palestine. I don't remember reading anything on Palestinian laws for ebikes. In Israel ebikes are limited to 250 watts of power, and 25 kph speed and I don't think throttles are allowed. You may not be able to import either bike Ann noted above, to be used in the region. Licensing, insurance and protective gear vary wildly from country to country. Check your local regulations before going too far researching bikes.

Good luck.

Edit: I just did a quick search and found this.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_bicycle_laws

http://m.jpost.com/Enviro-Tech/Regulations-for-electric-bicycles-to-take-effect-September-1-368537

JayVee
6 days ago

I also found a cool, free program for the iPhone called “Vidometer” I really like how they did the overlays and it’s pretty neat not having to do any post-production work. Although there is a Horizon / Tilt overlay, no Grade % information is provided, which for a cyclist video adds a lot of value.

They also sell bike mount cases for the iPhone with a quick change lens system so you can add a 170 degree lens like a GoPro.

Feel free to post a video. I'm curious about any other ways to do this. Because it's true that making these videos takes a lot of 'production' and is time-consuming.

About your video creation issue, I was wondering if you had the following installed:

- Microsoft .NET framework 4.7
- Microsoft Visual C++ 2015 redistributable (I have version 14.0.23026)

Anyway, when I install Windows 10, I'll update the info here on whether it works or not. I sort of like Dashware even if it's not the easiest to use.

P.S. I'm still on Windows 7.

fredi
6 days ago

I also found a cool, free program for the iPhone called “Vidometer” I really like how they did the overlays and it’s pretty neat not having to do any post-production work. Although there is a Horizon / Tilt overlay, no Grade % information is provided, which for a cyclist video adds a lot of value.

They also sell bike mount cases for the iPhone with a quick change lens system so you can add a 170 degree lens like a GoPro.

JayVee
6 days ago

First thing I tried, but Win 8 reported I have a"newer" version. RaceRender is faster but doesn't look as nice, they also have a Mac version.

I will be 'migrating' to Windows 10 soon, so I should have the same problems as you. I'm a Mac user, so that means an extra VM.

I made a quick test with Race Render below. Some thoughts:

Pros:

- Both Mac and PC versions.
- Files join automatically.
- It has the same functionality as Dashware. You can edit, synch, etc.
- It has a green screen capability included, which is important if you want to edit the video in an external editor.

Cons:

- It's not free. You only get 3 minutes of free video creation.
- It's not particularly 'cycle friendly'. There are no overlays included for cyclists from what I can see. You have to make the grade tool yourself. I made a primitive one (bottom right hand of the screen).
- You can choose between Kms and Miles, but elevation data is given in feet (didn't find out how to switch to meters).
- Distance is shown in miles but speed in Kms. Odd...

Saratoga Dave
6 days ago

It turns out I also developed this problem, or a similar one, though in my case it was stuck in Off. Wouldn't do anything!

Here is the way that turned out, you may have the same thing (from the thread I started on the issue)

RESOLUTION
So in our last exciting episode, I had dropped the bike off Saturday afternoon at my LBS. They had not seen this one, and said they would call Bosch on Monday and report back.

Sure enough, Monday (yesterday) around 11AM they had the thing fixed. During a call to the Bosch technical people, they removed the controller - a couple turns of an allen screw on the bottom side of the unit - and discovered some unspecified amount of dust/crap/crud on one of the contacts within. Cleaned it off and Shazam! Back in business.

This will probably never happen again, since I don't ride this on dirt much, but it doesn't happen to the mountain bikes either, so this one was a fluke. However, if it ever does, out on the road, a quick sacrifice of a CO2 canister from the tire repair bag would most likely blast it clean again just by shooting air into the edge of the controller without removing it. This stuff gets COLD so just a tiny shot would likely be a Save.

The thing comes apart after removing from the handlebar just by poking the end of the allen wrench into two little holes on the underside of the Plus and Minus buttons. They pop right up and expose the contacts. I'm not convinced I would mess around to that extent unless it was an emergent sort of situation... five miles up the side of a six mile mountain, perhaps.

By "controller" I am referring to the assist up/down selector on the left handlebar. This is on a Trek 700+, Intuvia setup.

fredi
1 week ago

This is my first ebike and my decision to buy her was based on getting the best ebike for me at the best price. First a little about me, I’m 60 years old, 6’1” and 230 lbs. A have a 34” Class-A RV and travel the east coast. On long trips I normally tow a Jeep Wrangler with a tray-style bike rack loaded with two or three mountain bike from a big box store. On short trips I leave the Jeep at home and mount the bike rack to the RV. Typical use of the bikes is for recreational riding in National and State parks. I thought it was time for a better bike and was intrigued with the idea of using ebikes and leaving the Jeep at home more.

I originally looked at Evelo because of their mid-drive with the NuVinci hub. They didn’t offer any local sales but work with local bike shops to provide service in conjunction with their 4-year/20,000-mile warranty. I was drawn to the Delta with the 750 watt mid-drive since all I’ve ever owned was mountain bikes and I wanted to make sure that it would get me up the hills. I soon discovered that where I live they only allow 500 watts and mid-drives are more efficient using the power, so while a 750 watt hub drive may struggle to get me up the hill, a 350 watt mid-drive should have less problems because they have higher performance, more torque and use less battery power. I also have always hated not being in the right gear at the right time and gnashing the gears and an Internally Geared Hub (IGH) like the NuVinci would solve those problems. Since I was planning on adding lots of comfort accessories like a plush seat, road tires, rear rack, fenders, lights, etc. and the Galaxy comes with all of those so I felt it was a better fit for me.

The Galaxy is billed as a comfort cruiser with an upright riding position, 27.5″ wheels and 2” tires on a ridge frame. Evelo makes two models the Galaxy, the GT with a step-through frame and the TT a traditional top tube frame. Each model comes in two versions, Premium or Fully Loaded. The Fully Loaded version upgrades the NuVinci N380 transmission to the Harmony fully automatic transmission and adds hydraulic brakes. So I ordered the Fully Loaded Galaxy TT version with a list price of $3899.

The bike came in about a week. She was double boxed and very well packed. The hardest part was getting the bike out of the box. I recommend having a little help here. Evelo isn’t kidding when they say the bike come almost fully assembled. Install the brake caliper, front wheel and fender, handlebars, headlight, and you’re done. They recommend charging the battery for 12 hours before the first use, so I plugged it in to charge overnight and then set about the process of assembling the bike which took about 30 minutes. They provided several allen wrenches, a couple of “real” boxed end wrenches and armed with the step by step instructions it was much easier to assemble than any bike I’ve ever bought from a big box store. My recommendation is that you put the fender on before you install the front wheel and then attach the brake caliper. The front wheel comes with a “Quick Release” so it’s really not a big deal.

The Galaxy is one of a small number of electric bikes that offer the NuVinci Harmony Automatic Transmission which allows me to enjoy the ride while it takes care of the shifting. In automatic it finds the proper gear while I dial in a comfortable cadence and set the assist level for my perfect ride. No more gnashing the gears and getting stuck on a hill because I was in the wrong gear. A simple button press changes the hub to manual mode, but I mostly I keep it in automatic on the lowest setting. The brushless motor combined with the Gates belt drive and the Harmony makes the ride smooth and virtually silent. I set the tire pressure to 50 lbs for a softer ride.

She comes with a 350 watt Bafang Max mid-drive motor (peak 600 watts) and uses a torque sensor (internal to the motor) and speed to determine how much power is drawn from the battery. The torque sensor uses a strain gauge inside the motor to measure pressure on the pedals. This allows for quick engagement and better sensitivity. I was concerned about the Galaxy’s uphill performance but found that she can easily climb hills at 8-12 mph that would normally bring me to a crawl. On level roads I can quickly reach the 20+ mph limit. At those speeds it’s nice to have the Tektro 180mm hydraulic disc brakes that provide great stopping power and simultaneously cut power to the motor. Once you stop there is a double fork kickstand to keep her upright.

The large backlit LCD display panel (made by King) is mounted center of the handlebars and can swivel forward or back to reduce glare. It’s easy to read and offers information about speed, distance, pedal assist, watts and a five segment battery charge level indicator. The control pad is located near the left grip, from there you can turn the bike on/off and select the level of assist. I really liked that holding the UP button turns on/off the backlight and holding the DOWN button activates “Walk” mode which moves the bike forward at about two mph. Pressing both the UP and DOWN buttons for 3 seconds puts you in the settings menu where you can increase the maximum speed to 25 mph, set the backlight level, and miles or kilometers. I set the wheel diameter to 27.5 inches since it defaulted to 26.

The bike has a thumb throttle but as a safety feature it doesn't engage unless the bike is moving. I originally thought I would need the throttle to get across an intersection or when starting up a hill, but the bike's torque sensor measures pressure on the pedals, so it quickly engages. It is so responsive and natural feeling that I haven't used the throttle much but I certainly have used “walk” mode several times.

The rear tail light is mounted directly beneath the battery rack so it isn’t blocked by my pannier and is powered by a couple of AA batteries. The LED Head Light has five modes and is USB rechargeable. It quickly installs on the handlebars with a rubber strap and the single large button on top makes it easy to turn on and change modes while riding.

Powering the bike is a 36 volt, 13 amp (468 wh) battery pack with an advertised 50 miles of range. I rode for over twenty miles before the charge indicator dropped from five to four bars. The battery weighs 8 lbs, can be charged on or off the bike and has its own level indicator. The small rubber cap protecting the charge terminal opens easily and stays closed. The battery is nicely protected in the full-size cargo rack and has a key lock which keeps it there and provides anti-theft security. You don’t need to leave the key in while riding and there’s a built-in handle to help remove the battery and carry it. Removing the battery makes it easier to lift the 46 lb bike onto my tray style carrier. The battery placement in the rack makes the bike a little heavy in the back, but frees up space for bottle cage bosses on the seat tube and allowed me to mount my folding lock on the down tube. All I did was add my Cloud-9 seat, bottle cage, pannier and a suspension seat post and I was ready to go.

After about a week of riding I took her to a local dealer for a full checkup. They did a minor adjustment to the brakes and gave her a clean bill of health, no charge. They were impressed at how well “I” put the bike together (LOL) and they loved the belt and throttle. I’ll be sure to make the checkup an annual event and return to that dealer.

Let me know if you have any questions

1/1
NovaEbike
1 week ago

Thank you for this response. I am pretty much sold on buying this after your response, including the 11g spokes for the front wheel. I think we're in the same area, as I don't have a LBS that has these in stock either.

Congrats on losing so much weight, especially that quick with the bike. I hope to do the same thing as you are (commute with bike even though it may add 30-45 minutes to the commute). Any tips on losing the weight besides biking?

I'm no weight loss expert haha. I'm trying to keep changes to my lifestyle and small and gradual so I don't give up on anything. I'm trying to eat a little healthier (more lean meats, fruits, veggies, and less carbs/sugar) but for the most part, I'm eating the same or similar to before but trying to do a LOT better with portion control. If I tried to do a diet, I probably wouldn't stick to it and I do all the cooking in my house for my wife and small children (3 and 4).

Also, going back to your original post, for battery recommendation since I have the 17.4ah pack. When I started I was in sport mode the whole way and I brought my charger to work to charge at my desk because I had range anxiety but I never got to work or home with less then 60% (according to the display LEDs). When I dropped to level 3, I started leaving it at home and still do. I can do the full 35 mile round trip in level 3 (using sport mode for hills only) and still have 60-80% (again according to the display LEDs) when I get home. Going to work I have around 450 ft of elevation gain and 850 ft of gain on the way home according to strava. I average 15-17 mph with crossings, hills, etc. I honestly think I could do the full round trip in sport mode if I had to. So I'd recommend the 17.4 ah if your commute distance looks similar. Also, when the battery capacity starts to degrade, having the larger pack should mean that I still have enough even at 50% of the original capacity since by that time I should be able to cruise along in level 1 and save battery for hills and when the trail is less congested and I can safely open her up haha.

Burp
1 week ago

I bought a crosscurrent back in June to do the same thing you are now. Get back in shape by commuting to/from work. I'm 6'-0 and I got a large frame which is perfect for me. I don't know what my starting weight was, but back in March at the doc I weighed in at 285-290. This morning I was 255. My commute is about 17 miles each way and as I've gotten stronger, I decrease the assistance level to get more of a workout but still am able to get to/from work in an hour or so. With my backpack of work stuff and the 17.4ah battery, my bike was probably around 350 at the beginning. I've had some issues with the bike, mostly broken spokes. I've broken 3 or 4 since I bought it. But honestly, a broken spoke is pretty easy to fix yourself. I just zip tie it out of the way until I get home and then remove the wheel, tire/tube, and replace it. My mistake was going too long with a broken spoke while waiting on replacements from Juiced (I'm on the east coast) and then broke a second one. When a second one broke, it knocked my wheel out of true enough to rub the frame so I took it to the bike shop to have it re-trued. That costs $15. But i did find 230 mm 11 gauge spokes from the husky bicycles website and bought 50 of them for like $12 i think. I just replaced a spoke last night and changed it out with the 11 gauge. Eventually I'll respoke the whole wheel with them, but for now just replacing one at a time.

In all, this bike has been GREAT for me and getting back in shape. I could not have started commuting on a regular bike at this distance, at least not everyday. Just know that like any bike, there's going to be maintenance. And when you're putting 175 miles a week on a bike, that's a LOT more than normal. But all the maintenance is cheap compared to driving. I save $17 a day in parking and $60 a week in gas. It takes 45-60 min to drive each way so I'm only increasing my commute by 30 min/day and getting in two good workouts.

And lastly, none of my LBS carry Juiced so I'm definitely on my own. They carry specialized and stromer, but those were WAY outside my price range. Watch youtube videos, learn to be handy with your bike and go for it.

EDIT: Also, you should know that you need an 18mm OFFSET box end wrench (similar to this https://www.amazon.com/uxcell-Point-Offset-Wrench-Spanner/dp/B0087ZU6DQ) to remove the nut on the rear tire with the power cord.
Thank you for this response. I am pretty much sold on buying this after your response, including the 11g spokes for the front wheel. I think we're in the same area, as I don't have a LBS that has these in stock either.

Congrats on losing so much weight, especially that quick with the bike. I hope to do the same thing as you are (commute with bike even though it may add 30-45 minutes to the commute). Any tips on losing the weight besides biking?

rich c
1 week ago

I agree, you must live in a tough neighborhood, or maybe the way you ride. I've ridding 3200 miles on three different ebikes. One is even a fat tired Sondors. People start looking around before I get close on the mixed trail because of those giant knobby tires. The only comments I ever get are positive. I've had people roll down their car windows to yell compliments about the Sondors and my Haibike Trekking. Any time I stop, I'm quick to answer questions and if the situation looks good, I let them take a ride. I am concerned about my Haibike mtb on the trails, because of the comments I've read online. But I have the advantage of being retired, so I've only ridden during the week. I don't tear through those trails either, and let traditional mtb bike guys pass by. Well I mainly don't tear through because I'm 64 and only started riding trails last year. Sorry you've had the negative experiences, but I don't think it's widespread as you might think. I have to admit I've done some yelling myself, for guys riding gas powered bikes on our converted rail trail. They can truly make a negative impact on bicycles using those trails with noise and smell!

dogdad
1 week ago

Hey Folks.

I have a Biktrix Juggernaut and I need a new charger

A 100-240V, 50-60Hz, 2A smart charger

This seems impossible to locate and Biktrix is in no rush to help me

This is my only means of transportation to and from Dialysis...

Any leads that won't break the bank?
'Thanks
That doesnt sound like Biktrix ,they are great to deal with . Watch out for quick chargers ,they will kill your
battery !

Nirmala
1 week ago

Another email and another delay:

Hello ShareRoller Indiegogo backer:

Now that August has arrived, we wanted to share a quick update, as we know you are more than ready for your ShareRoller(s) to arrive. We continue to get closer to assembly kick-off, with 4 of 7 key supplier sub-components now received or shipped, and 2 in final supplier production testing. But unfortunately our battery packs have been delayed another month, as production sample testing revealed further weatherproofing requirements for an IP54 rating (see below for detail).

We do expect to begin assembly of the main motor modules this month, but the battery packs will now delay shipment until September. We're terribly sorry to keep you waiting longer, but we absolutely want to be sure ShareRoller's battery packs can stand up to any amount of rainy weather!

On a more positive note, in preparation for our production launch we have moved into a much larger assembly facility here in lower Manhattan. This new space will allow us to both expand the ShareRoller Team and to produce the significantly higher volumes we hope ShareRoller will achieve once full launch occurs. It's a very exciting step for ShareRoller and we look forward to sharing photos of the new space soon!

And for those who want to read further, here is additional detail below on all key subcomponents:

Drive Motors: Our supplier has completed and shipped the first production run of our incredible custom Drive Motors. Since we managed to incorporate a few performance enhancements vs our earlier production samples (slightly thicker magnets for one), we can't wait to test out the optimized production version!

Heatsinks: With our diecast molds complete, our supplier has manufactured and shipped the first production run of our heatsink set (shown below is the smaller of the pair).

Gearmotors: Our custom designed ultra-high torque gearmotors+encoders have been received and are awaiting assembly here in our new space.

Retracting battery cables: We had to make a small unexpected change to the tooling last month, but that is now complete and the final plastic shells are in production (samples below). Assembly and shipment of our first production run should be complete within 2 weeks.

Wireless throttles: Since we had the time, we made one last change to a button position on the custom PCB, and expect to receive our production batch before the end of the month. We'll share pictures of our ultra-versatile and ultra-functional throttle design then.

PCBs: We had to make a few more tweaks to the design before doing a volume run, but still expect to receive production units before the end of the month.

Battery Packs: Below is a picture of a production prototype pack being assembled by our supplier - the BMS board has yet to be installed, hence the gap between the cells and the retracting battery cable (also a sample).

The issue with waterproofing had to do with the joint between the top and bottom halves of the battery pack shell. Initially our supplier felt we could meet IP5X level waterproofing without a rubber seal between the shells, but testing proved otherwise. So we had to design the custom seal below, and have another mold made to produce the seal, which takes several weeks, hence the one month delay.

At least with the rubber seal in place, the battery packs should have no trouble exceeding the IP54 standards, meaning you'll never have any problems riding in the rain.

Again, we're terribly sorry for these further delays and we really wish there were some way we could deliver sooner. Fortunately, we continue to get closer and closer to the goal (despite the fact that the goalposts keep moving on us!), and we're confident the ShareRoller SR4 we finally deliver will far exceed all expectations.

Thank you again for your patience and support.

Jeff Guida & The ShareRoller Team

Nirmala
1 week ago

Another email and another delay:
Hello ShareRoller Indiegogo backer:

Now that August has arrived, we wanted to share a quick update, as we know you are more than ready for your ShareRoller(s) to arrive. We continue to get closer to assembly kick-off, with 4 of 7 key supplier sub-components now received or shipped, and 2 in final supplier production testing. But unfortunately our battery packs have been delayed another month, as production sample testing revealed further weatherproofing requirements for an IP54 rating (see below for detail).

We do expect to begin assembly of the main motor modules this month, but the battery packs will now delay shipment until September. We're terribly sorry to keep you waiting longer, but we absolutely want to be sure ShareRoller's battery packs can stand up to any amount of rainy weather!

On a more positive note, in preparation for our production launch we have moved into a much larger assembly facility here in lower Manhattan. This new space will allow us to both expand the ShareRoller Team and to produce the significantly higher volumes we hope ShareRoller will achieve once full launch occurs. It's a very exciting step for ShareRoller and we look forward to sharing photos of the new space soon!

And for those who want to read further, here is additional detail below on all key subcomponents:

Drive Motors: Our supplier has completed and shipped the first production run of our incredible custom Drive Motors. Since we managed to incorporate a few performance enhancements vs our earlier production samples (slightly thicker magnets for one), we can't wait to test out the optimized production version!

Heatsinks: With our diecast molds complete, our supplier has manufactured and shipped the first production run of our heatsink set (shown below is the smaller of the pair).

Gearmotors: Our custom designed ultra-high torque gearmotors+encoders have been received and are awaiting assembly here in our new space.

Retracting battery cables: We had to make a small unexpected change to the tooling last month, but that is now complete and the final plastic shells are in production (samples below). Assembly and shipment of our first production run should be complete within 2 weeks.

Wireless throttles: Since we had the time, we made one last change to a button position on the custom PCB, and expect to receive our production batch before the end of the month. We'll share pictures of our ultra-versatile and ultra-functional throttle design then.

PCBs: We had to make a few more tweaks to the design before doing a volume run, but still expect to receive production units before the end of the month.

Battery Packs: Below is a picture of a production prototype pack being assembled by our supplier - the BMS board has yet to be installed, hence the gap between the cells and the retracting battery cable (also a sample).

The issue with waterproofing had to do with the joint between the top and bottom halves of the battery pack shell. Initially our supplier felt we could meet IP5X level waterproofing without a rubber seal between the shells, but testing proved otherwise. So we had to design the custom seal below, and have another mold made to produce the seal, which takes several weeks, hence the one month delay.

At least with the rubber seal in place, the battery packs should have no trouble exceeding the IP54 standards, meaning you'll never have any problems riding in the rain.

Again, we're terribly sorry for these further delays and we really wish there were some way we could deliver sooner. Fortunately, we continue to get closer and closer to the goal (despite the fact that the goalposts keep moving on us!), and we're confident the ShareRoller SR4 we finally deliver will far exceed all expectations.

Thank you again for your patience and support.

Jeff Guida & The ShareRoller Team

rede
2 weeks ago

I have an Expert has only 400 kms on it but I have had a couple of power outages one when I was powering smugly past a road cyclist (typical). I pedalled a couple of rotations and it came back on and away I went. The other times it seemed to be related to me backing off to shift as I'm scared to break a chain or strip a cog and the system powers down I stop and pedal and all normal again. I think I have to refine my technique for the levo a bit but I will keep an eye on it.

Yes, the power drops off when shifting, often even if you crash shift it, that is, keep pedaling normally through the shift. I find that it is best to anticipate a change and shift earlier than normal, and even to a lower gear than normal. I would think that the acceleration setting affects this, but haven't seen much difference. What level do you have your maximum current set to? I have emailed to the Mission Control address, but received no response. They were were quick to answer in the past. I wonder if they're overwhelmed? Regarding the power outage when pedaling, have a look at the motor temperature. When it gets much above 160F or 70 C, the motor control starts backing off. If you get to about 180 F or 82 C , the cutoff will be almost constant. If you have a chance to coast downhill after that, it will cool off, and operate normally.

Tom899
2 weeks ago

I don't think it's permanent. Rakesh must be out of the country. Hell, I even had him personally call me at home!
Yes, I have too, he has my cell number. If he is not available, which is completely understandable, he should instruct his employees to be courteous and give a quick email or call back to just confirm they are busy or what ever the case may be. I did a great review on the system when I first installed it, on Bentrideronline.com. Rakesh himself has always treated me well, just very hard to get a hold of. I have never been able to connect with anyone on the company phone, maybe just my luck.

tarhead
2 weeks ago

I picked up my shiny red Téo Limited, Size L earlier this week and thought I'd share my initial impressions.

First, some background on me and why I decided to go with an electric fat bike. I'm fairly large at 6'4" 285 lbs, in my early 50s, with the attendant knee problems you might expect of someone with that description. I purchased a new Colnago road bike last year and loved it, but I eventually realized it's just not the right bike for me at this point. It was exhilarating to ride, but also painful to my back, knees and wrists. I'll miss it!

I did my research and decided that something sturdier with pedal assist was the way to go. I was one of those considering the Voltbike Yukon 750, but just couldn't say no to the upgrades available on the Téo for only a few hundred extra $. The key factors were the larger battery capacity and hydraulic disc brakes.

The Purchase Experience

Benoit was great right from the start; quick to respond to queries and very accommodating. I live close enough to Montréal pick it up, so I'm not able to comment on the shipping process. The website is fairly straightforward to navigate, once you figure out how to change the language (for non-francophones, at least). I was only a bit saddened to see that I couldn't get a black or white Limited in Size L, but in retrospect the red colour looks fantastic. I think I prefer it to the black and the white would've been difficult to keep clean, so my third choice just might have been the best one.

Setup

I'm a technical writer who writes manuals for a living, so I'm going to be overly critical regarding most documentation for any goods I buy. I'll give Téo's a solid C+. ;) plenty of illustrations, but nothing about setting up the fenders, rack and lights for the Limited model. Also nothing about how to use the LCD display, though I was able to find that manual by searching this forum after being unsuccessful trying to find it on the Téo website.

The bike comes out of the box about 80% preassembled, with the most difficult bits happily ready to ride. I'm hardly a mechanically proficient person, but I was able to get most of the remainder put together in what appeared to be a solid fashion. The exception being the front fender--it remains off as the bolt doesn't appear to be long enough to thread through both the fender and the front light. This is a bit frustrating as I spent about an hour trying to make it fit without bending it. I noticed a post on this forum that mentions the same issue, so I'll try that fix over the weekend.

The Bike and its Components

My impression in seeing the fully assembled bike was, "wow, this is huge!" For someone my size, this is a very welcome feeling. The quick-release seatpost is a great touch, because you just know that you're going to have to let all of your buddies try this thing, so the seat will be bobbing up and down as everyone takes a turn. The leather (pleather?) handlebar grips are very attractive and offer a nice balance of comfort versus 'grippiness'.

Overall, I'm extremely impressed with the quality of components Téo has selected. I had expected to replace the grips, pedals and saddle immediately, but in the end decided to keep all of these, as the performance and comfort provided by the original components is more than adequate. The tires, cable-managent, paint/finish and suspension forks are all superior to what I would've expected for this price point. Great job, Téo!

The Ride

It doesn't take long to get used to riding this bike and, once you do, any other bike seems inadequate by comparison. The assist provided even at PAS 1 lends the impression of riding a regular road bike. Bump that up to 5 or more and you'll be feeling as if you're ready for the peloton in Paris. The only way to describe it is exhilarating and the minimal noise and drag created by the knobby 4" tires is more than overwhelmed by the smooth assist of the 500w Bafang hub motor. It's just an absolute blast to ride. Eventually, you might find yourself frustrated by the 32 km speed limit imposed by the government (understandable for bike paths but annoying on the road when a bit more speed would result in increased rather than decreased safety) and the requirement that you pedal a half-term or so before you can engage the throttle. Again, this is a safety feature, but one I'd willingly forgo if possible. (Is it possible?)

I took the bike into the woods on a medium-difficulty mountain bike trail and have yet to be able to wipe the stupid grin off of my face. I feel like I should be handing over $5 to some bored carney ticket-taker every time I ride these trails. Whenever I felt I was getting stuck in foot-deep water and muck, or starting to slide backwards on a particularly steep rock section, a quick blast of throttle was my get-out--of-jail-free card. It's an experience more akin to riding a motocross bike than a mountain bike.

Negatives

These are few and far between, but have to mentioned in the interests of a balanced review:

Gear shifting with pedal-assist activated. According to the manual, you're not supposed to do it. I didn't realize this and broke my chain on my first ride. Still a bit unclear as to how I should be handling this, as I discussed in another thread on this forum.
Front light wires are very susceptible to damage. After my chain broke (see above), the pedals moved on their own as I was walking it, activating the pedal assist and driving the bike out of my hands and into the brush. (Forgot to disable pedal assist.) The handlebars twisted all the way around in the very gentle collision and snapped the wires at the point where they attach to the light. (See photo.) Would like to have it fixed but my LBS didn't know how to and I'm the polar opposite of handy, so I guess I'll just go with a standalone light for now. I'm pretty sure this would just happen again were I to repair it.
The manual doesn't cover everything and I struggled with installing some of the Limited parts. Front fender in particular.
Handlebars are way too low with the seat raised to maximum. This is a problem for only a few of us I know and is to be expected for a bike with only two frame size choices. I must confess I look longingly at those whose bikes have the handlebars resting above the seat; sometimes far above. It looks sooooo comfortable! Perhaps a stem riser might work?

Conclusion

I love this bike and spend much of my time at work counting down the hours until I can go for a ride. It handles my gravitationally challenged body perfectly, making me feel like a kid again. (I was a very skinny kid, BTW.) Téo has done a great job examining the competition and learning from what works and what doesn't, offering upgrades wherever it makes the most sense, while still maintaining affordability. I would highly recommend this bike to anyone looking to increase the fun factor of cycling while decreasing the pain factor.
Something like this should help to raise your handlebars. MEC also has longer adjustable stems that could be tilted up for a little more height. https://www.mec.ca/en/product/5042-662/Alloy-Stem-Raiser

Donandnan Elmore
4 weeks ago

I did over 30 miles on Thursday. When I got up the hill to my driveway on fumes (me not the bike). I decided to walk the bike up my very steep driveway. I didn't like the walk feature. The button is hard to push and hurts the thumb. After about 120', I gave up walking and road it the rest of the way up.

Inc Gohd
4 weeks ago

The pronunciation of Schwalbe is still not correct. It's "uh" at the end. Why is it difficult for Americans to pronounce it the way it should be.

Donandnan Elmore
1 month ago

Did my first longer ride on my Quick-E somewhat over 23 miles. A couple of serious road bike riders pulled up next to me on the flats asking about the bike and then they just pulled away and I was doing near 20mph. I got caught at a light and they really put some distance between us. When I caught sight of them, they really started to fly pulling even further away. About I guess 5 miles later, I caught up to them on a long up hill grade. When I passed the guy, he kind of groaned. His wife had put some distance between them and was going pretty well. When I caught up to her, she said, "I could used one of those." Then I really started pushing to put distance between us and never saw them again on the following 3 up hill miles.

I did feel that, on the longer up hill climbs, the motor cut out from time to time for a second or two and I wasn't anywhere near 28mph.

CHAKRI KUMAR
1 month ago

hello i am indian where you buy this cycle

Rory McCabe
1 month ago

what are those tires

Martin Glaze
2 months ago

Good review. One thing it seems like all your reviews are about expensive Ebike's Not everyone looking at ebikes have that kind of money. There is a lot of other Ebike's out there that are easier on the pocket book that you could review. !!! Please don't give me the story that you have to spend $ 5000.00 to get a good bike, not true !

Marc Filion
2 months ago

Electricbikereview.com Nice review and probably looking to buy that exact bike I think its good value!

My ultimate wish list would be:
-Bosch motor 28mph
-IGH
-belt drive

Does such a bike exist?!!

lottsalasagna
2 months ago

I bike 7 days a week ... These bikes would never hold up
Maybe good for going for a coffee .. But no serious biker would own an off the floor bike and not upgrade the cheap parts they put on them
Som$3000 plus the extra cost of buying better parts

lottsalasagna
2 months ago

Cheap wheels and tires

lottsalasagna
2 months ago

No bus racks are for frames ... Wheels racks only

pcphoenix123
2 months ago

I see that the bike demoed here has a bottle holder. But when I went to the store, the salesperson said you can't add a bottle holder, because there are no holes. So I suppose the guy here drilled holes in the frame?

Donandnan Elmore
1 month ago

It is set up for a holder. I had my dealer install a bottle and holder in the existing bosses.

Torian the Cyclist
3 months ago

I love the play on words. "Quick E" 😆

F T
3 months ago

When manufacturers post torque specs on these mid-drive bikes, are they saying that's the output of the drive or are they talking about max torque when using the low gear of the rear wheel cassette?

slappy76
3 months ago

Tried this bike at the Bike Tour Expo in NYC. The motor was very quiet. The assist is pretty good. The ride is surprisingly harsh. Needs a seat suspension for sure. Not bad for a brand name bike with a decent sized battery.

MrDaanram
4 months ago

@electricbikereview I'm on a gazelle t10 chamonix and want something that has more power - how do you think the giant compares to those gazelle bikes with the bosch active drive? Thanks!

Arnold Humenuk
4 months ago

what size frame is this particular bike???

Brian Piper
4 months ago

I picked one of these up several weeks ago and have been quite happy with it. Though I've ridden limited E Bikes, I'm an experienced mountain biker and find the build quality and sturdiness of the quick e to be a great value at this price. It's pretty comical how fast it can go 20-24mph with very little effort. However, I'm a little disappointed that at about 26mph it starts to cut out instead of the advertised 28. Range seems good but obviously when on full power not nearly as much as advertised (I use about 60% battery in 17mi). Only other gripe is that because there is a freewheel in the cranks in addition to the hub, there is a good delay in pedal engagement when you get spinning. This can also be tricky when track standing and the motor thinks it should be assisting even though you are not moving. Overall though I am psyched to have picked this thing up and get as much use as possible out of it on my 17 mile (each way) commute! Might end up taking the front derailleur off but it's cool this bike has the option which many don't. Glad I opted for this instead of the Spec Turbo.

F T
3 months ago

Brian Piper The Stromer st1 has a code that you can punch into the display which lets you increase the cutoff point of the assist. I never reach the cutout point anymore. I can hit about 33 mph on the flats without the motor cutting out. I wonder if the Giant bikes have a similar way of overriding the cutoff point.

skyungjae
4 months ago

How long are you in town for?

botchok5
4 months ago

I demo'd this bike earlier today. I was quite impressed, it looks good and it rides smooth. But, it just doesn't have the same torque of the full suspension ones.
I'm looking for a bike to commute when the weather is good. I think this one will do.

However, I really want to remove the mudguards, because it has no use for me. It's just added weight and bulk.

I noticed that the front mudguard is easily removable. But I couldn't see the bolts for the rear one. And that's the one that I really want removed.

And personally I think the bike would look a lot better without the mudguards, gives it more of an aggressive look.

Luis Miguel Luna Pais
5 months ago

Hi, I've notest that usually you pedal fast all time, but my question is, do you have to pedal to the maximum all time or we can maintain a slower speed like enjoying the views?