Giant Road-E+ Review

Giant Road E Plus 1 Electric Bike Review
Giant Road E Plus 1
Giant Road E Plus 1 Syncdrive Yamaha Motor 250 Watt
Giant Road E Plus 1 500 Watt Hour Battery Pack
Giant Road E Plus 1 Fixed Backlit Lcd Display
Giant Road E Plus 1 Taped Drop Bars Alloy Fork Ebike
Giant Road E Plus 1 Pr 2 Disc Alloy Rims Drop Bars
Giant Road E Plus 1 Contact Sl Neutral Sadal
Giant Road E Plus 1 Shimano 105 Front Derailleur Compact Double
Giant Road E Plus 1 Shimano Hydraulic Disc Brake Rotor 160 Mm
Giant Road E Plus 1 Shimano Ultegra 11 Speed Cogset
Giant Road E Plus 1 Motor Protector Plate
Giant Road E Plus 1 3 Amp Charger
Giant Road E Plus 1 Electric Bike Review
Giant Road E Plus 1
Giant Road E Plus 1 Syncdrive Yamaha Motor 250 Watt
Giant Road E Plus 1 500 Watt Hour Battery Pack
Giant Road E Plus 1 Fixed Backlit Lcd Display
Giant Road E Plus 1 Taped Drop Bars Alloy Fork Ebike
Giant Road E Plus 1 Pr 2 Disc Alloy Rims Drop Bars
Giant Road E Plus 1 Contact Sl Neutral Sadal
Giant Road E Plus 1 Shimano 105 Front Derailleur Compact Double
Giant Road E Plus 1 Shimano Hydraulic Disc Brake Rotor 160 Mm
Giant Road E Plus 1 Shimano Ultegra 11 Speed Cogset
Giant Road E Plus 1 Motor Protector Plate
Giant Road E Plus 1 3 Amp Charger

Summary

  • An aggressive road bike with 28 mph top electric-assisted speed, drop bars and sport saddle, you get Shimano Ultegra rear and 105 front derailleurs with 22 gear combinations to work with
  • Shimano hydraulic disc brakes offer powerful stops and tend to stay cleaner than rim brakes, all-Aluminum frame is lightweight and sturdy but doesn't absorb vibrations as well as Steel or Carbon fiber
  • Available in four frame sizes for better fit, sold through Giant dealers worldwide so you can get setup right and rely on knowledgeable technicians for tuneups and any warranty support
  • The Yamaha mid-drive system is relatively quiet but still very powerful, it doesn't provide as wide an RPM range so I find myself pedaling slower than I'd like at times, LCD display is not removable

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Giant

Model:

Road-E+

Price:

$4,000

Body Position:

Forward Aggressive

Suggested Use:

Urban, Road

Electric Bike Class:

Speed Pedalec (Class 3)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Year Comprehensive, Lifetime Frame

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

44 lbs (19.95 kg)

Battery Weight:

7.5 lbs (3.4 kg)

Motor Weight:

7.6 lbs (3.44 kg)

Frame Material:

ALUXX SL-Grade Aluminum

Frame Sizes:

17 in (43.18 cm)19 in (48.26 cm)21 in (53.34 cm)23 in (58.42 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

Medium: 19" Seat Tube, 21.5" Reach, 30" Stand Over Height, 69" Length

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

Matte Black with Blue and Neon Yellow Accents

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid ALUXX SL-Grade Aluminum, OverDrive, 9 mm Skewer with Bolts

Frame Rear Details:

9 mm Skewer with Bolts

Attachment Points:

Fender Eyelets, Rear Kickstand Mount, Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

22 Speed 2x11 Shimano Ultegra Rear Derailleur 11-32T, Shimano 105 Front Derailleur 34/50T

Shifter Details:

Shimano RS685 Paddles on Left and Right

Cranks:

Custom Forged, 170 mm Length

Pedals:

Wellgo M-20, Alloy Platform Cage

Headset:

Tapered 1-1/8" to 1-1/2"

Stem:

Giant Connect, Alloy, 90 mm Length, 8° Angle, Three 5 mm Stacks, One 10 mm Stack

Handlebar:

Giant Contact, Alloy Drop Bar, 31.8 Clamp Diameter, 17.5" Width

Brake Details:

Shimano RS785 Hydraulic Disc with 160 mm Rotors, Heat Sinc on Calipers, Shimano RS685 Levers

Grips:

Black Tape, Rubber Hoods

Saddle:

Giant Contact SL Neutral, SST Tubular Rails

Seat Post:

Giant Contact, Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

300 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

30.9 mm

Rims:

Giant PR-2 Disc Alloy, Double Wall, 28 Hole, Giant Performance Tracker Road Disc Hubs

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 14 Gauge, Black with Silver Nipples

Tire Brand:

Schwalbe Durano, 700 x 32 (28" x 1.25")

Wheel Sizes:

28 in (71.12cm)

Tire Details:

RaceGuard Dual Compound, 55 to 95 PSI

Tube Details:

Presta Valve

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, 1.8 lb 3 Amp Charger

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Giant SyncDrive by Yamaha

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Geared Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

250 watts

Motor Peak Output:

500 watts

Motor Torque:

80 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Giant EnergyPak

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

13.8 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

496.8 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

4.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

50 miles (80 km)

Estimated Max Range:

100 miles (161 km)

Display Type:

Giant, Fixed, Backlit, Monochrome LCD

Readouts:

Battery Info-Graphic, Battery Percentage, Speed, Assist Level (Off, Eco, Normal, Power), Cadence (RPM), Trip Time, Trip Distance, Average Speed, Max Speed, Odometer, Range,

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad on Right (On/Off, Up, Down, Light, i, Walk Mode), 5 Volt Micro USB Port on Left Side of Display

Drive Mode:

Advanced Pedal Assist (Wheel Speed, Pedal Torque, Pedal Cadence)

Top Speed:

28 mph (45 kph)

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Written Review

The Giant Road-E+ is a unique electric bike because it’s designed for performance. In the US, the ebike space has traditionally been dominated by commuter products with some cruisers sprinkled in for recreational riders that want to feel young and avoid overheating or struggling to keep up with friends and spouses. The Road-E+ by contrast is aggressive and sporty… Rather than limiting you to 20 mph like the majority of e-bikes, it delivers up to 28 mph assisted top speed making it a Class 3 product (not permissible on many trails and some paths in California and other states). This is an electric bike that fits perfectly on the shoulder of the road and can help you earn the respect of cars starting off the line and ascending hills. I was thrilled to give it a spin for this review because I love road bikes and know that Giant has a great reputation for quality at value price points. My takeaway is that it would ease some of the knee pain I experience on longer rides with lots of climbing, allow me to jump into more dynamic rides on the weekends even though I cannot train as frequently as my friend (and am thus in limited shap by comparison) and offer a good alternative to my non-electric road bike when my muscles need a break. Some of the challenges I experienced were the heavier footprint at ~44 lbs, stiffer all-Aluminum frame and limited motor RPM range. I have tested and reviewed other electric road bikes with drop bars and the Road-E+ is well priced by comparison but it’s still not cheap. At $4k you’re getting decent components (Shimano Ultegra and 105) with a 22 speed drivetrain (many others are 1×10 or 1×11) and I love that there’s a vast network of dealers selling and servicing them, helping to honor the two-year comprehensive warranty on offer.

Driving the bike is a 250 watt nominal, 500 watt peak mid drive motor from Yamaha. Those numbers aren’t as important as torque in my opinion and the SyncDrive offers 80 Newton meters… which is a lot. Bosch’s mid-drive, by comparison, offers 63 to 75 Nm and is not compatible with multiple front chainrings. The Yamaha motor is quiet and smooth but doesn’t quit spinning as quickly as Bosch. It measures the same wheel speed, pedal cadence and pedal torque signals and allows you to shift gears smoothly if you ease off a bit before pressing the paddles. I love how integrated the motor is at the bottom bracket, how nicely it fits into the purpose-built frame and that it keeps weight low and centered as opposed to a hub motor system (popular with lower-end ebikes). One of the biggest benefits you get from a mid-motor is normal wheels and hubs that are easier to service and remove for transport or flat fixes. In addition to some plastic and frame surrounds, the motor also has a skid plate on the bottom that’s designed to protect it. Notice that the chainrings hang down lower than the motor and would take damage before it would in most cases. The only big compromise I experienced with this drive system is a limited RPM output that requires frequent shifting to hit higher top speeds and sometimes leaves me wanting to spin faster before shifting. The problem with this scenario is that if I want to spin faster I end up doing it all on my own (and pushing more weight plus the normal wind and wheel friction). It’s difficult to raise the speed of the bike all by yourself and when the motor isn’t able to keep up you simply have to shift gears to go faster. For many people, the bike is simply amazing and works flawlessly but this is one area that I sometimes struggle with on the Yamaha motor compared with Bosch and it’s why I love that you can go to a shop and take a test ride before buying.

Powering the motor is a custom 36 volt 13.8 amp hour battery pack named “EnergyPak”. I’m not sure what brand of cells are being used here but I’d guess they are higher quality (Samsung or Panasonic). With nearly 500 watt hours of capacity, this is a larger than average battery that Should take you 50+ miles depending on the level of assist chosen… As with all speed-pedelecs, as you ride above 20 mph the efficiency and range of the bike really drops off due to wind resistance. For me, it’s a reasonable trade-off and an area that’s addressable with the included 3 Amp charger (faster than the average 2 Amp I see on many other ebikes) or the upgrade 4 Amp charger option. I did not see this optional fast charger so cannot comment on price or availability but it got me excited. Specialized offered a similar fast-charger option with their ebikes a couple years back and they tend to be larger and heavier. Again, the three amp charger seemed great and wasn’t too large. I do like that it has a metal plug, that the charge port on the battery case is covered well with a rubber flap and that the battery locks securely to the frame but can be charged on or off so you could top it off at the office perhaps or maybe while eating lunch in the mountains at the half-way point during a ride. The battery design is simply beautiful and I love how they sort of integrated it with the downtube so the bike doesn’t scream “I’m electric” like some others do. The one area that isn’t so great is handling the pack. There’s literally no handle or loop to grab onto. With replacement packs costing upwards of $800 this is not something you want to drop…

Operating the Giant Road-E+ is pretty easy. Just mount the charged battery (I love that it clicks in without the key being necessary) then press the power button on the control pad. The display comes to life showing a precise charge level infographic and there’s even a percentage readout AND dynamic range estimate. Depending on the level of assist you arrow up or down to, the range estimate will change. It’s great to have this kind of feedback at your fingertips vs. guessing so that you can plan your ride for maxiumum fun. On this note, please make sure you always check your tire pressure because as with traditional road bikes, the narrower tires here can get snake-bite punctures easily if you hit a curb or let the PSI drop too low. This is a heavier bike after all and unlike many other e-bikes, the tires are narrow. So anyway, the display offers three levels of assist to choose from and gives you access to trip stats like range, trip distance, speed and max speed. If you’re someone who likes to use Strava on your phone or use a Garmin device, you can do this easily with the Giant Road-E+ without having to run the juice down because there’s a little Micro-USB port on the left side of the display. One area of concern or question is where and how to mount your device given the already large LCD display. Also, the display is not removable so parking and storing the bike could present more opportunities for scratches which is a bummer. Consider putting a towel over… This and many other parts of the bike are smart and modular so if they are broken or lost, your Giant dealer should be able to help with a fix.

At the end of the day, there are only a few choices when it comes to electric road bikes and of course, you’d want a speed pedelec with drop bars. Beyond that, the four frame sizes, dealer network and beautiful integration seen here really impressed me. For $4k I feel like you get a lot of value and could have a blast with this bike. I love that in addition to bottle cage bosses, they added threaded eyelets and a mounting provision at the rear for a kickstand and some mounts for fenders. There’s no rack mount but this really isn’t a commuter setup… frankly, I’m not sure how well fenders would really work but the holes are there. Giant sells a wider range of electric assist bikes in Europe and it’s wonderful to finally see them in the US. This is a refined product, despite being “new” to this market and I could tell that they had ironed out a lot of the kinks and compromises that other systems had not when they first arrived. This thing uses a smart, reliable drive system that can work with you to achieve new types of rides and because it’s from a bigger more recognized brand, I feel like it might garner more respect as well (at least in the USA where ebikes are still catching on). Because the frame is all Aluminum (including the rigid fork), one thing I would consider is a seat post suspension from BodyFloat. Their systems tend to be highly responsive, offered in lighte-weight materials like Carbon fiber and Titanium and are adjustable to rider weight. You might also benefit from a suspension stem like the ShockStop.

Pros:

  • It’s rare to see electric road bikes with drop bars that are also speed pedelecs (28 mph top speed vs. 20 mph) and this one comes in four frame sizes which makes it accessible to a wider audience
  • Giant has a vast network of dealers and is a larger more reputable bicycle company than most, seeing a product like this (with the complexity of electric systems) feels more reliable
  • The Yamaha mid-drive system is one of the quietest and most responsive motors I’ve tested, while it does have a more limited RPM output (requiring more shifting to fully optimize) it works well and the torque sensor lets you shift without mashing just by easing off the pedals as you might with a non-electric bike
  • I love how integrated the battery pack looks but also that it’s fully removable (reducing overall weight by ~7.5 lbs), worth taking off when carrying on a car rack or doing service
  • Hydraulic disc brakes are the way to go with a heavier bike like this and should perform well if the road is wet or dirty as they tend to stay cleaner than rim brakes… they also stay out of the way when taking wheels off for quick service
  • The frame is completely purpose built, cables are internally routed and the battery and motor are streamline, I love that they managed to squeeze in bottle cage bosses despite the much larger downtube
  • You get 22 speeds on this ebike vs. just 10 or 11 on some of the other mid-drive system and the component groups (Ultegra and 105 from Shimano) are pretty good, this adds up to a more natural and wide range of pedal cadence options, in short, I believe it’s a compact double setup as you’d see on a non-electric bike
  • The battery charger puts out 3 Amps which is above average so you should get faster charge times, I like the rubber cover on the charge port near the base of the battery pack but would suggest being careful not to bump the cable with the left crank arm when it’s plugged in
  • The motor assist is highly adjustable so you can still get an excellent workout, for people with a hurt knee or leg, those with heart conditions or people who want to take a break between strenuous rides this would be an excellent platform and it lets others draft, great for a cycling coach or others looking to maximize availability without straining muscles too much
  • I like that the display panel has a Micro-USB port on the left side where you could charge a phone, run some lights or use other portable electronics for longer periods relying on the large main battery
  • In addition to range approximation (based on the power level chosen and remaining battery capacity) there’s a good battery info-graphic with battery percentage! Many ebikes just show a 5-bar graphic with 20% drops… Giant went above and beyond with percentage here and I think it’s useful
  • As someone with a crowded space and rented walls… I appreciate that there are threaded eyelets on the left chainstay for adding a kickstand!
  • The motor and battery weight are kept low and centered on the frame helping to optimize handling and even lifting if you have to carry the bike up stairs or mount it on a rack

Cons:

  • Yamaha is a large reputable company and their motor is compact, quiet and well integrated here but it doesn’t offer as wide an RPM as some other mid-drives like Bosch, this means you have to shift more actively to hit the top speed
  • Given the all-Aluminum frame and fork, there’s not a lot of foregiveness going over bumps (especially at high speed), people tend to ride ebikes further and at higher average speeds so I’d consider using a Thudbuster or BodyFloat suspension seat post (look for 30.9 mm diameter) and maybe even a suspension stem, perhaps future Road-E+ models will offer a Carbon fiber fork?
  • The display is easy to read and navigating the menus is intuitive but you can’t take the display off which means more sun damage and possible scratched when transporting the bike or parking it outside
  • The battery pack weighs 7.5 lbs and doesn’t have a handle or great ridge for securely gripping and carrying it… so be careful not to drop it! I like that it can be left on the frame to charge
  • While the motor is very responsive to your pedal torque, there is no built in shift-sensing protection system so you could mash your chain if you don’t shift consciously

Resources:

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Joe Bernard
5 months ago

Nice bike, but handling that battery is going to be an issue. Even with the handle on my Haibike’s battery, I’ve found that it’s easy to muck up the stick-on graphics. With the Giant battery you’re pretty much forced to grab it right where the decals are.

Reply
Court Rye
5 months ago

Good point Joe, I hadn’t thought as much about sticker placement and fingerprints, thanks for the feedback!

Reply
Hiruy
5 months ago

Hi Court, As always, another great review. I bought this bike in February as soon as they released it for sale in US. I use it for my daily commute to work and put on about 500 miles on it. I really love this bike. It has very impressive handling, amazing range and fun to ride. I am about 195 lbs with additional cargo of 10-15 lbs and am getting about 60 miles in a single charge even though my commute includes several hills with a couple of really steep ones. On my other 2015 Diamondback Trace EXC, I can only get about 20 miles in a single charge. The Road E+ have the same feel as riding a normal road bike so you will feel the road bumps. To help with the road bumps, I changed the factory saddle which is too firm for me with the Serfas Variant 2 which enables you to adjust the firmness of the saddle. I also like the fact that it does not cut-off the motor immediately. When I am ready to shift gears, I stop peddling momentarily and immediately shift gears so that the momentum of the motor before it cuts off is just enough to make the shifting very smooth then continue peddling. A couple of things you mentioned are different on my bike:

  1. The seat post my bike came with is a carbon fiber, but you indicated that it is aluminum on your review. The Giant website have it listed as “Giant Contact Composite 30.9 mm
  2. My charger plug to the battery pack is plastic, but you show a metal end
Reply
Court Rye
5 months ago

Interesting, thanks for sharing your feedback about the seat post and charger Hiruy! I enjoyed reading about your experience with range and comparisons to the Diamondback Trace. Sounds like you’re a seasoned electric cyclist at this point! Keep riding safe and thanks again for your positive feedback on the site :)

Reply
Joe Bernard
5 months ago

The Yamaha motor on my Haibike Sduro Trekking has that slight over-rev feature, too. FYI, I found that stopping pedaling was too disruptive to my rhythm, so I’ve gone back to the standard practice of slightly backing off pedal pressure for shifts. I suppose this could wear out my chain faster, but I’ll take the cost hit for it.

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Ravi Kempaiah
10 hours ago

Ebike love or our conflicted love/hate relationships with them? I love Ebike commuting but Ebikes are ruining my finances. I bought a second bike because I liked the experience so much. I just had to buy several pairs of new jeans because my waist size has dropped an inch as I'm hitting 1300 commuting miles for the year. It just goes on and on: better bike bags, commuting clothes, lights etc.

Sounds like a good marketing idea and particularly for the industry events like the expos. Open up people's minds to the various applications for ebikes (commercial, cargo, commuting, exercise etc) and get them to make connections and open up their minds to possibilities not previously realized.

I like your "day in the life of a commuter" idea: it can really get bizarre to the point the stories sound like fiction. The other day on one commute I encountered two deer feeding at the side of the road, a block later I had to avoid a skunk crossing the road, and about a mile after that, deeper into the city, I passed three dudes with baseball bats walking down the street at 6am. On the ride home I almost crashed into a policeman who was crossing the street but changed his mind and reversed direction suddenly. Every commute something odd seems to occur.

E-bike commute is the best kind of commute. The freedom is unparalleled.
Re: Jeans, that's a good I suppose. You know the amount of money we spent on hospital treatment for my dad when he had stroke = 100's E-bikes. So, if investing in E-bikes helps someone stay healthy, avoid cardiovascular degeneration or keep their bones, knees and hips in great shape, then its a no-brainer.

I am glad you're having awesome fun on these bikes.

BernieS
12 hours ago

I'm looking for an electric mountain bike that I could use for commuting, touring, and some not-too-technical trail riding. Until now - I've only ridden road bikes. I'm leaning toward a 2018 PF5. I'm thinking the E-bikes designed for commuting might not do as well as PF5 off-road. For commuting, I'd like to get a rear rack, lights and perhaps fenders. Has anyone outfitted a PF5 or 7 this way? Would a rack rattle around too much off-road? How much of a pain would it be to take rack & fenders on/off? Any lighting option that would tap into the main battery?

I've also been looking at the PF5 for the same purpose and making the upgrades of fenders, lights, rack, suspension seat post, etc.

McSpiffy
14 hours ago

Pleasure is mine!
Many people have been very kind to me and have helped immensely. I am happy to help in anyway I can.
Trek FX+ is a pretty old model and the tech has moved on quite a bit. The latest bikes are in a league of its own.
I live close to the UIC campus. Let me know if you want to try out my ST2 or Trekking S Rx or both for a day or two and see if it suits your commute.
Whatever you choose, I am pretty certain that these new crop of ebikes will re-ignite your passion for biking.

Hi Ravi!

I've been communicating with Josh @ CrazyLenny's and I've narrowed my interest down to three: 2017 Haibike Urban Plus, 2017 Bulls Lacuba EVO45 and the Stromer ST2. The Urban Plus really looks like it would fit-the-bill, however; I'm a little concerned with the TransX M25 GTS drive unit with the recalls (forum posts do appear that repair/replacement was prompt and some posted that they can definitely feel a difference post-replacement) and the Cobi Smart-connected biking system . . . still working the bugs out or is it truly not ready for prime time? The Urban Plus is a 10+ aesthetically and really surpassed other manufacturers with their choice in components. The Lacuba EVO45 has the Brose drive unit but I'm concerned with how they chose to mount the battery (bottom vs. top-mounted) and where they chose to locate the key lock. On to the Stromer

. . . damn this impresses me but I'm gun-shy after reading several negative posts; can it really be that bad? I also don't want to spend another 1K on an already-pricey ride with stem/front shock upgrades to account for road vibration.

Is there a way to PM or IM you will a few more questions before I head out to CLB's?

Thanks for all your help!

Paul

mrgold35
17 hours ago

It would be an added bonus if they could lower the cost and lower the weight of the battery packs down the road. I think the Tesla battery pack comes in about 1000-1200 lbs while the electric motor is under 100lbs.

Alberto Orchansky
1 day ago

This is a copy of the email sent to Citrus Cycle and to BULLS on August 14, 2017

I bought an LACUBA EVO E8 WAVE from Citrus Cycle, Kelly Demoline, Ladysmith, BC, Canada on May 31, 2017. The choice of this model was due to my physical conditions. A few years ago I had an accident suffering serious injuries in my neck. As a consequence, my neck is fused, limiting my head movement. I have been an active bicycle rider, both mountain, and road- all my life, but since the accident, I was not able to get back to riding anyone.

Meeting Kelly Dmoline from Citrus Cycles changed all this once he introduced me the EVO E8 Wave.
It's riding position was just perfect for me, absolutely comfortable and the pedal-assisted feature made possible for me to get back safely to the road.

Unfortunately, and just within a couple of days, I had a terrifying and literally life threatening experience. While 'testing' the bike downhill on a paved road, reaching about 40 k/h (not pedaling) the bike started to wobble violently. Only thanks to the experience I have riding bicycles I was able to stop it safely.

The experience was so shocking that I immediately contacted Kelly Demoline, having decided to return the bike. He was very surprised about the issue but, without hesitation, was ready to take the bike back.

Overnight I thought about it, about how much the bike was going to give me back to my life, that I decided to keep it with the condition I set to myself to never get to 40 km/h again.

However, the problem subsisted at different speeds, 30, 25, 20 km/k and so. I kept trying to figure out what may be out of line to induce such a behavior. I have the bike checked in a bike shop without finding anything abnormal. All they did was to adjust the suspension fork pressure for my weight, 200 lbs.

Finally, today August 15, 2017, with the odometer at 179 km I was able to induce and reproduce the problem myself AT ANY SPEED.

Riding the bike on a paved road with enough grade to force the bike to increase its speed, WITHOUT PEDALING, once reaching about 15 km/h start jiggling the handlebar left-right right left quite fast. The movement will induce a wobble on the front end that will rapidly be transferred, amplified to the back, reaching its maximum where most of the weight is concentrated. I tend to think the weight and location of the battery are crucial components in this wave resonance / dynamic amplification problem.

The meaning of this is that just a pebble, pothole or any irregularity on the road may lead to a 'handlebar jiggle', inducing the wobbling effect AT ANY SPEED.

That's exactly why it happens to me so many times and at different speeds.

I understand the problem is magnified due to the typical riding position of an urban type bike, where there is limited rider's weight on the handlebars.

Another situation associated with the weight on the handlebars is when making a traffic signal: a single hand on the handlebar and very little control upon the jiggling/wobbling effect with the other hand.

To summarize, I do not believe there is nothing technically wrong or defective with my particular bicycle.

However, I strongly believe there is a conceptual flaw in the design of this particular model, making it unsafe to ride it to the point that it should be discontinued and a recall issued.

Sincerely,

Over50
1 day ago

Ebike love or our conflicted love/hate relationships with them? I love Ebike commuting but Ebikes are ruining my finances. I bought a second bike because I liked the experience so much. I just had to buy several pairs of new jeans because my waist size has dropped an inch as I'm hitting 1300 commuting miles for the year. It just goes on and on: better bike bags, commuting clothes, lights etc.

Sounds like a good marketing idea and particularly for the industry events like the expos. Open up people's minds to the various applications for ebikes (commercial, cargo, commuting, exercise etc) and get them to make connections and open up their minds to possibilities not previously realized.

I like your "day in the life of a commuter" idea: it can really get bizarre to the point the stories sound like fiction. The other day on one commute I encountered two deer feeding at the side of the road, a block later I had to avoid a skunk crossing the road, and about a mile after that, deeper into the city, I passed three dudes with baseball bats walking down the street at 6am. On the ride home I almost crashed into a policeman who was crossing the street but changed his mind and reversed direction suddenly. Every commute something odd seems to occur.

HappyHighwayman
2 days ago

I have about 1200 miles on the original tires, and I've had two tubes (one front, and one rear) go, but the tires were still good though quite worn as you can see. Plus you can see how flat they are in the middle compared to a motorcycle tire because you're not learning as much as often. I'm going to hold onto them in case I ever need off-road tires.

I'm not surprised you get so much rear wear, when my rear tube when out I had to walk the bike to the shop and the next day my right arm and bicep were quite sore, all the weight is in the back wheel.

E-Wheels
2 days ago

I'm actually the reverse. It probably depends on individual physical advantages or disadvantages, proclivities, preferences, and such. I am still relatively young. 42. I got the ebike not because I can no longer pedal well, but because I was starting to find commuting 16 miles to work a little challenging and annoying. The ebike has changed all that.

Even on an ebike, my heart rate spikes a lot. We're talking higher than 120, where my resting heart rate is in the 50s and 60s. I think it's because my endorphin effects are powerful? I don't have to be hopped up on adrenaline, either. I can go have a ride and pains just melt away. I don't feel anything at 120 HR, even at almost 140 HR. I feel a little warm throughout my body, but not uncomfortably so. I don't pant. In fact, I'm usually enjoying myself immensely. I love pushing on the pedals to go faster, especially on an ebike.

In the 10 months I've gotten the ebike, I've gotten quite a bit stronger. I'm now getting 60 km (little less than 40 miles) on half a tank of a 400 Wh battery. Much of that is because I not only reduce the assist to Eco, but also because on the flats, I just plainly overpower the motor and comfortably cruise above the cutoff. And that's loaded with panniers, too. This is so much more exercise than I would have gotten with my road bike because I simply don't want to commute on it anymore, and I don't otherwise have the time to pedal. Three hours of pedaling a day, regardless of perceived effort, apparently makes you very strong. Whodathunk? What ebike and motor do you have

Dewey
2 days ago

The Juiced Cross Current S is supposed to have a controller/display the user can change modes between the 3 California classes and an "off-road mode" that lets the motor run to its power speed limit of just over 30mph. At that speed on any street in the US it is considered a moped, motor-driven cycle, or motorcycle, and without a VIN number it cannot be legally registered, titled, insured, or operated as a motor vehicle. It is being marketed as an ebike but falls outside all current legal definitions of an ebike so I don't think this is the way forward as it just puts riders at risk of liability/contributory negligence suits.

JRA
2 days ago

Sometimes I'll just leave the battery off and go for a ride, bike is about 35 lbs. as seen in the picture. It rides really well without the battery weight actually. My plan if the electronics ever happen to break down far away is to stash the battery beside the road somewhere and go back and pick it up later.

1/1
McSpiffy
2 days ago

Funny you ask that.
I live in Chicago myself and given the terrible road conditions here, I switched from Stromer ST2 to Haibike Trekking S Rx. While I absolutely enjoy the smoothness and quiet power delivery of ST2, hitting bumps and pot holes every 10m was not a nice feeling. I still use that for long distance travel.
I got my Trekking from Lenny's in Madison. Lenny has been like a father figure in my life and he even sponsored by Guinness Record ride last summer. So, mentioning him might be a conflict of interest here. But, I am happy to give you my honest answer.

Among your list, Trek Super Commuter 8+ would be a great choice. You could run those Super Moto X at low PSI and with the Body Float, you would have no problem on the Chicago roads.
Looks like you are a pretty seasoned cyclist (not everyone rides a Trek Domane 5.9 wth Di2). You should also consider the BULLS Dail-E Grinder. It does come with Di2, Bosch speed motor and the Supernova M99 lighting that you see on the Trek Super commuter. The geometry is more relaxed compared to the Trek but it's so much lighter than the ST2 and the trekking S Rx. At 48lbs, it really handles very well. 2" Marathon Supereme + RockShox paragon does a great job of mitigating bumps.
http://www.bullsebikes.com/product/dail-e-grinder/

The rack on the Dail-E grinder is rated for 60lbs. So, I don't see any problem carrying stuff like groceries or laptop/lunch.

I recently did a weekend ride to Milwaukee and back on my Haibike Trekking S Rx: https://www.strava.com/activities/1118854733. While I was able to do the trip on 2 batteries, I also came to realize that upright riding positions just doesn't cut it for long rides like that. I am looking to switch back to the Dail-E grinder myself and retire the Trekking S Rx. It has been a great bike. I rode it throughout the winter and it has performed flawlessly. If you have the opportunity to pick up a Trekking S Rx, I would recommend it because it's an older year model and most shops offer some sale on those. You could also switch out the batteries to the newer 500Whr ones.

I am hesitant to recommend the Vado 6.0. I rode that bike at the Chicago Bike Expo and it rode great. In theory, that would be a terrific bike for the Chicago roads but there are some glitches with the Specialized firmware, their mission control app but if you have a dealer near you who is willing to back you up, it is worth a shot.
If you already have a pretty good relationship with your Trek dealer, then Super Commuter 8+ would be a great choice as well. My thinking may be different from yours. I am not going to own any system that has super proprietary battery geometry and related hardware. If I get another Bosch powered bike (whether it is Tern GSD or Yuba Spicy cargo bike or even Mountain bike), I could switch out batteries and chargers. Also, if two or more family members have similar kind of bikes, then you gain additional battery for occasional rides and stuff like that. With Bosch, you have more flexibility. There are more spares and accessories available for Bosch than the Specialized. I am not trying to downplay specialized here but their mountain bike battery is different from road bike and both of these are very different from their Turbo bikes. Now, I could use Trekking S Rx batteries on Yuba Cargo or any eMTB and eliminate redundancy.

Wow!!!! Thank you for the prompt reply and all the information! I was really impressed by Court's video of the Specialized Turbo Vado 6.0 and thought it would be the one . . . for some reason, I keep coming back to the Stromer ST2. I don't foresee myself doing century rides with it but it would be nice for commuting (@5am) as well as running errands/shopping. The Haibikes (Trekking S Rx and the SDURO Trekking 5) look like great options. The Bulls LACUBA EVO E45 intrigues me even more than the Dail-E Grinder; as for lighting, I have the DesignShine DS-500 tail light and DS-1300 headlight ( http://store.designshinelighting.com ) - phenomenal lighting!

I really appreciate your genuine passion for e-bikes and sharing your knowledge with others to be a better consumer. I'd like to bend your ear some more but I'd be happy to repay you with your favorite beverage (coffee/beer - whatever your drink of choice is!) or meal. I'd like to make the pilgrimage to Madison to visit Crazy Lenny's and compare some of these before a final purchase.

I'm hesitant to try another Trek e-bike since my Trek FX+ was a disappointment. It did get me back into bicycling after a +15 yr hiatus, putting in 3500mi/yr commuting and casual biking. I have lost interest the past few years and hope that this next step will re-ignite the passion. I still plan to ride my Domane 5.9 and I also have a Madone 4.7 that spends most of it's life attached to a Wahoo Kickr Snap or on my Kreitler rollers.

Thanks again for all you do! I look forward to hearing more from you . . .

Roxlimn
2 days ago

I'm actually the reverse. It probably depends on individual physical advantages or disadvantages, proclivities, preferences, and such. I am still relatively young. 42. I got the ebike not because I can no longer pedal well, but because I was starting to find commuting 16 miles to work a little challenging and annoying. The ebike has changed all that.

Even on an ebike, my heart rate spikes a lot. We're talking higher than 120, where my resting heart rate is in the 50s and 60s. I think it's because my endorphin effects are powerful? I don't have to be hopped up on adrenaline, either. I can go have a ride and pains just melt away. I don't feel anything at 120 HR, even at almost 140 HR. I feel a little warm throughout my body, but not uncomfortably so. I don't pant. In fact, I'm usually enjoying myself immensely. I love pushing on the pedals to go faster, especially on an ebike.

In the 10 months I've gotten the ebike, I've gotten quite a bit stronger. I'm now getting 60 km (little less than 40 miles) on half a tank of a 400 Wh battery. Much of that is because I not only reduce the assist to Eco, but also because on the flats, I just plainly overpower the motor and comfortably cruise above the cutoff. And that's loaded with panniers, too. This is so much more exercise than I would have gotten with my road bike because I simply don't want to commute on it anymore, and I don't otherwise have the time to pedal. Three hours of pedaling a day, regardless of perceived effort, apparently makes you very strong. Whodathunk?

Ravi Kempaiah
2 days ago

Hi Ravi!

I hope you don't mind if I interject into this post but I've been following most of your posts, hoping to glean some information to make an informed decision on which bike to purchase. Have you separated yourself from Stromer? I originally narrowed my options to the yet available Specialized Turbo Vado 6, Trek Super Commuter+ 8s, Stromer ST2 and the Haibike XDURO Trekking S RX. I'm looking for a commuter bike that I can also use for carrying misc. gear (~30 lbs). I originally had a Trek FX+ but it was plagued with issues and I traded it in towards a Trek Domane 5.9 Di2. I was riding the Domane into December in the western suburbs (Naperville) but the narrow tires doesn't bode well for Chicagoland weather. I'd appreciate your feedback and also where you purchased your Haibike from. Is it worth jumping to the new Haibike SDURO Trekking 5?

Funny you ask that.
I live in Chicago myself and given the terrible road conditions here, I switched from Stromer ST2 to Haibike Trekking S Rx. While I absolutely enjoy the smoothness and quiet power delivery of ST2, hitting bumps and pot holes every 10m was not a nice feeling. I still use that for long distance travel.
I got my Trekking from Lenny's in Madison. Lenny has been like a father figure in my life and he even sponsored by Guinness Record ride last summer. So, mentioning him might be a conflict of interest here. But, I am happy to give you my honest answer.

Among your list, Trek Super Commuter 8+ would be a great choice. You could run those Super Moto X at low PSI and with the Body Float, you would have no problem on the Chicago roads.
Looks like you are a pretty seasoned cyclist (not everyone rides a Trek Domane 5.9 wth Di2). You should also consider the BULLS Dail-E Grinder. It does come with Di2, Bosch speed motor and the Supernova M99 lighting that you see on the Trek Super commuter. The geometry is more relaxed compared to the Trek but it's so much lighter than the ST2 and the trekking S Rx. At 48lbs, it really handles very well. 2" Marathon Supereme + RockShox paragon does a great job of mitigating bumps.
http://www.bullsebikes.com/product/dail-e-grinder/

The rack on the Dail-E grinder is rated for 60lbs. So, I don't see any problem carrying stuff like groceries or laptop/lunch.

I recently did a weekend ride to Milwaukee and back on my Haibike Trekking S Rx: https://www.strava.com/activities/1118854733. While I was able to do the trip on 2 batteries, I also came to realize that upright riding positions just doesn't cut it for long rides like that. I am looking to switch back to the Dail-E grinder myself and retire the Trekking S Rx. It has been a great bike. I rode it throughout the winter and it has performed flawlessly. If you have the opportunity to pick up a Trekking S Rx, I would recommend it because it's an older year model and most shops offer some sale on those. You could also switch out the batteries to the newer 500Whr ones.

I am hesitant to recommend the Vado 6.0. I rode that bike at the Chicago Bike Expo and it rode great. In theory, that would be a terrific bike for the Chicago roads but there are some glitches with the Specialized firmware, their mission control app but if you have a dealer near you who is willing to back you up, it is worth a shot.
If you already have a pretty good relationship with your Trek dealer, then Super Commuter 8+ would be a great choice as well. My thinking may be different from yours. I am not going to own any system that has super proprietary battery geometry and related hardware. If I get another Bosch powered bike (whether it is Tern GSD or Yuba Spicy cargo bike or even Mountain bike), I could switch out batteries and chargers. Also, if two or more family members have similar kind of bikes, then you gain additional battery for occasional rides and stuff like that. With Bosch, you have more flexibility. There are more spares and accessories available for Bosch than the Specialized. I am not trying to downplay specialized here but their mountain bike battery is different from road bike and both of these are very different from their Turbo bikes. Now, I could use Trekking S Rx batteries on Yuba Cargo or any eMTB and eliminate redundancy.

1/2
Alphbetadog
3 days ago

Tubeless is the way to go for road use also. I fail to see why manufacturers/dealers are stopping at tubeless "ready" and not just going all the way to tubeless.
I think it might be because the sealant (i.e. Stan's, OrangeSeal, etc.) needs to be renewed in several months and who knows how long a particular bike sits in the warehouse or dealer's floor. I think it would be a great additional service that the LBS can provide to customers further separating them from the internet sellers. It can also bring customers back into the store for a "refresh" and perhaps they'll buy a new helmet, lock, etc. Problem is most LBS' don't think outside their little retail box. Look how so many of them have been so reluctant to accept ebikes.

JRA
3 days ago

Tubeless is the way to go for road use also. I fail to see why manufacturers/dealers are stopping at tubeless "ready" and not just going all the way to tubeless. The tech is there and the sooner that the biking community becomes used to it, like auto's did years ago, it will become the accepted method and tubes will become archaic.

Denis Shelston
3 days ago

By Michael Skopes. August 2017
With permission

A 2017 E-Bike Adventure

One day, not so long ago, I opened a door to enter an area where I am employed. I was hit, full on, with the fact that I no longer have any passion for what it is I do there. My days there are only a passing of time spent wondering about other things more important to me; my family, my home,...me, and other more fun activities.

At the same time, I appreciate the compensation that my job affords me - money and health care benefits. You know, all that boring stuff like an IRA, 401k, and such. But, all that, is for the most part, pleasureless. The most pleasing aspect of that crap is the toys I can buy to make my life more FUN.

The following sentence involves a subject, which to me, borders on the surreal. Retirement...is...just...around...the...corner. Hell, retirement is something old people do. I don't qualify as an old person. At least, not in my mind, I don't.

I don't know how my twenties turned into my sixties so quickly. My brain, my heart, and my soul, all tell me it's time for another game of 500 in the park, or a few high dives off of top board at my hometown swimming pool. But, uh oh...the deep end no longer has those old diving boards! In fact, the entire pool has been completely re-built and almost unrecognizable. And, unfortunately, what my body tells me about physical activity is not quite the same as what my brain, heart, and soul communicate.

Go for a long endorphin filled cross country type run? Uh uh. Don't even think about it. My lower back and knees won't take the pounding. Damn, I loved running so much. Extend my body airborne for that long pass at the goal line like I once often did? Not a good idea. Hitting the green grass wearing pads at one time was exhilarating, not debilitating. Hey, how about attacking a radical mogul course on freshly fallen snow? Get real fella! Not anymore. Oh, the knees, the hips, the lower back. Skiing became my all time favorite winter activity while in my mid to late twenties.

Get this, though. Physical exertion is far from a thing of my youthful past. Hooray for the bicycle! Hip hip hooray for the electric bicycle! I'll get to the e-bike in just a minute. Allow me to back track for a moment.

One of my very first loves, as a young boy, was learning how to ride a bicycle. And, after mastering that marvelous activity, the extended range that became my daily excitement, grew longer and longer. Soon, I disappeared from my parents' view for hours at a time as I biked with my pals from one end of town to the other. Minutes, hours, and miles meant nothing to us. We had trusty mechanical steeds whose rolling wheels seemed capable of endless, small town, summer time adventures. If we weren't kicking up dust, pebbles, and basic dirt while racing around Chapin Park's baseball field, we were busy slamming on our brakes while screaming down swimming pool hill.

That excellent downhill activity, of melting bicycle tire rubber, left twenty foot long black streaks on the blacktop. Bald tires? We never cared. That was part of the deal. And when those rubber burning slides ended, we just might opt to take a little detour out to the long abandoned strip mines. Out there, on the outskirts of town, the giant coal digging machines of old left us with huge mounds of gray/white earth. Over time, outstanding trails developed throughout those sometimes treacherous hills which were intertwined with deep, blue pools of water that stretched for hundreds of feet. Riding those paths brought many a boy, and a few girls, to the point of total exhaustion, and in some cases...broken frames and fractured bones.

Yes, my childhood relationship with my Monark bicycle was a love affair. Many of my friends had that same love affair. Several of us participated in the annual Corn Festival bicycle parade. We decorated our bikes with crepe paper, flags and banners. Some kids wore costumes. I donned a Marlon Brando type motorcycle cap - the tough guy look like from his fifties movie, "The Wild One".

But that love affair broke my heart when some criminal stole my beloved Monark. Sadness became my middle name. Consolation on the part of my mother didn't even help. And I adored my mother, and how she did so much for me and my two sisters. My father offered a matter of fact response to my long face with a few well chosen words and a simple pat on my shoulder. All that did little to mend my deep psychological wound. But Dad had a quiet way about him that endeared me to him just as much as Mom.

In time, a replacement two-wheeler appeared. That tale is one whose details I won't divulge in this story. I would rather keep that for anyone interested in reading my book "My Little Skinny Greek Life: On Liberty Street". Find it on Amazon. I don't want to spoil that story here. What I will go into here, is the flash forward to today.

FLASH!

For years, various physical problems have kept me from fully enjoying the activity that I had loved for so much of my life. Before losing the ability to travel by bicycle, I had the pleasure of making two long road trips. The first, at age twenty nine and turning thirty, went on for 1500 miles from California to Illinois.

Some of the information written in an unsolicited newspaper article about that tour - going all the way to Maine, down to Florida, and back to California - never happened. Those plans had to be changed for several reasons. I actually can't recall the primary reason. It may have been that being a touring novice, I bit off more than I could pedal.

I have read, in my current research, that the number one reason for many new bike touring enthusiasts cutting their tours short is because of unrealistic goals. Their mental and physical preparations couldn't match up with their lofty plans. Really. Just imagine coming up with the idea of riding a heavily outfitted bicycle for 7,000 miles without ever having done any touring at all prior to that. Hmm...you see what I mean? However, I did go over 1,500 miles on my Centurion two wheeler.

My second major distance bicycle adventure took me from Monterey, California south to Los Angeles and specifically, Northridge to attend a Super Bowl party. However, I only managed to put in about 155 miles because I strained my knee and had to grab a bus for part of the remaining distance.

So, as I mentioned above, hip hip hooray for the electric bike. Because now, I am so happy to say that I have returned to the joyful activity of riding a long distance tour by bicycle. I am in the middle of one as I write this story. It is forty miles this time. Nowhere near 1,500...yet.

This time, so many calendar years later and with bike technology that is light years ahead of 1982, I now ride a RadRover from Rad Power Bikes, out of Seattle, Washington. They have created a beauty that comes in two colors; black or white. I chose black. It is an electrically powered fat bike which I have modified to fit my practical and esthetic needs.

It is known as a fat bike partly because it has four inch wide knobby, fat, tires. It is, in essence, a mountain bike which is very capable as a road bike at the same time. The 750 watt motor and the 48 volt battery can take me up to 25 miles with my leg power added. With a second battery stowed away in my Burley Nomad trailer, my distance doubles. When that runs out, I hopefully am already camped or in a hotel where I can re-charge for the next day of travel.

My interest in bicycle touring was recently re-kindled by stumbling upon a few videos on YouTube. Seeing the various examples of which panniers to purchase, how and what to pack in them, brought back memories of my past pannier preparations. There is a certain excitement related to the process of deciding upon what to buy, where, and how much to spend. So, familiar tour preparation became a big part of my daily thoughts. This was particularly true while at my personally unsatisfying job.

Every day, while at work, my mind wandered away from vocational duties to adventurous daydreams. I couldn't help it. Every day, as I commuted to and from work, all I could think about was bike touring. Could I even physically do it anymore? I would soon find out.

Suffering through the slow stop and go crawl of heavy rush hour traffic turned into something completely different. My mind turned off the disgust associated with this daily grind and welcomed the fantasies I conjured up instead. Rather than mutter under my breath my roadway discontent with hundreds of other cars and trucks that surrounded me, I was smiling internally at the prospect of my next, long awaited, two wheeled adventure. Hot damn!

Well, the days passed by. Each night after work I would stitch together more and more ideas that percolated in my mind in the hopes of making my fantasy adventure come true. I pulled down my old Centurion Super Le Mans twelve speed that had been hanging in the garage for years and started the process of giving it new life. Yes, the very same bike that took me to Illinois from California thirty five years ago. It needed new tubes and tires for sure, and a good amount of service all totaling $240. That figure was just under what I paid for the bike new from Joslyn's Bike Shop in Monterey thirty seven years earlier. Ouch.

After that, an expense that ultimately turned out to be an unnecessary one, I rode it around my neighborhood for about a mile with no bags other than the old handlebar bag. It felt very familiar and good. The next day, I added the matching rear Eclipse panniers I had stored away from those past tours. I partially filled them with a few items to ease into a touring weight. I rode for three miles. That was not bad, but I did feel the difference and the need to get into better shape if a real extended tour were to take place. By the way, I tried desperately to figure out a way to once again use those great old blue bags on my Rover. I couldn't quite get their proprietary configuration to conform to my new ride satisfactorily, so I had to let them go back into storage after the third and final test run coming up. Bummer!

The following day, for that final test run, I went out for six miles. This time I had to walk up a few hills and also stop for a good rest or two along the way. It occurred to me, that there was no way I could realistically take this sentimental bike for a long tour ever again. My hopes faded. The idea of embarking on another tour adventure looked pretty much impossible. Then, I stumbled upon the e-bike world and everything changed.

I discovered a video, among many others, that was created by a young man named Adamm Jarvis. He produced an interesting review of the RadRover. It can be found on YouTube easily enough. I watched it a couple of times and thought the Rover was worth a better look, so I went to the Rad web site to learn more. I was impressed with the company and its young founders. Still, I needed to look around for other choices, which I did, just to be sure I was satisfied with my research.

I kept going back to Rad. I spoke with them on the phone a few times, telling them my plans and they thought the Rover would work best for my touring idea. I saw more reviews - EBR, Electric Bike Review, was another good one.

I returned to Adamm's video. There was something about it that spoke to me. It had an easy going vocal delivery by Adamm himself, music, and good production value. Along with the bike itself, featured in the video, that twenty something minute video helped me make up my mind. The Rover is what I wanted.

It is now June, 30th 2017. Today, I have pedaled my Rover twenty miles to the Sycamore Campground at the beach near Malibu, CA. Roughly ten miles on roads and streets, and ten miles on the great trail from inland to the beach. I am the only person in the hike and bike area. My campsite begins to take shape.

This may only be a shorter overnight adventure, but boy, am I ever loving it. The ride was wonderful - not hot at all, but perfect. I took this trail part way three other times. Having taken this trail now for the fourth time, and adding the camp out element to it, I am filled with a sense of adventure. I've longed for this touring/camping feeling. This short bike tour brings back all the experiences that my other longer tours gave me - scenery, fresh air, camping, exercising by bike, saying hello to new people as they go about their camping fun. The little kids on their bikes smile as they ride past me among the camp sites. I think one of those smiling little ones was the same one who woke up early the next morning and would not stop screaming. Seriously, for well over an hour, I struggled with those screams and the incessant small dog barking that complimented the shrieking. So much for a peaceful way to wake up with the great outdoors.

My penthouse suite tent is roomy and functional, but it isn't sound proof. It has enough room to hold my Rover and trailer all secured, dry and safe without a need to lock it up. I think it is fine with me right beside it. Even so, ever since my first bike was stolen so many years ago, I have never forgotten the hollow feeling of having lost such a treasured possession to some cold hearted thief. However, in my actual garage at home, my Rover is kept securely locked.

I kid around when asked about the space inside my voluminous tent.
"I have a garage, a bedroom, kitchen, and bathroom."
When people hear me say that, they often chuckle. It's true. I really make good use of the giant tent...I create a garage, a bedroom, a kitchen, and a bathroom within the nylon walls.

Many a campground will have a tendency to gross me out when it comes to the bathroom facilities. I decided to take my self contained idea to new heights by incorporating the survivalist style bathroom. I have a sliced section of a pool noodle circling the rim of a small bucket lined with a plastic waste bag, a hospital urinal, a hospital wash basin (I've spent a few days in hospital care recently), plenty of t. p., small trash bags, wet wipes, wash cloths, towels, soap, and I fill up one or two gallon plastic bottles with water from the campground source. All these comforts ease the hassle of having to walk to the facilities in the middle of the night if necessary. In fact, I am now so spoiled by this, I can't help but think that this is the only way to camp by bicycle.

Having my indoor kitchen is convenient, too. Boiling water for morning coffee without going outside is great. Oatmeal and coffee at my fingertips - perfect. My only concern is if Yogi Bear's cousins come snooping around. I had better start keeping the bulk of my minimalist food stuffs outside during the night. Ya think?

My bedroom set up is an important one. I have to be comfortable with my necessary pillow configuration, and mattress combo. My ground tarp is the first protective layer followed by the tent floor, a one half inch thick layer of foam rubber, topped with my air mattress, the Klymit Insulated Static V Sleeping Pad. I researched the mattresses and knew I had to have a top of the line product. It inflates with only about twelve deep breaths. The Klymit I bought is not their most expensive version. That said, I was not going to sacrifice my comfort to save a few bucks by going any lower.

My new sleeping bag, the OutdoorsmanLab sleeping bag is not of the mummy type. I feel way too restricted if and when I can't sprawl as part of my comfort zone. The bag also allows for poking your feet out when it gets too hot. I like that for sure. Everything is lightweight, and compact. That, my friends, is more than just desirable when biking. It is imperative.

There is so much room to work in my tent garage. I'm away from any flying pests or crawling bugs as I work. I fabricated a kick stand/tent floor protector out of a plastic coffee can lid, cardboard and gaff tape. I need to prevent holes in the tent floor. Spreading out my tools and parts inside my tent near my Rover and Nomad bicycle trailer makes it easier to be a do-it-yourselfer. Very convenient.

Here are some thoughts as the sun sinks behind the dry mountain a few yards west of my camp site.

We're taught from an early age to share. Share that Popsicle, or candy bar. Back in 1982, a lanky gray haired gentleman walked out of a small grocery store in Glacier National Park and saw I was bicycle touring. He had just unwrapped his candy bar and offered to share it with me. I think it was a Hershey bar - kindness.

"Here, have a bite of my Slim Jim, or half of my sandwich." That's a comment that may sound familiar to many of us from times past. Similarly, at another stop at a campground in northern Montana, an older retired couple, who upon learning I was in the middle of a cross country bicycle tour, offered dinner and homemade blueberry pie in their motor home camper. I will never forget the look on the woman's face, and her exclamation;

"You're doing what?? You must be hungry!"

I find it touching when on the receiving end of kindness and generosity. At the same time, I see the compassion and satisfaction on the faces of those who offer it. Those moments lead me into a more spiritual place where I often ponder the bigger picture, and how little things we do can have so much meaning.

Ah, the wonder of it all. The world going by at 70 to 80 miles per hour in a car is quite different from the world I see at 5 to 25 miles an hour by bicycle. The world I witness from a slower perspective has a more complete way of becoming a part of me. I see more. I hear more. I feel more. I acutely sense the wonder of it all.

I guess my philosophical nature comes from being Greek. My ancestors managed to produce a few good ones way back when. I'm sure you can recall their names.

This trip is only the beginning. I'd like to make several of these e-bike journeys to help re-capture some of the youthful times I loved so much. I want to retire soon and take advantage of the physical abilities I still have before they wither away never to be again. I can't see myself spending anymore precious days than I absolutely have to working in an unsatisfying job. I want to feel the wind against my face as I bike along a secluded trail. I want to hear the birds calling, see the squirrels, lizards, and rabbits dart across the trail in front of me as they rush toward their own little palaces. I want to cross the shallow stream that meanders across the trail in three different locations and get wet, muddy, and laugh about it to myself.

I travel alone. I don't mind the solitude, the mud, the sweat, the tough hills, and the occasional mechanical repair. They're all part of the smile. My smile. And I will savor all of these moments as they find me - as nature comes to me. I won't wonder, one day, why I didn't take advantage of the mountains, the beaches, the nights under the stars. Nope. That little boy who ate up the streets of small town USA while pedaling on his Monark still exists. He is just a little bigger, wiser, and definitely more gray. He continues to occupy the space between my ears and the heart of my soul.

So, this is my camp/biking story that replaced the original, longer, Santa Barbara round trip which had to be cancelled. Some of you have been waiting for this documentary of sorts for too long. I apologize for the delay. Perhaps I will get to the Santa Barbara adventure before my legs tell me to give it up. I hope to make that tour soon. For now, I hope you found this little story interesting. Perhaps even inspiring. Thanks for taking the time to share my adventure.

Ann M.
3 days ago

Awesome, Eddie! Like that the tubeless setup is already in place. My techie guy who's does a lot of off-road riding tells me that flats on the trail are easier to fix with this setup--what's your thoughts??

EddieJ
3 days ago

I guess that I put in about 1,500 - 1,800 miles a year riding off road after daylight hours. I actually prefer it to day time riding, but then we only have weirdos in the woods to worry about at night time, and the only animal hazards are deer.

The one thing that I have learnt, is that you never look behind. I have only managed to freak myself out twice on night rides, and on both occasions it was because I looked behind. :D

Up until recently, my main light has been a Fenix BT20 with a modified battery pack, but I am about to take delivery of a Magicshine EagleF3. I also make sure that I have a back up light of some kind, plus one of these wrist mounted lights. I thought that it was going to be a real gimmick when I bought it from Ebay, but it has proved to be very useful.

I don't use head/helmet mounted torches, as much of my riding terrain is through tight woodland with low hanging branches. As Mr. Coffee has alluded to, I'm another that doesn't want to risk a whiplash injury.

And a couple of very rare road shots.

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EddieJ
3 days ago

I have long had a passion for hardtail mtb’s be them analogue or pedal assist, and have found the eMTB version through ownership of the superb KTM Macina Race, to make the perfect bike for wet weather/winter use.

With the Macina Race now sold, it is time to introduce the replacement bike, a KTM Fogo 271
Click to enlarge

I decided a long time ago that whatever the next bike was going to be, that it needed to be 27.5” Plus size, and just as the Macina Race, it also needed to have a good component specification. I was also keen to stay with both the KTM marque and Bosch drive unit system.

As things stand the KTM Fogo 271 exceeds my requirements by a significant margin, so I am more than happy with my choice.

The Magura Boltron T-20x110 front forks is an interesting one for me, as I have read so many reports both good and bad, which made me keen to own a bike that had them fitted, just so that I could come to my own conclusion about them. I have also previously been asked privately about the forks and what I knew about them, so at least I finally get to discover for myself, and can offer opinion accordingly, and not just based from hearsay. I shall post more about the front forks as time passes, but from handling them off the bike, and checking them over thoroughly, it is a promising start. Clearly performance in use and durability are key, so time will tell, but from research that I have completed, I have already worked out that poor set up from end users, plays a major role in reported seal failure.
Click to enlarge

My preferred choice of front mudguard has long been the Rapid Racer Neoguard, (thanks guys) but after discussion, there are currently no plans to introduce a guard for USD front forks. There is no way that I could bring myself to install a guard that utilizes the steerer tube, and with that in mind I already have my own neoprene design waiting to fit to the bike.

The full bike/component specifications are detailed below, but as things stand, there is very little that I intend to change. I shall be replacing Intuvia with Purion, fit a Ragley Tracker saddle, Ritchey Foam grips, a 70mm Easton stem, and change what I believe to be a KS LEV Integra dropper post, in favour of a Rockshox Reverb Stealth. These four listed items are just personal preference and nothing more. The dropper post is simply being changed as I have one that I removed from the Macina Race, so the rebadged KS can be squirreled away.

I have chosen 27.5” Plus for a very specific reason, but just as with the front forks, I shall detail how things work out, as time passes. Briefly though, as many will be aware, I ride throughout the year and in all conditions. I treat my bikes very much as tool to do a job, and to date KTM bikes have filled this role very well, but with slight limitation. I now want to go one stage further and 27.5” plus is going to enable this. The plus size will fulfill the role of providing superb low-pressure grip in respect of riding wooded knarly terrain and also over rocks etc, then come the winter months, I intend to drop the tyre size down to 2.25-2.3 to optimize rear chain stay clearance. Running 2.25 for example, will give me a full 27mm of clearance all round, so close to zero issue of potential mud/leaf build up.

Having received the bike today, I cannot yet add ride specific details and data, but as with any bike that I receive, the first job is to strip the bike down to the component stages, then re assemble studying parts and construction as I go. By doing so I gain a greater insight into the construction of a bike, and can see what if anything in my opinion could or should be changed. Also, if anything fails whilst riding, having already stripped and rebuilt the bike, I have a head start on how to repair things. I get as much pleasure from working on bikes, as I do riding them.
Click to enlarge

This is where it gets interesting for me, as after having pulled the bike down, I am already very impressed by the frame. The build quality and paint finish is superb, but it is what is behind all that, that I am interested in. The shape and tube sizing has been improved, and just turning the first screw to remove the motor covers, revealed the first thought out design feature. A small banana shaped cover which when removed, gives clear and easy access to main connectors of the Bosch CX drive unit. That in itself was a simple, but welcome change. KTM have also now chosen to use an additional two motor mounting points. This again impressed me, not because the standard three wasn’t enough, but more from the potential that it may prevent any motor creaking, as the loading on the mounts is now more equal.

Turning the frame upside down gave the biggest and most pleasant surprise from the point of view of working on a bike. KTM have chosen to redesign the cable routing and internal cast mounts to the frame. Routing cables, wiring, hydraulic brake and dropper post hose, is now effortlessly easy and simple to do. I’m very impressed that such R&D has been put into this side of things, but I guess that it must save valuable seconds during the factory assembly stage. Speaking of cable and hose routing, I was also pleased to note that the frame entry points for routing, are now fractionally larger as well. A lot of thought has gone into the production of this frame.

Removal of the two tyres was next on the list, and it was yet another pleasant surprise to see that the rims are tubeless ready, not just compatible. That’ll save a bit of time and money when setting them up to run tubeless. Once the wheel set has been returned from a friend’s bike shop, after giving them to him to check and adjust spoke tension should it be required, it’ll then just be a simple job to install Stans valves and Effetto Mariposa CaffeLatex sealant. A sealant that I have no hesitation in using or recommending.

Whilst in its knock down stage, I decided to take advantage of the situation, and fitted an AMS XL Honeycomb frame guard kit. It seemed silly to pass up the opportunity to test a kit, so time will tell as to how effective that it is. It was certainly easy enough to apply, although the frame colour doesn’t really mask any slight air bubbles very well. I have also added 3M clear film to several areas of the frame as well.

Finally, the lad that purchased the Macina Race hardtail has indicated that he wants to start to ride off road as well, so that being the case, I should be able to format some interesting bike comparisons.

As well as regular updates to this forum, further updates and photographs will be posted at the following places.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/313908402329634/permalink/451984891855317/

https://www.facebook.com/edwardpeterjefferies/posts/474559259568509

https://www.instagram.com/eddiejefferies/?hl=en

Thanks to KTM Bike Industries, The Little Bike Shop, Bikegoo, Effetto Mariposa, Fork Juice, and Magicshine UK.

Full component specification

2017 KTM Macina Fogo 271 8s EX1Frame

:- Macina MTB 27.5"+ BOOST, Alloy for Bosch, with semi-integrated battery
Frame sizes :- 43cm, 48cm and 53cm.
Bike colour :- Matt light grey, black + toxic orange.
Front fork :- MAGURA Boltron inverted, T-20x110 120mm travel, weight 2,200g
Headset :- KTM Team B303AM drop/in-tapered, +10
Headset bearing numbers :- MH-P28 and MH-P08M
Stem :- KTM Team KT-6 7° 95mm Weight 133g
Handlebar :- KTM Team HB-RB12L riser, rise 15°, Width 720mm
Handlebar grips :- KTM Team VLG--775-12D2 Diamond fin with end Clamps
Brake rotors :- Shimano RT86 6-bolt, 180mm front, 180mm rear. 260.4g pr
Brakes :- Shimano Deore XT M8000 Weight 554g pr including caliper/hose/lever assembly
Trigger shifter :- SRAM SL EX1 8speed Weight 122g
Rear derailleur :- SRAM RD EX1 8speed. Weight 289g
Front sprocket size as supplied 16T
Cassette :- SRAM XG899 11-48 ( 11, 13, 15, 18, 24, 32, 40, 48) Weight 360g
Chain :- SRAM EX1 Weight 273g
Pedal cranks :- SRAM EX1, ISIS for Bosch. Length 170mm. Weight 510g pr
Pedals :- VP components VP-539 black platform, with replaceable pins. Weight 370g pr
Wheel set :- KTM Line 27-5" plus B/B Tubeless ready
Wheel rims :- Ryder edge 35, 32 spoke hole, suitable for 2.3 to ‘plus’ size of 3.0. Weight 580g
Front hub :- 20mmThrough axle DT Swiss 350 classic-6-bolt 20/110/TA BOOST. Weight 239g
Rear hub :- 12mm Through axle DT Swiss 350 classic-6-bolt 12/148/TA BOOST. Weight 305g
Tyres :- Schwalbe Nobby Nic 70-584 TL-easy, Snake skin, Apex. Weight 910g per tyre.
Saddle :- Fizik Gobi M7 with Manganese rails. Weight 255g
Seat post :- KTM Comp JD-YSP12L hydraulic adjustable 100-370, diameter 30.9mm Weight 560g
Display :- Intuvia LCD, with Walk assist
Drive unit :- Bosch Performance Line CX 36V-250W, 25km/h 75NM of torque, four assist levels,
Eco giving 50% Tour giving 120% Sport giving 210% Turbo 300% Maximum torque available
per assist level, Eco 40Nm Tour 50Nm Sport 60Nm Turbo 75Nm
Battery :- Bosch Powerpack 13.8Ah - 500WH
Motor weight :- 4kg
Battery weight :- 2.6kg, dimensions 325mm x 92mm x 90mm
Overall Bike weight :- 21.4kg

https://www.instagram.com/eddiejefferies/

And now 'Electric Mountain Bike Collective' on Facebook.

.

1/3
Mark Peralta
3 days ago

I did another round trip at North County Trailways. I started at Tarrytown Lake and this time I did 60 miles. Ride time was 2 hours and 45 minutes (average speed of 21.8 mph).
Fast road cyclists motivate me to pedal faster, so I have the added bonus of more exercise compared to my stationary bike based on my heart rate monitor.

1/1
Katman4532
4 days ago

I am very lucky to live in an area with abundant wildlife. I routinely see deer, coyotes, black bears, rattlesnakes, porcupines, skunks, bobcat, bald eagles, and ospreys. Less frequently I have seen mountain lion, lynx, wolves, elk (what Europeans call "giant deer"), and moose (what Europeans call "elk").

Bluntly I am far more afraid of the cows I routinely encounter as well. Coming around a blind corner at speed into a road full of cows isn't a good scenario.

Cycling is very popular where I live. I have never heard of any cyclist being attacked by wild beasts here. My normal run to town is a popular cycling route that I often make early in the morning -- I've never seen any evidence of animal attacks on cyclists -- no mangled bikes, no bloody bits of lycra, nothing. If the animals are attacking cyclists they are devouring them bike and all.

There is discussion of US F & W reintroducing grizzly bears into my locality. If that happens I will need to figure out how to mount a 12-gauge pump-action shotgun or Weatherby Dangerous Game Rifle on my bike. But that hasn't proven necessary. Yet.
Outside of the occasional vicious dog, the only wildlife encounter I've had was with a rabid coyote. Fortunately, it
was in the "prodromal" phase and not yet vicious. Rabies has been a bit of a problem in our area. I have considered
carrying a shotgun slung over my shoulder for night time rides. Openly carrying a long gun in Texas is legal. I really
wish I had access to the more effective pepper spray the police have.

Katman4532
4 days ago

I used to ride at night regularly for fun. I also prefer to ride early enough in the mornings that it's still dark. Visibility is a major issue. You can suddenly encounter serious road hazards without seeing them on account of bad lighting conditions. Worse in the rain. Aside from multiple rear lights, I have two front lights installed independent of the battery. It's a bit of a hassle but it's better than having no lights if your ebike system fails. I have two lights so I have a backup. I have two more lights in the pack. I have this many lights because in very dark conditions, I prefer throwing something like 800+ lumens down the street, and my primary lights only last 2 hours on that mode.
I plan on getting a helmet light. You can't have too many lights while cycling.

Thomas Jaszewski
4 days ago

What Americans lack are safe riding skills. How many if the helmet proponents know what the stopping distance is of their ride at max speed? At any speed? How many have had a "track" day and actually practiced avoidance skills? Braking skills? Road through obstacles and practiced tight turns at various speeds? I guessing if two in this thread have that's the sum total. Safety gear does not take the place of safe riding skills.

Burp
4 days ago

Honestly, the thought that I might be above any sort of weight limit never even crossed my mind. It probably should have. But no, I never felt like I was approaching what the bike could handle as far as weight goes. I've never weighed myself with my gear, but guessing I started around 285-290 with the larger battery pack so say an even 300, plus my backpack with I'd guess close to 30 lbs fully loaded with water, tools, clothes, etc. I've stopped on the way home and bought groceries which probably added another 20 lbs without issues. My advice would be, don't overthink it, engineers build in safety factors for a reason. If using the e-bike to commute is your motivation to get in shape and improve your life (like it is for me) then don't let the weight limit distract you from your goal. In my younger days I was big into jeeps and a motto from there that I still carry, is that things don't break, they just offer opportunity for upgrades (thus the 11 gauge spokes).

Other things you should get though, right off the bat, from my experience:
- spoke wrench (standard bike multi tools don't have the tool for 12 gauge (let alone 11) spokes. Ask me how I know . . .
- quality inner tubes, at least 3-4. I've gotten 2 flats so far, both from debris in the road but I was within a mile from home so I haven't had to do a trail change yet, just walked it home. I also carry a GAADI tube that is a bike tube that you don't need to remove the wheel for. If I do need to change it on the trail, I can always cut out the old tube and put that one in for the rear to get me home and put a regular tube in. I couldn't find it domestically, so I ordered it from some German bike website.
- 18 mm offset wrench (I stress this because I have a lot of tools, but didn't have this and had to make a special run to the autoparts store to get one)
- zip ties (every time you remove the rear wheel you have to cut off a zip tie that hold the wire connection so you'll need to replace it)
- brake pads and a brake bleed kit. I got my cross current refurbished and I don't know if they put new pads on it before sending it to me. I changed my pads in the rear at around 800 miles from when I got the bike.
- chain cleaner and chain lube (you should do it weekly for commuting)
- you can figure out clothes, bike shorts, helmet, gloves etc. haha But I will say that I didn't start with gloves but bought them on day 2.

EDIT: I just noticed in a previous replay, you mentioned the 11 gauge spokes for the FRONT wheel. I have not broken ANY spokes in the front, no issues there. It's the REAR wheel spokes that'll break because of the weight and the hub motor. Get the 230mm 11 gauge spokes for the rear wheel. You could probably use standard spokes for the front as there's not nearly as much weight there.
I can't say thank you enough for all of the information you have provided, motivation, and general knowledge that you have brought to light.

Looks like I'll be purchasing a CrossCurrent S in the next few weeks. I had this image in my head that I would get on the bike and I would immediately break a few spokes and pop a tire due to my size. Hopefully in a few months I'm not worried about pushing the weight limit on anything again!

The reason I mentioned the front wheel was because the length of the spoke seems to be different on the CrossCurrent S back wheel. I'll have to look into these measurements some more and maybe call a vendor or two before I purchase anything aftermarket.

Thanks again!

Barry King
2 weeks ago

Great vid. Thanks! I'm getting one this week. It opens up new ground. Seems Yamaha & Bosch are pretty similar. I think Bosch may look a bit cooler, but also a bit higher pricetag. Both good. Giant is a great company, but I wish they would re-brand. The name just lacks in coolness, although this bike looks pretty slick.

hcw199
2 weeks ago

can u ride these without the assistance to review how they are when the battery dies... cheers

Richard Day
3 weeks ago

I love the colors they be colorful .

Bad Ass
4 weeks ago

How much does it weigh without the battery pack.

Donandnan Elmore
1 month ago

I've got a GIANT Quick-E+ and my gears don't "mash" as much as they did for Cort. I did my first "longer" ride the other day. I was putting down the flat at around 20mph and got smoked by some very good road bike riders. They were far enough ahead of me that they got through a light and I had to stop. About 5+ miles later I saw them again (I had thought they had turned off when I couldn't see them. We were all three on a long climb and I passed them both never to see them again and we went another 2 or so miles before I turned. As I passed the wife, who had pulled away from her husband, she said, "I need that!" to me.

Apolaudi
1 month ago

Great. It's my first ride on E Bike last week. And i find it exciting as my age is nearly 50yrs old and my kid is 11 and on jump bike and bmx. I can't keep up with him riding together as age is catching up. Now i got lots of choices from your video. lots of knowledge. Thanks.

Sorin Vasile Bogdan
1 month ago

Is every road cyclist out there a ''racer'? What happened to just commuting or going out by yourself?

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 month ago

I'm not sure if your'e referencing something I said in the review but you're correct, road bikes can be great for active commuting and solo rides... that's how I usually ride with them anyway. In the ebike space, there are lots of models without drop bars so I think when I see something like this it stands out and feels like a racer in a way :)

gabe arellano
2 months ago

how's the resistance when you're pedaling with the pedal assist off just normal without the system on is there a big resistance or can you pedal like a normal bike

KCFlyer2
2 months ago

I just bought one of these bikes because of a health issue. This bike is just what the doctor ordered. It's a damn good road bike even with the system turned off. It is on the heavy side, but I've ridden 100 miles the first week I owned it and I noticed on the Mapmyride app that the line that displays the speed and elevation, the blue (speed) line is essentially flat. I am using the same amount of effort and I have increased my average speed on 30+ mile rides from 12 to 18.2 mph - and that was in Eco mode.

As he says, it takes a little getting used to when shifting. You have to ease up on peddling to insure that all shifts are smooth. Doesn't take long to figure out.

The bike shop told me that I'd most likely never use more than Eco unless I wanted to show off. So far, they are right...although I did show off on one ride - in Normal mode, I was going uphill at 25 mph. I;m almost afraid to use Power mode. But I love that this bike feels like a regular bike - every so often you can feel the assist, but it usually feels like you are riding as usual....just going faster. Wonderful bike. Ride one once and you'll want one

Aaron ___
2 months ago

this one is sweet and the price is high but not outrageous.

Louie Lamoore
2 months ago

These e-bikes should flourish in America if there wasn't this one big red flag: most Americans won't fit on a bike.

Karma King
2 months ago

One thing that is not "spectacular" is the glare on the display. Saw nothing

Noah C
2 months ago

Great review.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 months ago

Thanks Noah! I do my best, appreciate the compliment :)

Karl Fonner
2 months ago

Are you sure those forks are aluminum most are steel

Christopher Railwah
2 months ago

That looked really fun. I'm moving to NYC and your reviews are definitely helping me out. I'm just looking to see which is is right for me

scootosan
3 months ago

Nice video. As you said may be great for someone with psychical limits or for commuting. I would like to have one (someday).

RelentlessC2C
3 months ago

If you like going fast that much just buy a motorbike. These e-bikes make a mockery of what cycling is all about - self-propulsion. Look up 'bicycle' in the dictionary. A machine powered solely by pedals.

RelentlessC2C
2 months ago

Ok. My argument is that there is no situation where gearing could not be used to assist a less able rider. The price you pay for these ebikes is a massive premium over equivalent standard. It's a scam, and as we all know the bicycle industry is adept at scamming us. If you have knee problems, or just clocking up the years, you can put a 28 granny ring on the front and a 40 cassette on the back. You could convert to a 1x drivetrain, or combine the 28 with a 36/38/40, or you could put a triple on there. You need new derailleurs, new cranks and new cassette, all of which will cost a fraction of the premium for an ebike. And you will still be cycling, rather than 'motoring'. If you can't keep up with your group ride, find another group ride. Lithium ion batteries have a catastrophic environmental impact, and they do not last that long. If my spouse wanted to ride with me she is going to need more than an ebike. The idea that you can just jump on an ebike with no former experience and start doing 100km+ group rides is just ridiculous, and even if you could where is the reward from building up fitness and achieving all those milestones? If you ride an ebike to commute and you don't like exercise, then you probably NEED the exercise. So the ebike isn't really helping you, and it cost you a fortune. Cycling is a sport. It is physical exercise. It is freedom. Putting an electric motor on a bicycle is anathema. However, it's been done, and people are now being conned into buying them. That's fine. Nothing I can do about that. Doesn't mean I have to like it though. That's my 'opinion', and opinions are like assholes - everybody has one.

Jonathon Simon
2 months ago

+RelentlessC2C I just gave you a number of reasons to show how your point of view is incredibly narrow. Please present an argument to counter. Otherwise I just hear you insisting that your "point of view is that 2+2 is 1".

RelentlessC2C
2 months ago

It's not a "ridiculous claim". It's just my point of view. You have your point of view, and I have mine.

Jonathon Simon
2 months ago

+RelentlessC2C Actually you are right, ignorant wasn't the best choice of words - narrow-minded is much better. Your so called "point of view" is narrow minded. You make a ridiculous claim that cycling is ABOUT, and ONLY ABOUT "self_propulsion". If you had actually watched the video AND PAID ATTENTION, Cort gave several undeniable great reasons for ebikes, and none have to do with "liking to fast". Without going back and quoting Cort directly, I'll give you a few of the obvious ones: you ride a bike for a commute not for exercise (no insurance, low carbon footprint, often faster than a car in rush hour), you have knee problems, you are an older person that doesn't want to give up the weekend ride but needs a little help keeping up with the group, you are handicapped or a senior and want to experience the fun of riding but need an occasional assist on some steep spots on your route, your spouse is a serious cyclist and you'd like to share the experience occasionally but your just not in the same shape. Yeah those make a real mockery of cycling, right. Nuff said.

RelentlessC2C
2 months ago

Jonathon Simon: Just expressing my point of view. I did watch the whole video, and I understand completely what ebikes are for. What they are NOT for is making slow riders faster. My life is just fine thanks. I don't think the world revolves around me, quite the opposite. I am very happy, and I a not trolling. You called my remarks ignorant, which I think makes you the troll.

Doug McGaghie
3 months ago

does anybody know the price for this bike?

Doug McGaghie
2 months ago

KCFlyer2 the weight of the bike seemed like a lot. Is it too difficult to ride when the battery is off?

KCFlyer2
2 months ago

Not long. My battery was completely dead when I picked it up (I got it one day before the bike shop had intended) and it charged up in under 4 hours. I was kind of surprised at how quickly the energy level built up. If I were to take this bike on a long tour and had panniers or something to carry the charger (it is rather bulky) you could get a good charge while stopped for lunch.

Doug McGaghie
2 months ago

KCFlyer2 thank you for your detailed response. I only have one more question. How long does it take to completely charge the battery? Thank you

KCFlyer2
2 months ago

I rode 32 miles at an average pace of 18.2 mph over a pretty hilly route. It took 1 hour and 45 minutes and I still have 63% of the battery remaining. I had it in Eco mode pretty much the whole time. Last week I did 32 on a less hilly route and had the system turned off a large part of the time and it had 72% left. This was in all in Eco mode. for fun I moved it to "Normal" and easily did 25 uphill. I am kind of afraid to try Power mode.

Whats nice about this bike is that it assists when you need it, and cuts back very natually. It is a bit of a strange feeling to pass a line of guys drafting uphill, but I did it. A lot of it also depends on the gear you choose....it's a weird feeling to ride uphill and upshift and feel the bike speed up. But if you ride it like you are used to riding, it doesn't feel like you have anything assisting you, but the speed tells you otherwise.

The power consumption depends on the assistance level you pick. I didn't get this bike for speed, although it has made me a lot faster, I got it to flatten hills. That time today was a full hour better than it was on my regular bike. And I didn't feel beat up. I would imagine that a pace of 25 mph could take you an easy 50 miles though.

edgar lowther
3 months ago

M

David R
3 months ago

Did he stiff helium before doing this? Needs a voice over dude, the content is fine but I couldn't take you seriously. cheers