Giant Road-E+ Review

Giant Road E Plus 1 Electric Bike Review
Giant Road E Plus 1
Giant Road E Plus 1 Syncdrive Yamaha Motor 250 Watt
Giant Road E Plus 1 500 Watt Hour Battery Pack
Giant Road E Plus 1 Fixed Backlit Lcd Display
Giant Road E Plus 1 Taped Drop Bars Alloy Fork Ebike
Giant Road E Plus 1 Pr 2 Disc Alloy Rims Drop Bars
Giant Road E Plus 1 Contact Sl Neutral Sadal
Giant Road E Plus 1 Shimano 105 Front Derailleur Compact Double
Giant Road E Plus 1 Shimano Hydraulic Disc Brake Rotor 160 Mm
Giant Road E Plus 1 Shimano Ultegra 11 Speed Cogset
Giant Road E Plus 1 Motor Protector Plate
Giant Road E Plus 1 3 Amp Charger
Giant Road E Plus 1 Electric Bike Review
Giant Road E Plus 1
Giant Road E Plus 1 Syncdrive Yamaha Motor 250 Watt
Giant Road E Plus 1 500 Watt Hour Battery Pack
Giant Road E Plus 1 Fixed Backlit Lcd Display
Giant Road E Plus 1 Taped Drop Bars Alloy Fork Ebike
Giant Road E Plus 1 Pr 2 Disc Alloy Rims Drop Bars
Giant Road E Plus 1 Contact Sl Neutral Sadal
Giant Road E Plus 1 Shimano 105 Front Derailleur Compact Double
Giant Road E Plus 1 Shimano Hydraulic Disc Brake Rotor 160 Mm
Giant Road E Plus 1 Shimano Ultegra 11 Speed Cogset
Giant Road E Plus 1 Motor Protector Plate
Giant Road E Plus 1 3 Amp Charger

Summary

  • An aggressive road bike with 28 mph top electric-assisted speed, drop bars and sport saddle, you get Shimano Ultegra rear and 105 front derailleurs with 22 gear combinations to work with
  • Shimano hydraulic disc brakes offer powerful stops and tend to stay cleaner than rim brakes, all-Aluminum frame is lightweight and sturdy but doesn't absorb vibrations as well as Steel or Carbon fiber
  • Available in four frame sizes for better fit, sold through Giant dealers worldwide so you can get setup right and rely on knowledgeable technicians for tuneups and any warranty support
  • The Yamaha mid-drive system is relatively quiet but still very powerful, it doesn't provide as wide an RPM range so I find myself pedaling slower than I'd like at times, LCD display is not removable

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Giant

Model:

Road-E+

Price:

$4,000

Body Position:

Forward Aggressive

Suggested Use:

Urban, Road

Electric Bike Class:

Speed Pedalec (Class 3)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Year Comprehensive, Lifetime Frame

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

44 lbs (19.95 kg)

Battery Weight:

7.5 lbs (3.4 kg)

Motor Weight:

7.6 lbs (3.44 kg)

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Sizes:

17 in (43.18 cm)19 in (48.26 cm)21 in (53.34 cm)23 in (58.42 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

Medium: 19" Seat Tube, 21.5" Reach, 30" Stand Over Height, 69" Length

Frame Material:

ALUXX SL-Grade Aluminum

Frame Colors:

Matte Black with Blue and Neon Yellow Accents

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid ALUXX SL-Grade Aluminum, OverDrive, 9 mm Skewer with Bolts

Frame Rear Details:

9 mm Skewer with Bolts

Attachment Points:

Fender Eyelets, Rear Kickstand Mount, Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

22 Speed 2x11 Shimano Ultegra Rear Derailleur 11-32T, Shimano 105 Front Derailleur 34/50T

Shifter Details:

Shimano RS685 Paddles on Left and Right

Cranks:

Custom Forged, 170 mm Length

Pedals:

Wellgo M-20, Alloy Platform Cage

Headset:

Tapered 1-1/8" to 1-1/2"

Stem:

Giant Connect, Alloy, 90 mm Length, 8° Angle, Three 5 mm Stacks, One 10 mm Stack

Handlebar:

Giant Contact, Alloy Drop Bar, 31.8 Clamp Diameter, 17.5" Width

Brake Details:

Shimano RS785 Hydraulic Disc with 160 mm Rotors, Heat Sinc on Calipers, Shimano RS685 Levers

Grips:

Black Tape, Rubber Hoods

Saddle:

Giant Contact SL Neutral, SST Tubular Rails

Seat Post:

Giant Contact, Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

300 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

30.9 mm

Rims:

Giant PR-2 Disc Alloy, Double Wall, 28 Hole, Giant Performance Tracker Road Disc Hubs

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 14 Gauge, Black with Silver Nipples

Tire Brand:

Schwalbe Durano, 700 x 32 (28" x 1.25")

Wheel Sizes:

28 in (71.12cm)

Tire Details:

RaceGuard Dual Compound, 55 to 95 PSI

Tube Details:

Presta Valve

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, 1.8 lb 3 Amp Charger

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Giant SyncDrive by Yamaha

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Geared Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

250 watts

Motor Peak Output:

500 watts

Motor Torque:

80 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Giant EnergyPak

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

13.8 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

496.8 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

4.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

50 miles (80 km)

Estimated Max Range:

100 miles (161 km)

Display Type:

Giant, Fixed, Backlit, Monochrome LCD

Readouts:

Battery Info-Graphic, Battery Percentage, Speed, Assist Level (Off, Eco, Normal, Power), Cadence (RPM), Trip Time, Trip Distance, Average Speed, Max Speed, Odometer, Range,

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad on Right (On/Off, Up, Down, Light, i, Walk Mode), 5 Volt Micro USB Port on Left Side of Display

Drive Mode:

Advanced Pedal Assist (Wheel Speed, Pedal Torque, Pedal Cadence)

Top Speed:

28 mph (45 kph)

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Written Review

The Giant Road-E+ is a unique electric bike because it’s designed for performance. In the US, the ebike space has traditionally been dominated by commuter products with some cruisers sprinkled in for recreational riders that want to feel young and avoid overheating or struggling to keep up with friends and spouses. The Road-E+ by contrast is aggressive and sporty… Rather than limiting you to 20 mph like the majority of e-bikes, it delivers up to 28 mph assisted top speed making it a Class 3 product (not permissible on many trails and some paths in California and other states). This is an electric bike that fits perfectly on the shoulder of the road and can help you earn the respect of cars starting off the line and ascending hills. I was thrilled to give it a spin for this review because I love road bikes and know that Giant has a great reputation for quality at value price points. My takeaway is that it would ease some of the knee pain I experience on longer rides with lots of climbing, allow me to jump into more dynamic rides on the weekends even though I cannot train as frequently as my friend (and am thus in limited shap by comparison) and offer a good alternative to my non-electric road bike when my muscles need a break. Some of the challenges I experienced were the heavier footprint at ~44 lbs, stiffer all-Aluminum frame and limited motor RPM range. I have tested and reviewed other electric road bikes with drop bars and the Road-E+ is well priced by comparison but it’s still not cheap. At $4k you’re getting decent components (Shimano Ultegra and 105) with a 22 speed drivetrain (many others are 1×10 or 1×11) and I love that there’s a vast network of dealers selling and servicing them, helping to honor the two-year comprehensive warranty on offer.

Driving the bike is a 250 watt nominal, 500 watt peak mid drive motor from Yamaha. Those numbers aren’t as important as torque in my opinion and the SyncDrive offers 80 Newton meters… which is a lot. Bosch’s mid-drive, by comparison, offers 63 to 75 Nm and is not compatible with multiple front chainrings. The Yamaha motor is quiet and smooth but doesn’t quit spinning as quickly as Bosch. It measures the same wheel speed, pedal cadence and pedal torque signals and allows you to shift gears smoothly if you ease off a bit before pressing the paddles. I love how integrated the motor is at the bottom bracket, how nicely it fits into the purpose-built frame and that it keeps weight low and centered as opposed to a hub motor system (popular with lower-end ebikes). One of the biggest benefits you get from a mid-motor is normal wheels and hubs that are easier to service and remove for transport or flat fixes. In addition to some plastic and frame surrounds, the motor also has a skid plate on the bottom that’s designed to protect it. Notice that the chainrings hang down lower than the motor and would take damage before it would in most cases. The only big compromise I experienced with this drive system is a limited RPM output that requires frequent shifting to hit higher top speeds and sometimes leaves me wanting to spin faster before shifting. The problem with this scenario is that if I want to spin faster I end up doing it all on my own (and pushing more weight plus the normal wind and wheel friction). It’s difficult to raise the speed of the bike all by yourself and when the motor isn’t able to keep up you simply have to shift gears to go faster. For many people, the bike is simply amazing and works flawlessly but this is one area that I sometimes struggle with on the Yamaha motor compared with Bosch and it’s why I love that you can go to a shop and take a test ride before buying.

Powering the motor is a custom 36 volt 13.8 amp hour battery pack named “EnergyPak”. I’m not sure what brand of cells are being used here but I’d guess they are higher quality (Samsung or Panasonic). With nearly 500 watt hours of capacity, this is a larger than average battery that Should take you 50+ miles depending on the level of assist chosen… As with all speed-pedelecs, as you ride above 20 mph the efficiency and range of the bike really drops off due to wind resistance. For me, it’s a reasonable trade-off and an area that’s addressable with the included 3 Amp charger (faster than the average 2 Amp I see on many other ebikes) or the upgrade 4 Amp charger option. I did not see this optional fast charger so cannot comment on price or availability but it got me excited. Specialized offered a similar fast-charger option with their ebikes a couple years back and they tend to be larger and heavier. Again, the three amp charger seemed great and wasn’t too large. I do like that it has a metal plug, that the charge port on the battery case is covered well with a rubber flap and that the battery locks securely to the frame but can be charged on or off so you could top it off at the office perhaps or maybe while eating lunch in the mountains at the half-way point during a ride. The battery design is simply beautiful and I love how they sort of integrated it with the downtube so the bike doesn’t scream “I’m electric” like some others do. The one area that isn’t so great is handling the pack. There’s literally no handle or loop to grab onto. With replacement packs costing upwards of $800 this is not something you want to drop…

Operating the Giant Road-E+ is pretty easy. Just mount the charged battery (I love that it clicks in without the key being necessary) then press the power button on the control pad. The display comes to life showing a precise charge level infographic and there’s even a percentage readout AND dynamic range estimate. Depending on the level of assist you arrow up or down to, the range estimate will change. It’s great to have this kind of feedback at your fingertips vs. guessing so that you can plan your ride for maxiumum fun. On this note, please make sure you always check your tire pressure because as with traditional road bikes, the narrower tires here can get snake-bite punctures easily if you hit a curb or let the PSI drop too low. This is a heavier bike after all and unlike many other e-bikes, the tires are narrow. So anyway, the display offers three levels of assist to choose from and gives you access to trip stats like range, trip distance, speed and max speed. If you’re someone who likes to use Strava on your phone or use a Garmin device, you can do this easily with the Giant Road-E+ without having to run the juice down because there’s a little Micro-USB port on the left side of the display. One area of concern or question is where and how to mount your device given the already large LCD display. Also, the display is not removable so parking and storing the bike could present more opportunities for scratches which is a bummer. Consider putting a towel over… This and many other parts of the bike are smart and modular so if they are broken or lost, your Giant dealer should be able to help with a fix.

At the end of the day, there are only a few choices when it comes to electric road bikes and of course, you’d want a speed pedelec with drop bars. Beyond that, the four frame sizes, dealer network and beautiful integration seen here really impressed me. For $4k I feel like you get a lot of value and could have a blast with this bike. I love that in addition to bottle cage bosses, they added threaded eyelets and a mounting provision at the rear for a kickstand and some mounts for fenders. There’s no rack mount but this really isn’t a commuter setup… frankly, I’m not sure how well fenders would really work but the holes are there. Giant sells a wider range of electric assist bikes in Europe and it’s wonderful to finally see them in the US. This is a refined product, despite being “new” to this market and I could tell that they had ironed out a lot of the kinks and compromises that other systems had not when they first arrived. This thing uses a smart, reliable drive system that can work with you to achieve new types of rides and because it’s from a bigger more recognized brand, I feel like it might garner more respect as well (at least in the USA where ebikes are still catching on). Because the frame is all Aluminum (including the rigid fork), one thing I would consider is a seat post suspension from BodyFloat. Their systems tend to be highly responsive, offered in lighte-weight materials like Carbon fiber and Titanium and are adjustable to rider weight. You might also benefit from a suspension stem like the Shockstop.

Pros:

  • It’s rare to see electric road bikes with drop bars that are also speed pedelecs (28 mph top speed vs. 20 mph) and this one comes in four frame sizes which makes it accessible to a wider audience
  • Giant has a vast network of dealers and is a larger more reputable bicycle company than most, seeing a product like this (with the complexity of electric systems) feels more reliable
  • The Yamaha mid-drive system is one of the quietest and most responsive motors I’ve tested, while it does have a more limited RPM output (requiring more shifting to fully optimize) it works well and the torque sensor lets you shift without mashing just by easing off the pedals as you might with a non-electric bike
  • I love how integrated the battery pack looks but also that it’s fully removable (reducing overall weight by ~7.5 lbs), worth taking off when carrying on a car rack or doing service
  • Hydraulic disc brakes are the way to go with a heavier bike like this and should perform well if the road is wet or dirty as they tend to stay cleaner than rim brakes… they also stay out of the way when taking wheels off for quick service
  • The frame is completely purpose built, cables are internally routed and the battery and motor are streamline, I love that they managed to squeeze in bottle cage bosses despite the much larger downtube
  • You get 22 speeds on this ebike vs. just 10 or 11 on some of the other mid-drive system and the component groups (Ultegra and 105 from Shimano) are pretty good, this adds up to a more natural and wide range of pedal cadence options, in short, I believe it’s a compact double setup as you’d see on a non-electric bike
  • The battery charger puts out 3 Amps which is above average so you should get faster charge times, I like the rubber cover on the charge port near the base of the battery pack but would suggest being careful not to bump the cable with the left crank arm when it’s plugged in
  • The motor assist is highly adjustable so you can still get an excellent workout, for people with a hurt knee or leg, those with heart conditions or people who want to take a break between strenuous rides this would be an excellent platform and it lets others draft, great for a cycling coach or others looking to maximize availability without straining muscles too much
  • I like that the display panel has a Micro-USB port on the left side where you could charge a phone, run some lights or use other portable electronics for longer periods relying on the large main battery
  • In addition to range approximation (based on the power level chosen and remaining battery capacity) there’s a good battery info-graphic with battery percentage! Many ebikes just show a 5-bar graphic with 20% drops… Giant went above and beyond with percentage here and I think it’s useful
  • As someone with a crowded space and rented walls… I appreciate that there are threaded eyelets on the left chainstay for adding a kickstand!
  • The motor and battery weight are kept low and centered on the frame helping to optimize handling and even lifting if you have to carry the bike up stairs or mount it on a rack

Cons:

  • Yamaha is a large reputable company and their motor is compact, quiet and well integrated here but it doesn’t offer as wide an RPM as some other mid-drives like Bosch, this means you have to shift more actively to hit the top speed
  • Given the all-Aluminum frame and fork, there’s not a lot of foregiveness going over bumps (especially at high speed), people tend to ride ebikes further and at higher average speeds so I’d consider using a Thudbuster or BodyFloat suspension seat post (look for 30.9 mm diameter) and maybe even a suspension stem, perhaps future Road-E+ models will offer a Carbon fiber fork?
  • The display is easy to read and navigating the menus is intuitive but you can’t take the display off which means more sun damage and possible scratched when transporting the bike or parking it outside
  • The battery pack weighs 7.5 lbs and doesn’t have a handle or great ridge for securely gripping and carrying it… so be careful not to drop it! I like that it can be left on the frame to charge
  • While the motor is very responsive to your pedal torque, there is no built in shift-sensing protection system so you could mash your chain if you don’t shift consciously

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Joe Bernard
5 days ago

Nice bike, but handling that battery is going to be an issue. Even with the handle on my Haibike's battery, I've found that it's easy to muck up the stick-on graphics. With the Giant battery you're pretty much forced to grab it right where the decals are.

Court Rye
5 days ago

Good point Joe, I hadn't thought as much about sticker placement and fingerprints, thanks for the feedback!

Hiruy
5 days ago

Hi Court, As always, another great review. I bought this bike in February as soon as they released it for sale in US. I use it for my daily commute to work and put on about 500 miles on it. I really love this bike. It has very impressive handling, amazing range and fun to ride. I am about 195 lbs with additional cargo of 10-15 lbs and am getting about 60 miles in a single charge even though my commute includes several hills with a couple of really steep ones. On my other 2015 Diamondback Trace EXC, I can only get about 20 miles in a single charge. The Road E+ have the same feel as riding a normal road bike so you will feel the road bumps. To help with the road bumps, I changed the factory saddle which is too firm for me with the Serfas Variant 2 which enables you to adjust the firmness of the saddle. I also like the fact that it does not cut-off the motor immediately. When I am ready to shift gears, I stop peddling momentarily and immediately shift gears so that the momentum of the motor before it cuts off is just enough to make the shifting very smooth then continue peddling. A couple of things you mentioned are different on my bike:

  1. The seat post my bike came with is a carbon fiber, but you indicated that it is aluminum on your review. The Giant website have it listed as "Giant Contact Composite 30.9 mm
  2. My charger plug to the battery pack is plastic, but you show a metal end
Court Rye
5 days ago

Interesting, thanks for sharing your feedback about the seat post and charger Hiruy! I enjoyed reading about your experience with range and comparisons to the Diamondback Trace. Sounds like you're a seasoned electric cyclist at this point! Keep riding safe and thanks again for your positive feedback on the site :)

Joe Bernard
4 days ago

The Yamaha motor on my Haibike Sduro Trekking has that slight over-rev feature, too. FYI, I found that stopping pedaling was too disruptive to my rhythm, so I've gone back to the standard practice of slightly backing off pedal pressure for shifts. I suppose this could wear out my chain faster, but I'll take the cost hit for it.

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Nicolas
13 hours ago

All too often with crowd funding, the truth gets stretched way beyond reality. The campaign claims the proposed bike is EU and California (US) compliant, and it isn't.

Text copied from campaign:

The 30C3 has 4 operating modes

1. All compliant: Unpowered road bike max speed rider dependent

2. EU compliant: Motor assisted bicycle mode 20 mph max speed

3. California compliant: Moped mode 28 mph max speed

4. Non compliant: Motorcycle mode 33 mph speed (Turbo Porsche mode)

Design elements.

The design includes many minor items to make easy transportation.

1. Light weight still a road bike.

2. 60T front chain ring.

3. 1000 watt 3 kg motor.

4. 52v10 520 watt hour battery.
_____

The EU has a 250 watt limit on power and 15.5 mph max assisted speed. California allows 750 watts and max throttle speed of 20 mph and PAS to 28 mph. Adding a UI control to turn the speed or power on, off or down doesn't legalize the bike for any public right of way. As far as I'm aware (good or bad), the only place this bike is legal is private property, off road.

Thanks JR, I was wondering where he was quoting this stuff and it didn't fit with my limited understanding of the e-bike legalities.

Barkme Wolf
16 hours ago

After 3000 miles the RadWagon is still running great.

I used to drive a 65 Ford Falcon Ranchero- This feels like the bicycle equivalent but without the gas fumes.

Pros:

Solid construction- Have had no issues.

Reliable- After a disastrous run of flat tires (4 in the first month) I got some Mr. Tuffy liners. Since then I have had no issues that kept me from riding regularly.

Great for Cargo- I use cargo nets and a small set of paniers. Have different set ups for commuting, shopping and camping. Once I get the bike going I forget I am even carrying a load. I have not gone camping yet but acquired all of the necessary gear.

Electronics: Everything is working perfectly. Have had no power surges or drops. Batteries seem to be holding a charge as long as ever, although I have not been monitoring the distance per charge all that well. Never run out of power in assist level 2 and get 25 miles with lots to spare. Recently I upped the assist to level 3 and get 19 miles almost exactly. That said, there isn’t a flat road on my entire commute so I work those batteries. I have 2 batteries and alternate regularly.

Fun: I have lots of fun riding my RadWagon. It has improved my quality of life. I quit driving a few years ago and the bus system here has rapidly declined in quality of service so having this bike has been a great addition to my world.

Cons:

The shifters where a little hinky from the get go, the lower gears are jumpy and it won’t stay in the first gear on the back (1/1 2/1 3/1) and I have to hold the left shifter up a bit with my thumb to keep the chain from rubbing in first gear (1/2-1/7). This is a bit of a bother because I have some big hills to tackle everyday (Renton to Redmond WA daily- 48 miles round trip). My LBS says I just need better equipment; they have tuned it as well as possible.

I have had some trouble with the spokes breaking. This is due mostly to the torque from the motor but was exacerbated by all the hills. I have it in for regular maintenance and trueing. It seems like I am ready for a total re-thread of the back tire soon. This may be expected after 3000 miles. Spoke repair is one of the few things I had not taken into consideration before buying the bike.

The only other problem I have is that it rides a little rough. I have to be ready for bumps in the trail and avoid curbs all together. This will be solved when I get one of those fancy seat posts.

Now that the weather is better it won’t take long before I have a 6000 mile update-

Ride Safe- Be Seen!

1/1
J.R.
16 hours ago

Schwalbe has a bunch of new ebike rated tires, including more aggressive 700c tires. You may also be able to fit narrow 29er mtb tires, as both 700c and 29er have the same diameter rim, ISO size of 622. The difficulty is finding mtb tires you would want, that are narrow enough to take the place of your 38c (ISO 40) tires and then they need to fit inside of your fenders.

I thought these looked very promising for all terrain 700c: Marathon GT 365

I don't own those GT tires, but I do have a couple ebikes with Schwalbe tires, one road style and the other mtb. Great tires, great flat protection.

Nicolas
21 hours ago

So far I'll comment on ride comfort and stability.

Ride comfort is better than I accepted with a bike that low to the ground. Sometimes these bikes and e-bike can start to wobble. Although I felt I was wobbling at times, it was This is really because I haven't fully adjusted the handlebar and seat height correctly yet.

Since it's not an off-road e-bike, I did go through some patches of dirt and slight sand, crossing a path to a street for example. The Gocycle do anything unexpected. It handled well, better than I expected.

thegutterpoet
1 day ago

I am a complete beginner to ebikes and have lost myself in trying to understand all the different options too quickly. And hoping that I can gain guidance from the seemingly knowledgable community here!

I live in Melbourne, Australia and recently earned myself a 6 month suspension from my beloved FZ1 motorcycle. Rather than accept the horror of public transport I am compelled to purchase an ebike. Understanding the laws...I remain eager upon finding a 1000W+ fat tyre ebike. My physio had one made by a pal for him a year ago for $2000, and I have always liked the look of the thing.

I do require pedal assist as need to ride the bike not just become the passenger, though to have the power there will be perfect.

Presently, I have little idea if they will fit together, or how the ride will be, but with pedal assist, a fair amount of power and a lovely looking bike I have come across these options:>

http://dillengerelectricbikes.com.au/electric-bike-kits/1000w-electric-bike-kit-10ah-upgraded-by-dillenger.html

http://www.progearbikes.com.au/Cracker-Hi-Vis-Green.html

Or is there an option already available which comes as a complete package within my price range? If so, please show me the light!

Although this one has smaller tyres, it seems a good deal? A bit of oomph? And likely comfortable enough for my 16km round trip commute?

I am 5ft 10 and around 10 stone...really just want something which will allow me to cruise more than pedal! My commute is a 6km straight well away from prying eyes on the road, then a 3km CBD stretch with a lot of tram lines, which is partly why I like the fat tyres.

Can I get a simple to install front wheel kit to apply to the bike mentioned or another with fat tyres another could suggest?

Kindly help me!

Uphill
2 days ago

My experience on off trail terrain:
Once you hit some uphill it would be nice to have some granny gears as the bike's heft can slow you down quite quick. It is also back heavy so you can get some air if you are not aware going up stuff. Yes yes there is a throttle but.. perhaps my lack of mtn biking experience has proven that adding throttle to terrain that needs navigating and balance can result in an increased chance of crashing. I think this is normal any time you add power or speed no?

The bike excels at pathways but I wouldn't say it is great for any of the mountain biking trails in my neck of the woods where rocks, roots and steepness prevail. Even the "easy" biking trails are not always possible to traverse.. that doesn't stop me from trying. We do have a lot of glacial till here and the larger loose rocks adds to the challenge.

Going down can be quite the adventure on rocky back roads as with any bike with no shocks. The tires aren't quite enough to buffer the bumps.

The shorter handle bars do seem to limit the ability to turn smoother meaning the controller needs to be more skilled.. to which I am not. :oops: One could upgrade the handle bars.. I am happy to have the option to do so if I choose at some point.. just haven't quite gotten to it. I've also had the sprocket stand ground me out in clearance but that comes down to the tire size and limitations of a 20" tired bike.. I was also happy to have it grind out instead of destroy the front sprocket.

Just yesterday I decided to go up a curb.. at a slight angle. While I was not intending to pedal (in assist level 2) the bike did decide to treat me to a bucking bronko style launching into the air. I can only assume the sprocket rotated enough for the PASS to engage.. which it is meant to do. Forget trying to grab the brakes, it was hold on for dear life and try to land on two feet (luckily I did :D). Not the first or the last time this has or will happen but it does have me much more cautious on the bumpy terrain and using assist of any kind. I usually aim for 0 when things get tricky... and this tends to be much safer approach for me unless I'm feeling kamikaze like.. It happens. ;)

The bike is great though, and I love it just as it is and the many things it can do... There are limitations that one should be aware of though. I do still love my bike very much.. At +2000km's and still going...
My experience on off trail terrain:are l

I'm just starting on trails with this bike, so I haven't seen nearly as much as you have off road. But I think the increased chance of crashing also has a another side: being timid can also get you in trouble on uneven terrain because a bike is naturally tippy at low speeds and anything can throw its balance off. With this bike the PAS often overrides my own tendency for over-cautiousness because even level 1 is not a timid speed. It's "here goes!", and the big fat tires usually just roll over whatever is before them. This is super impressive on deep gravel or sand, and general bumpy terrain.
So far, that's been a big asset, especially going uphill or traversing loose gravel and stones. Big tires and a little momentum can really handle a lot of circumstances.
My scariest moments so far have been going downhill, with no PAS at all. That's when I tend to get cautious and brake a lot.
Not looking forward to getting airborne as you have, but I can see how that could happen.

J.R.
2 days ago

I was wondering if anyone could tell me anything about the hpc revolution x 6.0. I can't seem to find reviews about the bike. Also is it legal? Thanks
I don't have any first hand knowledge of HPC, other than what I've read and watched on YouTube. I believe there is a HPC sub forum here. As to whether the bikes are legal, you should be able to find the information you need here: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_bicycle_laws

It's an amazing setup, I'd have loved something like this in my motocross youth. No gas, no oil, just ride and plug it in at the end of the day. A 60 mph, 8 horsepower (6000 watts) bike would likely be confined to private property and places designated for off-road motor vebicles. It would be a blast to ride though!

E-Wheels
3 days ago

11-42 cassette 15t chainring. The chainring spins x2.5 crank speed, so equivalent to 37.5t chainring. Given rider is going through x2.5 gearbox, losses maybe higher than likes of Shimano and Yamaha direct drive.

When it comes to pedalling unassisted the more important things are frame style (pedal efficiency) and tyres (rolling resistance). A hybrid on skinny tyres running 100psi is going to be faster than MTB on of road tyres.
TrevorB,
Thanks for the reply
If I'm reading your post correctly you are saying the 15t motor drive sprocket continues to spin at x2.5 while pedalling, even after the motor has cut all assistance at the 25km/hr limit
I was lead to believe the crank sprocket would spin at x2.5 only while it received motor power and after the motor cut out it was x1 for every pedal rotation

TrevorB
3 days ago

11-42 cassette 15t chainring. The chainring spins x2.5 crank speed, so equivalent to 37.5t chainring. Given rider is going through x2.5 gearbox, losses maybe higher than likes of Shimano and Yamaha direct drive.

When it comes to pedalling unassisted the more important things are frame style (pedal efficiency) and tyres (rolling resistance). A hybrid on skinny tyres running 100psi is going to be faster than MTB on of road tyres.

Cnugget
3 days ago

@SuperGoop
Wire beads are tough.. Same deal on the Mariner 20x4".. Bought some replacement tires (flexible bead Vee's) for when replacement needs arrive. No way would I be able to change a tire on the road if I get a flat on this thing cuz of the bead... Travel with communication to the someone else is a must... hahaha..

Fitzy
4 days ago

Oh, meant to say, i mentioned in another thread when i fitted rs i decided to add a bit of hot glue to seal main cable out of box and wrap box in electrical tape. 1'm not sure it's necessary, but i'm a bit anal.

I've tested this dongle and managed 40mph on flat with 20t front chainring. Funny thing is i prefer the feel of the 18t (sweet spot), so may well change back.

Hey Steve,

You're more anal than I! I was impressed enough with the hardware to trust it not to allow moisture into where it's not wanted. In fact, I've had BAD experiences with attempts at waterproofing electronic connections on a gasoline-powered bicycle I used in my past, so I avoid trying! When it's done wrong, insulation can TRAP water and speed corrosion. I'm in a mode of heightened awareness now since it's a snowy/slushy winter on the US East Coast, and there's plenty of road-salt to go around. I also enjoy riding on tidal-flats, so I get my fair-share of sea-water on my Bosch.

I'm not done evaluating the RS, but I've been very happy so far. I had two or three instances where the computer needed to be rebooted before I could select a drive-mode, but I think this happened BEFORE I installed the RS. Power has been smooth and continuous on all modes. I topped out at about 36MPH on my fat-bike with a 16T chainring (pedaling like a madman), which is great, but while the speedometer has been accurate, and has exhibited no noticeable glitches while riding, I did notice last week that my MAXIMUM speed registered was around 45MPH...then this week it registered as 65MPH. Dunno what's up there since early on, it was registering accurate MAXIMUM speed. Not a deal-breaker though.

Now, as for my 16T chainring; I bought a 20T to replace it in hopes of attaining greater sustained speeds for commuting. Well, the FatSix has a specialized Bosch XDURO chainring that's designed to raise the plane of the ring off the motor to clear the tire. Sooooo, it appears that whoever makes these...not sure if it's Bosch for HaiBike, or if HaiBike makes 'em themselves...but I can't find any version but this 16T. This is very frustrating to me since the 16(1.44):11 ratio is a tad too small...just out of my happy-zone. I could probably jerry-rig something with the 20T...and at this point and after more use, I think an 18T would suit my needs perfectly...but I don't WANT to jerry-rig my wonderful and EXPENSIVE bike!

1/2
E-Wheels
4 days ago

I regularly do 28-30km/hr (flat no wind) on my CX drive FS MTB running off road tyres. Assist cuts out at 25-27km. You shouldn't have any problems riding above cut off on touring bike with road tyres.
TrevorB,
Thanks for the feed back
What gearing do you have on your bike to achieve these speeds and what is your cadence whilst doing 30km/hr

TrevorB
4 days ago

I regularly do 28-30km/hr (flat no wind) on my CX drive FS MTB running off road tyres. Assist cuts out at 25-27km. You shouldn't have any problems riding above cut off on touring bike with road tyres.

Larry Ganz
4 days ago

I think there is definitely a sophisticated algorithm in the computer to determine range. It's not just a simple "how much time is left at the current draw" kinda thing. Right now I'm showing 15/18/24/47 on the range and that is with 4 of 5 bars on the battery. Like you said, we only get bars so you can only see so deep into what it's telling you, other systems that give a percentage may or may not be accurate but you can project out a bit better than the 20% chunks allow.

How do you like the 29 inch wheels? They are taking a bit of time for me to get used to--I'm old school and had only ridden the 26 inch wheels in my older bikes. I'm not mountain biking with this yet so I'm not getting much of the benefit, just the occasional drag across the pant leg/shin at stoplights.

One cool thing: the more I ride the bike the less I notice the noise of the motor. It was never really loud but now I have to pay attention to it to notice when it's operating. Of course, I can certainly feel it.

It's really been fun taking this to work. I get in and am in a better mood than with the car ride, and the same thing when I get home. While the bike was an expensive buy for me, I have to say it's really living up to the hype. One of the rare times that seems to occur today with the constant marketing everywhere you look.

-Sam

Thanks for the info. My bike shop has a meeting with the Trek representative on Monday, and they'll ask him about the 600WH battery. Some guys did a youtube video of a rented PowerFly 8FS+ and a Specialized Turbo Levo eBike in Salida Colorado, and they did some hard riding, and pausing the video shows BKXC was getting twice the range that I'm getting - and he still had juice when the Specialized was empty (he pushed his friend, The Singletrack Sampler, up the highway for a ways to get back to the bike shop and return them).

I went for a another ride in our hilly neighborhood with my wife today - we went up and down our streets for 7.65 miles, and afterwards my trip estimate said I still had enough juice for another 7/8/11/21 miles in addition to this ride. But it was still showing 4 bars, and on the charger only one green LED was blinking, so I must have been at 80% or more battery left. That and the remaining range estimate confuses me, because I should have been at 3 bars if the remaining estimate was correct. At 4 bars I have half the range that you have.

This time I did more pedaling in OFF and ECO than on previous rides, and spent less time in TOUR and SPORT than before (no turbo), so this is the first time that I'm now quite sore after riding my new eBike. Too much lactic acidosis since I didn't use an oxygen tank and I pushed myself too hard. But I was trying to stretch the battery farther, and was disappointed that I could have only ridden a total of 15/16/19/29 today before running totally dry, if the estimate was correct.

We'll see how it looks after a long ride on fairly flat terrain with mild hills this Sunday, which I should be able to do in OFF and ECO only. But in our neighborhood I could not manage the hills without at least getting into TOUR mode part of the time (going slower if I avoid SPORT/TURBO). So the way I see it my real life range right now is about 20 miles avg with all the hills using OFF, ECO and TOUR.

I also think maybe the 29x2.2" tires are why I can hop up curbs without a lot of trouble despite the weight, and I haven't noticed any sense that they are taller than the 26x2.1" on my lighter Kona Nunu mountain bike. I did fail to notice that my rear tire pressure seemed down until near the end of the ride, but I couldn't get my pressure gauge with adapter to give me a reading. I removed the valve adapter and it removed the presta core and I lost all air pressure, so I'll never know how low it had gotten during the ride.

I was able to use a CO2 cartridge to put air back in to what felt like enough pressure, but then my big pump at home said I only had 20lbs. So, hopefully with the tires at max pressure this Sunday's ride will have better range. NOTE - I have aftermarket innertubes with green slime added to prevent flats, and my stock tubes are now my spares.

I also haven't been mountain biking with this yet. We plan to go up Gold Camp Road in the Colorado Springs area and ride back down soon - there's limited traffic on that road, and none in some places on that route. It's a spot where local bike tour shops shuttle riders up the mountain access road and then customers ride the rental bikes back down to the shop in Manitou Springs (I bought my used Kona from one tour shop 5 years ago). We're also planning to try some of the single track trails in the Cheyenne Mountain State Park soon.

My wife thinks that she'll be fine off-road on her Neko+ thinner 27.5x1.5" tires (700x38) since that's wider than what she rode on the for the past 30 years. It would have been nice to get her the Powerfly 5 mountain bike, rather than a trail hybrid, but the smallest women's Powerfly at 15.5" would have been too tall for her 5-1 height. She's on a 14" Neko+ and the standover height of the PF5 Women's was almost as tall as the 18" Neko+ that fit me!

[edit - a 700x38 is really a 27.5" wheel]

Larry Juiced rider
4 days ago

I have been using my body float on my Juiced bike for a week now
All I can say is wow what a deference it makes .
I was riding the other day on a tore up section of road and I could hear the bike chattering below me but did not feel it in my body
Amazing

Ravi Kempaiah
4 days ago

Thanks for the recommendations Ravi.

How is the Easy Motion Evo Cross vs, the 29er? I am wondering if maybe the Cross is a little better for road riding?

Cross and 29er are similar but 29er is lot more versatile and has better componentry (better shocks, drive train and MTB rims). You could always run street tires on them and make it a nice commuter.
Also, the Large frame of 29er is slightly bigger than the cross. and I think for your size, large- 29er would be a more apt.

What bikes have you tried so far?

jamesthewright
5 days ago

Hey Duncan,

I live in Denver with a heavy bike culture as well. So far only 1 fred got upset in the last 2 years (4000 miles), but I think most everyone else either

a) is unaware
b) doesn't care
c) keeps their frustration (naivety) to themselves

At work it is a little different since a relationship exists and I use it to commute. Either they don't understand and think you get NO exercise or they purely look at biking as a sport, like soccer instead of a potential lifestyle which ebikes could help everyone realize! Overall its just fun joking though, from my point of view.

On the street most of my interactions have been on the questioning side like: "How does it ride?", "How many watts is yours?", or "Do you like it? I am thinking of getting ....", but even these questions rarely happen. Mine is relatively stealth though.

My response to all of them is basically: "Best money I have ever spent! Period." I couldn't imagine a better way to travel!

Either way, who cares what other people think? Biking is awesome, and having the option to add power when needed/wanted is amazing! I haven't driven a car for an errand or excursion outside of a road trips in basically a year! If everyone knew the possibilities it would be a hit!

Cheers!

RedHawk
5 days ago

Any chance you've taken it on hard packed trails that have some slight bumps (like roots)? trying to figure out what bike to get. I mostly am on road but do like to do some easy packed trails (think state parks and such).

Dunbar
5 days ago

I wouldn't recommend going with narrower tires. Almost universally I noticed that the e-bikes I test rode with narrower tires all had a punishing ride quality. Check out bicyclerollingresistance.com and look at the touring tire section. I'm running the Schwalbe Marathon Almotion 29x2.0 tires and they are very good in terms of rolling resistance and have very good puncture protection. These tires are within 5 watts of the skinny tires I run on my road bike which is very respectable. Trust me, you don't want to change a flat tube on a rear hub motor bike out on the side of the road.

The stock fork has a lockout feature so no need to change it out for that reason. If your commute is only 7 miles just charge it twice a day to 80% and you will get 4X the battery life you would charging to 100%. Luna Cycles has smart chargers for ~$100 that allow you to do this. You can also do the poor man's version and use a timer with the stock charger (each hour of charging adds 100wH to the battery.)

bob armani
5 days ago

I'm not from the area but here in Columbus, OH we have an extensive bike path system. I ride an EMotion Evo 29. The people I have shown it to thus far don't even realize it's an ebike until I point it out to them. The motor is hidden by the cassette and the battery is well integrated into the down tube. Yes, it's beefy, but not huge. I don't really hear the motor over the tire noise. Except for the occasional road biker that is surprised when I ride by them on a 29" mtb most have no idea. As long as your not riding like an a** there isn't any reason even with an ebike that looks like an ebike that you should bring much attention to yourself. The bike trails have a 15 mph speed limit but most road bikers are exceeding that with ease. Again, as long as your riding respectfully and signaling when appropriate it shouldn't be a problem.

rcschmidt6-Thanks for the heads up and reassurance. This seems to be the general consensus of everyone that I have asked about this. I also reached out to an organization called Active Transportation Alliance which is a local group that helps bike legislation along for better trail, roadway and riding conditions. What was interesting was the rep was unaware of the local trail laws posted and their enforcements within our FPD trail systems. They initially thought it was okay to ride ebikes on the system, however there is that same 15 mph speed limit posted in the municipal codes. Safe riding!

rcschmidt6
5 days ago

I'm not from the area but here in Columbus, OH we have an extensive bike path system. I ride an EMotion Evo 29. The people I have shown it to thus far don't even realize it's an ebike until I point it out to them. The motor is hidden by the cassette and the battery is well integrated into the down tube. Yes, it's beefy, but not huge. I don't really hear the motor over the tire noise. Except for the occasional road biker that is surprised when I ride by them on a 29" mtb most have no idea. As long as your not riding like an a** there isn't any reason even with an ebike that looks like an ebike that you should bring much attention to yourself. The bike trails have a 15 mph speed limit but most road bikers are exceeding that with ease. Again, as long as your riding respectfully and signaling when appropriate it shouldn't be a problem.

Olrocker
5 days ago

Brand-new to e-bikes and the forum. My wife and I are looking for a pair of e-bikes to take with us on our RV travels. After some research on this site and others, we've pretty much narrowed it down to the Radmini and Voltbike Mariner since we like the idea of something we could take on the beach or off-road as well as the street.

The reviews for these two bikes have them neck-and-neck in our view. Similar weight, style, and capabilities. We'd be carrying them in the bed of our Tundra (we tow a 27' travel trailer.) Does anyone with experience with both have a preference? One question I have regarding the Radmini: it has two reviews on EBR; the older one says it has a 12 magnet cadence sensor and plastic pedals and the more recent one says a 6 magnet sensor and aluminum pedals. Was that a change made for the production run?

Any other observations are welcome. Thanks in advance!

J.R.
6 days ago

All too often with crowd funding, the truth gets stretched way beyond reality. The campaign claims the proposed bike is EU and California (US) compliant, and it isn't.

Text copied from campaign:

The 30C3 has 4 operating modes

1. All compliant: Unpowered road bike max speed rider dependent

2. EU compliant: Motor assisted bicycle mode 20 mph max speed

3. California compliant: Moped mode 28 mph max speed

4. Non compliant: Motorcycle mode 33 mph speed (Turbo Porsche mode)

Design elements.

The design includes many minor items to make easy transportation.

1. Light weight still a road bike.

2. 60T front chain ring.

3. 1000 watt 3 kg motor.

4. 52v10 520 watt hour battery.
_____

The EU has a 250 watt limit on power and 15.5 mph max assisted speed. California allows 750 watts and max throttle speed of 20 mph and PAS to 28 mph. Adding a UI control to turn the speed or power on, off or down doesn't legalize the bike for any public right of way. As far as I'm aware (good or bad), the only place this bike is legal is private property, off road.

Mark Peralta
6 days ago

loving my cc! however, I'm considering some upgrades to increase efficiency. I ride 7 miles each way to work on flat pavement.
I'm finding my average speed is about 13 -14 in PAS 2 or 3. Feeling a lot of wasted effort going into the suspension fork and wide tires.

switch to stiffer fork
get clipless pedals or toe cages
switch to skinnier tires

Anyone have any thoughts about getting skinnier tires? I am considering switching to 700 x 40 mm tires (the stock tires are 700 x 45 mm). Also considering clipless or toe cages. there are 2 spots that encounter some road grit.

Finally, I'm thinking about switching to a stiff fork. I prefer a stiffer ride and the 7 mile commute isn't long enough to give me vibration soreness. anybody switched to a stiff fork?

Seven miles is a very short distance. You have more than enough juice to step up your PAS level so you can achieve your desired speed.

Regarding tire size, the narrower standard non-ebike tires will have more chances of pinch flat and rim damage due to added weight of the motor and battery. Just keep it at 50-55 psi to give you a good compromise between efficiency and comfort.

I use clipless pedals and I don't see significant performance gain but it position my feet properly to the pedals and not touching the cranks.

Reduced speed due to suspension bobbing is an issue if you are into racing where every microscopic improvement counts. However, it is a non-issue with electric bikes. The major hindrance to speed is aerodynamics. Switching to stiffer forks will only worsen vibration soreness.

Talking of vibration soreness and discomfort, you can address it by changing to a more comfortable upright geometry. There are a number of ways to do this (shorter stem, adjustable stem, swept back handle bars, and/or head up stem riser). I have combination on all of those plus I use suspension seat post and saddle with springs.

mike kearsley
2 days ago

Great Vid, Thanks, always learn a lot from your vids.

R D
2 days ago

👍🏻🇨🇦

sam cam
3 days ago

I would like to hear your review and opinion of the Dirt E. i love watching your Reviews thanks.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 days ago

Hi Sam! I got to check that one out with help from a bike shop employee who is really into mountain bikes. It's in the works but might get published a bit down the line to help mix things up :)

Vass M
3 days ago

Nice review Court - due to the lack of quality road ebike choice out there, I am in the process of converting a Bosch Haibike Trekker with carbon Enve dropbars, fork, stem , seatpost and stripping off the all accessories it comes with. With a chip, the shop says it will do 45km motor assisted. There must be huge market out there with 40+ age group who have bad knees / weekend warriors. Surprised not many manufacturers are playing in this space. Tend to be more cashed up and happy to drop $10k in a heartbeat. And..... it's not cheating if you aint racing :)

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 days ago

That sounds awesome!! I liked what I saw from KTM last year, they added a Lauf suspension fork and all carbon cranks and parts to make a super light weight e-trail bike... your creation sounds pretty awesome, share a pic in the forum once it's done! I'd love to check it out :D

mvh808
3 days ago

Great review Tom! What I am missing at the moment is either an app or the onboard computer to calculate and display the watts that the motor adds in vs. the watts that I put in through my legs. At the moment, all I have is Strava which is showing me a watt estimate as a total when I am on my ebike. This however does not show what part of that was me and what was the motor. Accordingly, you cant rely on the calorie burnt values, etc.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 days ago

Good point, unless the bike computer shows your power output these secondary apps can only estimate your calories, distance and speed. Maybe we'll see more of that level of detail in the future

ytesb1
3 days ago

Re the "cheating" discussion, road bikes have always been evolving to be lighter, stiffer, and more aero. That has enabled us to go farther and faster with less effort. Is that cheating? If ebikes are "cheating", how is that different from having $3000 carbon fiber aero wheels when others on the road don't? Both mean you have to put in less effort at a given speed. Just interesting to me to try to understand where that cheating line is.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 days ago

Some people are just frustrated with their lives... there's a lot of stress in LA to deal with and they are probably jerks to lots of people throughout the day, sorry you have to deal with a bit of that though :/

Corn on the Coby
3 days ago

ytesb1 Also, in the cheating discussion, I use my ebike to get to work daily. I get yelled at and complained at by cyclists every now and then for "cheating." I am not cheating. I am being practical. It doesn't make sense for me to bike to work every day in the hot weather of Los Angeles on anything other than an ebike. I get to work faster without being sweaty. It helps me get up hills. But people still complain and call me lazy. Lazy would be not riding my bike to work.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 days ago

To me, cheating is where you break specified rules set out for a type of event... but evolving the sport into new categories and pushing the limits of what's possible is just awesome :D

Jared Oelderink-Wale
3 days ago

electricbikereview link is wrong. has extra '1' in url

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 days ago

Ahh, thanks so much Jared, will fix ;)

ForbinColossus
3 days ago

Giant as one of the big 3 (Trek, Specialized, Giant) has the resources to make a kickass ebike. My ebike tastes still side with full suspension MTBs, but this is good to see

ForbinColossus
3 days ago

FYI, Court, this German magazine tester agrees about the Yamaha cutting out too early:
"The Yamaha SyncDrive motor on the Giant works at its best when your
cadence hovers around 70 rpm. Any quicker and the system can’t cope."
http://ebike-mtb.com/en/giant-full-e-0-sx-review/

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 days ago

They launched a full suspension model called the Dirt-E+ that I've filmed and will be publishing soon! It's pretty awesome, and priced well ;)

tjenkens
4 days ago

I think you need to talk about where these e-bikes can be used and where they can't. This is very important on the off road (MTB) bikes. Thx.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 days ago

Great point, I try to touch on classes a bit while riding but have a more dedicated resource for that here: https://electricbikereview.com/guides/electric-bike-classes/ and there's a video. I hope this helps but feel free to comment more if there's a question or something you feel is missing :)

Grant Wakulczyk
4 days ago

Hey Court, are you going to be reviewing the Giant Quick-E+ also?

Grant Wakulczyk
3 days ago

Looking at getting one vs a DIY kit for a 20km (round trip) commute year round. General thoughts if you have time?

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 days ago

Absolutely, I filmed it and am planning to mix it in after a few reviews from other companies jut to keep variety ;)

Bob A
4 days ago

Wow have not seen a road bike that looks this cool in a while. Court-How does the front fork feel with no suspension? Does it have any flex to it to absorb some of the terrain. Hope you review he Dirt-E also. THX!

Bob A
2 days ago

Court-Thanks a lot for doing the reviews and listening to your fans! You are the best! Looks like Giant has really tapped into the market in a good way. Years ago, I lacked confidence in the brand due to comparisons we made with other manufacturers side by side, however, I like the interfaces and the motor pairings they put together. I'll be watching for the review. Go get 'em Court!

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 days ago

Hey Bob! Yeah, I filmed the Dirt-E and will be posting soon-ish, trying to rotate brands and styles to keep things interesting. The Road-E felt pretty rigid, Aluminum fork with an aggressive but aerodynamic design. I'd consider a suspension stem or seat post upgrade ;)

Ron OBlack
4 days ago

I wonder what this bike would be like with a 9 speed belt drive. I think the belt drive would be better suited to handle the extra torque and I suspect 9 gears would be enough in combination with the motor.
I like it, but I'm not ready to give up my two road bikes yet.
Too bad there isn't bosses for a rack and fenders.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 days ago

Good points all around, a belt drive and internally geared hub would handle motor torque but add a bit of weight and possibly price. Rack bosses would be nice for commuters, I think it has fender holes, more pictures and details in the full writeup here: https://electricbikereview.com/giant/road-e-plus/

Jeff Perteet
4 days ago

I am in the market for a premium bike, but I really don't know where to turn, when making that big purchase considering I'm in a very rural area, help me pls!

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 days ago

Hey Jeff, some bikes can be sold online and assembled and tuned locally. I also have a dealer map that might help you here: https://electricbikereview.com/shop-directory/ it's getting upgraded later today to be easier to use

Clothed in shadows
4 days ago

Hey court. When will you be releasing the mustache "asphalt" review ? .

Clothed in shadows
4 days ago

ElectricBikeReview.com THANKS FRIEND.

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 days ago

I'll plan to do that one sooner if you're excited about it :)

david campbell
4 days ago

hardly riding safe is it when you have one hand on the bike and a camera in the other? perhaps you should use a body or helmet camera all the time and that way you can have both hands on the handlebars and concentrate on the road conditions. David.

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 days ago

Thanks for your concern, there was one part of this ride test where a car is following me that I didn't know about. There's a certain amount of risk that I take on, I try to keep an eye out and enjoy working with others for added safety.

moinsen mann
4 days ago

I rly like the bikes look

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 days ago

Me too, it's like a race car :)

Seb K
4 days ago

I actually like these road Ebikes . I will make one point though . DO NOT SHARE WITH ROADIES !!! i shared a picture of a road Ebike with my road friends and well let's just say the air was very thick .

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 days ago

Ha! Well, to each their own I guess ;)

ilikewasabe
4 days ago

i dig the sexy tire clearance. And it looks slick.. are the chainrings replaceable? coz on my e-bike, i tend to turn off the assist and use it as a regular bicycle and use the assist as a rest period. Thats how i extend my mileage dramatically.. Since its a heavier bike i tend to lean on lower gearing, saves my knees too :)

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 days ago

I believe so, that's one of the big benefits of the Yamaha drive system, it uses regular chainrings (in this case a compact double) 34/50T

HTFAT
4 days ago

i shouldn't have watched this.i want one now.

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 days ago

Ahh, I know how you feel... I want one too, I love the speed and feel of road bikes ;)

Surfdocsteve
4 days ago

Great Video. I tried this bike at the Long Beach Expo and it was definitely fast and fun to ride. I thought it was interesting that it was a above 28 MPH bike but did not have any lights on it. I thought that was the law? I also find it funny that you rate the components as good and a good deal. The same bike without the motor would be considered low end and barely be a thousand dollars. It just does not matter as far as the weight is concerned, but definitely not high end components. That means you are paying $3000 for the motor! I think they are over charging! The reality is the big box brands could offer the bikes for less if they just added $1500-2000 more than the same non-motorized bike version. BTW Mike at Fullerton Bike is the best! He will go the extra mile to treat you right and get you the right bike at a great price.

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 days ago

You make a good point about components but I imagine that it costs a lot to do a custom frame like this and they aren't selling in volume yet. I try to compare and rate ebikes based on what's currently available in the US but I also just tend to be more positive :)

samuel Townsend
4 days ago

Surfdocsteve I agree and Mike and his staff at Fullerton Bikes are the best. It's great to see them embracing the electric bike market when Mike came back from sea otter this year he told me he had finally seen the light.