Giant Road-E+ Review

Giant Road E Plus 1 Electric Bike Review
Giant Road E Plus 1
Giant Road E Plus 1 Syncdrive Yamaha Motor 250 Watt
Giant Road E Plus 1 500 Watt Hour Battery Pack
Giant Road E Plus 1 Fixed Backlit Lcd Display
Giant Road E Plus 1 Taped Drop Bars Alloy Fork Ebike
Giant Road E Plus 1 Pr 2 Disc Alloy Rims Drop Bars
Giant Road E Plus 1 Contact Sl Neutral Sadal
Giant Road E Plus 1 Shimano 105 Front Derailleur Compact Double
Giant Road E Plus 1 Shimano Hydraulic Disc Brake Rotor 160 Mm
Giant Road E Plus 1 Shimano Ultegra 11 Speed Cogset
Giant Road E Plus 1 Motor Protector Plate
Giant Road E Plus 1 3 Amp Charger
Giant Road E Plus 1 Electric Bike Review
Giant Road E Plus 1
Giant Road E Plus 1 Syncdrive Yamaha Motor 250 Watt
Giant Road E Plus 1 500 Watt Hour Battery Pack
Giant Road E Plus 1 Fixed Backlit Lcd Display
Giant Road E Plus 1 Taped Drop Bars Alloy Fork Ebike
Giant Road E Plus 1 Pr 2 Disc Alloy Rims Drop Bars
Giant Road E Plus 1 Contact Sl Neutral Sadal
Giant Road E Plus 1 Shimano 105 Front Derailleur Compact Double
Giant Road E Plus 1 Shimano Hydraulic Disc Brake Rotor 160 Mm
Giant Road E Plus 1 Shimano Ultegra 11 Speed Cogset
Giant Road E Plus 1 Motor Protector Plate
Giant Road E Plus 1 3 Amp Charger

Summary

  • An aggressive road bike with 28 mph top electric-assisted speed, drop bars and sport saddle, you get Shimano Ultegra rear and 105 front derailleurs with 22 gear combinations to work with
  • Shimano hydraulic disc brakes offer powerful stops and tend to stay cleaner than rim brakes, all-Aluminum frame is lightweight and sturdy but doesn't absorb vibrations as well as Steel or Carbon fiber
  • Available in four frame sizes for better fit, sold through Giant dealers worldwide so you can get setup right and rely on knowledgeable technicians for tuneups and any warranty support
  • The Yamaha mid-drive system is relatively quiet but still very powerful, it doesn't provide as wide an RPM range so I find myself pedaling slower than I'd like at times, LCD display is not removable

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Giant

Model:

Road-E+

Price:

$4,000

Body Position:

Forward Aggressive

Suggested Use:

Urban, Road

Electric Bike Class:

Speed Pedalec (Class 3)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Year Comprehensive, Lifetime Frame

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

44 lbs (19.95 kg)

Battery Weight:

7.5 lbs (3.4 kg)

Motor Weight:

7.6 lbs (3.44 kg)

Frame Material:

ALUXX SL-Grade Aluminum

Frame Sizes:

17 in (43.18 cm)19 in (48.26 cm)21 in (53.34 cm)23 in (58.42 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

Medium: 19" Seat Tube, 21.5" Reach, 30" Stand Over Height, 69" Length

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

Matte Black with Blue and Neon Yellow Accents

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid ALUXX SL-Grade Aluminum, OverDrive, 9 mm Skewer with Bolts

Frame Rear Details:

9 mm Skewer with Bolts

Attachment Points:

Fender Eyelets, Rear Kickstand Mount, Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

22 Speed 2x11 Shimano Ultegra Rear Derailleur 11-32T, Shimano 105 Front Derailleur 34/50T

Shifter Details:

Shimano RS685 Paddles on Left and Right

Cranks:

Custom Forged, 170 mm Length

Pedals:

Wellgo M-20, Alloy Platform Cage

Headset:

Tapered 1-1/8" to 1-1/2"

Stem:

Giant Connect, Alloy, 90 mm Length, 8° Angle, Three 5 mm Stacks, One 10 mm Stack

Handlebar:

Giant Contact, Alloy Drop Bar, 31.8 Clamp Diameter, 17.5" Width

Brake Details:

Shimano RS785 Hydraulic Disc with 160 mm Rotors, Heat Sinc on Calipers, Shimano RS685 Levers

Grips:

Black Tape, Rubber Hoods

Saddle:

Giant Contact SL Neutral, SST Tubular Rails

Seat Post:

Giant Contact, Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

300 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

30.9 mm

Rims:

Giant PR-2 Disc Alloy, Double Wall, 28 Hole, Giant Performance Tracker Road Disc Hubs

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 14 Gauge, Black with Silver Nipples

Tire Brand:

Schwalbe Durano, 700 x 32 (28" x 1.25")

Wheel Sizes:

28 in (71.12cm)

Tire Details:

RaceGuard Dual Compound, 55 to 95 PSI

Tube Details:

Presta Valve

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, 1.8 lb 3 Amp Charger

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Giant SyncDrive by Yamaha

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Geared Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

250 watts

Motor Peak Output:

500 watts

Motor Torque:

80 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Giant EnergyPak

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

13.8 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

496.8 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

4.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

50 miles (80 km)

Estimated Max Range:

100 miles (161 km)

Display Type:

Giant, Fixed, Backlit, Monochrome LCD

Readouts:

Battery Info-Graphic, Battery Percentage, Speed, Assist Level (Off, Eco, Normal, Power), Cadence (RPM), Trip Time, Trip Distance, Average Speed, Max Speed, Odometer, Range,

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad on Right (On/Off, Up, Down, Light, i, Walk Mode), 5 Volt Micro USB Port on Left Side of Display

Drive Mode:

Advanced Pedal Assist (Wheel Speed, Pedal Torque, Pedal Cadence)

Top Speed:

28 mph (45 kph)

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Written Review

The Giant Road-E+ is a unique electric bike because it’s designed for performance. In the US, the ebike space has traditionally been dominated by commuter products with some cruisers sprinkled in for recreational riders that want to feel young and avoid overheating or struggling to keep up with friends and spouses. The Road-E+ by contrast is aggressive and sporty… Rather than limiting you to 20 mph like the majority of e-bikes, it delivers up to 28 mph assisted top speed making it a Class 3 product (not permissible on many trails and some paths in California and other states). This is an electric bike that fits perfectly on the shoulder of the road and can help you earn the respect of cars starting off the line and ascending hills. I was thrilled to give it a spin for this review because I love road bikes and know that Giant has a great reputation for quality at value price points. My takeaway is that it would ease some of the knee pain I experience on longer rides with lots of climbing, allow me to jump into more dynamic rides on the weekends even though I cannot train as frequently as my friend (and am thus in limited shap by comparison) and offer a good alternative to my non-electric road bike when my muscles need a break. Some of the challenges I experienced were the heavier footprint at ~44 lbs, stiffer all-Aluminum frame and limited motor RPM range. I have tested and reviewed other electric road bikes with drop bars and the Road-E+ is well priced by comparison but it’s still not cheap. At $4k you’re getting decent components (Shimano Ultegra and 105) with a 22 speed drivetrain (many others are 1×10 or 1×11) and I love that there’s a vast network of dealers selling and servicing them, helping to honor the two-year comprehensive warranty on offer.

Driving the bike is a 250 watt nominal, 500 watt peak mid drive motor from Yamaha. Those numbers aren’t as important as torque in my opinion and the SyncDrive offers 80 Newton meters… which is a lot. Bosch’s mid-drive, by comparison, offers 63 to 75 Nm and is not compatible with multiple front chainrings. The Yamaha motor is quiet and smooth but doesn’t quit spinning as quickly as Bosch. It measures the same wheel speed, pedal cadence and pedal torque signals and allows you to shift gears smoothly if you ease off a bit before pressing the paddles. I love how integrated the motor is at the bottom bracket, how nicely it fits into the purpose-built frame and that it keeps weight low and centered as opposed to a hub motor system (popular with lower-end ebikes). One of the biggest benefits you get from a mid-motor is normal wheels and hubs that are easier to service and remove for transport or flat fixes. In addition to some plastic and frame surrounds, the motor also has a skid plate on the bottom that’s designed to protect it. Notice that the chainrings hang down lower than the motor and would take damage before it would in most cases. The only big compromise I experienced with this drive system is a limited RPM output that requires frequent shifting to hit higher top speeds and sometimes leaves me wanting to spin faster before shifting. The problem with this scenario is that if I want to spin faster I end up doing it all on my own (and pushing more weight plus the normal wind and wheel friction). It’s difficult to raise the speed of the bike all by yourself and when the motor isn’t able to keep up you simply have to shift gears to go faster. For many people, the bike is simply amazing and works flawlessly but this is one area that I sometimes struggle with on the Yamaha motor compared with Bosch and it’s why I love that you can go to a shop and take a test ride before buying.

Powering the motor is a custom 36 volt 13.8 amp hour battery pack named “EnergyPak”. I’m not sure what brand of cells are being used here but I’d guess they are higher quality (Samsung or Panasonic). With nearly 500 watt hours of capacity, this is a larger than average battery that Should take you 50+ miles depending on the level of assist chosen… As with all speed-pedelecs, as you ride above 20 mph the efficiency and range of the bike really drops off due to wind resistance. For me, it’s a reasonable trade-off and an area that’s addressable with the included 3 Amp charger (faster than the average 2 Amp I see on many other ebikes) or the upgrade 4 Amp charger option. I did not see this optional fast charger so cannot comment on price or availability but it got me excited. Specialized offered a similar fast-charger option with their ebikes a couple years back and they tend to be larger and heavier. Again, the three amp charger seemed great and wasn’t too large. I do like that it has a metal plug, that the charge port on the battery case is covered well with a rubber flap and that the battery locks securely to the frame but can be charged on or off so you could top it off at the office perhaps or maybe while eating lunch in the mountains at the half-way point during a ride. The battery design is simply beautiful and I love how they sort of integrated it with the downtube so the bike doesn’t scream “I’m electric” like some others do. The one area that isn’t so great is handling the pack. There’s literally no handle or loop to grab onto. With replacement packs costing upwards of $800 this is not something you want to drop…

Operating the Giant Road-E+ is pretty easy. Just mount the charged battery (I love that it clicks in without the key being necessary) then press the power button on the control pad. The display comes to life showing a precise charge level infographic and there’s even a percentage readout AND dynamic range estimate. Depending on the level of assist you arrow up or down to, the range estimate will change. It’s great to have this kind of feedback at your fingertips vs. guessing so that you can plan your ride for maxiumum fun. On this note, please make sure you always check your tire pressure because as with traditional road bikes, the narrower tires here can get snake-bite punctures easily if you hit a curb or let the PSI drop too low. This is a heavier bike after all and unlike many other e-bikes, the tires are narrow. So anyway, the display offers three levels of assist to choose from and gives you access to trip stats like range, trip distance, speed and max speed. If you’re someone who likes to use Strava on your phone or use a Garmin device, you can do this easily with the Giant Road-E+ without having to run the juice down because there’s a little Micro-USB port on the left side of the display. One area of concern or question is where and how to mount your device given the already large LCD display. Also, the display is not removable so parking and storing the bike could present more opportunities for scratches which is a bummer. Consider putting a towel over… This and many other parts of the bike are smart and modular so if they are broken or lost, your Giant dealer should be able to help with a fix.

At the end of the day, there are only a few choices when it comes to electric road bikes and of course, you’d want a speed pedelec with drop bars. Beyond that, the four frame sizes, dealer network and beautiful integration seen here really impressed me. For $4k I feel like you get a lot of value and could have a blast with this bike. I love that in addition to bottle cage bosses, they added threaded eyelets and a mounting provision at the rear for a kickstand and some mounts for fenders. There’s no rack mount but this really isn’t a commuter setup… frankly, I’m not sure how well fenders would really work but the holes are there. Giant sells a wider range of electric assist bikes in Europe and it’s wonderful to finally see them in the US. This is a refined product, despite being “new” to this market and I could tell that they had ironed out a lot of the kinks and compromises that other systems had not when they first arrived. This thing uses a smart, reliable drive system that can work with you to achieve new types of rides and because it’s from a bigger more recognized brand, I feel like it might garner more respect as well (at least in the USA where ebikes are still catching on). Because the frame is all Aluminum (including the rigid fork), one thing I would consider is a seat post suspension from BodyFloat. Their systems tend to be highly responsive, offered in lighte-weight materials like Carbon fiber and Titanium and are adjustable to rider weight. You might also benefit from a suspension stem like the ShockStop.

Pros:

  • It’s rare to see electric road bikes with drop bars that are also speed pedelecs (28 mph top speed vs. 20 mph) and this one comes in four frame sizes which makes it accessible to a wider audience
  • Giant has a vast network of dealers and is a larger more reputable bicycle company than most, seeing a product like this (with the complexity of electric systems) feels more reliable
  • The Yamaha mid-drive system is one of the quietest and most responsive motors I’ve tested, while it does have a more limited RPM output (requiring more shifting to fully optimize) it works well and the torque sensor lets you shift without mashing just by easing off the pedals as you might with a non-electric bike
  • I love how integrated the battery pack looks but also that it’s fully removable (reducing overall weight by ~7.5 lbs), worth taking off when carrying on a car rack or doing service
  • Hydraulic disc brakes are the way to go with a heavier bike like this and should perform well if the road is wet or dirty as they tend to stay cleaner than rim brakes… they also stay out of the way when taking wheels off for quick service
  • The frame is completely purpose built, cables are internally routed and the battery and motor are streamline, I love that they managed to squeeze in bottle cage bosses despite the much larger downtube
  • You get 22 speeds on this ebike vs. just 10 or 11 on some of the other mid-drive system and the component groups (Ultegra and 105 from Shimano) are pretty good, this adds up to a more natural and wide range of pedal cadence options, in short, I believe it’s a compact double setup as you’d see on a non-electric bike
  • The battery charger puts out 3 Amps which is above average so you should get faster charge times, I like the rubber cover on the charge port near the base of the battery pack but would suggest being careful not to bump the cable with the left crank arm when it’s plugged in
  • The motor assist is highly adjustable so you can still get an excellent workout, for people with a hurt knee or leg, those with heart conditions or people who want to take a break between strenuous rides this would be an excellent platform and it lets others draft, great for a cycling coach or others looking to maximize availability without straining muscles too much
  • I like that the display panel has a Micro-USB port on the left side where you could charge a phone, run some lights or use other portable electronics for longer periods relying on the large main battery
  • In addition to range approximation (based on the power level chosen and remaining battery capacity) there’s a good battery info-graphic with battery percentage! Many ebikes just show a 5-bar graphic with 20% drops… Giant went above and beyond with percentage here and I think it’s useful
  • As someone with a crowded space and rented walls… I appreciate that there are threaded eyelets on the left chainstay for adding a kickstand!
  • The motor and battery weight are kept low and centered on the frame helping to optimize handling and even lifting if you have to carry the bike up stairs or mount it on a rack

Cons:

  • Yamaha is a large reputable company and their motor is compact, quiet and well integrated here but it doesn’t offer as wide an RPM as some other mid-drives like Bosch, this means you have to shift more actively to hit the top speed
  • Given the all-Aluminum frame and fork, there’s not a lot of foregiveness going over bumps (especially at high speed), people tend to ride ebikes further and at higher average speeds so I’d consider using a Thudbuster or BodyFloat suspension seat post (look for 30.9 mm diameter) and maybe even a suspension stem, perhaps future Road-E+ models will offer a Carbon fiber fork?
  • The display is easy to read and navigating the menus is intuitive but you can’t take the display off which means more sun damage and possible scratched when transporting the bike or parking it outside
  • The battery pack weighs 7.5 lbs and doesn’t have a handle or great ridge for securely gripping and carrying it… so be careful not to drop it! I like that it can be left on the frame to charge
  • While the motor is very responsive to your pedal torque, there is no built in shift-sensing protection system so you could mash your chain if you don’t shift consciously

Resources:

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Joe Bernard
7 months ago

Nice bike, but handling that battery is going to be an issue. Even with the handle on my Haibike’s battery, I’ve found that it’s easy to muck up the stick-on graphics. With the Giant battery you’re pretty much forced to grab it right where the decals are.

Reply
Court Rye
7 months ago

Good point Joe, I hadn’t thought as much about sticker placement and fingerprints, thanks for the feedback!

Reply
Hiruy
7 months ago

Hi Court, As always, another great review. I bought this bike in February as soon as they released it for sale in US. I use it for my daily commute to work and put on about 500 miles on it. I really love this bike. It has very impressive handling, amazing range and fun to ride. I am about 195 lbs with additional cargo of 10-15 lbs and am getting about 60 miles in a single charge even though my commute includes several hills with a couple of really steep ones. On my other 2015 Diamondback Trace EXC, I can only get about 20 miles in a single charge. The Road E+ have the same feel as riding a normal road bike so you will feel the road bumps. To help with the road bumps, I changed the factory saddle which is too firm for me with the Serfas Variant 2 which enables you to adjust the firmness of the saddle. I also like the fact that it does not cut-off the motor immediately. When I am ready to shift gears, I stop peddling momentarily and immediately shift gears so that the momentum of the motor before it cuts off is just enough to make the shifting very smooth then continue peddling. A couple of things you mentioned are different on my bike:

  1. The seat post my bike came with is a carbon fiber, but you indicated that it is aluminum on your review. The Giant website have it listed as “Giant Contact Composite 30.9 mm
  2. My charger plug to the battery pack is plastic, but you show a metal end
Reply
Court Rye
7 months ago

Interesting, thanks for sharing your feedback about the seat post and charger Hiruy! I enjoyed reading about your experience with range and comparisons to the Diamondback Trace. Sounds like you’re a seasoned electric cyclist at this point! Keep riding safe and thanks again for your positive feedback on the site :)

Reply
Joe Bernard
7 months ago

The Yamaha motor on my Haibike Sduro Trekking has that slight over-rev feature, too. FYI, I found that stopping pedaling was too disruptive to my rhythm, so I’ve gone back to the standard practice of slightly backing off pedal pressure for shifts. I suppose this could wear out my chain faster, but I’ll take the cost hit for it.

Soren Thomsen
1 month ago

Hi, thanks for the review. Can you estimate what the RPM limitation is? Does it simply stop to contribute at a certain RPM or what happens there? Thanks, Soren

Reply
Court Rye
1 month ago

Hi Soren, in my experience the Yamaha motor used on the bike reviewed here and some other Haibikes has a 100 RPM limit vs. Bosch and Brose which reach 120 RPM. So in practice, that means that when you are spinning and reach a certain pedal rotation speed, the motor sort of eases back and won’t help anymore… so you can either work harder on your own if you prefer higher RPM riding or you can switch to a lower gear which will slow your RPM but allow the motor to help out again. In practice, at least for me, this results in more frequent shifting and a ride style that is less enjoyable… because I like to spin due to a sensitive knee and a desire for a faster “cardio” type ride vs. slow and powerful. Does that make sense?

Reply
Soren Thomsen
1 month ago

Thanks for your comprehensive answer. That does indeed make a lot of sense.

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Beyizzer
48 mins ago

I'm going to get into my problem at the end, but i'm going to type a bit about what happened before it died in hopes that perhaps if i can get another one or fix this one i can avoid what i did wrong and prevent it from happening again. Because I'm so new to this and because resources seem to be real slim on the subject ANY help would be appreciated.

i got an ebike conversion kit (link)
I got one of those front wheel 1000w motors from walmart.com I got the kit in the mail and realized i needed a battery, researched batteries, realized it was something i'd have to figure out how to buy one day because $500 wasn't really in my budget.

i got a 48v 17ah battery (link)
couple months later i had an opportunity to get a loan double what the battery costed so i bought the battery with the loan, battery came in, i hooked everything up and connected the loose power wires of the battery to the power cables of the motor, my girlfriend then used the throttle, wheel moved, so the next day i had an electrician solder the connection to a set of male female connectors that were on the battery wire. the next day i was in business, riding around no problem.

bumps would disconnect wires, i kept having to pull over to reconnect
every time i hit a bump i would feel cautious because sometimes a bump would pull on a wire too much and disconnect one of them in the bag. i had the controller and the battery in the bag the motor came with sitting in a basket on the rear mount that the motor came with. So i got used to reconnecting wires anytime i would be driving through traffic and the throttle would suddenly stop doing something. I'd routinely pull over and check all the connections and check the throttle to see if the lights on the battery indicator lit up yet, once they did I lifted the front wheel and made sure the wheel reacted and then i'd be on my way. I knew this was only a temporary fix, maybe i needed to get some better connections from like an electric parts store or reconfigure my setup with longer wires. at first it was the yellow blue and green wires that kept coming undone, i've seen a lot of youtube videos where there's a plastic yellow box to connect them with but my setup came with three lose wires to three lose wires with some sort of rubber neck pieces that pulled over each other to make things snug. I pulled the green rubber back so the connectors were bare and made sure to make those click really secure and once those were secure i had a break for a while.

power cable issues
...but i still had problems, this time it seemed the power cable from the battery would not be disconnected, but nothing would work until I took apart the power connection of the red and black wires from the battery to the black and red wires coming from the motor i would disconnect them and reconnect them they would always spark but then the bike would work again, the other day i was about to do this on the side of the road but no spark, nothing worked, i took it to an electrician he said something about an over current and an electrical arc, i went to an ebike repair shop and he was saying he'd sell me another controller for $100 but the whole kit wasn't much more than that, and i found a bunch of really close controllers online for $20-100 most under $40. I'm not sure if i should open this controller up and find what needs to be fixed or get new connectors because one of the connectors is melted on the white plastic a little bit and the connector inside is kind of sideways counterclockwise. For walmart.com exchanges, some are sold by other sellers so i contacted the seller and they said they can send me a new controller but it would take 2.5 weeks.

Larry Ganz
1 hour ago

You should be okay on all streets, just watch for signs on bike trails or bike paths that might restrict the use of eBikes.

For off road use you'll likely need to contact the local jurisdictions and find out if the park or trails you want to ride on are restricted. Often BLM trails and national forests restrict the use of eBikes, but some state parks are fine - our Cheyenne Mountain State Park has some trails where eBikes are allowed, and use on the other trails is discouraged.

Rooster
3 hours ago

Hi all, new member here. I have a CCS on order for November delivery (hopefully), and wanted to get some feedback from real life users about battery life.

I would like to use the bike for commuting, which is 11 miles each way. The route is fairly hilly. I weigh 225 lbs. Do you guys think I will be able to make it round trip with the 12.8 amp-hour battery without having to recharge? Or should I pay up for the 17.4 upgrade? I will probably ride in Assist Mode 3 most of the time, keeping the speed around 16-20 mph. I have been road biking for many years, so I don't mind putting some effort into the pedals, but not so much where I am sweating a lot when I get to my destination.

Thanks in advance!
I would go ahead and get the upgrade if it were me. To much is way better than not enough, range anxiety sucks.

botbar
5 hours ago

It is indeed strange. The sample that Mozzo sent us had Allen on both ends. They decided to change it on the production order and this really messed us up. The delay in fixing this would be a few weeks. Hence we left it as is. It's tough to get Chinese factories stick to spec. Even though we're speaking to them almost every day.

Well, now I do not feel so dumb! Bike came this AM, first I forgot to turn the handlebars around even though I recalled reading about that step on the forum. Too excited I guess. Then after not being able to put the front fender on I rode it without the front fender. I found myself saying out loud "wow this is fun" and it was.
I will ride to the hardware store tomorrow and get the right size tool to get the "bolt with a round edge - and no place for pliers to fit around" off for the front fender.
PS I did email Roshan and he replied light lighting as usual and answered my questions. Customer service is great and I don't think I would get the same from the other companies I was researching.

I changed the display to imperial/MPH, but the clock is military only (right?).

Bike looks badass(that is good) - and the performance amazing , it was great to ride. In level 5 it wants to take off from a standstill.
PS FedEx just left it on the side of the house - no signature, which was a good thing even though I was inside waiting. I pedaled up the hill of my commute as if it was flat road. I did add a brighter front light. Too early to review the light but if you want the link from amazon let me know. I am happy with it so far, plenty bright and fits the bike nicely.

As a complete novice and not that handy, I think instructions would be nice for future buyers. or update the video to be much more clear on the front tire and turning the handlebars around. This bolt thing was an annoying hic-up but would rather have the bike then wait weeks for a bolt - not the end of the world. Very happy on day 1.

John from Connecticut
5 hours ago

John, re the handlebars, Origin8 makes a bar that is extremely close to the xm700 bar - I had bought it for my last ebike and when I got the xm700 I didn’t bother swapping them out since they were so similar. Might be worth a look for your Powerfly. I got them at Amazon, where else...

https://www.amazon.com/Origin8-Space-Off-Road-II/dp/B0046VYHI0/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1475791468&sr=8-1&keywords=origin+8+space+bar&th=1&psc=1

I really like the Origin8 stuff. Have a pair of their very flat pedals as well that I just used on my Erie Canal trip on my xm700, it handled the stone dust quite well also -there’s many, many miles of it - though a little more tire would have been nice for sure.

Hi Dave,
Wow ! What a great lead...Origin8. I was not familiar with them. Thank you very much. I debated between the handlebar you bought and the one below and
went with it because it appears to have a slightly less sweepback, which is what I think I want,won't know until I get it. If not I'll go with 'yours' . I'll
also check out Origin8's pedals 'cause I'm using the stock basic ones that came on the XM700.

When I first bought my bike in July I went with the simple Shimano clip-ins, not the fancy road ones, but all things considered they weren't worth 'the risk'.
I switched to those stiff plastic toe clips and I'm quite happy. Thanks for the lead Dave. I really appreciate it.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00ACTKH34/ref=od_aui_detailpages00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

All the best,
John from CT

FA63
5 hours ago

Hi all, new member here. I have a CCS on order for November delivery (hopefully), and wanted to get some feedback from real life users about battery life.

I would like to use the bike for commuting, which is 11 miles each way. The route is fairly hilly. I weigh 225 lbs. Do you guys think I will be able to make it round trip with the 12.8 amp-hour battery without having to recharge? Or should I pay up for the 17.4 upgrade? I will probably ride in Assist Mode 3 most of the time, keeping the speed around 16-20 mph. I have been road biking for many years, so I don't mind putting some effort into the pedals, but not so much where I am sweating a lot when I get to my destination.

Thanks in advance!

John from Connecticut
5 hours ago

PS: at 450 miles I rotated the rear tire to the front, where the front looks new and the rear was 1/2 way worn out in the center. I should get another 300-400 miles from the most worn tire that's now up front, and another 500+ from the other that is now in the rear. I'm at over 500 miles now, but the bike was down for 4 weeks after that crash over memorial day weekend. It's not a commuter for work, just for fun, but because of my health and all the hills around Cheyenne Mountain, one ride can wipe me out for a few days before I feel good enough to do another. Otherwise I could hit 3-4K miles a year.

Hi Larry,
Thank you very much for your complete and thorough reply...So much for me to learn. I should have my Powerfly7 by this weekend. I'll take
it out for a 'maiden voyage' and report back. You've provided a lot of good info, not the least of which is alerting me to body position while riding, on and off
the pedals etc, something I hadn't given much consideration to...

As mentioned I'll never do 'real' off road, single track (rocks, sticks, logs etc) because I have neither the strength and bike handling skills. A
crash would probably end my riding days. Groomed stone dust, rails to trails type will keep me busy. I'll catch you on the flip side.

Be well,
John from CT

Rooster
6 hours ago

Hello!
i have a round trip commute of 34 miles (total). The road is mostly flat. I am looking for a fast class 3 bike that also offer offroad mode, that allows me to ride faster than 28 miles limit.

any recommendations?

thank you
Get you a good bike that you like and get a kit with at least a 1000 watt direct drive motor and buy the biggest 52 v battery you can afford, at least 17 ah. That way you can baby it and still get there pretty quick. That's the cheapest way to go, other wise buy the juiced, it's the best deal going IMO.

itsaulgoodman
11 hours ago

I dunno, but for me personally being limited to 25Km/h is "what the hell is the point" territory. Even at 32Km/h I get passed by regular road bike cyclists.

Other than that, nice looking bike.

Jmegabite
11 hours ago

I found this at streetsmarts.bostonbiker.com :

Ray says:
March 26, 2017 at 7:30 am
Mr Allen, I just wanted to clarify that an electrically assisted bike if it meets the guidelines in of a Low Speed Electric Vehicle being a Consumer Product not a Motor Vehicle as described above of in USC Title 15 Section 2085 ( https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/USCODE-2011-title15/html/USCODE-2011-title15-chap47-sec2085.htm ) will be allowed to be operated on roads in MA because this law supersedes State Law as outlined in Part D. You do not need a license, registration or insurance to operate it. You do need to obey the law and wear appropriate safety gear and rules of the road.

I personally see these laws as a means to protect others on the road ways as a motor vehicle can kill other people and society needs to be protected. Otherwise a bicyclist or an assisted bicyclist would need to register this potential weapon. So when you stop pedaling a bicycle it stops moving forward which is the same for an electric bicycle. Hence the requirement for pedals…

The Federal link says if it's under 750Watts , but the bike is 750Watts . Wonder if that would be a problem ?

bluecat
12 hours ago

Thömus, the company, where the Stromer was founded, announced their first road e-bike: The Twinner E1. As you see, it's the Shimano Steps E8000 motor. Limited to 25 km/h, therefore no competitor to the Stromer ST5.

Mark Peralta
12 hours ago

I think this will be the ultimate trend in the future, an integrated motor and automatic CVT transmission, especially for many American riders who drive automatic cars as opposed manual shifting cars (and have no concept about shifting gears) .

http://ebiketips.road.cc/content/news/first-ride-continental-48v-mid-motor-system-with-automatic-gearing-664

Chris Nolte, when will you start to sell these?

Larry Ganz
12 hours ago

You have to be on the offense like I said above. You have to dictate to their insurance company what you expect and stick to your guns.

When my 2005 Subaru Impreza 2.5RS was totaled in 2014 after a careless driver hit myself and my eldest daughter head on, I got to experience firsthand in dealing with the “other guys insurance”.

They first tried to lowball us on replacement value, coming in at $7,000 for a $10,000 car, but I was able to use pictures and witnesses to prove the condition of the car was beyond exceptional, and that it had been maintained better than the average car its age. I then found other comparable cars for sale to prove that my claim was justified, while they were trying to use the low-end of the value.

When they still wanted to haggle with us, I started to nickel and dime them for every little thing that was in the car that was destroyed (plastic containers, ice chest, suitcases, etc) as we were bringing back most of my daughters things from college.

My son another daughter who weren’t in the car with us, while I was in the hospital with my eldest daughter, went out to collect everything from the car and put it in a big pile and took pictures of it. We even claimed the clothing and shoes that were on our bodies when it was cut off of us in the emergency room.

In the four days between the accident on an icy road in Kansas and my other kids leaving Colorado to collect our belongings, $1500 worth of item were stolen from the car (which had broken windows and both doors on the right side cut off to get me out) including cameras, Speakers, jewelry, hard drives, etc. Fortunately I had photos and the original boxes with serial numbers and/or receipts for all of the items stolen, and filed a police report. Then I proceeded to go after them and the towing yard for that as well. The accident happened while my other kids were still taking finals for college and high school so there was nothing we could do the pick up her items sooner.

I was very tenacious and they ended up replacing the car, both of our laptops that were bent, everything that was stolen, and everything else that was broken. My lawyer said I was doing such a good job dealing with property claim that he was able to focus more on the physical/medical damage claim for my daughter and myself, where we both broke both of our legs and my daughter is permanently disabled after the accident with a painful right ankle fusion. She spent 20 months in a wheelchair and went into the operating room 4 times over a year and a half.

EddieJ
16 hours ago

Hi Ann, the fully enclosed cover as on the black FS bike, are actually surprisingly good at keeping the mess out. If maintenance was neglected, you could gradually get a build of mud inside, but the electrics have never once had mud or water on them.

The motor on the white hardtail is far more exposed, but the electrics are still very protected.

An area that does get a build up of mud, is inside of the battery housing block. The connectors frequently get wet, but this has never presented any issue for me. The build up inside of the block is surprisingly fast.

If using an Intuvia display, the up/down remote switch can get mud behind the outer facia/bezel. You wouldn't be aware of this until it becomes tricky to switch between modes. No water gets into the electrics.

Water can get between the console and mount on the Intuvia display, but again it has never presented an issue or problem.

The down fall of the Bosch motor (or any ebike motor) when used in regular off road European conditions such as above, is the outer bearing on the chainset side. Just as with a normal/analogue mtb, this is a vulnerable area. Here in the UK, any mtb is going to require bottom bracket bearings at least once a year, and this seems to be something that many people forget, or don't understand. The Bosch outer bearing seal mod, is to my mind a bodge, it does help, but won't prevent bearing failure. The key to preserving the outer bearing is to never get any form of detergent or oil any where near it when cleaning or detailing the bike, and never ever use water to via hose or pressure washing to wash the motor down. The best way of cleaning is to unhook the chain from the front sprocket, and clean the area by hand with a cloth, and nothing more. I also remove the outer bearing seal at least once a month, remove the grease and any unwanted particles, regrease, and reinstall, applying a little extra grease over and above. It might sound like a pain, but in reality it takes very little time to complete, and is the best safe guard that yo can have.

mrgold35
16 hours ago

Excellent write-up on first impressions for new ebikers. Price was first on my list because my thinking was to work out the pros/cons and likes/dislikes before moving on to my 2nd ebike purchase a few years down the road (hopefully prices, range, and capabilities would also improve the next 2-3 yrs). I figured a few years with the Radrovers would give me an excellent starting point with a lot of ebike experience to draw from on my next e-ride.

I've had my two his/her Radrovers for over an year with +3500 miles between them. The RadCity wasn't available at time of purchase and I might have done one of each (RadCity for the wife). I had to make a few mods like 0-60 degree adjustable handlebar stem, better pedals, Cloud-9 cruiser seat, and Suntour suspension seatpost. I found the Rad bikes are like a "Swiss army knife" or "Gerber multi-tool" of ebikes. Not the best in any one area; but, very good to have if you encounter a lot of different situations.

The amount of debis you run over in the road when commuting is unbelievable! I've had issues with commuting flats with standard Kenda tires. It helped to use Mr. Tuffy liners and Stans tire sealant in the tubes. What really helped was Mr. Tuffy+Stans+Vee8 tires. I have yet to have a flat riding the exact same routes with the Vee8 tires +1200 miles compared to 5 "tire falling off the rim" flats with the Kenda. Upgrading the tires might save you from a flat or two.

I'm constantly tweaking the brakes and derailleur on my rovers and I have several problems related to the bike being beat up during shipping. The issues we will have at this price point; but, I've learned so much about bike maintenance that is extremely helpful.

I keep my rovers in the garage at home. I have to take my rover to the 2nd floor to store at work in a private room next to my office (I have the only key). I'm lucky to have an elevator near the main entrance that lets off next to my office area at 6am. I take my rover down the back fire escape stairs after work since the door lets out closer to my direction of travel (and I avoid running into +20 folks asking about my bike). I use to carry my bike down the stairs until I discovered it was waaaaay easier to walk it down the stairs riding both brakes. I also discovered (when the elevator was down), I can push the rover up stairs using the throttle. Much easier to apply the throttle is this application if you attached a thumb throttle.

Hopefully, the negative first impression will not be a lasting impression of the capabilities of the RadCity.

Saratoga Dave
18 hours ago

John, re the handlebars, Origin8 makes a bar that is extremely close to the xm700 bar - I had bought it for my last ebike and when I got the xm700 I didn’t bother swapping them out since they were so similar. Might be worth a look for your Powerfly. I got them at Amazon, where else...

https://www.amazon.com/Origin8-Space-Off-Road-II/dp/B0046VYHI0/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1475791468&sr=8-1&keywords=origin+8+space+bar&th=1&psc=1

I really like the Origin8 stuff. Have a pair of their very flat pedals as well that I just used on my Erie Canal trip on my xm700, it handled the stone dust quite well also -there’s many, many miles of it - though a little more tire would have been nice for sure.

Saburo
24 hours ago

Does anyone know a brand of ebike which can really go the distance? I read reviews all the time, and my biggest issue with the ebike reviews, is that I can't find any reviews over long term use. I'm sure such a review exists out there somewhere, can someone please direct me?
For the most part, the reviews I read go like this: "Hey, here's this bike I just got it's brand new and rides great."
Or... "Hey, I've been riding this for a whole week and I love it".... Or even the occasional.... "I've had this thing for a few months, I've ridden it on Saturdays and it's awesome."
While these reviews do sometimes give useful information, I'm looking for a review of how the bikes (and their motors and electrical components) hold up after serious long term use.
I've been using an ebike as my primary form of transportation for nearly four years now. When I started doing this, I was living twenty miles away from my workplace with very steep hills in my path. I ride every day.
I've bought only the lower priced ebikes so far.
I realize that with ebikes just as with everything else, you get what you pay for. So Before I go and shell out a higher dollar amount, can anyone recommend from experience, a brand of bike or conversion kit which can handle every day use on and off road for at least two years before a motor or controller box needs to be replaced?
I'm not talking about batteries. I realize batteries will eventually need replaced. I'm cool with that.
I'm not looking for someone who has owned the bike for a couple of years and rides it 2 months out of the year. That does not count :) That's not really the same as using the bike for a couple of years.
I ride my bike all year, all months, every day. Do any reviews exist of extended use on an ebike?
Please help :)

PCDoctorUSA
1 day ago

I just discovered this forum after watching way too many reviews. Information overload! I am certain there are other threads that cover this, so feel,free to direct me there if so. I could use some help finding the best ebike for my needs. Here goes! My ideal bike would have: a cruiser style or upright riding position, midstep frame, beefy tires, lights, fenders, cargo rack, long range integrated battery, dependable and powerful motor with 28 mph capability, front shocks, and an easy, intuitive shifting or CVT. It will mostly be used on the road but needs to be able to handle light trails. Twist throttle would be nice. Hub motor or mid drive, just want it to be proven, durable and well warrantied. American made would be a bonus. Does this ebike exist? Budget is flexible but $2500 to $5,000 is preferred. I’ll spend more if it can be justified. I am probably asking for too much here, but thought I should at least get some input from the forum members who know a lot more than me. Thank you for any and all feedback. Cheers!
With your price range, it shouldn't be difficult at all to satisfy your wish list. I know you said that this would primarily be used on the road but can you tell us is this going to be a commuter bike or are you going on a cross-country trek? If the former, how far is the commute one-way and is it a level ride?

Jghbg
1 day ago

I just discovered this forum after watching way too many reviews. Information overload! I am certain there are other threads that cover this, so feel,free to direct me there if so. I could use some help finding the best ebike for my needs. Here goes! My ideal bike would have: a cruiser style or upright riding position, midstep frame, beefy tires, lights, fenders, cargo rack, long range integrated battery, dependable and powerful motor with 28 mph capability, front shocks, and an easy, intuitive shifting or CVT. It will mostly be used on the road but needs to be able to handle light trails. Twist throttle would be nice. Hub motor or mid drive, just want it to be proven, durable and well warrantied. American made would be a bonus. Does this ebike exist? Budget is flexible but $2500 to $5,000 is preferred. I’ll spend more if it can be justified. I am probably asking for too much here, but thought I should at least get some input from the forum members who know a lot more than me. Thank you for any and all feedback. Cheers!

Larry Ganz
1 day ago

Hi Larry,
I've enjoyed your posts. I also have an XM700+ and have ordered a Powerfly 7 2017 ( hardtail ) . My plan is to use the Powerfly 7 on stone dust rails to trails rides,
any groomed trails and roads, but limited to 'back roads'. I tried my XM700+ on a stone dust trail, but didn't feel stable enough with the stock Schwalbe Energizer Plus
tires thus the Powerfly 7...The XM700+ will be for paved conditions.... How do like your Powerfly 7 off road, assuming you ride on stone dust etc ?
I'll never go true off roading so that is not a concern. I'm guessing the Powerfly performs well on paved roads?

Also I truly enjoy the XM700+ stock swept back handle bars, but Trek no longer carries them or I'd install them on my Powerfly 7. Did you stick with the stock
bars on your Powerfly ? I'm not comfortable with true flat bar/ Mtn bars and will be changing to something with a sweep. I installed a Bodyfloat seat post
on my XM700 because it was waaay too stiff, the Bodyfloat is great and made the bike very ridable for me... Is the Powerfly stiff like the XM700 ?
I've purchased a second Bodyfloat and was planning on installing it on my Powerfly. Lastly, how do you like your Powerfly 7 on the road?

Thanks in advance,
John from CT

I've taken the Powerfly 7 onto several gravel trails and it's pretty stable at 40psi tire pressure, although if you get into some deep soft <1/8" pea-gravel it will slow the bike way down as you sink in and you need to power up the motor to get through it rather than bogging down. It's not often that I run into that, where it feels like those old playgrounds with 12" deep soft loose round gravel. I imagine that if you were doing a lot of fine loose gravel it would be like riding on sand and you'd want a 4" fatbike instead, or lower the tires to 30psi (or go tubeless and go to 25psi).

On hard pack single tracks with gravel on top of the surface it seems to do pretty well, but as you know any 2.3" tire can still skitter around on gravel, so you have to keep your body loose and let the bike move around and find it's way. On those surfaces my wife can't keep up with me on her Neko+ with 1.5" tires and more of a hybrid tread. Her bike is geared all wrong for climbing on slow/loose dirt trails anyway, and is best on hard pack with mild gravel and pavement.

I've not had my front end wash out yet on loose dirt, but I've come close and it helps when I keep my weight back, which means getting off the seat and moving my butt back, but the bars are a longer reach forward than swept bars and without a dropper seat-post it's hard. Instead I did buy a suspension seat post, but just a better seat could be enough.

I tend to let the bike float between my hands and legs on bumpy surfaces, to absorb bumps and stay on track. So I haven't gotten much use from my Suntour NCX suspension seat post https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01IM2JZYY/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1 but when I force myself to take the weight off my feet and use the seat, I find that the seat post works very well and does a better job absorbing bumps than my front dual 100mm shocks set for 26% sag. If I sit too far forward on the seat then the Suntour seat post doesn't get enough leverage to move (it moves down and back with bumps). If I sit back far enough to get it to absorb everything then I can barely reach the handle bars with my spare tire in the way (okay, my gut).

On most rides I do use up 100% of my front fork travel, and have thought about spacers inside the forks to get it to be more progressive, so I can run a lower pressure for a softer street ride. I think my fork pressure is between 120-125psi but I haven't checked it since May. So, currently I can't go lower on the pressure without spacers to make it more progressive - the front suspension works better off road than on pavement where it doesn't absorb the small bumps as well.

My 2.3" dirt tires still do great on pavement without too much rolling resistance, although I suspect that the grip in emergency braking might suffer with less contact patch on the road due to the knobbies. I've taken mine up to 42.7mph downhill on pavement, and it's steering geometry is much more stable at high speed than the DualSport+ that I borrowed for a weekend before ordering my XM700+ and then canceling for the PF7.

It corners well, although I'd expect that the XM700+ would corner better/faster on pavement with it's tires. Regardless, a bicycle is not like riding a motorcycle, as I'm much higher off the ground (36" vs 28"). So I'm not as confident leaning hard into turns when I'm sitting on a tiny seat 3 feet off the ground. Countersteering still works, but I feel like if I'm leaning into the turn too much that I'll start to slide out. So I have not tested my limits on dirt or pavement, and I slow down to at least 15-20mph for turns.

I do keep the tires at 40psi for all rides now, as I usually have to ride on pavement to get to any off-road riding, and 3/4 of my ride miles are on pavement. I can pedal it up to 22-23mph comfortably on flat ground with a comfortable cadence, and occasionally 26-27mph but then the cadence is too high for me to maintain for long. There's one stretch on the ride back from the local Zoo where I can pedal at what I'm guessing is 100+rpm at 35mph for about 3/4 of a mile which is about a 2% downhill grade where the bike would coast at only 20-25 without pedaling.

I went for the smaller 55cm frame for my 5 foot 9 inch body (30" inseam) and I kept the stock bars. But I went with a shorter and steeper handlebar riser (maybe 110x45 I'm not exactly sure now) which brought the bars closer to me, although I'd wish they were 1" higher and 2" farther back for cruising.

For where I like to ride (street and dirt), and riding 10-20mph with my wife, the Powerfly 7 is perfect and very versatile. Although it would be nice to also have a 28mph speed pedelec with street tires, after dropping so much on the Trek if I get a 2nd eBike it might be something like the Juiced Crosscurrent S at a much lower price. I can't justify another $4K bike to my wife, but if money grew on trees my Bike #2 would be a Stromer ST2 S.

John from Connecticut
1 day ago

I'd look for a larger front sprocket first, before tires, since a high cadence seems to be your main complaint. If that's not enough then I'd look at tires in the hope that reduces your effort, but the tires wont help if the cadence at 25-28 mph is already too high for you.

I've found that the Powerfly 7 knobby tires don't have a huge contact patch with the ground (since there's a lot of air between the knobs) and that whether I'm running lower tire pressure or higher pressure that my pedaling effort is about the same.

I also think that I was getting more wear in the center of my rear tire when I was pressuring up to 50psi for my rides on pavement. Iit's no harder to pedal at 40psi, but I'm in a hilly area where I don't get to ride above 20mph that often (I think our tire's recommended range is 30-55 psi). I'm going to leave it at 40psi for pavement and hope to even our my tire wear.

It's funny but when I had an XM700+ on order so I'd be able to go 28mph, I was pricing the cost to install a Rock Shox front fork and knobby tires to be able to ride off road. I'm happy with my slower Powerfly7 because I like to ride with my wife and she doesn't like to ride fast.

Hi Larry,
I've enjoyed your posts. I also have an XM700+ and have ordered a Powerfly 7 2017 ( hardtail ) . My plan is to use the Powerfly 7 on stone dust rails to trails rides,
any groomed trails and roads, but limited to 'back roads'. I tried my XM700+ on a stone dust trail, but didn't feel stable enough with the stock Schwalbe Energizer Plus
tires thus the Powerfly 7...The XM700+ will be for paved conditions.... How do like your Powerfly 7 off road, assuming you ride on stone dust etc ?
I'll never go true off roading so that is not a concern. I'm guessing the Powerfly performs well on paved roads?

Also I truly enjoy the XM700+ stock swept back handle bars, but Trek no longer carries them or I'd install them on my Powerfly 7. Did you stick with the stock
bars on your Powerfly ? I'm not comfortable with true flat bar/ Mtn bars and will be changing to something with a sweep. I installed a Bodyfloat seat post
on my XM700 because it was waaay too stiff, the Bodyfloat is great and made the bike very ridable for me... Is the Powerfly stiff like the XM700 ?
I've purchased a second Bodyfloat and was planning on installing it on my Powerfly. Lastly, how do you like your Powerfly 7 on the road?

Thanks in advance,
John from CT

MarkElvis
1 day ago

Greg. Thanks for that info. I'll check and see what I use in PAS1. I know it isn't much. I tried setting the wheel size from 20 (correct size) to 18 and noticed a difference in pedaling effort. That is, using PAS 3 and wheel size 20 I was pedaling with no resistance, but PAS 3 and wheel size 18 I was getting some resistance. The speed displayed is based on the wheel size and the number of revolutions it counts, so the controller thought I was going slower. I then changed the wheel size to 24 and the pedal assist kicks in very quickly and I had basically zero pedal effort (and the speedometer had me going about 20% faster). This was all done on a flat stretch of road. I knew that setting a smaller wheel size would trick the controller/motor into powering faster than 20 mph, but I didn't think it would affect the pedal effort at the various PAS levels.

I am a tad nervous about any LBS messing with the rear wheel because I don't know if it could affect the internal gearing and motor, and thus had focused on the front gear. At any rate, if you get a higher gear AND lower your wheel size, then you should be passing those guys on their Rovers! And, the PAS levels should more evenly match your gearing so that you are contributing to forward momentum and not just idly spinning your pedals.

CoachDennisGreen
1 day ago

I was thinking about going with a 26x3 road tire to replace the stock tires. Roshan said I could add those to my Ultra rims. Thoughts?

TForan
1 day ago

My Ultra, that I've named Bessie, has arrived. Hope to have it on the road tomorrow. Rainy here today but clear the rest of the week!!!!!!!

Did you or anyone else have a problem threading the bolt for the fender brace into the bottom of the shock ?

signingof1
1 month ago

The engine is super loud...

Y Z
1 month ago

Anything you can tell me it would help, as I am selling my $5,000 Stump Jumper and buying an 'e' bike. I am stuck on the Giant or the Specialized has a 'e' mountain bike that resembles  the stump jumper. But the Specialized 'e' is $7,500. Please let me know what the higher end model of the Giant 'e' is, I would rather have the dual suspension. Does it come with different engine size offerings ? What is your max 'e' speed ? I am in NJ / NYC and there are laws that don't allow after a certain speed. What distance does one battery last ? Can you buy an extra battery ? charger ? I heard you should not bring the battery down below 20% remaining ? what is maximum 'e' assist speed ? Thanks for any info on yours..tim

Luis Calderon
1 month ago

rather you don't know how to shift gears, rather this bike is a piece of shit

All4Grogg
2 months ago

When he said aluminum fork...i though he made a mistake....he didn't. I had a road bike with an aluminum fork once, NEVER AGAIN. Steel is worth the weight over aluminum for forks, carbon is fantastic, aluminum will just beat you up.

Budwiser
2 months ago

Great vid , thanks. Here in England we are limited ( I believe) to a peddle assist of 15.5 mph! We are also limited to a maximum speed limit of 70mph on motorways driving a car or motorbike. My point is this , I can't buy a bike that goes over the 15.5 mph with the assist , but I can buy a car with 450bhp that can do zero to 60 in 3.5 seconds with a top speed of 150mph ! I just don't get it ! Does any body know if I can import one of your 28mph speed monsters ? :-)

Barry King
3 months ago

Great vid. Thanks! I'm getting one this week. It opens up new ground. Seems Yamaha & Bosch are pretty similar. I think Bosch may look a bit cooler, but also a bit higher pricetag. Both good. Giant is a great company, but I wish they would re-brand. The name just lacks in coolness, although this bike looks pretty slick.

hcw199
3 months ago

can u ride these without the assistance to review how they are when the battery dies... cheers

Richard Day
3 months ago

I love the colors they be colorful .

Bad Ass
3 months ago

How much does it weigh without the battery pack.

Donandnan Elmore
3 months ago

I've got a GIANT Quick-E+ and my gears don't "mash" as much as they did for Cort. I did my first "longer" ride the other day. I was putting down the flat at around 20mph and got smoked by some very good road bike riders. They were far enough ahead of me that they got through a light and I had to stop. About 5+ miles later I saw them again (I had thought they had turned off when I couldn't see them. We were all three on a long climb and I passed them both never to see them again and we went another 2 or so miles before I turned. As I passed the wife, who had pulled away from her husband, she said, "I need that!" to me.

Apolaudi
3 months ago

Great. It's my first ride on E Bike last week. And i find it exciting as my age is nearly 50yrs old and my kid is 11 and on jump bike and bmx. I can't keep up with him riding together as age is catching up. Now i got lots of choices from your video. lots of knowledge. Thanks.

Sorin Vasile Bogdan
3 months ago

Is every road cyclist out there a ''racer'? What happened to just commuting or going out by yourself?

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

I'm not sure if your'e referencing something I said in the review but you're correct, road bikes can be great for active commuting and solo rides... that's how I usually ride with them anyway. In the ebike space, there are lots of models without drop bars so I think when I see something like this it stands out and feels like a racer in a way :)

gabe arellano
4 months ago

how's the resistance when you're pedaling with the pedal assist off just normal without the system on is there a big resistance or can you pedal like a normal bike

KCFlyer2
4 months ago

I just bought one of these bikes because of a health issue. This bike is just what the doctor ordered. It's a damn good road bike even with the system turned off. It is on the heavy side, but I've ridden 100 miles the first week I owned it and I noticed on the Mapmyride app that the line that displays the speed and elevation, the blue (speed) line is essentially flat. I am using the same amount of effort and I have increased my average speed on 30+ mile rides from 12 to 18.2 mph - and that was in Eco mode.

As he says, it takes a little getting used to when shifting. You have to ease up on peddling to insure that all shifts are smooth. Doesn't take long to figure out.

The bike shop told me that I'd most likely never use more than Eco unless I wanted to show off. So far, they are right...although I did show off on one ride - in Normal mode, I was going uphill at 25 mph. I;m almost afraid to use Power mode. But I love that this bike feels like a regular bike - every so often you can feel the assist, but it usually feels like you are riding as usual....just going faster. Wonderful bike. Ride one once and you'll want one

Aaron ___
4 months ago

this one is sweet and the price is high but not outrageous.

Louie Lamoore
4 months ago

These e-bikes should flourish in America if there wasn't this one big red flag: most Americans won't fit on a bike.

Tow Hee
3 weeks ago

Riding a bike in most larger cities in the US will probably get you killed.

Karma King
4 months ago

One thing that is not "spectacular" is the glare on the display. Saw nothing

Noah C
4 months ago

Great review.

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 months ago

Thanks Noah! I do my best, appreciate the compliment :)

Karl Fonner
5 months ago

Are you sure those forks are aluminum most are steel

Christopher Railwah
5 months ago

That looked really fun. I'm moving to NYC and your reviews are definitely helping me out. I'm just looking to see which is is right for me