Giant Road-E+ Review

Giant Road E Plus 1 Electric Bike Review
Giant Road E Plus 1
Giant Road E Plus 1 Syncdrive Yamaha Motor 250 Watt
Giant Road E Plus 1 500 Watt Hour Battery Pack
Giant Road E Plus 1 Fixed Backlit Lcd Display
Giant Road E Plus 1 Taped Drop Bars Alloy Fork Ebike
Giant Road E Plus 1 Pr 2 Disc Alloy Rims Drop Bars
Giant Road E Plus 1 Contact Sl Neutral Sadal
Giant Road E Plus 1 Shimano 105 Front Derailleur Compact Double
Giant Road E Plus 1 Shimano Hydraulic Disc Brake Rotor 160 Mm
Giant Road E Plus 1 Shimano Ultegra 11 Speed Cogset
Giant Road E Plus 1 Motor Protector Plate
Giant Road E Plus 1 3 Amp Charger
Giant Road E Plus 1 Electric Bike Review
Giant Road E Plus 1
Giant Road E Plus 1 Syncdrive Yamaha Motor 250 Watt
Giant Road E Plus 1 500 Watt Hour Battery Pack
Giant Road E Plus 1 Fixed Backlit Lcd Display
Giant Road E Plus 1 Taped Drop Bars Alloy Fork Ebike
Giant Road E Plus 1 Pr 2 Disc Alloy Rims Drop Bars
Giant Road E Plus 1 Contact Sl Neutral Sadal
Giant Road E Plus 1 Shimano 105 Front Derailleur Compact Double
Giant Road E Plus 1 Shimano Hydraulic Disc Brake Rotor 160 Mm
Giant Road E Plus 1 Shimano Ultegra 11 Speed Cogset
Giant Road E Plus 1 Motor Protector Plate
Giant Road E Plus 1 3 Amp Charger

Summary

  • An aggressive road bike with 28 mph top electric-assisted speed, drop bars and sport saddle, you get Shimano Ultegra rear and 105 front derailleurs with 22 gear combinations to work with
  • Shimano hydraulic disc brakes offer powerful stops and tend to stay cleaner than rim brakes, all-Aluminum frame is lightweight and sturdy but doesn't absorb vibrations as well as Steel or Carbon fiber
  • Available in four frame sizes for better fit, sold through Giant dealers worldwide so you can get setup right and rely on knowledgeable technicians for tuneups and any warranty support
  • The Yamaha mid-drive system is relatively quiet but still very powerful, it doesn't provide as wide an RPM range so I find myself pedaling slower than I'd like at times, LCD display is not removable

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Giant

Model:

Road-E+

Price:

$4,000

Body Position:

Forward Aggressive

Suggested Use:

Urban, Road

Electric Bike Class:

Speed Pedalec (Class 3)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Year Comprehensive, Lifetime Frame

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

44 lbs (19.95 kg)

Battery Weight:

7.5 lbs (3.4 kg)

Motor Weight:

7.6 lbs (3.44 kg)

Frame Material:

ALUXX SL-Grade Aluminum

Frame Sizes:

17 in (43.18 cm)19 in (48.26 cm)21 in (53.34 cm)23 in (58.42 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

Medium: 19" Seat Tube, 21.5" Reach, 30" Stand Over Height, 69" Length

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

Matte Black with Blue and Neon Yellow Accents

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid ALUXX SL-Grade Aluminum, OverDrive, 9 mm Skewer with Bolts

Frame Rear Details:

9 mm Skewer with Bolts

Attachment Points:

Fender Eyelets, Rear Kickstand Mount, Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

22 Speed 2x11 Shimano Ultegra Rear Derailleur 11-32T, Shimano 105 Front Derailleur 34/50T

Shifter Details:

Shimano RS685 Paddles on Left and Right

Cranks:

Custom Forged, 170 mm Length

Pedals:

Wellgo M-20, Alloy Platform Cage

Headset:

Tapered 1-1/8" to 1-1/2"

Stem:

Giant Connect, Alloy, 90 mm Length, 8° Angle, Three 5 mm Stacks, One 10 mm Stack

Handlebar:

Giant Contact, Alloy Drop Bar, 31.8 Clamp Diameter, 17.5" Width

Brake Details:

Shimano RS785 Hydraulic Disc with 160 mm Rotors, Heat Sinc on Calipers, Shimano RS685 Levers

Grips:

Black Tape, Rubber Hoods

Saddle:

Giant Contact SL Neutral, SST Tubular Rails

Seat Post:

Giant Contact, Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

300 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

30.9 mm

Rims:

Giant PR-2 Disc Alloy, Double Wall, 28 Hole, Giant Performance Tracker Road Disc Hubs

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 14 Gauge, Black with Silver Nipples

Tire Brand:

Schwalbe Durano, 700 x 32 (28" x 1.25")

Wheel Sizes:

28 in (71.12cm)

Tire Details:

RaceGuard Dual Compound, 55 to 95 PSI

Tube Details:

Presta Valve

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, 1.8 lb 3 Amp Charger

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Giant SyncDrive by Yamaha

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Geared Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

250 watts

Motor Peak Output:

500 watts

Motor Torque:

80 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Giant EnergyPak

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

13.8 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

496.8 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

4.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

50 miles (80 km)

Estimated Max Range:

100 miles (161 km)

Display Type:

Giant, Fixed, Backlit, Monochrome LCD

Readouts:

Battery Info-Graphic, Battery Percentage, Speed, Assist Level (Off, Eco, Normal, Power), Cadence (RPM), Trip Time, Trip Distance, Average Speed, Max Speed, Odometer, Range,

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad on Right (On/Off, Up, Down, Light, i, Walk Mode), 5 Volt Micro USB Port on Left Side of Display

Drive Mode:

Advanced Pedal Assist (Wheel Speed, Pedal Torque, Pedal Cadence)

Top Speed:

28 mph (45 kph)

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Written Review

The Giant Road-E+ is a unique electric bike because it’s designed for performance. In the US, the ebike space has traditionally been dominated by commuter products with some cruisers sprinkled in for recreational riders that want to feel young and avoid overheating or struggling to keep up with friends and spouses. The Road-E+ by contrast is aggressive and sporty… Rather than limiting you to 20 mph like the majority of e-bikes, it delivers up to 28 mph assisted top speed making it a Class 3 product (not permissible on many trails and some paths in California and other states). This is an electric bike that fits perfectly on the shoulder of the road and can help you earn the respect of cars starting off the line and ascending hills. I was thrilled to give it a spin for this review because I love road bikes and know that Giant has a great reputation for quality at value price points. My takeaway is that it would ease some of the knee pain I experience on longer rides with lots of climbing, allow me to jump into more dynamic rides on the weekends even though I cannot train as frequently as my friend (and am thus in limited shap by comparison) and offer a good alternative to my non-electric road bike when my muscles need a break. Some of the challenges I experienced were the heavier footprint at ~44 lbs, stiffer all-Aluminum frame and limited motor RPM range. I have tested and reviewed other electric road bikes with drop bars and the Road-E+ is well priced by comparison but it’s still not cheap. At $4k you’re getting decent components (Shimano Ultegra and 105) with a 22 speed drivetrain (many others are 1×10 or 1×11) and I love that there’s a vast network of dealers selling and servicing them, helping to honor the two-year comprehensive warranty on offer.

Driving the bike is a 250 watt nominal, 500 watt peak mid drive motor from Yamaha. Those numbers aren’t as important as torque in my opinion and the SyncDrive offers 80 Newton meters… which is a lot. Bosch’s mid-drive, by comparison, offers 63 to 75 Nm and is not compatible with multiple front chainrings. The Yamaha motor is quiet and smooth but doesn’t quit spinning as quickly as Bosch. It measures the same wheel speed, pedal cadence and pedal torque signals and allows you to shift gears smoothly if you ease off a bit before pressing the paddles. I love how integrated the motor is at the bottom bracket, how nicely it fits into the purpose-built frame and that it keeps weight low and centered as opposed to a hub motor system (popular with lower-end ebikes). One of the biggest benefits you get from a mid-motor is normal wheels and hubs that are easier to service and remove for transport or flat fixes. In addition to some plastic and frame surrounds, the motor also has a skid plate on the bottom that’s designed to protect it. Notice that the chainrings hang down lower than the motor and would take damage before it would in most cases. The only big compromise I experienced with this drive system is a limited RPM output that requires frequent shifting to hit higher top speeds and sometimes leaves me wanting to spin faster before shifting. The problem with this scenario is that if I want to spin faster I end up doing it all on my own (and pushing more weight plus the normal wind and wheel friction). It’s difficult to raise the speed of the bike all by yourself and when the motor isn’t able to keep up you simply have to shift gears to go faster. For many people, the bike is simply amazing and works flawlessly but this is one area that I sometimes struggle with on the Yamaha motor compared with Bosch and it’s why I love that you can go to a shop and take a test ride before buying.

Powering the motor is a custom 36 volt 13.8 amp hour battery pack named “EnergyPak”. I’m not sure what brand of cells are being used here but I’d guess they are higher quality (Samsung or Panasonic). With nearly 500 watt hours of capacity, this is a larger than average battery that Should take you 50+ miles depending on the level of assist chosen… As with all speed-pedelecs, as you ride above 20 mph the efficiency and range of the bike really drops off due to wind resistance. For me, it’s a reasonable trade-off and an area that’s addressable with the included 3 Amp charger (faster than the average 2 Amp I see on many other ebikes) or the upgrade 4 Amp charger option. I did not see this optional fast charger so cannot comment on price or availability but it got me excited. Specialized offered a similar fast-charger option with their ebikes a couple years back and they tend to be larger and heavier. Again, the three amp charger seemed great and wasn’t too large. I do like that it has a metal plug, that the charge port on the battery case is covered well with a rubber flap and that the battery locks securely to the frame but can be charged on or off so you could top it off at the office perhaps or maybe while eating lunch in the mountains at the half-way point during a ride. The battery design is simply beautiful and I love how they sort of integrated it with the downtube so the bike doesn’t scream “I’m electric” like some others do. The one area that isn’t so great is handling the pack. There’s literally no handle or loop to grab onto. With replacement packs costing upwards of $800 this is not something you want to drop…

Operating the Giant Road-E+ is pretty easy. Just mount the charged battery (I love that it clicks in without the key being necessary) then press the power button on the control pad. The display comes to life showing a precise charge level infographic and there’s even a percentage readout AND dynamic range estimate. Depending on the level of assist you arrow up or down to, the range estimate will change. It’s great to have this kind of feedback at your fingertips vs. guessing so that you can plan your ride for maxiumum fun. On this note, please make sure you always check your tire pressure because as with traditional road bikes, the narrower tires here can get snake-bite punctures easily if you hit a curb or let the PSI drop too low. This is a heavier bike after all and unlike many other e-bikes, the tires are narrow. So anyway, the display offers three levels of assist to choose from and gives you access to trip stats like range, trip distance, speed and max speed. If you’re someone who likes to use Strava on your phone or use a Garmin device, you can do this easily with the Giant Road-E+ without having to run the juice down because there’s a little Micro-USB port on the left side of the display. One area of concern or question is where and how to mount your device given the already large LCD display. Also, the display is not removable so parking and storing the bike could present more opportunities for scratches which is a bummer. Consider putting a towel over… This and many other parts of the bike are smart and modular so if they are broken or lost, your Giant dealer should be able to help with a fix.

At the end of the day, there are only a few choices when it comes to electric road bikes and of course, you’d want a speed pedelec with drop bars. Beyond that, the four frame sizes, dealer network and beautiful integration seen here really impressed me. For $4k I feel like you get a lot of value and could have a blast with this bike. I love that in addition to bottle cage bosses, they added threaded eyelets and a mounting provision at the rear for a kickstand and some mounts for fenders. There’s no rack mount but this really isn’t a commuter setup… frankly, I’m not sure how well fenders would really work but the holes are there. Giant sells a wider range of electric assist bikes in Europe and it’s wonderful to finally see them in the US. This is a refined product, despite being “new” to this market and I could tell that they had ironed out a lot of the kinks and compromises that other systems had not when they first arrived. This thing uses a smart, reliable drive system that can work with you to achieve new types of rides and because it’s from a bigger more recognized brand, I feel like it might garner more respect as well (at least in the USA where ebikes are still catching on). Because the frame is all Aluminum (including the rigid fork), one thing I would consider is a seat post suspension from BodyFloat. Their systems tend to be highly responsive, offered in lighte-weight materials like Carbon fiber and Titanium and are adjustable to rider weight. You might also benefit from a suspension stem like the ShockStop.

Pros:

  • It’s rare to see electric road bikes with drop bars that are also speed pedelecs (28 mph top speed vs. 20 mph) and this one comes in four frame sizes which makes it accessible to a wider audience
  • Giant has a vast network of dealers and is a larger more reputable bicycle company than most, seeing a product like this (with the complexity of electric systems) feels more reliable
  • The Yamaha mid-drive system is one of the quietest and most responsive motors I’ve tested, while it does have a more limited RPM output (requiring more shifting to fully optimize) it works well and the torque sensor lets you shift without mashing just by easing off the pedals as you might with a non-electric bike
  • I love how integrated the battery pack looks but also that it’s fully removable (reducing overall weight by ~7.5 lbs), worth taking off when carrying on a car rack or doing service
  • Hydraulic disc brakes are the way to go with a heavier bike like this and should perform well if the road is wet or dirty as they tend to stay cleaner than rim brakes… they also stay out of the way when taking wheels off for quick service
  • The frame is completely purpose built, cables are internally routed and the battery and motor are streamline, I love that they managed to squeeze in bottle cage bosses despite the much larger downtube
  • You get 22 speeds on this ebike vs. just 10 or 11 on some of the other mid-drive system and the component groups (Ultegra and 105 from Shimano) are pretty good, this adds up to a more natural and wide range of pedal cadence options, in short, I believe it’s a compact double setup as you’d see on a non-electric bike
  • The battery charger puts out 3 Amps which is above average so you should get faster charge times, I like the rubber cover on the charge port near the base of the battery pack but would suggest being careful not to bump the cable with the left crank arm when it’s plugged in
  • The motor assist is highly adjustable so you can still get an excellent workout, for people with a hurt knee or leg, those with heart conditions or people who want to take a break between strenuous rides this would be an excellent platform and it lets others draft, great for a cycling coach or others looking to maximize availability without straining muscles too much
  • I like that the display panel has a Micro-USB port on the left side where you could charge a phone, run some lights or use other portable electronics for longer periods relying on the large main battery
  • In addition to range approximation (based on the power level chosen and remaining battery capacity) there’s a good battery info-graphic with battery percentage! Many ebikes just show a 5-bar graphic with 20% drops… Giant went above and beyond with percentage here and I think it’s useful
  • As someone with a crowded space and rented walls… I appreciate that there are threaded eyelets on the left chainstay for adding a kickstand!
  • The motor and battery weight are kept low and centered on the frame helping to optimize handling and even lifting if you have to carry the bike up stairs or mount it on a rack

Cons:

  • Yamaha is a large reputable company and their motor is compact, quiet and well integrated here but it doesn’t offer as wide an RPM as some other mid-drives like Bosch, this means you have to shift more actively to hit the top speed
  • Given the all-Aluminum frame and fork, there’s not a lot of foregiveness going over bumps (especially at high speed), people tend to ride ebikes further and at higher average speeds so I’d consider using a Thudbuster or BodyFloat suspension seat post (look for 30.9 mm diameter) and maybe even a suspension stem, perhaps future Road-E+ models will offer a Carbon fiber fork?
  • The display is easy to read and navigating the menus is intuitive but you can’t take the display off which means more sun damage and possible scratched when transporting the bike or parking it outside
  • The battery pack weighs 7.5 lbs and doesn’t have a handle or great ridge for securely gripping and carrying it… so be careful not to drop it! I like that it can be left on the frame to charge
  • While the motor is very responsive to your pedal torque, there is no built in shift-sensing protection system so you could mash your chain if you don’t shift consciously

Resources:

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Joe Bernard
1 month ago

Nice bike, but handling that battery is going to be an issue. Even with the handle on my Haibike’s battery, I’ve found that it’s easy to muck up the stick-on graphics. With the Giant battery you’re pretty much forced to grab it right where the decals are.

Court Rye
1 month ago

Good point Joe, I hadn’t thought as much about sticker placement and fingerprints, thanks for the feedback!

Hiruy
1 month ago

Hi Court, As always, another great review. I bought this bike in February as soon as they released it for sale in US. I use it for my daily commute to work and put on about 500 miles on it. I really love this bike. It has very impressive handling, amazing range and fun to ride. I am about 195 lbs with additional cargo of 10-15 lbs and am getting about 60 miles in a single charge even though my commute includes several hills with a couple of really steep ones. On my other 2015 Diamondback Trace EXC, I can only get about 20 miles in a single charge. The Road E+ have the same feel as riding a normal road bike so you will feel the road bumps. To help with the road bumps, I changed the factory saddle which is too firm for me with the Serfas Variant 2 which enables you to adjust the firmness of the saddle. I also like the fact that it does not cut-off the motor immediately. When I am ready to shift gears, I stop peddling momentarily and immediately shift gears so that the momentum of the motor before it cuts off is just enough to make the shifting very smooth then continue peddling. A couple of things you mentioned are different on my bike:

  1. The seat post my bike came with is a carbon fiber, but you indicated that it is aluminum on your review. The Giant website have it listed as “Giant Contact Composite 30.9 mm
  2. My charger plug to the battery pack is plastic, but you show a metal end
Court Rye
1 month ago

Interesting, thanks for sharing your feedback about the seat post and charger Hiruy! I enjoyed reading about your experience with range and comparisons to the Diamondback Trace. Sounds like you’re a seasoned electric cyclist at this point! Keep riding safe and thanks again for your positive feedback on the site :)

Joe Bernard
1 month ago

The Yamaha motor on my Haibike Sduro Trekking has that slight over-rev feature, too. FYI, I found that stopping pedaling was too disruptive to my rhythm, so I’ve gone back to the standard practice of slightly backing off pedal pressure for shifts. I suppose this could wear out my chain faster, but I’ll take the cost hit for it.

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Thomas Jaszewski
7 hours ago

I found this item Shipping from Thailand was reasonable, $4.9, item $9.90. The have a second version for road bike handlebars. $10.90. I tried to swing a group buy but could only get 10%. https://www.vincita.co.th/products/rc01-waterproof-handlebar-cover-for-mtb

1/1
JayVee
17 hours ago

I've been debating about the vado for six months. Now that it's available for order in USA I've been considering more because of battery issues and such. However, it is the only bike available near me that looks like a bike that doesn't have a battery slapped onto the down tube. I am 5 ft tall and other bikes with intergraded batteries are too big for me. I will be riding pavement half the time. The other 50 percent of the time will be dirt roads and light trails. I planned on removing the front fender cause I don't want rocks getting jammed between tire and said fender. Am I being silly? Should I wait even longer to see if their HT 29 is more appropriate for me? The levo 6 fatties seems too mountain bike for me. I really like the lights and rack too on the vado. Comments and suggestions welcome.

I would leave the looks aside and stick to functionality... If you really think there's a chance of a rock getting stuck in the front fender, then you've the chosen the wrong bike. Moreover, if it can get stuck in the front fender, nothing will stop it from getting stuck in the rear. I have a trekking type bike and occasionally do dirt trails (5-10% of the time). The shorter the distance the better because the front suspension isn't really designed for big bumps and the whole bike rattles and handles poorly. So, based on what you told us, I think you've chosen the wrong bike. Do some demos and (if possible) try them on your dirt trails. With 50% off-road riding you're a prime candidate for a mountain bike. The Vado is most likely not adapted to your terrain.

Cuajinais
19 hours ago

Ugh, when I hear or read things like "so far, so good," I cringe. Optimax nailed it - the savings of a cheap rack pale in comparison to your potential liability if it fails. Insurance shouldn't be expected to cover such recklessness, IMO.

FYI, Planet Cyclery sells the Saris Bones 2 for $130, but they don't list its weight capacity, they just say "two bikes." A visit to Saris' website, however, says "2 bikes, 35 lbs each."

This doesn't mean you can put one bike that weighs up to 70 lbs on it and assume it's good to go. The straps that hold the bike on the rack are probably not designed to sustain that much force bouncing up & down when you hit potholes etc., and even if you duct tape or rope it down, the concentration of all that weight on one section of the rack might cause it to buckle, eventually.

I got the Saris Freedom Superclamp 2, which is rated for 60 lbs per bike and lists at $430.* I also added two Curt Stabilizer straps for $9 each - they really do stabilize and help support all that weight! I now drive with the utmost confidence that, in the highly unlikely scenario of my ebikes bouncing off at highway speeds, USAA will "have my back."

* My brother and I found our Superclamp racks from two different websites - 6 months apart - for about $350 shipped. If you search and/or can wait a bit, you can probably find one on sale (eTrailer and Outside Outfitters currently show $430). His Subaru Legacy came with a hitch, but my Honda Fit required another $200 for a hitch, installed. Well worth it!
No need to cringe. The bike without the battery is about 45 lbs. Any engineering student that has successfully completed her 3rd semester can tell you about vector forces and bending moments. Of particular interest to some posters here would be how much bending moment a load of 35 lbs. acting on the furtherst rack position imparts on the pivot, vs. a load 45 lbs in the position nearest the pivot. I will not spoil the answer. I will spoil however, that the odds of your insurance company covering the claim on your bike-on-the-highway accident don't look so good. Is "bike rack accident" even an option when buying insurance? I guess maybe in an umbrella policy? I'd like know which type of insurance covers this.

Anyway I'm an engineer, not an insurance claims agent, but all anecdotal evidence I've heard point towards insurance companies looking for the simplest excuse to deny a claim. If someone can dig up statistics for claims on bike rack accidents, now that would be some very useful information to add to this thread.

For the sake of argument, suppose this type of insurance exists; (it very well may but I would like a to see a link). In this case, we don't know the % of successful claims on bike rack accidents, but I reckon that in case of an accident, the insurance claims agent will want to evaluate that the "safe bet" hitch rack was used per instructions. So here is a sampling of the user manual for the hitch-mounted Saris Freedom Superclamp 2, which is rated for 60 lbs per bike and lists at $430.
Hope you never exceeded 70 mph on the highway/replaced the strap on the first sign of wear/tightened the straps regularly during the journey/ etc. etc./

Yeah good luck with your claim...

All requirements for compatability/fit as stated in the current Saris vehicle/carrier compatability

guide must be followed. (Available at any Saris dealer or www.saris.com). If your vehicle is not listed or you have any questions, please call our customer service at 800-783-7257 or visit www.saris.com.

Read and follow instructions carefully. Save owner’s manual for future reference or parts information. Ensure that any other users of the bicycle carrier are familiar with their content.

It’s the end users responsibility to ensure that use of this product meets all local and state laws.

When cleaning vehicle and rack, use only water soluble cleaners. Do not take rack through car
wash.

Make sure bike tires are not directly behind exhaust pipe.

Do not mount to any type of trailer, towed vehicle, or RV.

Prior to usage on the road, remove all loose parts from bicycle, including (but not limited to) child
seat, basket, lock, light, pump, etc.

This carrier is not recommended for off-road use or for use at speed exceeding 70 mph (113 km/h).

The handling characteristics of a vehicle will change when a rear bicycles carrier is fitted and
especially when it is loaded (in particular crosswind sensitivity, handling on bends and braking). Driving techniques should be altered to allow for these changes, reduce speed, especially on bends and allowing for longer braking distances.

The vehicle’s total length increases when the bike carrier is attached. The bikes themselves may increase the vehicle’s total width and height. Take care when reversing and/or entering garages or ferries, etc.

Remove carrier from vehicle when not in use.

This carrier is constructed to carry standard-bike-frames. It is not intended for use with tandem or
recumbent bicycles.

Replace any mounting strap at the first sign of wear. Replacement parts are available through your
local Saris dealer or call 1-800-783-7257.

Tighten straps regularly during the journey.

Vehicle should be in good condition in the area at which the hitch is located.

Do not exceed maximum load capacity of carrier (120 lbs max or 60 lbs max per bike!) Secure
properly and adjust for even load distribution, loading the heaviest/biggest bike first and closest to
the vehicle.

Saris absolves itself of responsibility for any personal injuries or consequential damage to property
or wealth caused by incorrect fitting or use.

Warning and Disclaimer:
This carrier has been designed to carry bicycles on specific vehicles. Before installation, user must read and follow current Saris Fit Guide (available through Saris dealer) recommendations and enclosed instructions. Fit recommendations are based on vehicle’s standard features; optional features may affect the fit recommendations. User must attach carrier correctly to the vehicle, check its attachment before each use, and inspect carrier parts for wear. Carrier’s attachment to the vehicle is critical and beyond the control of the manufacturer. Manufacturer and seller expressly disclaim any and all liability for personal injury, property damage or loss, whether direct, indirect, or incidental, resulting from the incorrect attachment, improper use, inadequate maintenance, or neglect of this carrier.

GingerBeardMan
1 day ago

I was able to upgrade my front LED light with new components and still utilize the ability to turn it on and off with the native buttons/display. Requires some basic soldering wiring stripping skills but that's it really

Here are the parts I used:

- 10w LED chip (purchased from this seller) - http://www.ebay.com/itm/10pcs-10W-LED-Chip-White-SMD-for-Light-Bulb-Lamp-or-Project-US-Stock-10-pieces-/262940436884
- Adjustable power supply (also purchased from this seller) - http://www.ebay.com/itm/10X-Re-DC-DC-3A-Buck-Converter-Adjustable-Step-Down-Power-Supply-Module-LM2596S-/222245520202?hash=item33bedd834a:g:UZsAAOSwknJX05VB

Found a DIY page to confirm what parts I needed then didn't refer back to it after I got the parts so I don't remember which site I used

Now do note I used an older metal bike lamp that I found at a local bike shop selling used parts. This LED GETS HOT! I dialed it down since I don't have a proper heatsink to mount on the back of the LED for now but still is a HUGE upgrade. I was okay if I messed up because it was cheap for 10 pcs per part.

So far not noticing any dropping of battery life or anything strange. I was riding home once from the grocery store and it got really dark by the time I was heading home. The stock LED front lamp did nothing for visibility. I live in Michigan so pot holes are plenty through every road that hasn't been newly added that year. On roads or trails that are not well lit at night the stock light is not suitable for so I went out to find a solution that would work and be stronger than the previous while still being able to turn it on from the "handlebar dash" buttons or whatever you call them.

Mark Peralta
1 day ago

Vado all-weather full fenders.
This new Vado has an extended front fender close to the ground although it doesn't look like it has a flexible lower lip. I knew that the front fender has to extend all the way down in order the protect the mid drive from road splash and dirt. More especially if you have the low lying Bafang BBS. The modifications I did to my fender effectively kept my BBS and my shoes splash free and dirt free. However, when I carry my ebike through stairs the lower lip actually touches the steps, good thing it's made up of flexible rubber.

Addendum:
I take that back. After reviewing the video, there is actually a flexible rubber mud flap that is flush mounted to the fender. Sweet!

1/1
shivas
2 days ago

My biktrix stunner has throttle. There are certain stretches of road I ride with no bike lane and miserably rough shoulder. When I get to those areas I check for traffic and use every means at my disposal to get through those stretches as fast as possible to minimize encountering traffic. The throttle helps in those areas.

eagamer80
2 days ago

I do the same as the other guys: just keep the disks as clean as possible (I keep a towell in my backpack) and use the regen when going steeply downhill. This works. But I agree with you that is annoying that the breaks have to be maintained so often to avoid this. When the road is wet, the noise is tremendous. Is impossible to solve it on the road. The good thing is that you don't need the bell anymore.

fxr3
2 days ago

It's impossible to make any reasonable argument against a throttle.
"If you need a throttle, get a motorbike". Huh
"If you need a motor, get a motorbike". Yea
"I'm really interested in understanding this perspective"
I think he said he likes longer rides, but feels he deserves a break in the last couple miles and throttle it home.
How bout " if you need 300% help, instead of double, you should get a moped, motorcycle or car".
Some of us admit we are enjoying all the shortcuts, advantages of regular bikes, getting some exercise, taking a car off the road while doing our errands, and having fun. A throttle can only improveou all those things, with no negatives. Period.
Save to assume mfgs tried to stay away from throttles to maintain ability to ride the bike lanes, and take advantage of perks a regular bike enjoys. As my health deteriorates(heart failure), I find myself taking the 20mph st1 with jailbroken 20mph boost button, instead of 28mph st2. And it doesn't take much energy or pedaling to maintain mid 20's on st2, yet for me, sometimes I just don't have the juice. You would have to pay close attention to me riding to recognize I'm throttling more pedaling less though, just because of stupid pride- I guess.
Liability wise- mfg or dealer- arguing pedaling vs.throttle is safer is tough. Pedaling at 75rpm has to reduce your attention more than holding a throttle on.
And motor damage caused by throttling in wrong gear is remote- how many motorcycle or cars do you hear of being damaged by trying to take off in too high of a gear or trying to reach freeway speeds in first gear? Not many.
I dig ebikes, but dealers and forum members(that I personally respect and admire) that argue against a throttle makes no sense to me at all. A throttle just gives rider another option- what could be wrong with that?

Vass M
2 days ago

Turning a Haibike Trekker into a road weapon. Custom Carbon wheels with Hope hubs and brakes, Enve carbon fork, bars and stem, Dura Ace carbon pedals and 105 levers for 11 speed shifting. Not a cheap build but hitting 50kph in a group ride is a pretty darn satisfying. Getting good mileage from the battery running Gator Skins 32mm road tyres. Current buidl weight 17.3kg and can still shave weight with seat-post change

1/1
tinynja98
2 days ago

Hello,

I'm thinking about making my own electric bicycle, which would be able to go around 50+ kph. I have it almost all planned out, I want to make a homemade electric bike, not just buy a ready to install kit. Looking at the cost of such a project, its right around 1000+$...

I was wondering what you guys use your electric bikes for? Do you only go out with an electric bike to have fun or do you actually use it as a mean of transportation replacing, for example, a car? More specifically, it's all great when you're on the road with an electric bike, but what do you actually do with your electric bicycle once you arrive at your destination? Do you simply leave it there, attached to a pole, knowing that you could lose (get stolen) 1000$ of equipment in a single day? This got me questionning my decision of building an expensive electric bicycle.

EDIT: I think it should be taken in consideration that I will probably not be able to secure the electric components to the bicycle as good as a company would do it to prevent theft...

My idea was to build an electric bicycle instead of buying a car, because it would cost way too much for me, knowing that I don't actually NEED a car, since I'm currently using public transport (Bus, Subway) and it's going somewhat great. So, of course this would make a very fun toy to play with, but would you use it often as a mean of transportation?

For what it's worth, I live close to Montreal, if anyone has experience with biking in this city?

Thanks in advance for your feedback!

Mark Peralta
1 day ago

I knew that the front fender has to extend all the way down in order the protect the mid drive from road splash and dirt. More especially if you have the low lying Bafang BBS. The modifications I did to my fender effectively kept my BBS and my shoes splash free and dirt free. This new Vado also has an extended fender although it doesn't have the flexible lower lip. When I carry my ebike through stairs the lower lip actually touches the steps, good thing it's made up of rubber.

Addendum:
I take that back. After reviewing the video, there is actually a flexible rubber mud flap that is flush mounted to the fender. Sweet!

1/1
Dunbar
2 days ago

How about this little experiment for everyone other than Duncan? Go ride your e-bike. You'll probably need the lowest pedal assist setting to make this work without going too fast. Get your cadence up to 70-90. This should provide fairly easy, low resistance pedaling. Get your heart rate up to 70% of your maximum sustained rate and hold it there for 15 minutes. Are you sweating? Bring plenty of water and enjoy the endorphins.

I have plenty of experience riding my road bikes in cool winter conditions (such as they are in California) and warm summer months. I sweat far less in the cool winter months than I do in the warm summer months even despite the fact that I wear more clothing in the winter. As you might expect, I also drink much less water on the same length rides in the winter. Here's the kicker, I ride with power meters so I can dial in exactly the same power (say 200 watts) and tell you with absolute certainty that I'll sweat more when it's 85 degrees out than when it's 55 degrees out. I don't even know why you are arguing this basic fact at this point.

Marceltt
2 days ago

For myself with bad knees and a back surgery my ridge rider gets me back out cycling. I use mostly number 2-3 pas but when my knees need a break I do use my throttle or going up bigger hills. To me there's no price tag for the freedom I get back with a throttle. I don't do single track racing or bother cyclist that want just regular bikes on these paths. I'm just happy to go cruzing along the road or paved bike paths. No throttle bike haters needed.

Drumulac
3 days ago

Hey, you can post your full review within this thread if you want, but if you want to start your own I understand:) Your story was very funny, I would have been so upset to see a pannier missing! I lock the panniers onto my rack with a small Abus chain. I am glad you found yours! I recently lost a full set of keys for my bike, the whole key ring gone! Lost the battery and abus lock keys, as well as the 2 keys to my car roof rack for the Yakima and Rockymounts.... Thank god I had a spare of everything, but I have no idea where they went! I usually leave my keys in my Abus Granit city chain which I then bungee onto the rack using the bungees that came with it. They key stays in the locking core well, if you turn it so that it can't be pulled out out, you really have almost no chance of losing it. If you've had that chain youll know what I mean, it really stays in there well. I have no idea where it went!

I had a similar situation with a slow leak where I had to stop and pump every mile, it sucked! One thing you can always count on are fellow cyclists to help out, I've had some guys go wayyyy above and beyond in helping me once or twice on the side of the road. Of course you had to ride your whole route just to find your bag a block away, but at least you found it!! I would be so upset if I lost a great product I couldnt replace. I use the huge Ortleib panniers.

By shorter for the Delite rack, do you mean from saddle to tail? Or from the top of the rack to the bottom by the dropouts? I have never had any other bike with a rack, but I do notice that my Ortleibs have a hard time attaching the bottom swing bolt to clamp onto the rack from the bottom. It seems like the rack arms are in the worst place for attaching that bottom support piece. I kind of forced one on there which eventually led to it flying off my pannier. I keep a lot of tools in those bags and used to keep my 10lb abus chain in there but it would cause the panniers to bump the tire and spokes in rough riding. Now I just roll the chain up and use the bungees to hold it onto the rack which works fine, I have nothing on top of the rack anyway. For my girlfriends bike, we bought the 60L Ortleib Duffle RG. She wanted something she could wheel around so I guess we will just bungee the hell out of it to her Charger rack lol

I'll definitely post my review of the Rohloff GX in this forum Matt as soon as I get some time to do so (Grrrrr. . .). Regarding the rack dimensions vis-à-vis the panniers - the R&M rack is shorter from top to bottom (vertically). I, too, find the bottom support piece of the rack to be oddly setup. I'm sure there is a reason for it being that way and there must be some standard they are following, but it is definitely not compatible with panniers I've owned. But, I'm doing a workaround that will take care of the issue.

One more humorous "lost pannier" story: My wife and I were doing a three week self contained trip in Alaska back in 1995. We had just started out, having flown into Anchorage. First day, we ride to Whittier to catch the ferry to Valdez. I forget the name of the state park we camped in, but right after setting up the tent and getting settled in, a ranger comes by to warn us that there was high Grizzly activity in the area and told us to be sure to clean up well, hang a bag with our food & utensils away from the site, etc. We used to keep our portable kitchen kit and cook stove in one of my wife's front panniers. When camping,we would use a length of zip cord, attach it to a tall overhanging limb, and then hoist up the food pannier 10 feet or so above the ground to keep it from the wild critters. Having celebrated the beginning of our trip with maybe a bit too much JD, I got lazy before turning in and didn't do a great job of hanging the pannier, though it was a considerable distance from our site. Upon waking in the morning, the pannier was missing . . . directly underneath it were very fresh Grizzly tracks! We looked around (very carefully), but never found the pannier. My wife spent the rest of the trip with a sleeping back bungeed to the front rack where the pannier should have been. Visions of mama, papa & baby bear sitting around the den using the spices and utensils to dine on their latest victim. When we got back home, I contacted my LBS who had sold us the panniers to order a new set. Turns out that the folks at Cannondale were so amused by the bear story that they sent on a new pair at no cost.

Bluenotgreen
3 days ago

Lots for me to think about folks, thank you. My intention was to give the bike a good workout during a holiday next month. However, a very recent minor hospital procedure means that I should not ride off-road for the next six weeks or so. The best laid plans etc! I will be back with comments later.

Chris Nolte
4 days ago

I don't use the throttle much on my Emotion Evo City. If I were 20 years younger, I wouldn't even consider a throttle (or ebike) since I was doing century rides on my road bike. 10 years ago, I had to give up my road and mountain bikes, but got a new lease on riding with a recumbent. I still use the recumbent but realize its time for the next bike phase, ebiking. I still have a competitive spirit and like those long rides, but sometimes get to the point where I feel I've earned the right to use the throttle and rest my weary legs for those last few miles home. I use a throttle only as a safety measure for those rare instances outlined in this thread but can see where some riders feel it is unnecessary just as some feel ebikes are the devil. I hope to be posting many years from now about my experiences on a throttled tricycle!
Have you ridden a bike with a Bosch motor? I ask because the pedal assist is quite a bit more refined and predictable. I wonder if you would feel the same on a bike with that system. I know with the Easy Motion bikes you often have to feather the brake to stop the bike from taking off on you. Easy Motion bikes require a brake cut off switch, whereas the Bosch system does not. The motors sensors are advanced enough that it's not necessary. I don't mean to criticize. I'm really interested in understanding this perspective since it comes up often.

Ravi Kempaiah
4 days ago

I have a friend who has purchased 10 E-bikes in the last 1 year [ He is a dental surgeon and can afford it]. He owns a Stromer ST2, few different Haibikes with Bosch CX and Yamaha systems, recently got a Brose system BULLS.
May it's his age but he prefers a bike with PAS and throttle. He is getting fitter everyday and feels like he throttle can be useful in certain conditions.

Especially on a mid-drive, shifting is very important and not everyone likes to do that. For many, they are out to enjoy a nice ride and get some exercise. There is reason why manufacturers are trying to introduce systems like Nuvinci, H-sync Nuvinci etc. It makes it easier on the cognitive level and mechanically as well.

Traditional bike shops have this snobbish attitude that E-bikes are cheating and certain extension of that can be seen within E-bike community, PAS vs Throttle!
If you go on MTBR or road biking forums, you will see this ... "if you need a motor, get a moped. Leave my trail alone...MTB is for people who can bike and earn their downhill...etc" kind of attitude..
Whether throttle or hub drive or mid-drive, anything that gets people enjoy a ride is good.

romagjack
4 days ago

I don't use the throttle much on my Emotion Evo City. If I were 20 years younger, I wouldn't even consider a throttle (or ebike) since I was doing century rides on my road bike. 10 years ago, I had to give up my road and mountain bikes, but got a new lease on riding with a recumbent. I still use the recumbent but realize its time for the next bike phase, ebiking. I still have a competitive spirit and like those long rides, but sometimes get to the point where I feel I've earned the right to use the throttle and rest my weary legs for those last few miles home. I use a throttle only as a safety measure for those rare instances outlined in this thread but can see where some riders feel it is unnecessary just as some feel ebikes are the devil. I hope to be posting many years from now about my experiences on a throttled tricycle!

Ann M.
4 days ago

@hualalai, take a look at the Schwalbe Big Ben Plus. These Schwalbe tires are specifically designed for ebikes; they cost a bit more; however, they do have extra tread and protection along the middle of the tread to help prevent wear from the motor stress and junk in the road. They've got a comfy feel like other balloon tires have and will wear well.

america94
4 days ago

Rode 35 km today on the new Maxxis tires - Automatic Grin Generator for sure! Man those tires are so smooth and quiet, grippy and steady, a dream come true on pavement! The improved rolling resistance compared to the Kenda's is insane. I went down some hills I took often with the Kendas and the bike kept going on it's own momentum for soooooo much longer, just incredible. I could not resist some packed off road tracks here and there, and going into some mud... the Maxxis did super well. They gripped where I was sure they would slip. I guess the decent width helps even though they are smooth.

I was a bit frustrated at the thought of spending the entire summer with the Maxxis on, but now I am very content to leave them on the bike for several months. I also might buy an extra wheel, install a Kenda on it permanently for the front and just have to deal with the rear tire change in the future. From what I saw, the wheels are pretty inexpensive.

Polycarp
4 days ago

I am 6'4", about 235lbs. I've put about 250 miles on my ST2S commuting to work. I ride paved roads and bike lanes all the way. Some paths I have options to take nicely groomed gravel paths that have some embedded rocks about the size of half a kiwi. I tried it once. Learned my lesson. It's way too rough. I ride with padded mountain bike shorts. I've also got a BodyFloat (which is amazing), and even replaced the Fizik saddle with something with gel. Even with all of these "buffers", the time on the gravel paths I have experienced are too strongly felt on the behind and back. For me, riding the ST2S on such reasonably groomed off-road conditions is not worth the discomfort. This is just my experience. YMMV. Alternatively, the ST2 with fatter tires may be better suited for more off-road riding as you describe.

Nutella
5 days ago

Variable psi is a good point. Finding the sweet spot for any specific tire for me can be just a few psi on a mtb tire and +/- 5 or so for me on the road. I'm kind of a nerd that way.

Matt A
5 days ago

Yes Matt, got the bike two weeks ago. Chris Nolte was kind enough to have someone personally deliver it on a Sunday. Can't say enough about Chris . . . great guy, knowledgeable, responsive, caring.

Like you, my delayed response to your last post is due to the email notifications mysteriously going missing, but no biggie - I've also been super busy, so haven't even looked at the forum since getting the Delite.

I'll give a full narrative of my first impressions in a separate posting, hopefully within the next day or so. For now, suffice it to say that it is pretty much all as advertised: exceptional quality/engineering, lots of fun. Due to inclement weather and commitments that required my truck, I didn't get to ride it more than 10 miles the first week, but have been making up for it with 140 miles over last week commuting to work + doing a lot of "dead head" miles over this past weekend.

Quick "feel good" story for now: I took it out early yesterday (Easter Sunday) for a 35 mile ride on some of my favorite local roads. On the way back & approximately 6 miles from home, I have a flat in the rear. Not a big deal, since I always carry pump, toolkit, and spare tube. Since I am still setting up the bike and haven't found a good on-frame mounting point for the pump, plus the tool kit isn't mounted on the seat yet due to my still fooling around with seat position settings, I have been keeping all that emergency repair stuff in my right pannier. So, I go to get the pump, etc., out of the pannier and . . . the pannier is missing! Since my wife isn't driving yet (recovering from neurosurgery) and I didn't want to bother friends/family on an Easter Sunday morning, I figured I'd just bite the bullet and started to push the bike the rest of the way home (glad Chris told me how to operate the push assist function - some pretty substantial hills on the route). Anyway, I go maybe one mile and a couple on a tandem stops and offers to pump up the tire. I figured "what the heck, let's see what happens" and the tire did take the air - slow leak. I jump back on the bike, go maybe 1/2 mile and it is flat again. Push another 2.5 miles and woman on another bike stops and offers her pump. This time I really crank the pressure up, thank her profusely, and ride as fast as possible to put more miles on before the tire flattened. Actually got most of the way home. I get home, hop in my truck, and retrace the entire 35 miles in hopes of finding my lost pannier + contents. Didn't see it the whole route until . . . I get one block away from my house and there it is, propped up against a hydrant. Contents untouched. Actually, the pannier is an Arkel Expedition, one of the originals custom made when they were just getting into biz and not cheap, so it would have been sorely missed. Anyway, through pure luck and a string of good Samaritans, all turned out well! The "trail angels" were definitely looking out for me.

The Delite rack is shorter (top to bottom) than the standard after market bolt-on racks I've had in the past, so even though I had done some adjustments, I guess the panniers were still not quite tight enough; also, the thicker diameter of the rack top tube negated the use of the pannier lock mechanism. Will have to figure that out since buying new panniers is not an option right now. Will also be sure to frame mount the pump and make sure the toolkit is mounted on the seat rails, not thrown in the pannier.

As mentioned, I'll post my initial impressions soon.
Hey, you can post your full review within this thread if you want, but if you want to start your own I understand:) Your story was very funny, I would have been so upset to see a pannier missing! I lock the panniers onto my rack with a small Abus chain. I am glad you found yours! I recently lost a full set of keys for my bike, the whole key ring gone! Lost the battery and abus lock keys, as well as the 2 keys to my car roof rack for the Yakima and Rockymounts.... Thank god I had a spare of everything, but I have no idea where they went! I usually leave my keys in my Abus Granit city chain which I then bungee onto the rack using the bungees that came with it. They key stays in the locking core well, if you turn it so that it can't be pulled out out, you really have almost no chance of losing it. If you've had that chain youll know what I mean, it really stays in there well. I have no idea where it went!

I had a similar situation with a slow leak where I had to stop and pump every mile, it sucked! One thing you can always count on are fellow cyclists to help out, I've had some guys go wayyyy above and beyond in helping me once or twice on the side of the road. Of course you had to ride your whole route just to find your bag a block away, but at least you found it!! I would be so upset if I lost a great product I couldnt replace. I use the huge Ortleib panniers.

By shorter for the Delite rack, do you mean from saddle to tail? Or from the top of the rack to the bottom by the dropouts? I have never had any other bike with a rack, but I do notice that my Ortleibs have a hard time attaching the bottom swing bolt to clamp onto the rack from the bottom. It seems like the rack arms are in the worst place for attaching that bottom support piece. I kind of forced one on there which eventually led to it flying off my pannier. I keep a lot of tools in those bags and used to keep my 10lb abus chain in there but it would cause the panniers to bump the tire and spokes in rough riding. Now I just roll the chain up and use the bungees to hold it onto the rack which works fine, I have nothing on top of the rack anyway. For my girlfriends bike, we bought the 60L Ortleib Duffle RG. She wanted something she could wheel around so I guess we will just bungee the hell out of it to her Charger rack lol

Matt A
5 days ago

Wow this is intriguing. When you say the shop fixed it was that Propel? Or did you take it somewhere else? Did they give you a full explanation? I'm very curious as to what the problem was, what caused it to occur and how it was fixed. Any more info you have would be greatly appreciated. I haven't had any trouble with my Nuvinci yet but I'm only at 500 miles. I asked my LBS if they had ever worked on them. The mechanic told me he had successfully repaired the mechanical Nuvinci without too much trouble but had an electronic/automatic Nuvinci that was a major pain in the rear. And with that he said the Fallbrook Technologies was really hard to work with. Just one mechanic's feedback.

Regarding the speed: I'm still glad I got the 28mph version but I have learned that I could have lived with the 20mph bike for commuting. My commute has so much start/stop that I rarely find myself over 20mph. The other day I hit 27mph but it was for only a very short stretch. When I do have open road, I find myself usually cruising right around 20mph in Tour mode. I find myself wondering whether the higher torque but lower speed Bosch motor would have been a better choice for my commuter bike just in terms of efficiency and battery range. The HS Charger is a blast to ride so no regrets at all so I was just referring to what the most "efficient" choice would have been. Over my last few commutes, I've averaged about 2 hours and 10 to 20 minutes for the 35-36 miles or about 15+mph. I'd say I have a few sections where I can get the speed up and cruise but for the most part it is start/stop commuting.
I will certainly get some more information on what went wrong with the NuVinci. I had it fixed at Propel and spent the day in Brooklyn with family so when I picked up the bike I was very tired. I asked about what was wrong and everything but I will ask again in a way that will allow me to explain it to you. Initially I went to Firth & Wilson in Philly and he re-aligned the gear range rings of the Nuvinci which were out of alignment. For some reason, this actually made it worse and instead of spinning like a clown at 24mph i was doing it at 20mph. That guy told me the Nuvinci had to be reset internally but he didnt have time to do it. I had propel fix it so I will ask when I go there in a week or so to pick up my girlfriends bike, she got the same as you I believe. Charger GT Nuvinci HS in matte black, but she got dual battery as well. Can never have too much lithium!

It works great now at least! I am almost at 1000 miles now, but I ride the bike really really hard sometimes. Since my Nuvinci was messed up I was discouraged from working since speed helps me make more money, so I took it up and down some rough terrain and in the city at night was jumping off all of the driveway curbs like I did when I was a kid, only this time I was going 20+ mph. It was so much fun, the bike really can take a beating but I am not sure why this Nuvinci thing happened to me. I was thinking about the electronic Harmony Nuvinci one day, but Kyle at propel told me it isnt smooth and feels glitchy. My only motivation for it was the fact that my cables were frayed multiple times for seemingly no reason. The 2nd time it happened it was from over tightening the cable into the metal piece at the end.

I drive through Center City Philadelphia constantly, but I ride quickly and pedal hard/fast so I end up hitting over 20mph even if I am stopping and starting 1 block at a time. I just like the ability to travel at a speed that cars behind me really cant complain when there is only one lane or the million other situations that require riding in the car lane. Honestly, I mostly travel in the middle of the car lane because I jump red lights, only yield at stop signs, and don't want to get doored. Cars never complain, it usually only takes a couple seconds off the line to hit 15-20mph, I can be at 25+ by half a block when actually putting in real effort.

I don't think efficiency is changed much between motors, just depends more on how you ride I guess. Really I think the dual battery gives more than double the range of a single battery. I took a test ride one night in all Turbo to see how far I could go. Mind you, I was riding in all Turbo, with about a 225lb load on the bike between me and all my tools, water, supplies, and my 10lb Abus chain. I went 52 miles before the range said 1 mile left, I didnt run it to dead but stopped when the range said 1 mile. Also, I have the Supernova M99 Pro, and used it on high beam for most of the ride but pointed down because my tail light only turns on right now if I turn the high beam on the light. Remedying that with the M99 tail light. Anyway, with all that weight, electronic usage (including phone charging), and I frequently travel 25+, and also this was all in busy city stop/start riding, I amazingly went over 50 miles!

With regards to your speed, it sounds like you go faster than you think! At 2 hours and 20 minutes for 36 miles, thats an average of about 15mph if you never stop and just do 15 the entire time. With all the stopping and starting you are doing you must be going faster :)

I ordered a Nyon a while back and it took 4 weeks for German Customs to just cancel it and send it back. I tried again using Ebay this time for an extra $100 compared to the bike-discount.de price, and in just 4 days since shipment its already just a couple towns away! The guy shipped it the day after I ordered, and it went through the exact same German facility. With the Nyon I will have a ton more stats to help decipher where the wattage really goes! After I get that, my final 'upgrade' will be the Sherlock bike tracker when it ships in a few weeks. I am very excited to have the Nyon though, I feel like for a $7000 bike, it should have more than the Intuvia. The Intuvia is great, but minimalist. The Nyon is feature rich, but most likely still has some glitches. I just feel like it really completed the whole feel of having spent car money on a bike if the bike has a serious headlight, and a serious smart computer with GPS. Other than that everything has been great on the bike, the only thing I ever get jealous of is the suspension setup and fenders on the Moustache Starckbike, even though the bike as a whole is something I'd never choose.

P.S. The day after I did that 52 miles all turbo test, I had charged the bike fully and it showed a crazy 154 mile range in Eco.

Oh I forgot one thing to mention but then I remembered you have only 1 battery. Charging on the bike is weird, no matter how much I charge it, my Range in Turbo will only go up to like 38-40. When I charge the batteries separately off the bike using 2 chargers, it will then show me a 5-54 mile range estimate. However, when I begin a ride 'fully' charged but only showing 38 miles of range, I can go 20 miles and the range will still say 30. Really weird, can't figure out why! At first I thought the batteries were only charging to 80% on the bike, but now I'm see the range is just inaccurate, can't imagine why....

John Swanson
3 days ago

Court your reviews are excellent. Any older cyclist, any rider wanting their spouse to cycle along with them, anyone over 50 considering a new road or touring bike needs to consider the Giant Road-E+. After following e-bikes for a few years and waiting for a road/touring bike to come along, and after seeing your review of this bike we went out and bought (2) of them. Let me say up front, “Giant got it right the first time!” This bike has exceeded my expectation 100-fold! It pedals and rolls so well without using the e-assist it is a joy to ride; a very stable bike. The folks at our local Giant e-bike dealer, Midwest Cyclery, were very patient and helpful to get us fit and setup on the bikes. The Giant Road-E+ has put a smile on our faces and joy in riding!

Castaway
1 week ago

Why don't you stop peddling when you shift so you don't mash?

ziasong
2 weeks ago

It's nice to be able to speak after 28 mph sprint.

melonbarmonster
3 weeks ago

$4k

F r e e l e e
4 weeks ago

I see the Yamaha motor is more powerful than Bosch motor and cheaper also.

PETER DAVID david
1 month ago

thanks you finally did the test on the bike i want to buy

Alex Davis
1 month ago

Strange comment about RPM thats the 2017 motor which spins at a max 120 RPM up from 86 RPM 2016 model.the motor is more powerful than the top of the range Bosch motor.
I have this bike and have "hacked it for one Euro" see how on You Tube the bikes top speed on the flat with no wind is about 33.5 mph and I am Mr average on a road bike. Yamaha invented the mid drive motor which all the others including Bosch copy.

F r e e l e e
1 month ago

A well written report Alex.

John Swanson
1 month ago

This review is absolutely outstanding considering this is the only real way to compare these bikes since they are so new. Thanks, and thanks also for the accessories on your website. I want one of these; now to find a dealer . . .

mike kearsley
1 month ago

Great Vid, Thanks, always learn a lot from your vids.

R D
1 month ago

👍🏻🇨🇦

sam cam
1 month ago

I would like to hear your review and opinion of the Dirt E. i love watching your Reviews thanks.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 month ago

Hi Sam! I got to check that one out with help from a bike shop employee who is really into mountain bikes. It's in the works but might get published a bit down the line to help mix things up :)

Vass M
1 month ago

Nice review Court - due to the lack of quality road ebike choice out there, I am in the process of converting a Bosch Haibike Trekker with carbon Enve dropbars, fork, stem , seatpost and stripping off the all accessories it comes with. With a chip, the shop says it will do 45km motor assisted. There must be huge market out there with 40+ age group who have bad knees / weekend warriors. Surprised not many manufacturers are playing in this space. Tend to be more cashed up and happy to drop $10k in a heartbeat. And..... it's not cheating if you aint racing :)

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 month ago

That sounds awesome!! I liked what I saw from KTM last year, they added a Lauf suspension fork and all carbon cranks and parts to make a super light weight e-trail bike... your creation sounds pretty awesome, share a pic in the forum once it's done! I'd love to check it out :D

mvh808
1 month ago

Great review Tom! What I am missing at the moment is either an app or the onboard computer to calculate and display the watts that the motor adds in vs. the watts that I put in through my legs. At the moment, all I have is Strava which is showing me a watt estimate as a total when I am on my ebike. This however does not show what part of that was me and what was the motor. Accordingly, you cant rely on the calorie burnt values, etc.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 month ago

Good point, unless the bike computer shows your power output these secondary apps can only estimate your calories, distance and speed. Maybe we'll see more of that level of detail in the future

ytesb1
1 month ago

Re the "cheating" discussion, road bikes have always been evolving to be lighter, stiffer, and more aero. That has enabled us to go farther and faster with less effort. Is that cheating? If ebikes are "cheating", how is that different from having $3000 carbon fiber aero wheels when others on the road don't? Both mean you have to put in less effort at a given speed. Just interesting to me to try to understand where that cheating line is.

Donandnan Elmore
4 weeks ago

ytesb, I had the same discussion with a friend of mine in 1980 when I bought my SR Semi-Pro aero bike. He said just ride more and harder. I suggested he dump his derailleur as both offer the same thing: more speed with less effort. I think I need to sell the SR because, at my age, the riding position is just too bent over.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 month ago

Some people are just frustrated with their lives... there's a lot of stress in LA to deal with and they are probably jerks to lots of people throughout the day, sorry you have to deal with a bit of that though :/

Corn on the Coby
1 month ago

ytesb1 Also, in the cheating discussion, I use my ebike to get to work daily. I get yelled at and complained at by cyclists every now and then for "cheating." I am not cheating. I am being practical. It doesn't make sense for me to bike to work every day in the hot weather of Los Angeles on anything other than an ebike. I get to work faster without being sweaty. It helps me get up hills. But people still complain and call me lazy. Lazy would be not riding my bike to work.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 month ago

To me, cheating is where you break specified rules set out for a type of event... but evolving the sport into new categories and pushing the limits of what's possible is just awesome :D

Jared Oelderink-Wale
1 month ago

electricbikereview link is wrong. has extra '1' in url

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 month ago

Ahh, thanks so much Jared, will fix ;)

ForbinColossus
1 month ago

Giant as one of the big 3 (Trek, Specialized, Giant) has the resources to make a kickass ebike. My ebike tastes still side with full suspension MTBs, but this is good to see

ForbinColossus
1 month ago

FYI, Court, this German magazine tester agrees about the Yamaha cutting out too early:
"The Yamaha SyncDrive motor on the Giant works at its best when your
cadence hovers around 70 rpm. Any quicker and the system can’t cope."
http://ebike-mtb.com/en/giant-full-e-0-sx-review/

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 month ago

They launched a full suspension model called the Dirt-E+ that I've filmed and will be publishing soon! It's pretty awesome, and priced well ;)

tjenkens
1 month ago

I think you need to talk about where these e-bikes can be used and where they can't. This is very important on the off road (MTB) bikes. Thx.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 month ago

Great point, I try to touch on classes a bit while riding but have a more dedicated resource for that here: https://electricbikereview.com/guides/electric-bike-classes/ and there's a video. I hope this helps but feel free to comment more if there's a question or something you feel is missing :)

Grant Wakulczyk
1 month ago

Hey Court, are you going to be reviewing the Giant Quick-E+ also?

Grant Wakulczyk
1 month ago

Looking at getting one vs a DIY kit for a 20km (round trip) commute year round. General thoughts if you have time?

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 month ago

Absolutely, I filmed it and am planning to mix it in after a few reviews from other companies jut to keep variety ;)

Bob A
1 month ago

Wow have not seen a road bike that looks this cool in a while. Court-How does the front fork feel with no suspension? Does it have any flex to it to absorb some of the terrain. Hope you review he Dirt-E also. THX!

Bob A
1 month ago

Court-Thanks a lot for doing the reviews and listening to your fans! You are the best! Looks like Giant has really tapped into the market in a good way. Years ago, I lacked confidence in the brand due to comparisons we made with other manufacturers side by side, however, I like the interfaces and the motor pairings they put together. I'll be watching for the review. Go get 'em Court!

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 month ago

Hey Bob! Yeah, I filmed the Dirt-E and will be posting soon-ish, trying to rotate brands and styles to keep things interesting. The Road-E felt pretty rigid, Aluminum fork with an aggressive but aerodynamic design. I'd consider a suspension stem or seat post upgrade ;)

Ron OBlack
1 month ago

I wonder what this bike would be like with a 9 speed belt drive. I think the belt drive would be better suited to handle the extra torque and I suspect 9 gears would be enough in combination with the motor.
I like it, but I'm not ready to give up my two road bikes yet.
Too bad there isn't bosses for a rack and fenders.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 month ago

Good points all around, a belt drive and internally geared hub would handle motor torque but add a bit of weight and possibly price. Rack bosses would be nice for commuters, I think it has fender holes, more pictures and details in the full writeup here: https://electricbikereview.com/giant/road-e-plus/