Giant Road-E+ Review

Giant Road E Plus 1 Electric Bike Review
Giant Road E Plus 1
Giant Road E Plus 1 Syncdrive Yamaha Motor 250 Watt
Giant Road E Plus 1 500 Watt Hour Battery Pack
Giant Road E Plus 1 Fixed Backlit Lcd Display
Giant Road E Plus 1 Taped Drop Bars Alloy Fork Ebike
Giant Road E Plus 1 Pr 2 Disc Alloy Rims Drop Bars
Giant Road E Plus 1 Contact Sl Neutral Sadal
Giant Road E Plus 1 Shimano 105 Front Derailleur Compact Double
Giant Road E Plus 1 Shimano Hydraulic Disc Brake Rotor 160 Mm
Giant Road E Plus 1 Shimano Ultegra 11 Speed Cogset
Giant Road E Plus 1 Motor Protector Plate
Giant Road E Plus 1 3 Amp Charger
Giant Road E Plus 1 Electric Bike Review
Giant Road E Plus 1
Giant Road E Plus 1 Syncdrive Yamaha Motor 250 Watt
Giant Road E Plus 1 500 Watt Hour Battery Pack
Giant Road E Plus 1 Fixed Backlit Lcd Display
Giant Road E Plus 1 Taped Drop Bars Alloy Fork Ebike
Giant Road E Plus 1 Pr 2 Disc Alloy Rims Drop Bars
Giant Road E Plus 1 Contact Sl Neutral Sadal
Giant Road E Plus 1 Shimano 105 Front Derailleur Compact Double
Giant Road E Plus 1 Shimano Hydraulic Disc Brake Rotor 160 Mm
Giant Road E Plus 1 Shimano Ultegra 11 Speed Cogset
Giant Road E Plus 1 Motor Protector Plate
Giant Road E Plus 1 3 Amp Charger

Summary

  • An aggressive road bike with 28 mph top electric-assisted speed, drop bars and sport saddle, you get Shimano Ultegra rear and 105 front derailleurs with 22 gear combinations to work with
  • Shimano hydraulic disc brakes offer powerful stops and tend to stay cleaner than rim brakes, all-Aluminum frame is lightweight and sturdy but doesn't absorb vibrations as well as Steel or Carbon fiber
  • Available in four frame sizes for better fit, sold through Giant dealers worldwide so you can get setup right and rely on knowledgeable technicians for tuneups and any warranty support
  • The Yamaha mid-drive system is relatively quiet but still very powerful, it doesn't provide as wide an RPM range so I find myself pedaling slower than I'd like at times, LCD display is not removable

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Giant

Model:

Road-E+

Price:

$4,000

Body Position:

Forward Aggressive

Suggested Use:

Urban, Road

Electric Bike Class:

Speed Pedalec (Class 3)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Year Comprehensive, Lifetime Frame

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

44 lbs (19.95 kg)

Battery Weight:

7.5 lbs (3.4 kg)

Motor Weight:

7.6 lbs (3.44 kg)

Frame Material:

ALUXX SL-Grade Aluminum

Frame Sizes:

17 in (43.18 cm)19 in (48.26 cm)21 in (53.34 cm)23 in (58.42 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

Medium: 19" Seat Tube, 21.5" Reach, 30" Stand Over Height, 69" Length

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

Matte Black with Blue and Neon Yellow Accents

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid ALUXX SL-Grade Aluminum, OverDrive, 9 mm Skewer with Bolts

Frame Rear Details:

9 mm Skewer with Bolts

Attachment Points:

Fender Eyelets, Rear Kickstand Mount, Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

22 Speed 2x11 Shimano Ultegra Rear Derailleur 11-32T, Shimano 105 Front Derailleur 34/50T

Shifter Details:

Shimano RS685 Paddles on Left and Right

Cranks:

Custom Forged, 170 mm Length

Pedals:

Wellgo M-20, Alloy Platform Cage

Headset:

Tapered 1-1/8" to 1-1/2"

Stem:

Giant Connect, Alloy, 90 mm Length, 8° Angle, Three 5 mm Stacks, One 10 mm Stack

Handlebar:

Giant Contact, Alloy Drop Bar, 31.8 Clamp Diameter, 17.5" Width

Brake Details:

Shimano RS785 Hydraulic Disc with 160 mm Rotors, Heat Sinc on Calipers, Shimano RS685 Levers

Grips:

Black Tape, Rubber Hoods

Saddle:

Giant Contact SL Neutral, SST Tubular Rails

Seat Post:

Giant Contact, Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

300 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

30.9 mm

Rims:

Giant PR-2 Disc Alloy, Double Wall, 28 Hole, Giant Performance Tracker Road Disc Hubs

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 14 Gauge, Black with Silver Nipples

Tire Brand:

Schwalbe Durano, 700 x 32 (28" x 1.25")

Wheel Sizes:

28 in (71.12cm)

Tire Details:

RaceGuard Dual Compound, 55 to 95 PSI

Tube Details:

Presta Valve

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, 1.8 lb 3 Amp Charger

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Giant SyncDrive by Yamaha

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Geared Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

250 watts

Motor Peak Output:

500 watts

Motor Torque:

80 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Giant EnergyPak

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

13.8 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

496.8 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

4.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

50 miles (80 km)

Estimated Max Range:

100 miles (161 km)

Display Type:

Giant, Fixed, Backlit, Monochrome LCD

Readouts:

Battery Info-Graphic, Battery Percentage, Speed, Assist Level (Off, Eco, Normal, Power), Cadence (RPM), Trip Time, Trip Distance, Average Speed, Max Speed, Odometer, Range,

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad on Right (On/Off, Up, Down, Light, i, Walk Mode), 5 Volt Micro USB Port on Left Side of Display

Drive Mode:

Advanced Pedal Assist (Wheel Speed, Pedal Torque, Pedal Cadence)

Top Speed:

28 mph (45 kph)

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Written Review

The Giant Road-E+ is a unique electric bike because it’s designed for performance. In the US, the ebike space has traditionally been dominated by commuter products with some cruisers sprinkled in for recreational riders that want to feel young and avoid overheating or struggling to keep up with friends and spouses. The Road-E+ by contrast is aggressive and sporty… Rather than limiting you to 20 mph like the majority of e-bikes, it delivers up to 28 mph assisted top speed making it a Class 3 product (not permissible on many trails and some paths in California and other states). This is an electric bike that fits perfectly on the shoulder of the road and can help you earn the respect of cars starting off the line and ascending hills. I was thrilled to give it a spin for this review because I love road bikes and know that Giant has a great reputation for quality at value price points. My takeaway is that it would ease some of the knee pain I experience on longer rides with lots of climbing, allow me to jump into more dynamic rides on the weekends even though I cannot train as frequently as my friend (and am thus in limited shap by comparison) and offer a good alternative to my non-electric road bike when my muscles need a break. Some of the challenges I experienced were the heavier footprint at ~44 lbs, stiffer all-Aluminum frame and limited motor RPM range. I have tested and reviewed other electric road bikes with drop bars and the Road-E+ is well priced by comparison but it’s still not cheap. At $4k you’re getting decent components (Shimano Ultegra and 105) with a 22 speed drivetrain (many others are 1×10 or 1×11) and I love that there’s a vast network of dealers selling and servicing them, helping to honor the two-year comprehensive warranty on offer.

Driving the bike is a 250 watt nominal, 500 watt peak mid drive motor from Yamaha. Those numbers aren’t as important as torque in my opinion and the SyncDrive offers 80 Newton meters… which is a lot. Bosch’s mid-drive, by comparison, offers 63 to 75 Nm and is not compatible with multiple front chainrings. The Yamaha motor is quiet and smooth but doesn’t quit spinning as quickly as Bosch. It measures the same wheel speed, pedal cadence and pedal torque signals and allows you to shift gears smoothly if you ease off a bit before pressing the paddles. I love how integrated the motor is at the bottom bracket, how nicely it fits into the purpose-built frame and that it keeps weight low and centered as opposed to a hub motor system (popular with lower-end ebikes). One of the biggest benefits you get from a mid-motor is normal wheels and hubs that are easier to service and remove for transport or flat fixes. In addition to some plastic and frame surrounds, the motor also has a skid plate on the bottom that’s designed to protect it. Notice that the chainrings hang down lower than the motor and would take damage before it would in most cases. The only big compromise I experienced with this drive system is a limited RPM output that requires frequent shifting to hit higher top speeds and sometimes leaves me wanting to spin faster before shifting. The problem with this scenario is that if I want to spin faster I end up doing it all on my own (and pushing more weight plus the normal wind and wheel friction). It’s difficult to raise the speed of the bike all by yourself and when the motor isn’t able to keep up you simply have to shift gears to go faster. For many people, the bike is simply amazing and works flawlessly but this is one area that I sometimes struggle with on the Yamaha motor compared with Bosch and it’s why I love that you can go to a shop and take a test ride before buying.

Powering the motor is a custom 36 volt 13.8 amp hour battery pack named “EnergyPak”. I’m not sure what brand of cells are being used here but I’d guess they are higher quality (Samsung or Panasonic). With nearly 500 watt hours of capacity, this is a larger than average battery that Should take you 50+ miles depending on the level of assist chosen… As with all speed-pedelecs, as you ride above 20 mph the efficiency and range of the bike really drops off due to wind resistance. For me, it’s a reasonable trade-off and an area that’s addressable with the included 3 Amp charger (faster than the average 2 Amp I see on many other ebikes) or the upgrade 4 Amp charger option. I did not see this optional fast charger so cannot comment on price or availability but it got me excited. Specialized offered a similar fast-charger option with their ebikes a couple years back and they tend to be larger and heavier. Again, the three amp charger seemed great and wasn’t too large. I do like that it has a metal plug, that the charge port on the battery case is covered well with a rubber flap and that the battery locks securely to the frame but can be charged on or off so you could top it off at the office perhaps or maybe while eating lunch in the mountains at the half-way point during a ride. The battery design is simply beautiful and I love how they sort of integrated it with the downtube so the bike doesn’t scream “I’m electric” like some others do. The one area that isn’t so great is handling the pack. There’s literally no handle or loop to grab onto. With replacement packs costing upwards of $800 this is not something you want to drop…

Operating the Giant Road-E+ is pretty easy. Just mount the charged battery (I love that it clicks in without the key being necessary) then press the power button on the control pad. The display comes to life showing a precise charge level infographic and there’s even a percentage readout AND dynamic range estimate. Depending on the level of assist you arrow up or down to, the range estimate will change. It’s great to have this kind of feedback at your fingertips vs. guessing so that you can plan your ride for maxiumum fun. On this note, please make sure you always check your tire pressure because as with traditional road bikes, the narrower tires here can get snake-bite punctures easily if you hit a curb or let the PSI drop too low. This is a heavier bike after all and unlike many other e-bikes, the tires are narrow. So anyway, the display offers three levels of assist to choose from and gives you access to trip stats like range, trip distance, speed and max speed. If you’re someone who likes to use Strava on your phone or use a Garmin device, you can do this easily with the Giant Road-E+ without having to run the juice down because there’s a little Micro-USB port on the left side of the display. One area of concern or question is where and how to mount your device given the already large LCD display. Also, the display is not removable so parking and storing the bike could present more opportunities for scratches which is a bummer. Consider putting a towel over… This and many other parts of the bike are smart and modular so if they are broken or lost, your Giant dealer should be able to help with a fix.

At the end of the day, there are only a few choices when it comes to electric road bikes and of course, you’d want a speed pedelec with drop bars. Beyond that, the four frame sizes, dealer network and beautiful integration seen here really impressed me. For $4k I feel like you get a lot of value and could have a blast with this bike. I love that in addition to bottle cage bosses, they added threaded eyelets and a mounting provision at the rear for a kickstand and some mounts for fenders. There’s no rack mount but this really isn’t a commuter setup… frankly, I’m not sure how well fenders would really work but the holes are there. Giant sells a wider range of electric assist bikes in Europe and it’s wonderful to finally see them in the US. This is a refined product, despite being “new” to this market and I could tell that they had ironed out a lot of the kinks and compromises that other systems had not when they first arrived. This thing uses a smart, reliable drive system that can work with you to achieve new types of rides and because it’s from a bigger more recognized brand, I feel like it might garner more respect as well (at least in the USA where ebikes are still catching on). Because the frame is all Aluminum (including the rigid fork), one thing I would consider is a seat post suspension from BodyFloat. Their systems tend to be highly responsive, offered in lighte-weight materials like Carbon fiber and Titanium and are adjustable to rider weight. You might also benefit from a suspension stem like the ShockStop.

Pros:

  • It’s rare to see electric road bikes with drop bars that are also speed pedelecs (28 mph top speed vs. 20 mph) and this one comes in four frame sizes which makes it accessible to a wider audience
  • Giant has a vast network of dealers and is a larger more reputable bicycle company than most, seeing a product like this (with the complexity of electric systems) feels more reliable
  • The Yamaha mid-drive system is one of the quietest and most responsive motors I’ve tested, while it does have a more limited RPM output (requiring more shifting to fully optimize) it works well and the torque sensor lets you shift without mashing just by easing off the pedals as you might with a non-electric bike
  • I love how integrated the battery pack looks but also that it’s fully removable (reducing overall weight by ~7.5 lbs), worth taking off when carrying on a car rack or doing service
  • Hydraulic disc brakes are the way to go with a heavier bike like this and should perform well if the road is wet or dirty as they tend to stay cleaner than rim brakes… they also stay out of the way when taking wheels off for quick service
  • The frame is completely purpose built, cables are internally routed and the battery and motor are streamline, I love that they managed to squeeze in bottle cage bosses despite the much larger downtube
  • You get 22 speeds on this ebike vs. just 10 or 11 on some of the other mid-drive system and the component groups (Ultegra and 105 from Shimano) are pretty good, this adds up to a more natural and wide range of pedal cadence options, in short, I believe it’s a compact double setup as you’d see on a non-electric bike
  • The battery charger puts out 3 Amps which is above average so you should get faster charge times, I like the rubber cover on the charge port near the base of the battery pack but would suggest being careful not to bump the cable with the left crank arm when it’s plugged in
  • The motor assist is highly adjustable so you can still get an excellent workout, for people with a hurt knee or leg, those with heart conditions or people who want to take a break between strenuous rides this would be an excellent platform and it lets others draft, great for a cycling coach or others looking to maximize availability without straining muscles too much
  • I like that the display panel has a Micro-USB port on the left side where you could charge a phone, run some lights or use other portable electronics for longer periods relying on the large main battery
  • In addition to range approximation (based on the power level chosen and remaining battery capacity) there’s a good battery info-graphic with battery percentage! Many ebikes just show a 5-bar graphic with 20% drops… Giant went above and beyond with percentage here and I think it’s useful
  • As someone with a crowded space and rented walls… I appreciate that there are threaded eyelets on the left chainstay for adding a kickstand!
  • The motor and battery weight are kept low and centered on the frame helping to optimize handling and even lifting if you have to carry the bike up stairs or mount it on a rack

Cons:

  • Yamaha is a large reputable company and their motor is compact, quiet and well integrated here but it doesn’t offer as wide an RPM as some other mid-drives like Bosch, this means you have to shift more actively to hit the top speed
  • Given the all-Aluminum frame and fork, there’s not a lot of foregiveness going over bumps (especially at high speed), people tend to ride ebikes further and at higher average speeds so I’d consider using a Thudbuster or BodyFloat suspension seat post (look for 30.9 mm diameter) and maybe even a suspension stem, perhaps future Road-E+ models will offer a Carbon fiber fork?
  • The display is easy to read and navigating the menus is intuitive but you can’t take the display off which means more sun damage and possible scratched when transporting the bike or parking it outside
  • The battery pack weighs 7.5 lbs and doesn’t have a handle or great ridge for securely gripping and carrying it… so be careful not to drop it! I like that it can be left on the frame to charge
  • While the motor is very responsive to your pedal torque, there is no built in shift-sensing protection system so you could mash your chain if you don’t shift consciously

Resources:

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Joe Bernard
9 months ago

Nice bike, but handling that battery is going to be an issue. Even with the handle on my Haibike’s battery, I’ve found that it’s easy to muck up the stick-on graphics. With the Giant battery you’re pretty much forced to grab it right where the decals are.

Reply
Court Rye
9 months ago

Good point Joe, I hadn’t thought as much about sticker placement and fingerprints, thanks for the feedback!

Reply
Hiruy
9 months ago

Hi Court, As always, another great review. I bought this bike in February as soon as they released it for sale in US. I use it for my daily commute to work and put on about 500 miles on it. I really love this bike. It has very impressive handling, amazing range and fun to ride. I am about 195 lbs with additional cargo of 10-15 lbs and am getting about 60 miles in a single charge even though my commute includes several hills with a couple of really steep ones. On my other 2015 Diamondback Trace EXC, I can only get about 20 miles in a single charge. The Road E+ have the same feel as riding a normal road bike so you will feel the road bumps. To help with the road bumps, I changed the factory saddle which is too firm for me with the Serfas Variant 2 which enables you to adjust the firmness of the saddle. I also like the fact that it does not cut-off the motor immediately. When I am ready to shift gears, I stop peddling momentarily and immediately shift gears so that the momentum of the motor before it cuts off is just enough to make the shifting very smooth then continue peddling. A couple of things you mentioned are different on my bike:

  1. The seat post my bike came with is a carbon fiber, but you indicated that it is aluminum on your review. The Giant website have it listed as “Giant Contact Composite 30.9 mm
  2. My charger plug to the battery pack is plastic, but you show a metal end
Reply
Court Rye
9 months ago

Interesting, thanks for sharing your feedback about the seat post and charger Hiruy! I enjoyed reading about your experience with range and comparisons to the Diamondback Trace. Sounds like you’re a seasoned electric cyclist at this point! Keep riding safe and thanks again for your positive feedback on the site :)

Reply
Joe Bernard
9 months ago

The Yamaha motor on my Haibike Sduro Trekking has that slight over-rev feature, too. FYI, I found that stopping pedaling was too disruptive to my rhythm, so I’ve gone back to the standard practice of slightly backing off pedal pressure for shifts. I suppose this could wear out my chain faster, but I’ll take the cost hit for it.

Soren Thomsen
3 months ago

Hi, thanks for the review. Can you estimate what the RPM limitation is? Does it simply stop to contribute at a certain RPM or what happens there? Thanks, Soren

Reply
Court Rye
3 months ago

Hi Soren, in my experience the Yamaha motor used on the bike reviewed here and some other Haibikes has a 100 RPM limit vs. Bosch and Brose which reach 120 RPM. So in practice, that means that when you are spinning and reach a certain pedal rotation speed, the motor sort of eases back and won’t help anymore… so you can either work harder on your own if you prefer higher RPM riding or you can switch to a lower gear which will slow your RPM but allow the motor to help out again. In practice, at least for me, this results in more frequent shifting and a ride style that is less enjoyable… because I like to spin due to a sensitive knee and a desire for a faster “cardio” type ride vs. slow and powerful. Does that make sense?

Reply
Soren Thomsen
3 months ago

Thanks for your comprehensive answer. That does indeed make a lot of sense.

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Deacon Blues
2 hours ago

I have Schrader valves on my Pedego Ridgerider and Presta valves on my carbon road bike. I'll take the Schrader valve over the Presta valve ANY day of the week.

MLB
20 hours ago

While the single ring front is perfectly adequate for road use when under assist,even lowest level assist here in Flat land. BUT for peddling a 50lb bike with motor off, I really find that single a bit short of gearing, certainly for any kind of hills.
I think they made a mistake going from triple fronts on the bikes the Ebikes were built from to singles.
Double front ring, like Yamaha has, makes the bike workable with power off. JMO FWIW

ebike Richard
1 day ago

I don't understand the obsession bike riders & supply houses have with short sleeves and pants. Seems veterans are proud of their road scars. I ride >2000 miles a year now, and wear long sleeves and pants, thick ones, in dark blue usually. I don't get too hot, even at 102 deg F in the sun. I do drink water.A bright green or orange Tee or vest is over top.
I haven't skinned my knees since I was seven riding a 20" bike. I go over the handlebars about once a year when the wheel turns sideways on obstacles, hitting usually my chin & chest. I usually alight on my arms, but have for 30 years worn cotton or cotton/poly long sleeves workshirts, which are a lot cheaper than those knox items linked to above. https://www.automotiveworkwear.com/mm5/graphics/00000001/SP14_small.jpg Scrapes are minimal in that heavy cloth. The all cotton workshirt costs more but is cooler in summer, wicking the sweat effectively. I wear long sleeves in all weather on the bike. Dickies makes cotton/poly workshirts available in discount stores; red cap has that and a full cotton one (for welding) which has to be mail ordered. See automotiveworkwear.com or equivalent sites.
Dickies long pants also keep my legs from getting roadburn; red kap makes an equivalent cotton/poly workpant that doesn't fit my round *** and thick thighs as well.
As far as chin protection, I broke it in November on the pavement and am ****ed that nobody online would show me a ventilated bike helmet with chin guard in September. Niagara, competitive, modernbike, nothing, jenson I got javascript error. Jenson actually has them, but you can't see it with my browser unless you know the secret word: "downhill mountain bike racing helmet". I bought the Fox Rampage Comp, http://www.jensonusa.com/globalassets/product-images---all-assets/fox-apparel/he191g06-yellow~black.jpg?w=250&h=300&quality=85 It is in fact very well ventilated although heavy at 2.2 lb. The stupid wind catching visor does unscrew if you're not racing downhill through the forest with a risk of being stabbed in the face by a branch or planting it onto a rock. I ride on pavement 99.9999% of the time. Do this mod at your own risk.
Thanks for all the tips!
I don't understand the obsession bike riders & supply houses have with short sleeves and pants. Seems veterans are proud of their road scars. I ride >2000 miles a year now, and wear long sleeves and pants, thick ones, in dark blue usually. I don't get too hot, even at 102 deg F in the sun. I do drink water.A bright green or orange Tee or vest is over top.
I haven't skinned my knees since I was seven riding a 20" bike. I go over the handlebars about once a year when the wheel turns sideways on obstacles, hitting usually my chin & chest. I usually alight on my arms, but have for 30 years worn cotton or cotton/poly long sleeves workshirts, which are a lot cheaper than those knox items linked to above. https://www.automotiveworkwear.com/mm5/graphics/00000001/SP14_small.jpg Scrapes are minimal in that heavy cloth. The all cotton workshirt costs more but is cooler in summer, wicking the sweat effectively. I wear long sleeves in all weather on the bike. Dickies makes cotton/poly workshirts available in discount stores; red cap has that and a full cotton one (for welding) which has to be mail ordered. See automotiveworkwear.com or equivalent sites.
Dickies long pants also keep my legs from getting roadburn; red kap makes an equivalent cotton/poly workpant that doesn't fit my round *** and thick thighs as well.
As far as chin protection, I broke it in November on the pavement and am ****ed that nobody online would show me a ventilated bike helmet with chin guard in September. Niagara, competitive, modernbike, nothing, jenson I got javascript error. Jenson actually has them, but you can't see it with my browser unless you know the secret word: "downhill mountain bike racing helmet". I bought the Fox Rampage Comp, http://www.jensonusa.com/globalassets/product-images---all-assets/fox-apparel/he191g06-yellow~black.jpg?w=250&h=300&quality=85 It is in fact very well ventilated although heavy at 2.2 lb. The stupid wind catching visor does unscrew if you're not racing downhill through the forest with a risk of being stabbed in the face by a branch or planting it onto a rock. I ride on pavement 99.9999% of the time. Do this mod at your own risk.

Thanks for all the tips!.
I hadn't thought about chin straps but that makes a lot of sense.

And researching about all this stuff, some devices are made of a material which is soft most of the time but stiffens upon impact. This would be particularly useful like for knee protectors.
Thanks again for your informative response.

PowerOnBikes
1 day ago

I would suggest the Road Warrior. It has a 48v 500 watt Bafang motor, torque sensor, 13.6ah battery and hydraulic disc brakes.

Road Warrior

PowerOnBikes
1 day ago

I think commuter bikes with suspension are way more comfortable, especially if you don't have a really smooth road on your commute. I've tried out a lot of different ebikes but I personally like The City Slicker. It has an upright seated position and the handlebars come back a bit for an easy reach. 48v 500 watts of power.

indianajo
1 day ago

I don't understand the obsession bike riders & supply houses have with short sleeves and pants. Seems veterans are proud of their road scars. I ride >2000 miles a year now, and wear long sleeves and pants, thick ones, in dark blue usually. I don't get too hot, even at 102 deg F in the sun. I do drink water.A bright green or orange Tee or vest is over top.
I haven't skinned my knees since I was seven riding a 20" bike. I go over the handlebars about once a year when the wheel turns sideways on obstacles, hitting usually my chin & chest. I usually alight on my arms, but have for 30 years worn cotton or cotton/poly long sleeves workshirts, which are a lot cheaper than those knox items linked to above. https://www.automotiveworkwear.com/mm5/graphics/00000001/SP14_small.jpg Scrapes are minimal in that heavy cloth. The all cotton workshirt costs more but is cooler in summer, wicking the sweat effectively. I wear long sleeves in all weather on the bike. Dickies makes cotton/poly workshirts available in discount stores; red cap has that and a full cotton one (for welding) which has to be mail ordered. See automotiveworkwear.com or equivalent sites.
Dickies long pants also keep my legs from getting roadburn; red kap makes an equivalent cotton/poly workpant that doesn't fit my round *** and thick thighs as well.
As far as chin protection, I broke it in November on the pavement and am ****ed that nobody online would show me a ventilated bike helmet with chin guard in September. Niagara, competitive, modernbike, nothing, jenson I got javascript error. Jenson actually has them, but you can't see it with my browser unless you know the secret word: "downhill mountain bike racing helmet". I bought the Fox Rampage Comp, http://www.jensonusa.com/globalassets/product-images---all-assets/fox-apparel/he191g06-yellow~black.jpg?w=250&h=300&quality=85 It is in fact very well ventilated although heavy at 2.2 lb. The stupid wind catching visor does unscrew if you're not racing downhill through the forest with a risk of being stabbed in the face by a branch or planting it onto a rock. I ride on pavement 99.9999% of the time. Do this mod at your own risk.

Headcase650
2 days ago

Got my bike this week and am going to give a few quick thoughts. First off...I really like the bike, so that being said I did or do have a few issues. They should improve their packing. The bike shipped from china to California then to me. So I don't think there is any real quality control between manufacturer and customer. The cardboard box it was in was pretty smashed up with some holes in it and I noted that on the ticket I signed when taking delivery. They said I had 30 days to file a claim. It was dark out when I picked it up and I couldn't really tell if things were damaged until I started assembly. I was excited to get the thing after a long wait and a small delay in shipping. The tool kit was spread out in the bottom of the box and parts of it were missing but I have tools. It went together well just like in the video, checked wheels for true,they were good, no scratches on anything, that was good. Build quality, paint looked great. The only problem I had upon first ride was the derailleur was badly bent in toward the hub by about 20 degrees and I missed that on my initial inspection so first time riding it, shifting through the gears it threw off the chain when it got to 1st and left a nice ring scratched into the hub motor behind the largest sprocket. So That's kind of on me as they recommend having a professional shop put the bike together. This isn't my first bike so I decided to fix it myself. If you don't have a bike stand, and I don't, you can put a couple long M5 screws into the lower rear rack mounts and set the rear of the bike up on a pair of jack stands to get the back tire off the ground. I then bent the derailleur back as straight as I could get it and started the process of properly setting it back up so it wont throw the chain, shifts smoothly and works as it should. Took a black sharpy and covered up the nice shiny scratch I put in the hub motor. All better now. If you don't know how to check your derailleur there are plenty of videos on youtube explaining how to do it and I highly recommend doing it before riding. So that's it for the negatives. Lets talk about the positives. This thing is awesome. I was concerned about the 19" large frame size being to big for my 5'9" height 31" inseam. Its not. If you are any shorter I would go with the 18" medium. My only other E-Bike experience is with my brothers two Rad Rovers. Ill list the differences after comparing them side by side. The AT R750 has more guts and top end no doubt about it. It will hit 31mph in off road mode with me at 200lbs and I can climb a moderate incline at around 25mph. The RR is done at 24mph and slows to 17 or 18 on the same incline. The high gear on the AT R750 is 11 tooth to the RR's 14 and you can feel it when peddling. I kind of wish the AT R750 had a little larger chain ring. Hitting 31mph in assist your hustling. The AT R750 has hydraulic brakes compared to the RR's manual cable brakes. Riding them back to back its hard to tell if the hydros are better. If they are its not a huge difference, The both stop pretty quick. Handle bars on the AT R750 are about 3 1/2" wider than the RR. It gives you a little more leverage and control over the bike and room to add stuff if you like. I also like the slotted wheels on theAT R750 more, should knock off a little weight. The integrated larger battery on the AT R750 gives you more room if you want to use a small triangle bag in the frame. The front light on the AT R750 is brighter but the back light on the RR is better as far as visibility goes. So as far as powertrain, form and function the AT R750 wins and is a much better bike. Even my brother loves it, small issues aside. Now a few things on the RR that I wish were on the AT R750. The RR has Rivnuts for adding a bottle holder and front rack/basket. The AT R750 has zero so anything you want to add has to be strap/clamp on except for a rear rack. The RR has contoured leather wrapped grips and matching seat. They are nicer than the plain rubber ones on the AT R750. The chain stays on the Chain ring on the RR are metal as apposed to plastic on the AT R750. The RR has a USB port on the display, M2S wants $75 for an upgraded display that has a USB built in for the AT R750. So there you have my took it out of the box and initial review. It wasn't perfect but is it an awesome bike?......YES! As I get more time on it and add some optional equipment I'll post that up as well.....Adrian

Rooster
2 days ago

Road the HyperFat into work today. I too have noticed the 1/2" raise to plug in the battery. Also the flicker on the headlamp. Ordered Mr Tuffy 3XL Tire Liners and Mongoose MG78253-6 Fat Tire Tube, 26 x 4.0" which should come in next week. I live in a hilly area and its night and day different between the OceanCurrent and this HyperFat. I can actually get up the steep hills. I need to run Strava to see how bad it really is grade wise.
I too have the ocean current and I bet it is like night and day it's got a 30 amp controller compared to the Oc 15 amp. It ought to haul butt, the question is, how long will it last???

Hagrid
2 days ago

Road the HyperFat into work today. I too have noticed the 1/2" raise to plug in the battery. Also the flicker on the headlamp. Ordered Mr Tuffy 3XL Tire Liners and Mongoose MG78253-6 Fat Tire Tube, 26 x 4.0" which should come in next week. I live in a hilly area and its night and day different between the OceanCurrent and this HyperFat. I can actually get up the steep hills. I need to run Strava to see how bad it really is grade wise.

Skyhawk4754
4 days ago

What's your age? How far do you want to ride? How fast? Is it mostly flat? Are you riding by your self or with someone? On a bike path or on the road? How big are you? All of these come in to play on what you end up with.
I have a trike and wouldn't give it up.

Mark Peralta
4 days ago

So I just took the bike to my first morning commute to work. around 5 miles. few tiny hills, but other than that just straight road.

Pros:
- The power - this is of course the main reason why everyone bought this bike. it's very easy to get to 30mph, with little extra effort to 31 or 32. I am in good shape, active sports guy.
- Gearing - really well geared, even at the highest speeds there is still a lot of resistance and it feels good
- Weight - honestly I though this thing would be way heavier than it is
- Agility - I think it's more agile than RadRover, easier to turn in curves

Cons:
- Geometry - I really don't like it. I feel I am way too stretched to reach handlebars.
- Stem and Handlebars - very connected to the geometry point. This bike deserves better stem to hold the handlebars, it's the first thing I am going to change. Also the handlebars should be wider. I just don't like my position on this bike, it does not feel natural. (I am 6'2 and have the XL frame)
- Low speed motor hiccups - at very low speeds the motor makes weird sounds and just does not pull properly. Keeps lagging, etc. Happened to me only once though.
I feel your pain on the forward and aggressive riding position. I also wanted a relaxed upright position and made some changes on mine. There are many option to address it and you can combine those options.
1. Relaxed swept handle bar. Make sure you have the correct diameter at the clamp.

http://www.treefortbikes.com/product/333222409416/1430/Soma-Fabrications-Sparrow.html?utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&adpos=1o2&scid=scplp3332224094169141&sc_intid=3332224094169141&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIsa3oxNuH2AIV00oNCh0eBAexEAQYAiABEgJaD_D_BwE

2. Short stem, to bring the handlebar closer to you.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Aluminum-Alloy-Fixed-31-8mm-Cycling-Mountain-Bike-Short-Handlebar-Stem-Riser/172747096633?_trkparms=aid=222007&algo=SIM.MBE&ao=1&asc=20160908110712&meid=7cfe5e9e80804b529ded93aaf9c33b60&pid=100677&rk=11&rkt=29&sd=272959241036&_trksid=p2385738.c100677.m4598

3. Stem riser.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/MTB-Bike-Bicycle-Head-Handlebar-Stem-Raiser-Riser-Extender-Extension-28-6mm-B126/361323370746?_trkparms=aid=555019&algo=PL.BANDIT&ao=1&asc=41375&meid=ad24c6907003405b9bd5b0a0dc625ed9&pid=100706&rk=1&rkt=1&&_trksid=p2045573.c100706.m4781

4. Or you can use adjustable stem (I saw some feedbacks that these are not very strong).

https://www.ebay.com/itm/XLC-Adj-Stem-31-8Mm-95Mm-0-60-Black-2501552400/311961485115?_trkparms=aid=888007&algo=DISC.MBE&ao=1&asc=49564&meid=ea3ead3c99fb403d99672ca9ff61436e&pid=100009&rk=2&rkt=2&sd=292265781099&_trksid=p2047675.c100009.m1982

I used the combination of 1, 2, and 3 on my 2 ebikes.

DanielB111
4 days ago

By following these simple bike battery care tips from eBikeFAQ.com you can give your battery a long and healthy life.

Storage:

Avoid prolonged storage in a fully charged or fully discharged state (Ideally store at 50% charged.)
Store at normal room temperature – avoid storage at over 20°C or below 5°C (41 °F and 68 °F).

Use:

Where possible avoid discharging your battery to below 20%.
Avoid leaving the bike in direct sunlight on hot days – heat is a battery’s worst enemy. Temperatures over 30°C (68 °F) are harmful to Li-Ion batteries.
Over-discharge can occur when you push your bicycle batteries to their limit. Full discharges put a lot of strain on the battery.
Constantly making the motor and battery work hard (e.g. cycling up steep hills with full assistance) will reduce battery life.

Charging:

The practice of charging to only 80% of capacity can almost double the life of a Li-Ion battery.
Use a good quality charger designed specifically for your type of Lithium-Ion battery.
Use the slowest (lowest power) charging option your charger supports unless you are desperate to get back out on the road.

Notes:
Lithium Ion batteries do not have a “memory” and shallow discharges extend battery life.
‘Cycle life’ is the number of complete charge/discharge cycles that the battery is able to perform before its capacity falls below 80% of its original capacity.

Ultra-Fast Charging
Where possible, charge at a moderate rate. Ultra-fast charging always causes battery stress.

With Ultra Fast charging it is important to note that :

Your battery should be a type suitable for ultra-fast charging.
Check your the battery is in good condition as ultra-fast charging puts higher stresses on your battery.
You should always use a charger that has the correct specifications to work with your battery.
It is best to charge at moderate ambient temperatures. Do not use a fast charger when the battery is hot or cold.
Avoid fast charging a damaged, aged or low-performing battery.
Ultra-fast charging only applies during the first charge phase (up to 70% charge).
If you are shopping for an ultrafast charger look for one which has a charge-time selector to allow a slower charge when time allows. Selecting the slower charge option will help extend the life of your battery.

for more on battery care visit eBikeFAQ.com

Gary R Peacock
5 days ago

Loved the Giant Road E+! Only problem was the drop down bars. Need something upright for my neck/shoulders. Might have found it at High Peaks Cyclery in Lake Placid (Giant Quick E+). (See my comments in previous thread.) Anyone out there own the Quick E+? Impressions?

BikeMike045
5 days ago

Is all that noise characteristic to hub drive bikes ?
I've got a bike lock bouncing around, the camera case made a clicking noise against the spokes once or twice, tires make noise on the road, and the camera is mounted directly to the frame right beside the motor, so every vibration is amplified. Brake noise is also due to proximity. It is nowhere near that loud while riding. In fact my moped friend and neighbor was sitting on his front porch looking at his phone... I buzzed by twice at about 25 before he noticed me at all!

Andy_in_CA
5 days ago

So I just took the bike to my first morning commute to work. around 5 miles. few tiny hills, but other than that just straight road.

Pros:
- The power - this is of course the main reason why everyone bought this bike. it's very easy to get to 30mph, with little extra effort to 31 or 32. I am in good shape, active sports guy.
- Gearing - really well geared, even at the highest speeds there is still a lot of resistance and it feels good
- Weight - honestly I though this thing would be way heavier than it is
- Agility - I think it's more agile than RadRover, easier to turn in curves

Cons:
- Geometry - I really don't like it. I feel I am way too stretched to reach handlebars.
- Stem and Handlebars - very connected to the geometry point. This bike deserves better stem to hold the handlebars, it's the first thing I am going to change. Also the handlebars should be wider. I just don't like my position on this bike, it does not feel natural. (I am 6'2 and have the XL frame)
- Low speed motor hiccups - at very low speeds the motor makes weird sounds and just does not pull properly. Keeps lagging, etc. Happened to me only once though.

I swapped out the stock handle bars on my CCS with a Jones Hbar.. .and love it. They have two widths or you can buy the wider one and trim it if you don't like the width....and they mark it for you 710 and 660 i think.

hurricane56
5 days ago

So I just took the bike to my first morning commute to work. around 5 miles. few tiny hills, but other than that just straight road.

Pros:
- The power - this is of course the main reason why everyone bought this bike. it's very easy to get to 30mph, with little extra effort to 31 or 32. I am in good shape, active sports guy.
- Gearing - really well geared, even at the highest speeds there is still a lot of resistance and it feels good
- Weight - honestly I though this thing would be way heavier than it is
- Agility - I think it's more agile than RadRover, easier to turn in curves

Cons:
- Geometry - I really don't like it. I feel I am way too stretched to reach handlebars.
- Stem and Handlebars - very connected to the geometry point. This bike deserves better stem to hold the handlebars, it's the first thing I am going to change. Also the handlebars should be wider. I just don't like my position on this bike, it does not feel natural. (I am 6'2 and have the XL frame)
- Low speed motor hiccups - at very low speeds the motor makes weird sounds and just does not pull properly. Keeps lagging, etc. Happened to me only once though.

What kind of stem do you think you'll use?

Eglon
5 days ago

So I just took the bike to my first morning commute to work. around 5 miles. few tiny hills, but other than that just straight road.

Pros:
- The power - this is of course the main reason why everyone bought this bike. it's very easy to get to 30mph, with little extra effort to 31 or 32. I am in good shape, active sports guy.
- Gearing - really well geared, even at the highest speeds there is still a lot of resistance and it feels good
- Weight - honestly I though this thing would be way heavier than it is
- Agility - I think it's more agile than RadRover, easier to turn in curves

Cons:
- Geometry - I really don't like it. I feel I am way too stretched to reach handlebars.
- Stem and Handlebars - very connected to the geometry point. This bike deserves better stem to hold the handlebars, it's the first thing I am going to change. Also the handlebars should be wider. I just don't like my position on this bike, it does not feel natural. (I am 6'2 and have the XL frame)
- Low speed motor hiccups - at very low speeds the motor makes weird sounds and just does not pull properly. Keeps lagging, etc. Happened to me only once though.

I agree with just about everything here. That's funny that you mention feeling cramped. I'm also 6'2" with the XL frame and I scooted my seat all the way back and still feel like I could use a longer stem. I have unusually long arms though so that's a big factor. I also feel that the frame is is good. My seat isn't way high and I like that. I like to have most of the seat post in the frame.
I think that the low speed hiccup is related to the lack of an internal speed sensor in the MAC motor. It has happened to me a couple of times as described in the setup and troubleshooting instructions.

sowhat
5 days ago

So I just took the bike to my first morning commute to work. around 5 miles. few tiny hills, but other than that just straight road.

Pros:
- The power - this is of course the main reason why everyone bought this bike. it's very easy to get to 30mph, with little extra effort to 31 or 32. I am in good shape, active sports guy.
- Gearing - really well geared, even at the highest speeds there is still a lot of resistance and it feels good
- Weight - honestly I though this thing would be way heavier than it is
- Agility - I think it's more agile than RadRover, easier to turn in curves

Cons:
- Geometry - I really don't like it. I feel I am way too stretched to reach handlebars.
- Stem and Handlebars - very connected to the geometry point. This bike deserves better stem to hold the handlebars, it's the first thing I am going to change. Also the handlebars should be wider. I just don't like my position on this bike, it does not feel natural. (I am 6'2 and have the XL frame)
- Low speed motor hiccups - at very low speeds the motor makes weird sounds and just does not pull properly. Keeps lagging, etc. Happened to me only once though.

Mark Peralta
2 days ago

I came across the internet about "ebike efficiency" from endless sphere
https://endless-sphere.com/w/index.php/EBike_Efficiency
and I thought it is worth sharing. The beauty of ebikes is there is a second source of motive power and that is your pedal power. It talks about the very basic principle about ebike motors. Here , it relates to a hub motor but the principle is still the same for the mid drives. The road speed on the chart is just changed to cadence on mid drives.

First, the power (watts) that comes out from the battery does not completely translates to actual watts to the wheels. There is a certain speed at which the conversion to mechanical power (motor efficiency) is highest.

In this example, the motor efficiency is highest at speeds somewhere between 25-31 mph. The lower the speed, the less efficient is the motor. However, if we consider the power requirement at these speeds (as we will find out later), the actual window of efficiency is a very narrow 23-26 mph only since the motor is only strong enough up to 25-26 mph. The power curve slightly goes down to 600w at that speed while the power requirement quickly goes up to 600w at 25 mph and continue to go up above that speed.

Those watt meters on some ebike displays do not always represent the watts to the wheels but these are the wattage that came out from the battery. And if you are on the wrong speed, most of those watts are wasted as heat. Or if you are in the wrong cadence in the case of mid drives. Basing on the efficiency curve of the hub motor above, it appears that it is ideal for high speed commuting.

To minimize energy waste at lower speed, a controller is used to limit the max current.

In the old days, simple resistors were used to control the current but these are very inefficient and obsolete and are now replaced by pulse width modulation controllers (PWM) with the use of metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET). The electrical current is then controlled to different levels. Example of this simple controller with different current settings at different assist levels is from a chart from Bafang mid drive (cadence is used at the x axis instead of road speed). The orange curve represents 100% (current decay is another user adjustable parameter in the Bafang controller)

https://electricbike-blog.com/2015/06/26/a-hackers-guide-to-programming-the-bbs02/

However, it is also important to know the power demand of an ebike at different speeds brought about by many factors and most especially the air resistance (aerodynamic drag), in order to further minimize power wastage when it is not needed and only apply power to when it is really needed.

You don't really need a lot of power at low speed but a simple controller's output is opposite (Cheap Chinese controllers). No wonder the cheap ebikes and ebike kits cannot reliably provide good battery mileage since you thought you are saving battery by going slower but you actually wasted a lot of power there. Most of the time, I notice that simple controllers feel "punchy" and tend to lurch ahead from a dead stop (great for showing off to friends) but once the ebike is already moving and you needed more assist, sometimes the power isn't there anymore, when you needed it the most.

Enter the Smart Controllers from the big players where more brain capacity is added to the controller's program in order to determine and match power requirement with the power output of the motor. And added measures are incorporated to cut the assist if the motor speed is at the inefficient range. This is made possible with the use of torque sensors and sophisticated program algorithms. An example of this is the "dynamic assist" from Juicedbikes.

http://juicedbikes.com.au/bikes/2017-crosscurrent/

I cannot find the controller charts of other big players but that is understandable (trade secret). It only goes to show that it's not only the motor efficiency that is important but how sophisticated the controllers are made. Not all controllers are created equal.

On mid drives, the gear reduction ratio is also set up so that the motor is most efficient at a cadence rate preferred by most cyclists (normal cadence range) .

https://www.electricbike.com/bosch-cannondale/

This principle in actual application made it possible for a small motor (mid drive) to achieve a very very impressive efficiency of 100 miles in 1 charge of the 500wh battery or 5 wh/mile!
https://electricbikereview.com/forum/threads/range-100-miles-giant-road-e.14617/#post-121767

This highest mileage potential is demonstrated by the small mid drive, but at a slower average speed (~15mph). The mid drives also has an advantage for the ability to climb very steep hills, as long as the gear ratio in the drive train is appropriate, but at the expense of even much slower, snail paced, speed (sometimes it feels like being pulled up by a winch!).

However, hub drives are not far behind in efficiency. Especially with increasing sophistication of the controllers and more efficient motor designs like the Maxon.
http://partir-en-vtt.com/fsb2/index.php?p=search&mode=author&id=52

https://electricbikereview.com/forum/threads/hub-vs-mid-drive-how-can-i-compare.14635/page-5

Hub drives are also more appropriate for high speed commuting, such as riding regularly at higher average speeds (above 23 mph) since the bicycle drive train at that higher crank output will wear out prematurely in less than a couple thousand miles. Or for transporting heavy loads such as the delivery ebikes.

There is still a bright future for efficient hub drives since, aside from the above mentioned strengths, hub drives are also very user friendly, easy gear shifting, durability, and is superior on stop and go city streets.

1/1
PowerOnBikes
6 days ago

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trebor
6 days ago

Road range test as to how someone might use it for commuting:

11 mile road test at 100% power. I put in 96 watts of my own power (so great the bike has a power meter for the rider). Average speed 17.8 mph. Time 36:54. 505 feet elevation gain. Battery went from 99 to 55. So that is a 25 mile street range with 145 lb rider. I used ~202 wh in 37 minutes. That is 328 wh in an hour, or the motor averaged ~328 watts.

Alan Butters
6 days ago

Purchased new in October 2013. Very low miles. Lithium battery properly maintained with regular charge intervals. Bike is in excellent condition. Only one small rub mark on lower chain stay. My wife has Cystic Fibrosis and doesn't ride very often, so hoping someone can use this as a commuter bike or similar. I plan to purchase a Geo Orbital wheel for one of my road bikes for the rare occasion when she decides to ride.

mrgold35
6 days ago

Welcome!

I've been an owner of two 2016 Radrovers since Sept/16. I'm +3800 miles between both bikes and I use equally between work commuting and trail riding. I didn't realized they finally updated the Rad product line. I didn't find any tech data for what improvements over the 2016/2017 Radrover models.

I've been extremely happy with my Rads and most updates I could do aftermarket anyways like suspension seatpost, adjustable height handlebars, battery pack, brakes, or lights. It would be nice to have the option for +2018 upgraded front suspension, brakes upgrade, extra gears for more low hill climb ability and higher road speeds, or different frame sizes.

The only bad thing out the box with the Rad are the Kenda tires. Noisy, OK grip on pavement, a lot of drag to limit acceleration/top speed, can be flat prone, and wear pretty fast (especially in the rear with pavement riding). Everyone has be extremely happy and never looked back after dumping the Kenda and switching to Vee8 120tpi, Origin8 Supercell, or Maxxis Hookworms.

RedRides
3 weeks ago

good review - thank you

Ronnie Dylan
1 month ago

Cheating? In what event? What class, what rules? Are there winners? What is the prize? Who sponsored the event, who can enter? Was there an entry fee? ....

AGT0M
1 month ago

Thanks for sharing.

Kali vara prasad
2 months ago

Hey, I am from INDIA. I do watch every review of yours. You try to keep every detail with so interestingly.

signingof1
3 months ago

The engine is super loud...

Y Z
3 months ago

Anything you can tell me it would help, as I am selling my $5,000 Stump Jumper and buying an 'e' bike. I am stuck on the Giant or the Specialized has a 'e' mountain bike that resembles  the stump jumper. But the Specialized 'e' is $7,500. Please let me know what the higher end model of the Giant 'e' is, I would rather have the dual suspension. Does it come with different engine size offerings ? What is your max 'e' speed ? I am in NJ / NYC and there are laws that don't allow after a certain speed. What distance does one battery last ? Can you buy an extra battery ? charger ? I heard you should not bring the battery down below 20% remaining ? what is maximum 'e' assist speed ? Thanks for any info on yours..tim

Luis Calderon
3 months ago

rather you don't know how to shift gears, rather this bike is a piece of shit

All4Grogg
4 months ago

When he said aluminum fork...i though he made a mistake....he didn't. I had a road bike with an aluminum fork once, NEVER AGAIN. Steel is worth the weight over aluminum for forks, carbon is fantastic, aluminum will just beat you up.

Budwiser
4 months ago

Great vid , thanks. Here in England we are limited ( I believe) to a peddle assist of 15.5 mph! We are also limited to a maximum speed limit of 70mph on motorways driving a car or motorbike. My point is this , I can't buy a bike that goes over the 15.5 mph with the assist , but I can buy a car with 450bhp that can do zero to 60 in 3.5 seconds with a top speed of 150mph ! I just don't get it ! Does any body know if I can import one of your 28mph speed monsters ? :-)

BBK III
5 months ago

Great vid. Thanks! I'm getting one this week. It opens up new ground. Seems Yamaha & Bosch are pretty similar. I think Bosch may look a bit cooler, but also a bit higher pricetag. Both good. Giant is a great company, but I wish they would re-brand. The name just lacks in coolness, although this bike looks pretty slick.

hcw199
5 months ago

can u ride these without the assistance to review how they are when the battery dies... cheers

Richard Day
5 months ago

I love the colors they be colorful .

Bad Ass
5 months ago

How much does it weigh without the battery pack.

Donandnan Elmore
5 months ago

I've got a GIANT Quick-E+ and my gears don't "mash" as much as they did for Cort. I did my first "longer" ride the other day. I was putting down the flat at around 20mph and got smoked by some very good road bike riders. They were far enough ahead of me that they got through a light and I had to stop. About 5+ miles later I saw them again (I had thought they had turned off when I couldn't see them. We were all three on a long climb and I passed them both never to see them again and we went another 2 or so miles before I turned. As I passed the wife, who had pulled away from her husband, she said, "I need that!" to me.

Apolaudi
5 months ago

Great. It's my first ride on E Bike last week. And i find it exciting as my age is nearly 50yrs old and my kid is 11 and on jump bike and bmx. I can't keep up with him riding together as age is catching up. Now i got lots of choices from your video. lots of knowledge. Thanks.

Sorin Vasile Bogdan
6 months ago

Is every road cyclist out there a ''racer'? What happened to just commuting or going out by yourself?

ElectricBikeReview.com
6 months ago

I'm not sure if your'e referencing something I said in the review but you're correct, road bikes can be great for active commuting and solo rides... that's how I usually ride with them anyway. In the ebike space, there are lots of models without drop bars so I think when I see something like this it stands out and feels like a racer in a way :)

gabe arellano
6 months ago

how's the resistance when you're pedaling with the pedal assist off just normal without the system on is there a big resistance or can you pedal like a normal bike

KCFlyer2
6 months ago

I just bought one of these bikes because of a health issue. This bike is just what the doctor ordered. It's a damn good road bike even with the system turned off. It is on the heavy side, but I've ridden 100 miles the first week I owned it and I noticed on the Mapmyride app that the line that displays the speed and elevation, the blue (speed) line is essentially flat. I am using the same amount of effort and I have increased my average speed on 30+ mile rides from 12 to 18.2 mph - and that was in Eco mode.

As he says, it takes a little getting used to when shifting. You have to ease up on peddling to insure that all shifts are smooth. Doesn't take long to figure out.

The bike shop told me that I'd most likely never use more than Eco unless I wanted to show off. So far, they are right...although I did show off on one ride - in Normal mode, I was going uphill at 25 mph. I;m almost afraid to use Power mode. But I love that this bike feels like a regular bike - every so often you can feel the assist, but it usually feels like you are riding as usual....just going faster. Wonderful bike. Ride one once and you'll want one

Aaron ___
6 months ago

this one is sweet and the price is high but not outrageous.

Louie Lamoore
6 months ago

These e-bikes should flourish in America if there wasn't this one big red flag: most Americans won't fit on a bike.

Tow Hee
3 months ago

Riding a bike in most larger cities in the US will probably get you killed.