JOLT eBike Folding Bike Review

Jolt Ebike Folding Electric Bike Review
Jolt Ebike Profile Right
Jolt Ebike Chainring 350 Watt Motor
Jolt Ebike Lg Battery Frame
Jolt Ebike Handelbars Control Center Throttle
Jolt Ebike Handlebars Brake Inhibitors
Jolt Ebike Shimano 160 Mm Mechanical Disc Brake
Jolt Ebike 20 Inch Kenda Tire
Jolt Ebike Shimano Tourney Derailleur
Jolt Ebike Velo Plush Saddle
Jolt Ebike Folded Profile
Jolt Ebike Folded Front
Jolt Ebike Folded Top
Jolt Ebike Profile Left
Jolt Ebike 2 Amp Hour Batttery Charger
Jolt Ebike Folding Electric Bike Review
Jolt Ebike Profile Right
Jolt Ebike Chainring 350 Watt Motor
Jolt Ebike Lg Battery Frame
Jolt Ebike Handelbars Control Center Throttle
Jolt Ebike Handlebars Brake Inhibitors
Jolt Ebike Shimano 160 Mm Mechanical Disc Brake
Jolt Ebike 20 Inch Kenda Tire
Jolt Ebike Shimano Tourney Derailleur
Jolt Ebike Velo Plush Saddle
Jolt Ebike Folded Profile
Jolt Ebike Folded Front
Jolt Ebike Folded Top
Jolt Ebike Profile Left
Jolt Ebike 2 Amp Hour Batttery Charger

Summary

  • A clean looking folding electric bike that comes in three different colors and has an easily removable locking internal battery
  • Extremely simple to fold and unfold but still has two-step locks so it won't come undone accidentally, relatively lightweight
  • Throttle and pedal assist options expand the role the Jolt can play, sturdy alloy wheels won't go out of true, the motor and battery are hidden
  • Good folding electric bike for zipping through the city with a low Indiegogo campaign price, but there's still some hidden fees like $199 for shipping, higher MSRP, no suspension, racks or integrated lights

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

JOLT eBike

Model:

Folding Bike

Price:

$1,999 ($199 Shipping in Contiguous US)

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Urban, Travel

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

None

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

2018

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

46 lbs (20.86 kg)

Battery Weight:

3.8 lbs (1.72 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

12 in (30.48 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

Unfolded: 12" Seat Tube, 24.35" Reach, 22.5” Stand Over Height, 24" Width, 60.5" Length, Folded: 27.75" Height, 17" Width, 34” Length

Frame Types:

Mid-Step, Folding

Frame Colors:

Pearl White, Obsidian Black, Electric Blue

Frame Fork Details:

Aluminum Alloy, 100 mm Hub Length, 10 mm Axle with Nuts

Frame Rear Details:

142 mm Hub Length, 10 mm Axle with Nuts

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses

Gearing Details:

7 Speed 1x7 Shimano Tourney, 12-28T Cassette

Shifter Details:

Shimano SIS Index Thumb Shifter

Cranks:

Aluminum Alloy, 170 mm Length, 48T Chainring with Plastic Guide

Pedals:

Wellgo, Plastic Platform, Folding

Headset:

Neco, Threadless Internal Cups, 1-1/8" Straight

Stem:

Aluminum Alloy, Telescoping 240 mm Length to 400 mm Length, Quick Release, Folding

Handlebar:

Aluminum Alloy, Low-Rise, 620 mm Length

Brake Details:

Shimano Mechanical Disc with 160 mm Rotor in Front and Tektro V-Brake in Rear, Dia-Compe Steel Levers with Motor Inhibitors

Grips:

Semi-Ergonomic Rubber

Saddle:

Velo Plush

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

580 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

33.8 mm

Rims:

Cast Aluminum Alloy, 37.5 mm Width

Spokes:

6 Cast Supports

Tire Brand:

Kenda, 20" x 2.125" (57-406)

Wheel Sizes:

20 in (50.8cm)

Tire Details:

40 to 65 PSI, 2.8 to 4.6 BAR

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Mid-Frame Kickstand, Optional LED Headlamp ($29), Optional Additional Battery Charger ($59), Optional Additional Lithium-ion Battery ($249)

Other:

Locking Removable Internally Mounted Battery Pack with USB port and On/Off switch, Metal Bar Below Bottom Bracket Stabilizes the Bike When Folded and Protects the Front Chainring, .8 lb 2 Amp Charger

Electronic Details

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

350 watts

Battery Brand:

LG

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

7.8 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

280.8 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

3.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

10 miles (16 km)

Estimated Max Range:

25 miles (40 km)

Display Type:

Fixed, LED

Readouts:

Power Mode (Low, Medium, High), Battery Level (4 Bars), On/Off, 6 KMH Mode (Slow Mode, Walk Mode)

Display Accessories:

USB Type A Charging Port on Left Side of Frame

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist, Trigger Throttle (8 Magnet Sensor Disc)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

JOLT eBike is a new company fresh off their Indiegogo campaign, which they absolutely crushed by the way. These guys were looking for $50,000 in funding and have nearly reached $300,000 at the time of this review. While JOLT’s folding electric bike, aptly named the Jolt, isn’t particularly unique, it still offers a few unique features that set it apart. It comes with motor inhibitors that cut power whenever you brake, folds and unfolds quickly and easily, comes in three different colors, has a 350-watt geared hub motor that is built into the rear wheel (which looks great) and has both throttle and pedal-assist with a top speed of 20 mph. Perhaps the best thing about the Jolt from my perspective is the super low Indiegogo campaign price of $599. I was excited to review this bike given the price, but after a bit of research I discovered some caveats. First and foremost, the MSRP for the Jolt is $1,999 – a far cry from the campaign price. While it’s possible the retail price may go down once the Jolt hits the market, it’s not a guarantee. And even those who got in early on the campaign, and snagged one of these for $599, still have to pay a flat shipping fee of $199. Additionally, it costs $39 to upgrade the front brake from a V brake to a mechanical disc brake, and $29 for those who want to opt for the LED headlamp. Still, all said and done, you’re getting out the door for only about a grand after taxes – for the campaign price anyway… Something I found a bit confusing about the campaign though is shipping and warranty. The JOLT Indiegogo campaign website mentions warranties aren’t honored outside the U.S., which seems to imply this bike comes with a warranty and can be shipped worldwide. However, after talking with JOLT directly, I discovered there is no warranty and it can only be shipped to the contiguous U.S. So folks in Alaska and Hawaii are out of luck, unfortunately. Still, this was a fun bike to review and ride, so let’s make like a swan and dive right in.

The Jolt comes in only one frame size – 12 inches – but thanks to the telescoping handlebars and extremely long seat post, I think this bike can accommodate riders of various heights. I’m 5’10” and this bike fit me fine, though it did feel a little small and reminded me of a BMX bike. But taller riders, or those who simply want to extend their reach, can easily raise the handlebars, twist them forward, and raise the seat with the quick-release levers. One thing I want to note about the quick-release for the seat post was that it seemed like it might not have been quite the right size, or perhaps the seat post diameter was just slightly too narrow. The seat post rattled around some and I had to seriously tighten the quick-release lever to the point where I needed to use both my hands and almost all my strength to clamp it down. On the plus side though, the seat post is a whopping 33.8 mm in diameter, which is great for taller riders who need to raise the seat post higher than normal. That extra thickness should help ensure the seat post doesn’t bend or otherwise become deformed. Another note for those who are looking to utilize the telescoping handlebars: Raising the handlebars also extends the brake lines and motor inhibitor wires, which could be pulled loose or get damaged if the handlebars are raised too high and then you turn hard. Try not to stretch the wires or pull on them too much.

The frame is made from 6061 aluminum alloy, giving the Jolt a curb weight of 46 pounds. That’s not too bad for an electric bike and should make lugging it around a bit easier than some heavier electric bikes. It’s on the lighter side for folding models but that’s probably because it doesn’t have suspension and the battery capacity is lower than average. Because the 350-watt hub motor is located in the rear and the internal locking battery is secured in the middle of the frame, the Jolt felt pretty well balanced. Folding this thing is a breeze. Flick open the quick release lever in the middle of the frame and at the base of the handlebars and voila! Folded. I managed to fold and unfold this bad boy with one hand, which I thought was pretty cool. That might be handy if I had luggage or groceries or something in one hand and still needed to load the Jolt into my car with the other. The Jolt I received was the Pearl White color, but the company also offers it in Obsidian Black and Electric Blue. At the bottom of the frame is a metal bar that serves to help protect the chainring and also balance the bike when it’s folded. However, I noticed that in order to actually utilize this feature the bike couldn’t be completely folded or it would tip over. There’s also no magnetic clasp, rubber strap, or bungee system included to keep the bike folded. I sometimes use my own bungee cords or you can get some all-plastic cords with adjustable length from Amazon like this.

The tires on the Jolt are little 20-inchers, which are great for giving a mechanical boost to the motor and coasting efficiently, but not so good for shock absorption or stability. The smaller tire can lead to some squirreliness at higher speeds, and 20 mph feels a lot faster on a bike like this than something with 26″ or 28″ wheels. That’s not to say the smaller tire size is a bad thing – in fact I actually like them and think they’re fitting for this bike’s philosophy of use – but it’s definitely something to be aware of. It’s not the kind of ebike I’d get for long daily commutes. From an aesthetics standpoint, I also appreciate the rims, which have six large cast bars as opposed to traditional spokes. As far as components go, the Jolt has primarily entry-level equipment. I wasn’t able to discern the brand of the hub motor, and the Shimano Tourney derailleur works fine, but it’s definitely on the lower end of the quality spectrum. In fact, it’s the lowest component group that Shimano makes as far as I’m aware. I did like the Wellgo folding pedals quite a bit, though I prefer the type that have a lever in the middle as opposed to these, which need to be pushed in before they fold. They’re pretty generic, and might flex or feel small if you’re heavy and have large feet… this is another area that is easy to upgrade with larger alloy folding pedals from Wellgo like these.

JOLT estimates the range of their bike at 50 miles, though honestly I think with the 36 volt 7.8 amp hour battery it’d probably be closer to around 15 to 30 miles. But I think that’s still fine as I personally wouldn’t want to be riding a folding bike with no suspension fork for extended periods. The battery itself was extremely easy to remove. Just open the frame and insert the key to unlock it and it slides right out. Some of the older folding e-bikes required you to leave your key in while riding or had the locking core external to the frame which could take more water and dirt, so it’s nice that this one is protected. I LOVE that the battery has a USB port built in as that means it can be used to power the bike and also my accessories! It also means I can use the battery as a portable power bank too, which is a huge plus in my opinion. The battery has an on/off switch so you can keep it from drawing down when not in use (and maybe keeping it safer if you’re on a long trip and the bike is getting jostled around). Having a removable battery is great for those who want to use the Jolt as a city bike and charge the battery while the bike is parked a rack or maybe the bike is loaded in the cold outside of your car and you want to keep the battery safe inside or use that USB port to fill your phone or something. Because the battery is relatively lightweight – weighing just 3.8 pounds – it won’t be as much of a chore to lug around as some of the heavier battery packs. Accessing the USB port, On/Off button and charging port on the battery while it’s inside the bike is done via a triangular rubber grommet on the left side of the Jolt. The grommet seemed to fit securely and snuggly in place and didn’t seem like it would come loose during riding – a problem I’ve noticed with quite a few other electric vehicles. This may seem like a small detail, but having a grommet that doesn’t come undone when it’s not supposed to means dirt, water and other debris will stay out of the electronics, thereby increasing the overall longevity of the battery. Do be careful if you plug a USB cable in while riding the Jolt, because it could get snagged and bumped by your foot when pedaling.

Riding the Jolt was fun. The eight-magnet cadence sensor did an okay job at giving and cutting off power when I started and stopped pedaling and the lag wasn’t too bad – about a half second to a second at most. The throttle was also fun to use as it made the Jolt feel a little like a scooter as opposed to a bicycle. This is a feature I always appreciate, especially since I don’t see throttles on electric bikes that often. Because of the Jolt’s small frame and tires, it was easy to whip around and felt quite nimble. I think those who are able to get the Jolt at the campaign price of $599 plus $199 for shipping are getting a decent deal, but with an MSRP of $1,999 it would be nice to see some more upgraded features like front and rear disc brakes, a cargo rack, integrated LED lights, a torque sensor and maybe a step up or two with the derailleur and a suspension fork. You can see lots of other folding electric bikes which do offer these upgrades priced in the $1,500 range reviewed here. This seems like a good bike for those who need something portable and relatively lightweight to zip through the city or down the beach. I’d like to thank JOLT for partnering with me on this review and I welcome your comments and feedback below, especially if you’re a backer for the Indiegogo campaign. As with all crowd funded products, there’s some question as to how long it will take to ship or whether it will change from what is presented to the final product. I have done my best to present what I got in an objective way and I hope for the best to anyone who is backing.

Pros:

  • Very easy to fold and unfold this electric bike with sturdy quick-release levers on the frame and stem, the handlebar can also be rotated and this raises or brings it back because of the low-rise bar design
  • Telescoping handlebars and extremely long seat post means the Jolt should be suitable for a large range of rider heights, plus the seat post is sturdy thanks to its larger than normal diameter
  • Having a trigger throttle means the Jolt ebike can be used like a moped or scooter instead of only being pedaled, this could be handy if you’re carrying cargo or focused on balancing with the smaller wheels (which tend to be twitchier)
  • Gotta love the plastic chain guide, this ensures that the chain won’t bounce off as easily (important since there’s no suspension here) and it is handy when folding the bike as well, though plastic could get cracked vs. Aluminum alloy used on some other ebikes I have seen
  • The bike is very stealthy, you cannot see the motor casing or battery unless you know what to look for, I like how they are concealed and also well protected inside parts of the frame
  • Buying an ebike online usually means you’ll have to deal with packaging and some assembly… and while the JOLT eBike did come in a big cardboard box, I was delighted to see that it was fully assembled, and the wheels were perfectly straight because they don’t use spokes like most full sized models
  • It’s nice to be able to tap into the battery for your own portable electronics, either while riding or with the pack off the bike, just be careful with any wires that might be plugged in if you do try to use it and ride at the same time… it would be a bummer if you snagged a wire and broke the USB port
  • Being able to override pedal assist with the brake levers, which both have motor inhibitors, provides a sense of control and safety
  • I like how the bike remembers what level of pedal assist you were in when you turn it off… it stays in the same mode when you turn it on again! Just be careful not to get surprised by this or bump the trigger throttle on the right because that could cause some instability or an accident
  • Three color choices so you could get a couple of bikes and keep them separate, or just go for something more fun, but I like the white because it’s going to be the most visible at night (especially since this ebike has no integrated lights or reflective tires)
  • It looks like you could add a rear rack to this bike pretty easily, I saw threaded eyelets on the seat stays and near the rear dropout, just find one that would fit a smaller 20″ wheel setup

Cons:

  • The pricing on this ebike is a bit confusing because of the Indiegogo special, it sounds like shipping is $199 and if the true MSRP is $1,999 then this is one of the most expensive folding electric bikes around despite being kind of generic
  • No suspension, cast rims instead of spokes, and the smaller 20″ wheel diameter means that this ebike could feel stiff and uncomfortable on long rides
  • The motor power cable exits the right side of the rear dropout and is not protected by a derailleur guard, so just be careful not to bump this cable when folding and transporting, it’s not uncommon to see these cables get bent if the bike tips etc. and that could ruin the motor
  • The display panel is very basic, instead of an LCD with numeric readouts for speed, odometer, and battery percentage, you get LED indicators and dots that guide you but aren’t as precise
  • Rim brakes are a bit more basic than disc brakes and may get dirty and squeak more, apparently you can upgrade the front to disc (the demo bike I got came with a front disc) so this is one of the areas where cheaper parts were used but the price of the bike doesn’t really reflect that, on the Indiegogo campaign you have to pay more for the headlight and disc brake so I’m not sure how that will work on the final bike once the campaign is over
  • It seems like either the seat post is too narrow for the seat tube or maybe the seatpost collar needs to be tighter, I had to really tighten this down to reduce rattling and support my weight (so the seat wouldn’t slide down)
  • It’s great to have a kickstand but this one is mounted just below the bottom bracket which means the crank arms can collide with it if you back the bike up, it’s a minor gripe but some bikes do have their kickstand positioned further back and out of the way of the cranks
  • Minor gripe, the shifter cables, brake lines, and electrical wiring on this bike is all externally routed and can look a bit messy – especially on the white frame, but maybe it’s easier to repair and won’t get pinched when folding as easily?

Resources:

Ann M.
6 months ago

Good overview; I did notice that the console pictured on Jolt’s Indiegogo page is not the old style, simplistic type that your bike comes with. The issue of not knowing your speed would’ve been solved had Jolt used the LCD console originally showed online. And no warranty; that’s a non-starter for me!

Reply
court
6 months ago

Good catch Ann, I’m not sure exactly what the deal was with Brent’s demo bike (having a front disc brake, no light, the more basic LCD) but even if it had all of these things I would still feel that the $2k+ price tag is a bit high, especially with products like the ENZO Lite which does have an LCD, a larger battery pack, integrated headlight, two disc brakes, and a long track record of selling electric bicycles with decent support for $1.4k

Reply
Ann M.
6 months ago

Definitely agree on that price point; too high for this product.

Mike
6 months ago

Still can’t figure out how these Indiegogo campaigns get started or are allowed to be funded? This is clearly a direct copy of at least 5 chinese made ebikes you can find on Alibaba, and even then you can spec better components that whats on this bike. Typically you can source them for $495 to $695, and if you buy in sufficient quantities (maybe 80 to 100 at a time), you can keep your shipping and customs costs down to about $40 to $60 per bike. With barriers to entry this low, I’m amazed that more e-bike vendors white labeling bikes like this aren’t introducing a new one on Indiegogo, at least once a week.

That this bike has an MSRP of $1999, means they will gross margin out at least $1200 per bike. It’s clear there is near zero innovation or design work put into this particular unit. Fraudulent misrepresentation if you ask me, and I’d seriously refrain from reviewing any ebike that is sourced as a copy direct from China. I wonder if people understand that when a bike is copied in China, there is literally no engineering done, but merely a copy of geometry and components. M2S does the exact same thing. They tried a Kickstarter, but somehow got ‘caught’. Again, nothing but white labeled China copies with a US ‘name’ slapped on them. You can find at least 4 or 5 copies of the same models they offer on Alibaba. So who is the ‘original’ engineering designer or manufacturer?

Reply
court
6 months ago

Hi Mike, all great points. I agree with you… but we try to cover a wide range of products, especially if they are fully funded and people are interested, so they can know more about what they are getting. I personally strive to be as thorough and objective/critical as I can, but Brent is newer and tends to be more generally excited. It can be a fine balance reviewing products and presenting information but also trying to stay fair and generally constructive so as not to upset people who are excited about cheaper products. Almost every ebike out there, even really nice ones, use parts made in China or Taiwan. Yes, this particular model isn’t as unique, but that doesn’t mean it cannot be appreciated. I do agree that the MSRP is pretty high.

Reply
Mike
6 months ago

Hey Court, you are doing a Yeomans job of reviewing here, and a huge service for everyone in this market. That you are doing a wide range of products, is laudable too.

That said, you are walking a tight rope by reviewing so many offerings, as people can inadvertently take these reviews as a defacto endorsement, by even being on your website, or figure that if it is being reviewed as long as they take whats said in the reviews that they think they ‘understand’ what they are getting into, it could still end up being a little misleading for them. Its hard to do what you are doing, but at some point without getting into the nuts and bolts, and actually taking these things apart to know what truly is the underlying technology in things like the motors, or batteries, and what type of controllers or BMS’s are employed in the batteries, it would seem to me to represent some risk on EBR’s part on how or what is being said.

Keep up the good work ! (my comments are only meant to help people have a little more discerning eye, and come from someone who has been following this market since the late 90’s, and is in the business of repairing them, buying them, selling them, etc.) (and yes, I have taken many of these things apart, and seen the ‘guts’ of how some are made.)

Mike
6 months ago

So here is a China version of the Jolt. Just order it with the 5 spoke mag wheels, and rear hub motor, and you have the Jolt. Feiwel, the model name of this ebike, and firm name of Jinhua Feirui Vehicle Co., Ltd does show other folding bike designs with the same wheel design. Depending on quantity and options, they price it between $450 and $800/unit. I have corresponded with at least 20 of these firms, to pin down pricing, and specific components, to see what is possible to bring over here to the US with some level of quality control. The primary issue is stocking enough of their parts in the US. Then dealing with the hassles of US customs. If you deal with an Alibaba sourced firm you have to make sure you deal with one that has at least 5 to 9 years as a Gold Star Supplier. And unless you are willing to set up a real dealer network, shipping ebikes without local dealer support, is a non starter for me. Too many things can and do go wrong, and eventually the brand will get eroded, and people will eventually catch on and likely steer toward name brands with local dealer support, selling their first ‘e-bike’ on Craiglist or Ebay, once they learned their lesson. As always its buyer beware.

Reply
court
6 months ago

Wonderful insights here Mike. Thank you for taking the time to illuminate different options and weigh the pros and cons of going with a direct cheaper product from Alibaba vs. an importer like JOLT who might handle some of the inconvenience, and how much the price differs. I love the Internet, being able to compare, and get help and perspective from others like this. Thank you :)

Reply
Rick
4 weeks ago

I’m really surprised to see a review of the bike. Indiegogo still shows this item to be in prototype stage meaning it has not gone into production. The owner of the project, John Madden, has missed the estimated shipping date which was in April. When pressed for a new estimated shipping date he responds that there are many moving parts, he’s working on it and the latest update states that he’s now looking for import support. Did you actually order one on Indiegogo? If so, perhaps he’s closer than we think to getting the product delivered. Thanks for the great review. I hope mine is as fun to ride when and if it arrives.

Rick Rose
Phoenix, AZ

Reply
court
4 weeks ago

Hi Rick! This review was posted by my friend Brent. He has done a handful of videos here and usually covers bikes that get shipped to him (as companies are looking to build awareness). He did not purchase the bike, it was sent by Jolt because they wanted to have an independent review done even as the product had not yet fully come to market. I cannot say when it will come and I feel your pain as far as the delays go. We try to mention that crowdfunding can have delays and that the final product may differ slightly from the review units. I hope this helps you and wish you luck with the bike when it does arrive :)

Reply

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marcuspresident
6 months ago

This one, the Jolt ebike

looks exactly like this one on Alibaba https://www.alibaba.com/product-detail/High-quality-20-inch-folding-e_60695446086.html?spm=a2700.7724838.2017115.100.2d6929d1ePpAsz

Is it the same product? And I cant find anywhere lwhat motor it is on the Jolt bike? The review doesnt say that either.

jhoblo
1 week ago

Another reason to ride a folding bike! Here's what Amtrak has to say about folders:

Folding bicycles under the dimensions of 34" x 15" x 48" (860 x 380 x 1120 mm) will be allowed onboard all trains in lieu of a piece of baggage.
Only certain passenger cars can accommodate folding bicycles as carry-on baggage, otherwise they must be checked.
Only true folding bicycles (bicycles specifically designed to fold up into a compact assembly) are acceptable. Generally, these bikes have frame latches allowing the frame to be collapsed, and small wheels. Regular bikes of any size, with or without wheels, are not considered folding bikes, and may not be stored as folding bikes aboard trains.
You must fold up your folding bicycle before boarding the train. You may store the bike only in luggage storage areas at the end of the car (or, in Superliners, on the lower level). You may not store bikes in overhead racks.

I would suggest that you watch your bike at stops so that someone doesn't grab it when exiting the train (when I rode the SW Chief from ABQ to L.A. almost anyone could have grabbed someone's luggage, it appeared to me.) Put it in a bag so that it doesn't look so much like a bike, especially an e-bike.

bob armani
1 week ago

My 2 cents-You mentioned "The Panasonic is a very reliable motor,". There are not very many E-bikes currently that I have seen with this motor. Back in 2015, Easy Motion had one on a race bike. The other motors you have listed are the most well known brands on E-bikes today, for the exception of the TQ120S. Nice post though about motors and their characteristics. I would pick any of those from the list for each selective terrain you will be riding. Just to know they can be serviced is a big plus IMHO.

vasubandu
1 week ago

Today, I decided to wander over to Electric and Folding Bikes Northwest, which is in the Ballard neighborhood about 11 miles away.I checked, and they close at 6, which surprised me. So I headed out at 4:30. Some confluence of circumstances apparently caused massive traffic jams throughout Seattle today, and at 5:45, Google Maps said I was still 20 miles away. I really wished I had an electric bike the whole way. I called and asked the guy if he would mind sticking around for 10 minutes so I could pop my head in and take a look around, and he said he would be happy to.

Electric and Folding Bikes was an entirely different experience than E-Bikes Seattle. They carry more brands and have newer models out. They also carry non-electric bikes and are an actual bike store. The guy I talked to was a lot more knowledgeable that the one at E-Bike. I really was not impressed with E-Bike, but I was very pleased with Electric and Folding Bikes. I did not try to test drive anything because it was late and raining, but we looked at a number of bikes and discussed my needs. He said that with my hills, he would tend to prefer a mid -drive bike. He also said that they can build a custom bike using a kit, but apparently the trade war is going to his those kits hard. I asked him out if a carbon fiber frame could be used, and he said it could, but he would not advise it because when carbon fiber fails, it does do catastrophically. I actually looked that up, and it is amazing.

They had a Specialized Turbo Como and Turbo Vado, which both were impressive and a number from Easy Motion. They also carry Orbea, which is a Spanish brand. Their Keram bike is nice, but their Wild FS mountain bike pretty much steals the show

Looks like it was well received. It sells for $4,700, but bikebling.com has it on sale for $3,760. The frame looks like carbon fiber, but is alloy, and is has a Shimano Motor DU-E8000 motor and a Shimano Steps E8010 500Wh battery

An article came out in ebike-mtb.com four days ago called "The best eMTB motor 2018 – 6 powerhouses go head to head." The Shimano DU-E8000 was one those included. It did not rank them in the end, just compared. But its discussion of the DU-E8000 was very complimentary

"The compact Shimano motor gives developers and engineers the most freedom when designing frame geometries, which explains its popularity with bike designers and engineers. On top of that, it’s a whole kg lighter than the big Bosch Performance CX, which also requires considerably more room for installation and thus limits both the geometry and the positioning of the bearing points. "

"When it comes to displays, bike manufacturers have the choice. Almost every motor supplier offers a number of options and different sizes. For their Brose motor, Specialized dispense with a display altogether and rely on a minimalist charge-indicator placed on the downtube. You also have the option of sending all of the most important data via Bluetooth directly to an external device such a Garmin or a smartphone. With their high-resolution display mounted behind the handlebars, Shimano currently offers the best compromise between integration, legibility, and protection. Shimano also offers a very intuitive remote system which derives from a Di2 shifter and allows you to switch between support levels. "

"Which motor is the best?
If we were exclusively looking for power, the TQ 120S would be the undisputed winner. However its sheer power is difficult to modulate and eats through a lot of energy in the higher support levels – plus not many manufacturers are using it at the moment. The Yamaha PW-X churns out decent amounts of power at low cadence, but eventually runs out of steam when riding at high cadence. Its turbulent nature in standing starts is not to everyone’s liking either.
The Panasonic is a very reliable motor, but its performance loss at a high cadence is irritating at best and the display integration still needs more sorting.
The Bosch Performance CX is currently the most common motor on the market and has repeatedly proven its capability over the years. Thanks to its updated software and the progressive eMTB mode, it is now even better equipped for all off-road scenarios. Unfortunately, its large dimensions and the noticeable drag above the 25-km/h limit is still a major drawback and represents a serious challenge for ebike designers.

Shimano’s STEPS E8000 motor offers the fewest compromises and suits a wider range of applications. Its intuitive operation system and well-balanced power delivery (especially in Trail mode) are truly pleasant – plus the compact design and light weight are the ideal prerequisites for manufacturers to design the perfect eMTB.

The brand-new Brose Drive S motor offers the most natural and controllable ride. If its predecessor was lacking power, the updated version of the Brose motor stands right behind the TQ motor. On top of this, it runs very quietly, can be finely modulated even in the higher support levels, and presents virtually no resistance at speeds above 25 km/h.

However, the motor is only half of the story. Factors such as geometry, suspension, and spec of a bike are the keys to a comfortable, safe, and pleasant ride. When deciding on a bike you should consider all of these decisive factors carefully."

Overall a surprising and somewhat compelling bike. They did not have one these in stock, but I will check their plans. I will try to head back tomorrow to test a few.

If you sensed a rabbit hole developing, you were right. That article refers to a TQ 120S motor that is described as far more powerful than anything else. TQ used to be Cleanmobile but changed its name. The TQ 120S appears to be a radical development. It is very small and extremely powerful.

I only found one bike for sale with the TQ 120S http://www.togoparts.com/marketplace/ad-details/1003913/new-m1-spitzing-race-850-watt-e-bike-carbon-colour

Insane

Alaskan
1 week ago

Mike, I went through this process back in January. I spent loads of time reading Court's reviews, watching his videos and then test riding bikes in four different bike shops in Seattle and one on Vashon Island.

I live in Bellingham, have been ebiking since February and just love it. I am 67 and peaked out at 238 lbs last year. I now ride my bike almost every day for at least averaging 17 miles. The only time I drive my car is if it is raining or I need to haul something too big for the bike. I am now down to 208 lbs. I wake up every day and look out the window to see if I can ride. The feeling of freedom, health and vitality is addicting.

Keep up the good work doing research. There are a wealth of shops to visit in Seattle. Resist the urge to buy until you do some more test riding. You will find one that feels right for you soon enough.

Make your next trip to Seattle Electric & Folding Bikes in Ballard http://electricvehiclesnw.com/ They have been around longer than anyone else in the area, are very helpful and friendly.

Next go up to G&O Cycles at 85th & Greenwood https://familycyclery.com/. They are the Riese & Muller dealer and have a good number of demo bikes to ride...nice people as well.

Seattle Electric Bike https://seattleelectricbike.net/ is nearby. They carry Cube, Bulls, Raleigh, Felt , Focus and others. My experience with the owner was quite offputting though. PM me if you want details.

After you have visited these three shops, the style of bike that will work best for you should begin to emerge.

TeJay
1 week ago

Thank you so much for that! I did go to nice wheels. But I didn't like the bike they had color wise and it was the only color they offered. I believe it was the blix 20 inch wheel folding bike.

jhoblo
1 week ago

Which Tern did you ride? A couple have Bosch motors, but I think that one still uses the 350W Bafang. I’ve thought about adding a BBSHD on a Link D8.
You know, folding bikes with small wheels without motors are sluggish. It’s a compromise between how portable you need your transportation to be and comfort. I seriously thought about doing a Grin conversion on a Brommie, but that kit is sold out. I didn’t ask if/when they will get more in. I don’t know that I’d like the ride on 16” wheels, but that fold is sooo nice!

rich c
1 week ago

Don't buy one without riding it! I hate the geometry of the folding bikes. The small tires and long steerer tube feels very uncomfortable to me. I'm a pretty big guy, and just have this feeling I look like a circus bear riding a tiny bike. Riding side streets in Chicago with my son makes me think that a full suspension bike is required for commuting year round. The small tires on the folding bikes will not help on a rough ride, but maybe your city does a better job with street maintenance.

EWH
2 weeks ago

Thanks, Shane. I haven't talked to Mark for at least two years. Actually I think that it was three years ago that is sent my Ridekick back and he fitted it with a fan. It helped but not enough. I still found it easier to just granny gear my recumbent trike up the hills than to pedal hard enough to maintain a speed of 6mph. That speed is what is required to keep the controller from shutting down. But it takes so long to ride that way that I just don't take the bike out. Right now I am just using it for exercise to keep me in shape - sort of.
My first electric bike was a BikeE Mountain bike with a 500w motor scavanged from a Currie electric folding bike. Eventually I got a LiPing battery from China. That bike I still have but my family rides it and I prefer the lightweight nomad-style trike with the Ridekick. Often I just want to ride near my house and I like having a bike with no heavy stuff on it. If I were touring as you are then I would do just what you are doing.
Wow, if Mark could help me I would be so grateful. I will email him or Dee. I hope they find an investor. Thank you so much for your suggestion!

Ed D
2 weeks ago

I've also started looking at 1Up USA and Quik Rack USA bike racks. The Quik Rack USA appears to be an updated version of the 1Up USA rack by the original designer in a new company. On the Quik Rack website is an interesting video. Also, in the section with pictures it shows a ramp that is included (sweet for the old guys if it's true). My bike is 65 lbs and I'm an old guy. Does anyone have any knowledge or recent info on Quik Rack.

harryS
2 weeks ago

One reason not to use them behind a trailer is you can't see them.

I was too rushed to adjust my swagman platform carrier last week for my smaller wheelbase folding bikes. Whizzing along on the expressway, I looked in the mirror and only saw one bike. Yikes! The rear bike was hanging horizontal, only held by a cable lock and the two rubber straps that hold the tires to the platform. The handlebar was only a few inches above the pavement.

Because I didn't adjust the carrier, the smaller bikes were sitting on top of the wheel baskets instead of inside them. I had also forgotten put the pin in the arm that grabs the frame, so it tilted and let the rear bike fall off. Perfect combo for a disaster, but I happened to see it.

Edie
2 weeks ago

Hi

New owner of a Tern Vektron folding bike. Have yet to buy a bike lock. Not too heavy but sufficiently secure would be ideal. Can any other owners of a Vektron S10 recommend a particular lock?

Thanks!

Scruffy's Human
2 weeks ago

Hi. I’m in the same predicament. Currently have the Riese & Mueller Delite and looking for a more compact option as well. Was considering the Tinker or Vextron and curious what decision you came up with, if any.
Many thanks for your feedback.

Dennis Dowd
7 hours ago

That is crazy, no warranty no purchase. 😮👎

Juri Coa Bori (Taino)
1 day ago

The 6kph button is for people like me who live in the city and the way it works is when you stopped at a traffic light and your actually in an incline street you hold down the button and it will help you to start moving the bike and make it easier to peddle again instead of straining your legs and gets you moving again. My bike has that option and I use it alot since we do have quite alot of inclines here in NY.

Live-Torsion-Paradox
3 weeks ago

This thing is really bad for the money with cheap parts and questionable behaviour from the manufacturer... Does NOT inspire trust. There is so much better out there.

MrLazer1211
3 weeks ago

This is literally the evelo quest one, all the way down to the charging ports and everything... Other than you get lights and a rack and all sorts of goodies for less... And a much nicer display...

Henry
2 months ago

Seen every where with normal internal battery frame, I don't see any special with it.

S B
2 months ago

Bait and switch?

LLC
4 months ago

Your gonna ruin your knees riding like that.

Lift the seat your knees will thank you later

Roman P
5 months ago

msrp is irrelevant noise as nobody in their mind would pay that for it

Ticky Tocky
6 months ago

Is this the same one that is for sale on craigslist in Rocklin that you got as a gift?

Ticky Tocky
6 months ago

2 grand?  Buy a used motorcycle.  What a rip, what is even more hilarious is the ones going for 5 grand.  Why are all these anti capitalists and tree huggers so greedy?  Buy a bicycle and a motorcycle for less instead of one of these good for neither things.

Baron Of Hell
6 months ago

Good review.

Genecop Coppola
6 months ago

Rad mini, way better..

marcuspresident -
6 months ago

And what's the brand on the motor?!

NoodlesTBograt
6 months ago

$200 shipping??? get out of here

Chris Till
6 months ago

Brent seems to keep getting quite of lot of the oddball ones. I can’t really tell if this is good value or not. The Rad Power Bikes seem very well made for the money at 1500. But this is folding so that adds to the cost. The warranty situation is also concerning.

trekkeruss
6 months ago

A fake MSRP used to make people think that $600/$800 is a great deal, and entice them to join the crowdfunding campaign. Without a motor, a folding bike of that quality can be found online for less than $300, shipping included. No way is the motor, battery, and electronics worth $1700.

Lavonne Boggs
6 months ago

Amazingly overpriced, Nice video!

Chris Barr
6 months ago

WOW the RADmini CRUSHES this bike in features and price!!!

Isaiah Yhomas
6 months ago

For $2k and only 350w 7.8ah and 280 wh, no shocks, and basic disc breaks and rear rim breaks? Is Jolt out of their minds?

Martin Schmidt
6 months ago

Overpriced crap. Really cheap parts and quality. The seatpost Belt is a crime. 2k is a joke. :D

ElectricBikeReview.com
6 months ago

I'm not sure what to make of their full price level, it seems like marketing and price anchoring to me

D Danilo
6 months ago

Excellent review, Brent! The loose seatpost issue would be annoying, and other uncertainties typical of early "campaign" editions. We've seen this frame on other folders. I'm not sure how many brands with identical frames the market will bear...time will tell. Thanks for your thoroughness, and the ride-test part of the review was quite informative. The 6kph walk-mode is very handy, but that little surface-button is definitely not handy!

Martin Schmidt
6 months ago

I also think this was a better Review than the previous Review of brent. Presentation Was much better. :)

ElectricBikeReview.com
6 months ago

Thanks for your supportive words! I'm sure Brent appreciates them. I enjoyed his insights on this review about the seat post and how the display maintained set levels of assist when power cycled. His ride test was fun too :D