Magnum Premium Review

Magnum Premium Electric Bike Review
Magnum Premium
Magnum Premium 500 Watt Internally Geared Hub Motor
Magnum Premium 48 Volt 13 Amp Hour Battery Pack
Magnum Premium Ergonomic Grips Das Kit Display And Buttons
Magnum Premium Rst Carve Suspension Fork
Magnum Premium Tektro Mechanical Disc Brakes
Magnum Premium Stand Alone Spanninga Rear Light On Rack
Magnum Premium 7 Speed Shimano Tourney Drivetrain
Magnum Premium Battery Handle Led Charge Indicator
Magnum Premium Selle Royal Look In Gel Saddle
Magnum Premium Folding Ebike In Trunk Of Car
Magnum Premium Portable 2 Amp Charger
Magnum Premium Electric Bike Review
Magnum Premium
Magnum Premium 500 Watt Internally Geared Hub Motor
Magnum Premium 48 Volt 13 Amp Hour Battery Pack
Magnum Premium Ergonomic Grips Das Kit Display And Buttons
Magnum Premium Rst Carve Suspension Fork
Magnum Premium Tektro Mechanical Disc Brakes
Magnum Premium Stand Alone Spanninga Rear Light On Rack
Magnum Premium 7 Speed Shimano Tourney Drivetrain
Magnum Premium Battery Handle Led Charge Indicator
Magnum Premium Selle Royal Look In Gel Saddle
Magnum Premium Folding Ebike In Trunk Of Car
Magnum Premium Portable 2 Amp Charger

Summary

  • A folding speed pedelec (capable of ~25 mph) that also offers throttle on demand, you get plenty of power from a 500 Watt hub motor and 48 Volt 13 amp hour battery pack
  • Two frame styles and four color choices let you personalize the product a bit, folding mechanisms have locks for safety, I like the reflective tires and LED lights even though they require separate batteries
  • Cast Aluminum rims can handle more weight than spokes and won't go out of true or break as easily, decent suspension fork, seat post shock, ergonomic grips and gel saddle enhance comfort
  • With so many features the bike weighs more at ~61 lbs, the kickstand would stay out of the way better if mounted towards the rear vs. bottom bracket, key must be left in to ride

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Magnum

Model:

Premium

Price:

$1,899

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Urban, Commuting, Travel

Electric Bike Class:

Speed Pedalec (Class 3)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States, Canada

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

61.3 lbs (27.8 kg)

Battery Weight:

9.2 lbs (4.17 kg)

Motor Weight:

8.5 lbs (3.85 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

15 in (38.1 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

15" Seat Tube, 21.5" Reach, 14.5" or 22.5" Stand Over Height, 65.5" Length

Frame Types:

Step-Thru, Mid-Step, Folding

Frame Colors:

Gloss White with Blue Accents, Matte Black with Blue Accents, Gloss White with Orange Accents, Matte Black with Orange Accents

Frame Fork Details:

RST Carve Suspension with Preload Adjustment, 60 mm Travel, 9 mm Axle with Nuts

Frame Rear Details:

11 mm Axle with Nuts

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses

Gearing Details:

7 Speed 1x7 Shimano Tourney, 11-28T

Shifter Details:

Shimano RevoShift Grip Twist on Right

Cranks:

Prowheel SOLID, 165 mm Length, 52T Chainring with Aluminum Alloy Guide

Pedals:

Wellgo K20410, Folding Plastic Platform

Headset:

Neco 1 1/8"

Stem:

Aluminum Alloy, Folding with QR Telescoping Height (10" to 13")

Handlebar:

Low-Rise, 24" Length, Aluminum Alloy

Brake Details:

Tektro Mechanical Disc with 160 mm Rotors, Tektro Levers with Rubberized Edge and Motor Inhibitor

Grips:

Ergonomic Stitched

Saddle:

Selle Royal Look In Gel, Oversized with Rubber Bumpers

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy, Basic Suspension, Flip-Up Saddle Clamp

Seat Post Length:

350 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

27.2 mm

Rims:

Solid Aluminum Alloy, Black

Spokes:

Cast Radial Support Arms

Tire Brand:

CST, 20" x 2.125"

Wheel Sizes:

20 in (50.8cm)

Tire Details:

Reflective Sidewall Stripes, 40-65 PSI, Nylon

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Flick Bell, Rear Rack with Pannier Blockers and Spring Latch 25 kg Max Weight (55 lbs), Single Side Adjustable Length Kickstand, Metal Derailleur Guard, Aluminum Alloy Fenders with Mud Flaps, Independent Spanninga GaLeo Headlight (2 AA Batteries), Independent Spanninga Back Light (2 AA Batteries), Support Bar on Bottom Bracket

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, 9 Mosfet 14 Amp Current Controller, 1.5 lb 2 Amp Charger, Max Weight Rated at 240 lbs

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

8Fun

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Motor Peak Output:

700 watts

Battery Brand:

Samsung, Panasonic or LG

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

13 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

624 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium Nickel Cobalt Manganese (Li-NCM)

Charge Time:

6.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

30 miles (48 km)

Estimated Max Range:

60 miles (97 km)

Display Type:

Das-Kit Fixed Backlit Monochrome LCD

Readouts:

Power Level (Power, Normal, Eco), Pedal Assist (0-6), Odometer, Time, Trip 1, Trip 2, Speed, Voltage, Battery Level (1-5), (Press Power Once for Backlighting, Hold Set for Menu)

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad (Power, Set, +, -)

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist, Trigger Throttle

Top Speed:

25 mph (40 kph) (20 mph Throttle Only)

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Written Review

The Magnum Premium is an interesting folding electric bike… Not only is it powerful with a 500 watt geared motor and 48 volt battery configuration, it’s also sturdy and fast. Rather than spoked wheels, which tend to be stronger at the 20″ size to begin with, they chose cast Aluminum 20″ wheels setup like mag wheels. And instead of a standard 6 Mosfet controller, the Premium uses 9 Mosfets which can handle 14 Amps of Current vs. just 10 or 12. During the ride test, I had one of the company’s co-founders, Jesse, hop on and ride around the parking lot. Even with his 6’3″ height and 200+ body weight, the bike worked fine. Smaller wheels offer a mechanical advantage to hub motors, which tend to be easier on drivetrains than mid-drives. You’re getting a zippy compact platform here which is great for space savings but it is not light. Weighing in at 61+ lbs, it’s worth taking a couple of minutes to remove the 9 lb battery before lifting. And even though the frame only comes in one size, there are two different styles (a mid-step and the deep wave step-thru shown in the video and images above). Both come with a longer suspension seat post and adjustable stem for increased height. This is a big deal if you’re a taller rider, I felt great on the bike at 5’9″ myself and I have longer legs. In short, the bike felt comfortable and solid which is very important given the higher assisted top speed of roughly 25 mph. Again, it’s an interesting folding e-bike because it delivers a platform that is truly capable as a speed pedelec and might be great for commuting if you’ve got limited space… Wheel it into work, fold it up under your desk and charge it there vs. locking it up at the rack?

Driving this electric bike is an 8Fun internally geared hub motor sealed inside the rear wheel. It puts out between 500 and 700 watts and produces a bit more whirring noise than weaker options. I found it to be zippy and capable, it switched on very fast in pedal assist mode thanks to a precise cadence sensor mounted near the left crank arm (around the spindle). The sensor used here is compact and sealed compared to the larger discs with visible magnets. I imagine it would stay cleaner and get bumped less easily which translates to more reliable operation. As highlighted earlier, the motor is backed up with a 48 volt batter, more mosfets in the controller and higher current thruput. If you’re a larger rider or someone who plans to carry gear on the rack, this is a great thing.

Powering the motor and backlit display, but not the lights, is a 48 volt 13 amp hour battery pack mounted just behind the seat tube. To me, this is way above average in terms of capacity and very impressive to see on a folding electric bike. Depending on how you ride, the bike should get excellent range. Stick to the first few levels of pedal assist and under 20 mph for truly optimal performance. Note that the trigger throttle, mounted near the left grip, cuts out at 20 mph for legal reasons but that you can reach the higher speeds using the top level of assist, level 6. The battery pack is painted black which matches the saddle, rims and tires and it slides onto the frame easily. I felt it lock securely and noticed a 5 Volt USB power outlet on the right side. This would be handy for charging a portable electronic device stored in one of the panniers or a trunk bag but you could also string a longer USB cord across the frame with zip ties if you wanted to mount something to the handle bars. Just be careful near the folding point on the frame and dull the edges of cut zip ties so they don’t scratch and cut your legs while pedaling. A couple of downsides for the battery is that it doesn’t power the lights and that you must leave the key in while it’s being used. The key is mostly out of the way but might jingle if connected to a chain or other keys… this is quite common with the style of battery housing used here (called a Silver Fish in the industry). I like that Magnum fills the pack with premium cells (from Samsung, LG or Panasonic depending on supply) and that it has a handle and LED indicator on top. Another huge win is the flip-forward saddle mount which allows you to take the pack off without removing the seat and seat post. And when you do adjust the seat post, I noticed that the clamp is angled to the side so the lever won’t scratch the battery pack or collide with it… very smart.

Operating the bike is a multi-step process and one of the areas where improvements could be made. You have to press a little power button or switch on both lights, then turn the key to on in the battery pack then press a power button on the control pad. That’s four steps and it’s easier to miss one when parking or folding the bike. Perhaps you leave a light on and it runs out of juice? Perhaps you start folding and bump the trigger throttle which spins the wheel? These are areas to keep an eye on. All that aside, I do like the display panel and all of the options Magnum has offered. The throttle works at all times, even in assist level zero which I call “throttle only mode”. Arrowing up and down through assist is easy to do without taking your left hand off the grip because of the remote button pad. The trigger throttle on the left is a bit trickier to reach depending on where you mount it (behind the brake lever or in front of it closer to the grip). Given how responsive assist is, I’m not sure I’d use the throttle as much with this bike and fully appreciate that the brakes are higher quality disc style with rubberized levers that have motor inhibitors built in. And while I’d love to see hydraulic disc brakes, I appreciate the lower price point that they hit with this e-bike… again, compromises had to be made here and there so I get it.

The Magnum Premium comes with everything you need to commute, rain or shine, but it is a more advanced electric bike. With an always-active trigger throttle and higher top speed, I see this as a perfect option for commuters and younger riders (or those with more weight). Remember, you can tone down the power and speed by changing the six levels of assist but the throttle will always be ready with full up to 20 mph. I love this style of setup because I can save energy riding at lower assist then zoom up a hill or past another riding simply by pressing the throttle for a few moments. Note that the Aluminum fenders felt solid and didn’t make a lot of noise while riding on bumpy terrain. The rack uses standard gauge tubing which should work with panniers and other standard accessories and you could use the USB port on the battery to add additional lights if you wanted. I’m impressed with all of the frame and color options here and appreciate that Magnum now has 70+ dealers in the US who can let you take a test ride and help with service and warranty stuff. The bike comes with one year comprehensive and the company has been around globally for five plus years.

Pros:

  • One of the most noticeable and coolest features about this folding ebike, at least to me!, is the cast Aluminum wheelset which can support more weight and won’t go out of true the way traditional spokes might
  • I love that Magnum sells two versions of this bike, mid-step and wave step-thru, both are relatively easy to mount but might appeal to different tastes (I reviewed the wave style because it has the lowest downtube)
  • Four color combinations make it fun, you could get a set of these for your family and easily keep track of who owns which bike, my favorite is the white because it is the most visible for night riding
  • Solid rack with a full 25 kg max weight rating, I like the little spring latch for quick cargo additions and love that the battery is mounted to the frame leaving the rack clear vs. some older designs
  • This is a minor plus but I noticed how the seat tube and collar were twisted a bit so the quick release tab wouldn’t collide with the battery pack when fully closed! This is a wonderful attention to detail
  • I love the included lights and reflective tires but wish that the lights ran off the main battery pack, they are higher quality builds however (both from Spanninga)
  • The folding points seemed very reliable thanks to locking mechanisms (there’s even a spring run through the frame to help with alignment and unfolding if you’re by yourself)
  • Sturdy metal plates sandwich the chainring acting as protection when folded (along with a metal support arm directly below the bottom bracket), the metal plates also act as a guide, keeping the chain on track if you’re riding over bumpy terrain… this is especially important in throttle mode and when riding on bumpy terrain at high speed
  • Capable of ~25 mph top speeds (in pedal assist mode) this is one of the very few speed pedelec folding e-bikes I have ever seen and would work well for some people who want to commute faster
  • Excellent drive mode control here with throttle only mode, throttle override (with full power) and six levels of assist… just be careful to turn it off before folding or you could bump the throttle and have the bike take off
  • At under $2k I feel like this bike is priced well, especially because it comes with all the accessories you need for commuting (rack, sturdy Aluminum fenders and lights)
  • Mechanical disc brakes are a good upgrade from rim brakes because they stay cleaner and don’t wear out as fast, the brake levers on the Magnum Premium have motor inhibitors so you stop safer and don’t compete with the power of the bike
  • Smaller wheels keep the bike compact for folding but aren’t as comfortable as larger ones so it’s great that you get a mid-level suspension fork, suspension seat post and large gel saddle… it really makes a difference at speed and on longer journies
  • Telescoping stem offers more height options to improve the ride for taller people (the bike only comes in one size after all), don’t stretch it all the way up however because the cables can get stretched and messed up when steering if so
  • You can charge the battery on or off the frame with this bike and I love how easy it is to take off! The saddle flips forward and the slide and locking mechanisms just seemed to work here vs. some other folders I’ve tested
  • I really like the cadence sensor they chose for this pedelec, it’s not a big disc with exposed magnets (easier to bump and mess up), this thing is compact and sealed from water and mud but still very responsive
  • The fold point mid-frame does bulge out a little but is positioned much lower than some other e-bikes so I feel like it wouldn’t bruise your thigh as easily (this was an issue my girlfriend had with some of the folding fat bikes we tested)
  • I like that the battery features a USB charging port on the side so you can fill your phone, GPS or music player… in some ways I’d like it up by the handlebars but on the other hand, it’s very close to the rear rack so your gear could be charging while stored, consider buying a right angle USB dongle like one of these to keep it out of the way
  • The charger is pretty compact and very lightweight at ~1.5 lbs, the plug end for the bike is metal which seems tougher if it was dropped or stepped on, I’d probably bring it along all the time and just keep it in a trunk bag on the rack
  • I love the brake levers they chose for the Premium, you get a tiny (but loud!) integrated bell on the left and the levers themselves have a rubberized edge for comfort
  • Generally speaking, this is one of the most powerful folding electric bikes around given the 500 Watt motor, 9 Mosfet controller with 14 Amp thruput and 48 Volt battery, it was able to move Jesse who is a larger rider (6’3″ at 230 lbs), up hills as shown in the video review above

Cons:

  • The folding plastic pedals are light, inexpensive and compact but not as stiff or durable as some Aluminum ones I’ve seen, given the “premium” price and features found elsewhere on the bike this is one area that could be improved… or you could add some like this aftermarket
  • Weighing in at over 60 lbs, this is one of the heavier electric bikes out there (folding or otherwise) due in part to the cast wheels, suspension fork and larger battery… but at least the battery is removable so you can subtract ~9 lbs when moving the frame
  • Neither wheel offers quick release which means you’ll need tools to fix flats or break the bike down further (for super compactness), one positive here is that they’re less likely to be tampered with or stolen when parked
  • While I love the adjustable length feature of the kickstand, I wish it was mounted further back on the frame from the crank arms because it collides (especially when walking the bike backwareds as the cranks turn themselves)
  • Both lights require two AA batteries and must be switched on separately (that adds time and makes them easy to leave on accidentally to drain overnight or during the day when parked at a bike rack), the lights also don’t have flashing modes or other settings besides on/off
  • The key must be left in the battery pack in order to operate this bike, it’s positioned mostly out of the way but could jingle if you have a chain or other keys connected
  • The display looks great but isn’t removable, you can angle it forward and back to reduce glare but it could get scratched at a rack or weather worn being left on all the time
  • This is a minor con but the drivetrain is entry-level, with seven speeds you’re getting enough range to climb but might not keep up at the ~25 mph level, Shimano Tourney components work well enough but might need more tuneups, I love that they included a derailleur guard to protect it when folded
  • One way their folding design could be improved is with a rubber latch or maybe some magnets to keep the bike from coming unfolded during transport… this might also reduce banging and rattling as it flops around due to vibrations in your car trunk, plane, boat or whatever

Resources:

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Nirmala
10 months ago

Nice to see Magnum upgrading some of the features on their newer ebikes. I love my Ui5, but I do wish it had the throttle with full power at all times, the higher voltage battery and some other features found on this new model. Ebikes just keep getting better!

Reply
Court Rye
10 months ago

I see Magnum making incremental upgrades to their products and it’s exciting to think of where it will lead. Even today, I feel like you get a lot more bang for your buck than just a year or two ago. And yes, with the throttle settings and better display I like how it empowers riders to choose vs. limiting them or requiring extras steps. In short though, it sounds like you’re enjoying your Ui5 and I’m glad to hear that :D

Reply
Susan
10 months ago

Hi Court, I love your website and your video reviews! I’m short (5’1″) and a big fan of non-elecric folding bikes, and this is the first folding electric which has peaked my interest. I live in a hilly area of Northern San Diego, and wanted to know if you would recommend this bike for hilly areas.
Thanks in advance for your reply!

Reply
Court Rye
10 months ago

Hi Susan! Yeah, the Magnum Premium could be a good fit for your area. It’s much more powerful than the average hub motor driven folder, priced pretty well and comes in that deep step-thru configuration. As noted in the review, it’s heavy but depending on your needs (and a bit of help) it can work great for a wide range of uses. I continue to hear great things from shops and owners about Magnum and am seeing their brand grow significantly in the US which also gives me confidence. I hope this helps! You could also chime in at the EBR forums and ask for feedback, maybe people who already own their products will share.

Reply
Mark M
8 months ago

For a folding e-bike, this is a rather heavy bike at 61 lbs. The primary purpose of folding is going to be ability to put in compact spaces, carry on a train, or easily place in a car, or easily carry up steps into apmt or condo, so this ebike is a just not a very viable candidate for those purposes. Also, at 500 watts, and 48 volts its way more power than an ebike with those size tires and the likely speeds anyone would want to travel at, especially for the purposes of what most foldables are chosen for. The price point is also a few hundred dollars more, than more viable and purpose designed foldables. I’ve tried this and the Blix Vika’s and felt the Vika’s were actually sturdier, and gave a more confident and secure ride. Plus their models are 48 lbs and 36 lbs, respectively, which better suits the purposes most riders searching for foldables are seeking.

Reply
Court Rye
8 months ago

Thanks for chiming in and sharing your experiences Mark! I appreciate your perspective and am sure others will too. I like the Blix products and was excited to also see the lower powered, less expensive Magnum Classic as an alternative to the Premium here :)

Reply
Eric S
7 months ago

I went and bought one of these, and it’s been very nice- one thing I wish they had was a manual that reflected the actual bike’s screen, which is not at all what they show in the manual. I’m trying to figure it out as I go… it appears that the 20-inch wheels may be limited to a top speed of 20 miles an hour, but I’m not sure what that screen is. I think it’s the 4th one… it shows 2 numbers, one of which seems to change the bike’s top pedaling speed, the other of which I’m not sure about. Possibly wheel size? Scratching my head here.

Aside from the instruction manual not helping at all with learning the settings, it’s a good bike. The rear wheel’s not easy to remove if you get a flat there, and the tire takes patience to get back on afterward. As far as flats go, the folding is a godsend if you need to call someone to come pick you up and get out of the rainy roadside.

But on the positive side, the range I’m getting out of it is at LEAST 40 miles with pedal assist, and around 2 bars of battery left after a day of riding. It’s been handy for small grocery runs and has given me the freedom to commute locally, which is a good thing for someone without a car and no public transport in town.
20 MPH has been a good, serviceable top speed for me. It’d be nice to get it a little faster as advertised, but I’m fine with this.

I don’t find myself using the throttle for more than short bursts, at times when I want to get off the line quickly such as crossing roads or starting on steep slopes.

Pedal assist 2-4 are most comfortable for me in terms of just riding around, 1 is good for starting up or just taking my time, and 5-6 are nice and effortless ways to get somewhere fast.

I’ve used the USB charging from the battery, and my Samsung Note 4 tells me this battery is only capable of slow charging- turns out to be maybe half the speed of its normal charger, if that. But getting 40% of my phone’s battery recharged did not seem to tax or noticeably drain the Magnum’s battery at all, so for topping off electronics or charging stuff like a Kindle as I ride to my favorite reading spot is perfectly doable.

On another note, no reading or texting on-bike: even without doing these things I managed to WHUMP! myself into a signpost and a parked car in the month I’ve had it. The bike and I were both fine after each incident, aside from the usual shattered-dignity bit. :)

I tend to ride my bike in Eco mode (Settings screen 5- hold Set, press Set until you reach screen 5, and press minus to toggle between the three modes), just because I want this battery to last, and because so far I can’t tell a difference between that and Normal in terms of acceleration or top speed. Still trying to figure this one out. I’m not sure how Power mode differs either.

It’s a fun bike, and is turning out to be pretty practical whenever it’s not outright raining (in which case no bike of mine is going outside for long.) I’ve even gotten some interested questions from strangers at the bike rack. It’s weird how much more expensive people around me tend to think it is, and how much slower and shorter-range. It feels good to give ’em a pleasant surprise with “Yes, it’s electric. …20 miles an hour, 40+ miles range. …Yes, it folds. …$2000 including tax.”

Reply
vik Kaminskas
3 months ago

Hi Court … Vik from down under… How do I get a couple to Australia with out the price of another bike as postage…??? A his and hers package…!!! I’m 100 odd KG and the missus is about 70ish ,so a Classic would do her, or stick to both premiums for the better suspension and bibs and bobs…???

Over to you Courty me old mate… vik… Adelaide South Australia…

Reply
Court Rye
3 months ago

Hi Vik! Sorry for the late reply, I just got back from Interbike and am playing catch up. I could be mistaken, but I believe Magnum may be offering some of their products in Australia. Perhaps you could reach out and ask them and get connected, then you could get the bikes and not have to pay all of that shipping. Let me know what you find, I can help reach the company if they don’t reply to you for some reason :)

Reply
mike
7 days ago

Hello everyone. Has anyone come across a delimiter for the magnum premium?

Reply

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Ed P
1 day ago

Enjoyed Mike's erudite post last month on this topic. I have a Kalkhoff Include 8 Premium (with which I have been v pleased), and thought it was a Hub, but I guess it is actually a Mid-drive--is that right?

e-boy
2 days ago

Coming Soon
https://pedegoelectricbikes.com/shop/conveyor/
$4,995.00

Smart Battery technology with built in GPS theft protection

Belt drive provides a seamless, quiet ride with no messy chain grease

Internally geared hub for easy pedaling and smooth shifting – even at a complete stop

Top of the line hydraulic disk brakes that can stop on a dime with the greatest of ease

Brose S Mid-Drive 250 Watt , 20mph
36V 13Ah Integrated Downtube Battery
Comfort Display w/ Watt Input, Remaining Range, Trip, Odometer and Automatic Light Sensor
Front and rear lights for your safety
Fenders and a chainguard to help keep you clean and dry
Traditional city-style handlebars feel natural and familiar
Premium balloon tires give you a nice, smooth ride

Leon Washington
5 days ago

I wanted to add some very relevant information that no one seems to ever mention when comparing mid-drives and hub motors.

Mid-drive do tend to be excellent climbing systems because they benefit from the drive ratio of the front to rear sprockets at slow speeds where the torque of the motor can actually be increased to the rear wheel. The problem is that at high speeds that advantage becomes a disadvantage. If you say running at 20mph on a 44T front and 11T rear sprocket only 1/4th the axle torque of the mid-drive is delivered to the rear wheel because of the 4 to 1 reduction to achieve the speed at a reasonable cadence. In my opinion this is the equivalent of inefficiency - decreases the drive system efficiency because an 80nM mid drive will only provide 20nM of torque to the rear axle at that speed.

Hub drives (at least the gear-less more simply ones) do run at lower RPMs which is a less efficient dymanic state for a brushless motor but the torque is delivered directly to the rear axle. So if you are riding at 20mph, a rear hub motor only needs to be providing 20nM to equal the "effective" power of the mid-drive at this speed. The higher the speed the more efficient a rear hub motor becomes so I would venture to say that if you spend a significant % of your riding time over speeds of say 15mph a hub drive may be more efficient and provide more power to the rear wheel.

I would venture to say this is why some of the premium speed pedelecs still utilize hub drive motors.

If you think you will spend the bulk of your riding time below say 15mph and on trails, no doubt get a mid-drive but if you want a fast urbam mobility bike I would give hub drives serious consideration.

I have both a mid drive Haibike and a rear hub Polaris and the Polaris has better fast performance and the Haibike with the Yamaha mid-drive is awesome up to about 15mph. I think the Bosch mid-drives with the smaller front chain ring that spins at 2.5X cadence do provide better high speed assist than the Yamaha but at the cost of some low speed torque to the rear wheel.

This post was really helpful, and from my experience, I whole heatedly agree. I ride the back roads to work with my speed pedalec, mid-drive mountain bike. My DD hubs just get me from point A to Point B on paved surfaces really fast. Thankfully I have a loud horn.

Ken M
1 week ago

I am researching the heck out of a bike I can use as an overland trail bike. We have a Winnebago Revel on the way and need to match it up with a bike that can get us around some cool trails.

I've noticed some bikes have the option of a 350 w Mid Drive and a 500 w Hub Drive. Can someone help me compare these? I know there are some positives and negatives to both.....

BTW - such a great forum ! This site rules!
I wanted to add some very relevant information that no one seems to ever mention when comparing mid-drives and hub motors.

Mid-drive do tend to be excellent climbing systems because they benefit from the drive ratio of the front to rear sprockets at slow speeds where the torque of the motor can actually be increased to the rear wheel. The problem is that at high speeds that advantage becomes a disadvantage. If you say running at 20mph on a 44T front and 11T rear sprocket only 1/4th the axle torque of the mid-drive is delivered to the rear wheel because of the 4 to 1 reduction to achieve the speed at a reasonable cadence. In my opinion this is the equivalent of inefficiency - decreases the drive system efficiency because an 80nM mid drive will only provide 20nM of torque to the rear axle at that speed.

Hub drives (at least the gear-less more simply ones) do run at lower RPMs which is a less efficient dymanic state for a brushless motor but the torque is delivered directly to the rear axle. So if you are riding at 20mph, a rear hub motor only needs to be providing 20nM to equal the "effective" power of the mid-drive at this speed. The higher the speed the more efficient a rear hub motor becomes so I would venture to say that if you spend a significant % of your riding time over speeds of say 15mph a hub drive may be more efficient and provide more power to the rear wheel.

I would venture to say this is why some of the premium speed pedelecs still utilize hub drive motors.

If you think you will spend the bulk of your riding time below say 15mph and on trails, no doubt get a mid-drive but if you want a fast urbam mobility bike I would give hub drives serious consideration.

I have both a mid drive Haibike and a rear hub Polaris and the Polaris has better fast performance and the Haibike with the Yamaha mid-drive is awesome up to about 15mph. I think the Bosch mid-drives with the smaller front chain ring that spins at 2.5X cadence do provide better high speed assist than the Yamaha but at the cost of some low speed torque to the rear wheel.

rich c
2 weeks ago

I'm a huge Haibike fan, but only with Bosch power. The premium for Bosch is worth every penny in my book.

indianajo
2 weeks ago

I've taken a LiPO4 battery apart to examine the battery management system. It was 11 stacks of cells for 15 AH and 48 v. The BMS disconnected stacks as they charged up to max so that the other stacks could continue to receive charge until all were charged.
Cell charge voltages do vary. A cell is one electrochemical device and a battery is an assembly or holder of more than one. So your device on the right with lots of parallel cells, each stage will only charge until the lowest capacitory cell reaches cutoff voltage. This is bad design.
Also I'm personally not sure my welding quality would be good enough to ensure all cells actually stay connected as the battery was shaken by road bumps. The first battery I bought, only one of the eleven stacks was actually connected when I bought it, and the last one opened up eleven miles into my first trip. The connection problem was under the solder joints on the BMS board. I suspect the argon feed was off when that battery was welded, and the amazon vendor was selling me rejects the scooter company had flogged off. He had a great website, but **** batteries. I paid a premium for full information on that battery, but amazon did give my money back. The vendor did not want the old battery back before refund.
18650 cells apparently come in several rated discharge currents. I downloaded a datasheet previously for a "flashlight" variety, and 11 stacks would not have made 30 amps safe discharge current for a 1000 W controller (26.4 A), The cells I bought in the first battery were allegedly sanyo. The batttery was rated at 60 A discharge according to the vendor, but I can't find a sanyo datasheet online to confirm.
The second LiPO4 battery was from a LA warehouser of sun-ebike.com and performed okay until my power wheel or controller quit after 60 miles. Check out the prices on e-bay; you pay a little more for an e-bay warrenty and shipping from LA instead of china.
I too am suspicious of LiIon due to various fires, and notice on wikipedia that LiPO4 allegedly has more discharge-recharge cycles. LiPO4 is allegedly heavier, but with me carrying a 30 lb basket and 50 lb supplies on the back, I find 18 lb battery + rack on the front fork balances the bike out nicely. Before electrification my front tire would weigh as low as 15 lb on the foot scale, with the rear reading 110, with the bike loaded but without me on it. This lead to skidding when dodging vicious dogs.
If you're worried about battery dropout, invest in a voltmeter to bolt to the handlebar. I don't see any convenient ones online, but I could build a 42 v (or 30 v) warning system out of a LED, a transistor, and a stack of zener diodes 1 v less than the warning voltage.
The charger I got from the first battery vendor was generic and seem similar to the ones on amazon & ebay. Check the charge voltages, apparently it goes up as time goes on. The first battery was dated 1548 internally, or 48th week of 2015, and it had a 58.4 v charger on a nominal 48 v battery. It was bought September, 2016. The second battery from sun-ebike had a 61 v charger on a 48 v battery. The sun-ebike charger was proprietary.
And for safety sake don't ride around without your foot propulsion system working.

Mike's E-Bikes
3 weeks ago

Just started looking into e bikes. Live in Ontario Canada and the LBS are limited in e bike choices. So my concern is the longevity of some e bike companies. How can you tell if a certain company is in for the long haul? Many companies seem small and run by the owners/ employee. It is nice to have the owner involved but does this really ensure it's longevity? What would indicate that a particular e bike brand is going to be in business in 10 years?
With over 100 different ebike brands, and nearly a new one coming out every month on Indiegogo, or Kickstarter, and barriers to entry so low, the odds are very high that 25% to 50% of the e-bike brands won't be around in 5 years or less. Its a LOT of competition for such a small North American market thus far, so a lot will come and go. I wouldn't worry so much about that though, as long as you spend enough money to get quality components such as Samsung or Panasonic batteries, High quality brake brands like Magura, or Avid, and if its a mid drive you prefer stick with a name like Bosch or maybe Yamaha or Shimano Steps. If you don't mind paying a premium, larger names like Trek, Giant, Raleigh, Fuji etc are likely to be around to support their e-bikes with a large enough dealer structure and base to offer some level of security they will be around at least as long as you want to use your e-bike. Since this is still an emerging technology concept (motors and li-ion batteries on bikes), there are going to continue to be a lot of improvements in a fairly short time frame, so whatever you buy today will likely be out done by new models and brands in a few short years. With that in mind, you may want to keep your budget low (say stay below $2500) and plan on upgrading to a new ebike in 3 or 4 years. (that is if you find you really want to keep e-biking). Maybe plan on handing your ebike off to another family member at that time, or trading it in for less than half what you paid which is likely to be the case, as used e-bikes do not hold their value very well. I get quite a few people to my shop who bought ebikes 3 or 4 years ago, that have issues, and the brands are no longer around, or the models have been discontinued. For repairs, the hardest part is getting an exact replacement to fit the battery compartment design, or the motor replaced with the right connections and controller match, because there are so many different ways these OEMs have found to connect the various components electronically. the safest approach would be to stick with a rear hub motor design, as those are the most common and dont require a special frame design (which these frames vary significantly for mid drive motors), and a rear rack battery mount (despite those are not aesthetically the best looking), as frame integrated batteries are varying a LOT in their designs, and the casings are evolving a lot, and very unique. Which could make battery replacement fairly challenging in a few years, if that OEM went out of business, or simply stopped making or supporting a particular casing design. Which would only leave the option of getting the battery rebuilt if it failed.
If you prefer Canadian OEM, check out Surface 604. They have been around a few years, but use very good components, offer a lot of value for the price point (below $2000), and have some very good reviews here by Court. Fairly sturdy frames, thicker tires, robust motors, for an ebike that should last awhile.

Echos
4 weeks ago

Weiterstadt, Germany - Riese & Müller - www.r-m.de - a maker of luxury eBikes sold worldwide has introduced the stylishly minimal and clean Roadster that will change how you look at eBikes. The Roadster’s sleek frame and traditional aesthetics combined with the best new e-technology are sure to catch the eye as you navigate urban areas or head out of the city and into the countryside.

Stylish, clean and minimal define the approach and lines of the redesigned Roadster while offering all of the technology and performance expected from Riese & Müller. The Roadster factors in concepts of classic bicycle frames: diamond frame construction, narrow rounded tube cross-sections, almost horizontal top-tube and delicate seat stays. The result is a clean, lightweight and sporty appearance that Riese & Muller have dubbed E-sthetics for those who love the classic construction and feel the technical elements of an eBike detract from the overall look of a bicycle. The Roadster incorporates a new, lighter Bosch Active Plus motor, the Gates belt drive, and Suntour NCX fork, bringing the total weight to just below 44 pounds. The Roaster is a perfect city rocket built for those who want all the benefits of an eBike in a classic look.

Features:

Bosch Performance CX Motor

36V / 500 watt battery

Shimano Deore 10-speed drivetrain

Magura MT4 hydraulic brakes

Suntour NCX Suspension Front Fork

Three Available Sizes

Mixte Model Available

Available colors: Electric Green Metallic, Black Matte, White

MSRP: $3879 (starting price)

Landing Page

ABOUT RIESE & MÜLLER
It all began with two engineers, a good idea and a garage. But not in California, rather in the south of Hesse. In Darmstadt, to be more precise. In the parent's courtyard. Immediately after the company was founded, it won the Innovation Prize in 1993 and has grown to become an internationally renowned premium manufacturer of E-Bikes and folding bikes. As previously, Riese & Müller manufactures the most innovative bikes of tomorrow with the passion of yesteryear - and still in Weiterstadt, not far from the old garage.

Andy_Austria
4 weeks ago

Hi there,
not many user reviews about that bike are out there. I have the 250W version, bought second hand, and can answer your real world questions if there are any.

Owning the Ariel Rider for a month I can say it keeps the promises of the flashy ads and videos so far. I am not super happy with the range which seems to be closer to 30 km (assist level 1 in a rather flat city) than the 50 km promised, but on the other hand it is quite cold now in Austria, the battery gets charged overnight in my yard at typically 5-10 °C and used during the day at about 5-15° C which is not ideal.

Only thing I really miss is any kind of instructions, e.g. on the assist levels and that "6 km walk" thingy I read about. Can anybody enlighten me here? Do new bikes come with any instructions?
Ariel Rider does not seem to have such downloads on their home page.

Thanks,
Andy

John from Connecticut
4 weeks ago

I've been studying bikes for some time the past two years. I was one of those ones that scoffed at spending even a couple of thousand on electric bike let alone a normal bike.

These days I've come to appreciate quality but also knowing how to make a dollar stretch even still.

I'm torn in choosing. So let's take the Pesu for example. It's light weight, around 48 I think. It's got some good torque. Top speed 28. Looks good. Only drawback is no throttle what if you break a chain? Or what if you just want throttle? But for the price of 1800$ wow.. and that tittium motor. 100nm torque

When I look at a bike like the specialized Turbo 4000$ ugh. Not sure if that one has a throttle or not either.

Now there's always the do-it-yourself approach with the bafang 1000w or 750 watt and you can have a throttle but the drawback is you get a heavy bike that doesn't look like a normal bike.. and it really doesn't look nice at all.

The ultimate approach would be to have a bike that looks less like an electric bike, lightweight mountain bike. Speed closer to 30 than 20. High torque. Premium components without having to shell out 4000 and beyond.

If I could just have a throttle on the Pesu, I think that would be cool. Although I've never had an electric bike so I don't know what to expect in terms of torque and
power. Mostly riding around in the city but when hitting the trails in Mountain would like to have another torque to get up the mountain with a nice work out. BTW I weigh in at 275. Any help would be appreciated.

Hello,
What bike to buy ??? There's such a range and choice. This past July I purchased a Trek XM700+ and have not regretted it one bit. I love the bike and
would do it all over again in a second. I'd been riding a Trex 7.7 FX carbon touring bike.... I had never ridden an e-Bike...didn't really know much about them, but was
interested... My LBS had a Trek XM700+ for demo. I took it out for 15 minutes and there was no turning back. I bought one. For me the bike is just so much fun.

Nearly all of my riding is paved trails and or very isolated quiet streets. The Trek XM700+ is not great on gravel/stone
trails or at least I don't feel secure on it, I really enjoy the entire experience of riding on rails to trails gravel /stone dust trails so I bought a Trek Powerfly7 MTN
bike. The Powerfly7 is fantastic, incredibly stable, and again like the XM700+ just the greatest to ride.

A friend of mine has a Raleigh with a throttle, he let me take it for a 'spin'. It was fast ( perhaps a bit too fast) , but after riding it I prefer
my Trek's with the Bosch motor system pedal assist. The Bosch system is silky smooth shifting etc....Bottom line. All these e-Bikes bikes are personal
preference and what's most important to you the rider. What Trek has built into their bikes is important to me. I didn't know that until I took my
15 test ride : ) ...I'm not saying Trek is the 'only game in town' I'm sure there are other equally good e-Bikes out there.

I hope my rambling was some help,

John from CT

net200777
1 month ago

I've been studying bikes for some time the past two years. I was one of those ones that scoffed at spending even a couple of thousand on electric bike let alone a normal bike.

These days I've come to appreciate quality but also knowing how to make a dollar stretch even still.

I'm torn in choosing. So let's take the Pesu for example. It's light weight, around 48 I think. It's got some good torque. Top speed 28. Looks good. Only drawback is no throttle what if you break a chain? Or what if you just want throttle? But for the price of 1800$ wow.. and that tittium motor. 100nm torque

When I look at a bike like the specialized Turbo 4000$ ugh. Not sure if that one has a throttle or not either.

Now there's always the do-it-yourself approach with the bafang 1000w or 750 watt and you can have a throttle but the drawback is you get a heavy bike that doesn't look like a normal bike.. and it really doesn't look nice at all.

The ultimate approach would be to have a bike that looks less like an electric bike, lightweight mountain bike. Speed closer to 30 than 20. High torque. Premium components without having to shell out 4000 and beyond.

If I could just have a throttle on the Pesu, I think that would be cool. Although I've never had an electric bike so I don't know what to expect in terms of torque and
power. Mostly riding around in the city but when hitting the trails in Mountain would like to have another torque to get up the mountain with a nice work out. BTW I weigh in at 275. Any help would be appreciated.

Riki
1 month ago

I am like a lot of new people I have seen on the forum, I am looking for a leisure/Mountain bike to ride around town, off the curb, on a paved trail here and there and on a gravel trial once every blue moon. I DO NOT do ANY serious off-road riding. I like to ability to fold a bike it is not paramount. I am not commuting to work and my longest ride would be 10 to 15 miles average would be 5 to 8 miles. I have limited hills in my area but would like a bike that makes hills a non-issue when I do encounter them. Ride comfort, reliability, repairability, and price are my main concerns. I have looked at the Ancheer offerings and while I think it is durable enough for my needs, repairability or lack thereof is a turn-off.
Here are the bikes I am considering I would appreciate your input
http://www.x-tremescooters.com/products/electric-bicycles/24-volt-electric-bicycles/x-cursion

The major concern, I called a dealer I found on their website and was told he no longer carries them because he could not reach them for support, the 2nd dealer he works from home the 3rd on just does service and has never done warranty work.

Limited online reviews

https://www.electric-bike-kit.com/hill-topper-folding-electric-bike.aspx
Major concerns, No peddle assist, do I need it, Is it possible to add peddle assist? No local dealer, unsure how the warranty work is handled (I can figure that out but anyone who has had prior experience your input would be great.) The only reviews I could find was a guy who got a free bike. Nothing on Amazon. Kits are $100 less than the bike how good can the bike be? Amazone ad says (Hill Topper bikes are made of premium bicycle components. Some of which include: Shimano Hydraulic Disc Brakes, SR Suntour XCM30 Suspension Fork, Tourney derailleurs, Shimano trigger shifters.) Their site says bikes are better than the China imports, I am wondering how so? Who makes their batteries?

https://store.electrobike.com/products/steel
No info on this eBike at all

I have been told I need to spend 2K plus to get a bike to meet my needs so I am leading away from this but thought I would get some other insights.

Thank you all so much!!!!
Hi there, My advice I have is that it is best to purchase an ebike from a local dealer that can offer you warranty after sales service, can service the electrics as well as the bike itself and finally have all parts in stock. You might have cheap e-bikes online, but it doesnt take much for an ebike to crap out especially something as simple as water in the cables blowing the controller which means your e-bike will not work. E-Bikes are fun and they are not unbreakable. Hope this helps.

daniel58
1 month ago

When my wheel went bad it didn't sound like that, but rather an electrical whirring sound & the motor wasn't engaging reliably. A replacement wheel fixed it, but I really wonder what was wrong with the original wheel since I may need to work on it myself next time since I'm out of warranty. I am kind of suspecting that maybe the internal gears wore out since the wheel had several thousand miles on it already.

Any decent branded name internal geared electric hub motor should last at least a minimum of 7,000 to 10,000km; now sometimes what happens is the "special glue" that holds the fixed position magnets in place heats up and is vibrated "loose" from their fixed position; now if that were to actually somehow happen that can potentially cause the loss of electromotive forward propulsion force and at the same time make an incredible amount of "noisy racket" like in NovaBikes case or if one has a bit more mileage it could result in a total outright failure making "no noise" at all; unfortunately these things do happen on occasion and one can only hope and pray they actually happen within the one year Juiced Bikes electrical product warranty period;

that is where it truly pays off to get something like a premium recognized branded name e-bike like HaiBike or Bulls Bike as they have a standard two year very extensive "no questions asked" comprehensive bullet proof product warranty; both of those e-bike brands in particular don't cut corners to just increase and fatten up ones corporate profit margins as they have quite a good ebike "field proven" brand name quality to actually protect over the longer term time frame;

now just count oneself lucky that one was not in the middle of a across the country bicycle tour; if it was me actually going across the United States on a e-biking coast to coast cross country bicycle tour; it would by default have to be a HaiBike or Bulls Bike; they both are ultra reliable and proven brand name e-bikes in their own right; where reliability in the thousands of miles is proven without a shadow of a doubt whatsoever; no matter what the extreme conditions one might encounter; now the CCS ebike would in all probability likely fail in the first driving unexpected "pop up" rain storm that got the "thumb push throttle" moisture soaked(just better to take it off altogether to avoid "shorting out" the thumb throttle and/or the motor controller);

its definitely not looking very good at all for CCS in the area of Juiced Bikes basic "good quality assurance" department with its ongoing mysterious busted spokes problem, bad mysterious ongoing poorly fitting lithium ion battery intermittent connection woes; and now also apparently a mysterious somewhat questionable bad electrical hub motor problems; and now actual confirmed and verified reports of existing paying Juiced Bikes customers receiving a truly substantially and horrific levels of substandard customer service as if they contracted to buy a bike with a kickstarter marketing campaign e-bike based company(honeymoon is over Juiced Bikes); now it turns out one has to pay for their Juiced Bikes CCS in advance and then wait for three months or more in order to actually receive their Juiced Bike E-bike(one should only be charged for purchased merchandise once tracking shipping information has been supplied and never before); now saving and making money is fine but not if it is going to show up in the final post purchase customer feedback analysis with a totally unacceptable unexpected potential Juiced Bikes product faults in ones e-bike product after ones product warranty has expired; its really not that prudent or wise to try and look to be saving money like that on a long term ongoing basis; as your paying Juiced Bikes customers deserve a much better E-Biking product for their hard earned dollars in the final analysis.

Botte
1 month ago

I have a new 2018 Giant Dirt e +1 Pro with the Yamaha PW-X motor.

I have installed lights and found it hard to find information on this, here are a few pictures and some info to help.

Choosing the correct lighting is important as the information I have seen says that this is only a .5 amp connection. I found that the Busch & Müller Lumotec IQ Premium Cyo E from Peter White Cycles works great with the Toplight Line for 6 volt E Bikes tail light. I mounted the Tail light on a Salsa Wanderlust rack and the front with the Nylon Headset Mount 1- 1/8" for threadless headset B&M471B11. Note you must raise the bars a bit for clearance.

First, you must drop the motor to get to the harness. It is in the down tube of the bike by the motor. Once you pull the harness out of the down tube you will see a big piece of shrink wrap tubing, the wires you need are loose inside of this tubing. They are the white (+6v) and gray ground. I added a plug and extended them to the bottom of the motor where i made the connections to the headlight and tail light. make sure to pull the headlight wire at this time.

I hope this helps,

1/2
MoreyFan
2 months ago

If you are manufacturing any product that has to be sold by a dealer network that dealer network will devour your profit margins.

I can go buy a Versys 300 X for $800 less than a Trek Super Commuter+ 8S. The Kawasaki does 100 mph has way more storage range and less maintenance. The reason is not dealer network related.

I think that Ebikes, like fancy mountain bikes are a luxury item, so they can charge a premium for it.

Someone was talking about profit margin and eBikes by the large manufactures are on luxury item profit margins compared to the paper thin profit margins they have on their bikes. You can pay full retail for a Trek hybrid with your choice of 5 frame sizes and LBS support for less than $400 OTD.

I think the large manufactures don't want an eBike market mostly because at the end of the day 70-90% of the value added is just the drive motor and battery. They would be turning their entire marketing and sales into a vehicle to move Shimano and Bosch product.

For eBikes to go mainstream I think it will be a different set of companies that sell the majority of them.

scrambler
2 months ago

I think that Ebikes, like fancy mountain bikes are a luxury item, so they can charge a premium for it.

Misty
2 months ago

I am like a lot of new people I have seen on the forum, I am looking for a leisure/Mountain bike to ride around town, off the curb, on a paved trail here and there and on a gravel trial once every blue moon. I DO NOT do ANY serious off-road riding. I like to ability to fold a bike it is not paramount. I am not commuting to work and my longest ride would be 10 to 15 miles average would be 5 to 8 miles. I have limited hills in my area but would like a bike that makes hills a non-issue when I do encounter them. Ride comfort, reliability, repairability, and price are my main concerns. I have looked at the Ancheer offerings and while I think it is durable enough for my needs, repairability or lack thereof is a turn-off.
Here are the bikes I am considering I would appreciate your input
http://www.x-tremescooters.com/products/electric-bicycles/24-volt-electric-bicycles/x-cursion

The major concern, I called a dealer I found on their website and was told he no longer carries them because he could not reach them for support, the 2nd dealer he works from home the 3rd on just does service and has never done warranty work.

Limited online reviews

https://www.electric-bike-kit.com/hill-topper-folding-electric-bike.aspx
Major concerns, No peddle assist, do I need it, Is it possible to add peddle assist? No local dealer, unsure how the warranty work is handled (I can figure that out but anyone who has had prior experience your input would be great.) The only reviews I could find was a guy who got a free bike. Nothing on Amazon. Kits are $100 less than the bike how good can the bike be? Amazone ad says (Hill Topper bikes are made of premium bicycle components. Some of which include: Shimano Hydraulic Disc Brakes, SR Suntour XCM30 Suspension Fork, Tourney derailleurs, Shimano trigger shifters.) Their site says bikes are better than the China imports, I am wondering how so? Who makes their batteries?

https://store.electrobike.com/products/steel
No info on this eBike at all

I have been told I need to spend 2K plus to get a bike to meet my needs so I am leading away from this but thought I would get some other insights.

Thank you all so much!!!!

Bosch eBike Systems
2 months ago

BOOGALOO eMTB Race heading to Southern California

Join the fun at the SoCal Endurance Race at the Vail Lake Resort in Temecula, CA Nov 4th

Oct 18th, 2017 Temecula, CA – THE BOOGALOO, a Class 1 pedal-assist mountain bikes (eMTB) race and demo event presented by Troy Lee Designs & Bosch eBike Systems, is heading to Southern California after a sold-out & stoked-up race at the Kamikaze Bike Games in Mammoth. Check out this video from Troy Lee Designs recapping the race, as well as the video produced by Transworld Motocross.

The race will be held Saturday November 4th on a course specifically designed for eMTB racers and built by legends like Brian Lopes, David Cullinan, Ryan Hughes and both previous champions of the Pro Class Victor Sheldon and Evander Hughes. Expect near-vertical ascents, killer drops, obstacles, berms, and more that will take you and your eMTB to the limits of what you thought possible on two wheels.

Limited registration is filling up fast for 32 Amateur “Race of Champions” slots. The early-bird entry fee of $60 is available until Oct 31st and will have you treated like a pro for the day with a Class 1 eMTB provided by Bulls, Haibike, Raleigh Electric, and Specialized set up to your specifications. Riders will also get a custom Troy Lee Designs A1 helmet, number plate, fender and commemorative t-shirt to take home along with some great stories from the event. The fastest five will win a premium Bosch Power Drill. REGISTER NOW before all entries are sold out. Also take advantage of the early-bird pre registration price as on site entries will increase to $75 per rider.

The Pro Class eMTB race will take place immediately following the Amateur race, where pros will compete for a $2,000 purse and Power Tools.

“These events are just full of stoke. I am pumped that we are able to get the Vail Lake eMTB race together so quickly following the success of the recent Boogaloo race at the Mammoth Kamikaze Games. We have already been cutting the coarse and it’s shaping up great, this is going to be one exciting day of racing!” -Troy Lee

If racing isn’t your blood, FREE demos will be also be available before and after the race on a custom built course suited for beginner riders near the registration area of the So Cal Endurance / So Cal Enduro at Vail Lake. Bikes from Raleigh Electric, Haibike, Bulls Bikes and Specialized, will be on hand with representatives from each brand to set up and educate riders on Class 1 eMTB riding.

Demo Schedule:

Friday 11/3/17 – 1pm – 5pm

Saturday 11/4/17 – 9am – 12pm

Sunday 11/5/17 – 9am – 12pm

“I want to give a big congrats and thanks to all the our Mammoth Boogaloo racers who poured their hearts out there on the track. We had teens racing against men and women three times their age, and many legends from the extreme sports world.” said Claudia Wasko, General Manager of Bosch eBike Systems Americas. “We look forward to seeing who returns to Vail Lake to challenge our reigning Pro-Class champ Evander Hughes.”

Race Director of So Cal Endurance and So Cal Enduro, Jason Ranoa said. “ I am looking forward to hosting my first Class 1 eMTB event. We will be racing and doing demo’s on a closed course in hopes to educate MTB riders about what Class 1 eMTB is all about. You can’t help but smile after taking a lap on our course!”

Class 1 is a specific classification for sustainable use on any trail, path or riding area. Class 1 eMTB models are defined as “a human powered bicycle with fully operable pedals, and an electric motor under 750 Watts peak power that must be pedaled to activate the motor and that ceases to provide power above 20 mph”. (See Photo 4 for Class 1 visual)

Once again please visit the pre registration page for early-bird pricing by clicking here - http://www.socalendurance.net/boogaloo.html

###

Contacts for press inquiries:

Aaron Cooke, Proper Management

Phone: 714-720-5872

BoogalooeMTB@gmail.com

Andy Ambrosius, Tech Image

phone: +1-312-888-1628

andy.ambrosius@techimage.com

Ken M
2 months ago

I actually was not focusing on the weight savings of carbon as much a the ride quality improvement. Handlebars and seat posts mode from carbon dampen shock and vibrations far better than aluminum (it's noticeable if you have ever ridden both on the same bike to compare on the same day on the same road conditions).

When the cost premium is so low now for those two components it seems to me to make sense to just go with carbon. When you are paying $2,000+ for an ebike is paying $20 more for those two components to be made of carbon really not worth it?

PaulGee
2 months ago

I noticed more manufacturers offering carbon eMTBs in the past couple years. Bulls and Specialized for example. One pays a premium for these bikes compared to their aluminum counterparts. Besides the seemingly insignificant reduction in weight and perhaps increased esthetics (cool factor), is there any performance or durability benefit offered by these bikes? With exception of the hardcore MTBers with money to burn, IMO I really can't see a significant advantage or market for them. What's your opinion? What do you think is driving this niche segment of the market?

ethy
2 months ago

In regard to the das-kit C6 display and controller (of the Magnum 48V premium) and the PAS levels:
1. What is the the effect of these levels setting: speed or Wattage limits?
2. Do they affect the use of the throttle?
3. Do they affect the 6 KpH walk mode?

Verde
2 months ago

SIMI VALLEY, Calif. (Interbike 2017) – Raleigh Electric, maker of industry-leading electric bikes, designs ebikes around one simple idea: make them really, really fun. That core value continues in its newly unveiled 2018 bikes that will debut at the Interbike trade show next week in Las Vegas.

So much of our lives are focused on getting from point A to B, why shouldn’t we enjoy the ride while we get there? Raleigh Electric’s bikes bring the harmony of design, tech, performance, and comfort together, and are purpose-built with premium materials for every type of riding. All of Raleigh Electric’s ebikes are designed with “integrated Electronic” (iE) drive system technologies and are designed to be electrified. For 2018, the brand introduces seven new ready-to-ride models that will get your heart pumping and spike your fun level on pavement and dirt.

Lore iE (MSRP: $4,199)
If you want a fast-moving steed that meshes performance and style with average speeds of 25 MPH without breaking a sweat, look no further than the Lore iE. Combining 27.5-inch wheels with plus size tires for confidence and speed, a Bosch CX Speed motor for up to 28 MPH of pedal-assist power, Shimano drivetrain, and a 120mm RockShox Judy fork for supple suspension, the Lore tackles on-and-off road terrain with ease, and is truly an ebike for the ages.

Lore iE

Lore iE

Tamland iE (MSRP: $4,399)
Watch out, because the new drop-bar Tamland iE is going to raise some eyebrows – while also raising your game on the road and trail. This ebike was born from a desire to explore. With an integrated 500W Brose motor housed neatly in the downtube, the sleek ebike handles smooth roads with speed and singletrack with confidence. With 27.5-inch tires, pedal-assist speed up to 28 MPH, and an adventure-inspired SRAM drivetrain, if you can imagine a place to ride your bike, the Tamland will take you there.

Tamland iE

Kodiak Pro iE (MSRP: $TBD) & Kodiak iE (MSRP: $4,599)
The Kodiak Pro iE is hands down the perfect eMTB to calm the most rugged of terrain. Built with a Bosch Performance CX motor that brings pedal-assist speeds up to 28 MPH, and utilizing some of the best components from the most proven manufacturers, the Kodiak Pro is truly a sum of its parts. Featuring a lightweight 6061 Aluminum frame, 27.5-inch plus-sized wheels, 130mm of full-suspension travel, and the industry’s only ebike-specific groupset – SRAM’s eMTB super robust EX1 8-speed drivetrain with an 11-48 rear cassette – the Kodiak Pro oozes with the confidence of a muscle car while providing the gear range of a tractor. Its sibling – the Kodiak – delivers all the same performance and riding fun, with the major difference being components and a lower entry price point.

Kodiak Pro iE

Kodiak iE

Tokul Pro iE (MSRP: $TBD) & Tokul iE (MSRP: $3,499)
Lightweight carbon frame. Bosch Performance CX 500Wh motor integrated into the downtube. Ebike-specific SRAM EX1 drivetrain. These – among other attributes – are what make the new high-performance Tokul Pro eMTB one of the lightest, fastest, most tech-savvy bikes on the market. Equipped with 27.5-inch tires, an Enduro-inspired geometry, 120mm of RockShox full-suspension, and 8-speed drivetrain, the Tokul Pro is as nimble as eMTB’s come, and provides efficient uphill momentum on singletrack with quick maneuverability and handling on the down. Swap out component packages and the carbon frame for aluminum alloy, and the Tokul iE is one fun eMTB that comes in at an excellent value.

Tokul Pro iE

Tokul iE

Tokul iE

Magnus iE (MSRP: $3,499)
Rounding out Raleigh Electric’s 2018 trail-inspired ebike line, the Magnus iE fat bike easily crushing miles on sand, snow, or dirt. Touting a Bosch Performance CX motor, 26-inch wheels with 4-inch fat tires, lightweight aluminum frame, and disc brakes, the Magnus powers through just about any condition in its way. Whether you’re loaded up for packing into a hunting blind or rolling through town for a beer and a burger, the Magnus always goes big while bringing with it performance and comfort.

Magnus iE

Raleigh Electric is also leading the charge in helping preserve our environment with its new, first in the cycling industry Call2Recycle battery-recycling program. Batteries contain hazardous materials, and if dumped or disposed of incorrectly the harmful elements can find their way into our water sources and adds to pollution. The program disposes of old batteries in an environmentally responsible manner, and collection sites are located throughout the U.S. and Canada. After collecting and sorting, the batteries are processed and turned into new batteries, stainless steel products, and other products. For more, please check:call2recycle.org.

About Raleigh Electric
Our electric bicycles are designed around one simple idea: make them really, really fun. This is an idea that inspired our very first bicycles back in 1887 and continues to inspire how we do things today. After all, fun makes people happy. And, that’s something we proudly stand behind. Raleigh Electric is included in a family of brands that is part of the world’s largest electric bike supplier, Accell Group, so you can count on quality, reliability, and value. And, it’s easy to find a bike dealer whenever you need service or have questions about your electric bike. For more, check: raleighelectric.com.

MEDIA CONTACT: Keith Cozzens, Verde Brand Communications, keith@verdepr.com, 970-259-3555 x122

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Ravi Kempaiah
3 months ago

Hi all, I am trying to narrow down the choices for a solid commuter and would greatly appreciate any input.

We had the opportunity to test ride BULLS six50 e2 street and lacuba e45 side by side, and they are both fantastic rides. From a brief test ride in a suburb they seem more or less equivalent, and spec-wise they are also similar. Do any of you have a word to put in for either?

These two bikes feel premium, and go for around $4k. My next question is if anyone had the opportunity to test ride any bike with similar characteristics (28mph, suspension) in a slightly lower segment, say $2.5-$3k, and have an opinion on the marginal value of the last $1000 invested?

For the record my commute is ~10mi one way, a few hundred feet up and down, paved but not super smooth. I do it on road bike, but want to save some time, my knees, and not be sweaty every day. I am willing to invest in a good commute, but I am really curious about what those last $1000 buys.

Thanks!

Lacuba E45 has a much bigger battery (650 vs 500 on the E2 street).
I would recommend the E2 street. You could make it ~50lbs if you change the front forks. You could run 12V Supernova M99 lights and you could carry an extra 400 or 500 powerpacks.
You could also look at Trek Xm700+ https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/bikes/electric-bikes/xm700/xm700/p/1982140-2018/?colorCode=black

jonase
3 months ago

Hi all, I am trying to narrow down the choices for a solid commuter and would greatly appreciate any input.

We had the opportunity to test ride BULLS six50 e2 street and lacuba e45 side by side, and they are both fantastic rides. From a brief test ride in a suburb they seem more or less equivalent, and spec-wise they are also similar. Do any of you have a word to put in for either?

These two bikes feel premium, and go for around $4k. My next question is if anyone had the opportunity to test ride any bike with similar characteristics (28mph, suspension) in a slightly lower segment, say $2.5-$3k, and have an opinion on the marginal value of the last $1000 invested?

For the record my commute is ~10mi one way, a few hundred feet up and down, paved but not super smooth. I do it on road bike, but want to save some time, my knees, and not be sweaty every day. I am willing to invest in a good commute, but I am really curious about what those last $1000 buys.

Thanks!

Lucia Scannicchio
1 month ago

Good morning! Could you tell please how much it cost this nice folding electric bike? Where I can buy it this bike? Looking forward to receive your reply back. Thanks for sharing this nice video. Have a good day!

Billy Shea
1 month ago

buy a quick release for your keys motorcycle guys do this. locks are locks. clippable rings are easy to swap. nice review. thanks

Steven James DeBlasi
1 month ago

I'm trying to decide between this bike or the RadMini.

Isaiah Yhomas
4 days ago

Steven James DeBlasi Rad mini no brainer. This is more of a female bike.

David A
4 months ago

My battery is blocked cuz I lost keys, another way beside going to a locksmith, options please ?

Rob T
5 months ago

PRICE? you forgot to give that.

ShiSha
5 months ago

Rob T They mentioned it at the beginning, are you serious? Any way it's 1899 and the classic is 1299

Josiah Vergonio
5 months ago

so, this bike can go up to 25 mph with pedal assist?? does the Voltbike Mariner also go up to 25 mph with pedal assist? I don't understand why this goes up to 25 mph, isn't 20 mph the legal limit?

Roger Ferreira Batista
6 months ago

Will there be some model that I can drag instead having to lift after folding to take inside subway and supermarkets. Does this model perform this function?

Aqua Gods
7 months ago

I just wish i knew which one to buy... So many on the market right now. Can't wait till we can start narrowing down the big players of the ebike. Honestly with the laws restricting top speed I feel reliability and distance are the most important factors. I have a feeling there is going to be endless hours of research.....................

Nyana11
8 months ago

The motor noise is really annoying ,imagine it like constant mosquito sound on all your tours

Gumption1111
9 months ago

Finally a 500 watt folder.

キングクリストファー
9 months ago

Batteries that are not integrated into the bike look amazingly ugly, especially in these smaller fold bikes.

Mark S
10 months ago

Not crazy about the looks but the versatility is amazing... Does the frame flex, considering it is a folding style??? What is the approximate range??

Miphone tech
10 months ago

If you can do a review of fisher electric bike that will be great. You can also check my Israel YouTube channel about electric bikes in Israel.

McNuggetEh
10 months ago

Wondering how the initial take off is. Does it sweep you off your feet or is it more intuitive? I think I have a similar hub motor(Volt Mariner) and just wondering if it's been dialed in different with the controller. I love mine but realize it can zip you off in a hurry and that may not be the best for a more tentative rider. Looking for my folks. Thanks :)

melonbarmonster
10 months ago

$1900

Dale Wildey
10 months ago

I like the step through bikes the most. So many options out there. It's really exciting to see what's going on with bicycles and tricycles today. The electric bikes stepped everything up to a new level

Peter Kenyon
10 months ago

I love folding e-bikes. The 20 inch wheels are great for getting around. I hardly ever fold the bike, I just love the geometry (no neck pain) and the step through. I'll always be a small wheel devotee. Thanks for the vids. Keep up the exceptional work.

rcespin
10 months ago

what is the folding dimensions of the bike and the weight ? thanks

ElectricBikeReview.com
10 months ago

The weight is listed back with the specs on the website and it's 61.3 lbs. I did not get the folding dimensions... sorry :O

Mathew Davis
10 months ago

Hey Court, have you ever used the Genesis folding bike? Matt

JohhnyPump
10 months ago

Marvelous video, and what an impressive folding ebike. Folding bikes are my preference(I own 2, non-electric), this one is awesome. Camera question, your videos images are very stable, even when you were jogging, the image stabilization was rock solid. What kind of camera(or phone) did you use? Thanks for your work, when it comes to ebike reviews, you are unrivaled. Thanks for putting it out there.

ElectricBikeReview.com
10 months ago

Hey JohhnyPump (cool name btw) I use a motorized handheld gimbal with GoPros and some deadcat mic fur to reduce wind noise. These are the exact items:
- GoPro 4 Silver with Memory Card (Bundle) http://amzn.to/1rUMzUq
- Deadcat Sticker http://amzn.to/27Bn6Qg
- 3 Axis Motorized Gimbal http://amzn.to/1U0dyXJ