Magnum Premium Review

Magnum Premium Electric Bike Review
Magnum Premium
Magnum Premium 500 Watt Internally Geared Hub Motor
Magnum Premium 48 Volt 13 Amp Hour Battery Pack
Magnum Premium Ergonomic Grips Das Kit Display And Buttons
Magnum Premium Rst Carve Suspension Fork
Magnum Premium Tektro Mechanical Disc Brakes
Magnum Premium Stand Alone Spanninga Rear Light On Rack
Magnum Premium 7 Speed Shimano Tourney Drivetrain
Magnum Premium Battery Handle Led Charge Indicator
Magnum Premium Selle Royal Look In Gel Saddle
Magnum Premium Folding Ebike In Trunk Of Car
Magnum Premium Portable 2 Amp Charger
Magnum Premium Electric Bike Review
Magnum Premium
Magnum Premium 500 Watt Internally Geared Hub Motor
Magnum Premium 48 Volt 13 Amp Hour Battery Pack
Magnum Premium Ergonomic Grips Das Kit Display And Buttons
Magnum Premium Rst Carve Suspension Fork
Magnum Premium Tektro Mechanical Disc Brakes
Magnum Premium Stand Alone Spanninga Rear Light On Rack
Magnum Premium 7 Speed Shimano Tourney Drivetrain
Magnum Premium Battery Handle Led Charge Indicator
Magnum Premium Selle Royal Look In Gel Saddle
Magnum Premium Folding Ebike In Trunk Of Car
Magnum Premium Portable 2 Amp Charger

Summary

  • A folding speed pedelec (capable of ~25 mph) that also offers throttle on demand, you get plenty of power from a 500 Watt hub motor and 48 Volt 13 amp hour battery pack
  • Two frame styles and four color choices let you personalize the product a bit, folding mechanisms have locks for safety, I like the reflective tires and LED lights even though they require separate batteries
  • Cast Aluminum rims can handle more weight than spokes and won't go out of true or break as easily, decent suspension fork, seat post shock, ergonomic grips and gel saddle enhance comfort
  • With so many features the bike weighs more at ~61 lbs, the kickstand would stay out of the way better if mounted towards the rear vs. bottom bracket, key must be left in to ride

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Magnum

Model:

Premium

Price:

$1,899

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Urban, Commuting, Travel

Electric Bike Class:

Speed Pedalec (Class 3)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States, Canada

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

61.3 lbs (27.8 kg)

Battery Weight:

9.2 lbs (4.17 kg)

Motor Weight:

8.5 lbs (3.85 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

15 in (38.1 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

15" Seat Tube, 21.5" Reach, 14.5" or 22.5" Stand Over Height, 65.5" Length

Frame Types:

Step-Thru, Mid-Step, Folding

Frame Colors:

Gloss White with Blue Accents, Matte Black with Blue Accents, Gloss White with Orange Accents, Matte Black with Orange Accents

Frame Fork Details:

RST Carve Suspension with Preload Adjustment, 60 mm Travel, 9 mm Axle with Nuts

Frame Rear Details:

11 mm Axle with Nuts

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses

Gearing Details:

7 Speed 1x7 Shimano Tourney, 11-28T

Shifter Details:

Shimano RevoShift Grip Twist on Right

Cranks:

Prowheel SOLID, 165 mm Length, 52T Chainring with Aluminum Alloy Guide

Pedals:

Wellgo K20410, Folding Plastic Platform

Headset:

Neco 1 1/8"

Stem:

Aluminum Alloy, Folding with QR Telescoping Height (10" to 13")

Handlebar:

Low-Rise, 24" Length, Aluminum Alloy

Brake Details:

Tektro Mechanical Disc with 160 mm Rotors, Tektro Levers with Rubberized Edge and Motor Inhibitor

Grips:

Ergonomic Stitched

Saddle:

Selle Royal Look In Gel, Oversized with Rubber Bumpers

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy, Basic Suspension, Flip-Up Saddle Clamp

Seat Post Length:

350 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

27.2 mm

Rims:

Solid Aluminum Alloy, Black

Spokes:

Cast Radial Support Arms

Tire Brand:

CST, 20" x 2.125"

Wheel Sizes:

20 in (50.8cm)

Tire Details:

Reflective Sidewall Stripes, 40-65 PSI, Nylon

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Flick Bell, Rear Rack with Pannier Blockers and Spring Latch 25 kg Max Weight (55 lbs), Single Side Adjustable Length Kickstand, Metal Derailleur Guard, Aluminum Alloy Fenders with Mud Flaps, Independent Spanninga GaLeo Headlight (2 AA Batteries), Independent Spanninga Back Light (2 AA Batteries), Support Bar on Bottom Bracket

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, 9 Mosfet 14 Amp Current Controller, 1.5 lb 2 Amp Charger, Max Weight Rated at 240 lbs

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

8Fun

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Motor Peak Output:

700 watts

Battery Brand:

Samsung, Panasonic or LG

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

13 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

624 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium Nickel Cobalt Manganese (Li-NCM)

Charge Time:

6.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

30 miles (48 km)

Estimated Max Range:

60 miles (97 km)

Display Type:

Das-Kit Fixed Backlit Monochrome LCD

Readouts:

Power Level (Power, Normal, Eco), Pedal Assist (0-6), Odometer, Time, Trip 1, Trip 2, Speed, Voltage, Battery Level (1-5), (Press Power Once for Backlighting, Hold Set for Menu)

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad (Power, Set, +, -)

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist, Trigger Throttle

Top Speed:

25 mph (40 kph) (20 mph Throttle Only)

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Written Review

The Magnum Premium is an interesting folding electric bike… Not only is it powerful with a 500 watt geared motor and 48 volt battery configuration, it’s also sturdy and fast. Rather than spoked wheels, which tend to be stronger at the 20″ size to begin with, they chose cast Aluminum 20″ wheels setup like mag wheels. And instead of a standard 6 Mosfet controller, the Premium uses 9 Mosfets which can handle 14 Amps of Current vs. just 10 or 12. During the ride test, I had one of the company’s co-founders, Jesse, hop on and ride around the parking lot. Even with his 6’3″ height and 200+ body weight, the bike worked fine. Smaller wheels offer a mechanical advantage to hub motors, which tend to be easier on drivetrains than mid-drives. You’re getting a zippy compact platform here which is great for space savings but it is not light. Weighing in at 61+ lbs, it’s worth taking a couple of minutes to remove the 9 lb battery before lifting. And even though the frame only comes in one size, there are two different styles (a mid-step and the deep wave step-thru shown in the video and images above). Both come with a longer suspension seat post and adjustable stem for increased height. This is a big deal if you’re a taller rider, I felt great on the bike at 5’9″ myself and I have longer legs. In short, the bike felt comfortable and solid which is very important given the higher assisted top speed of roughly 25 mph. Again, it’s an interesting folding e-bike because it delivers a platform that is truly capable as a speed pedelec and might be great for commuting if you’ve got limited space… Wheel it into work, fold it up under your desk and charge it there vs. locking it up at the rack?

Driving this electric bike is an 8Fun internally geared hub motor sealed inside the rear wheel. It puts out between 500 and 700 watts and produces a bit more whirring noise than weaker options. I found it to be zippy and capable, it switched on very fast in pedal assist mode thanks to a precise cadence sensor mounted near the left crank arm (around the spindle). The sensor used here is compact and sealed compared to the larger discs with visible magnets. I imagine it would stay cleaner and get bumped less easily which translates to more reliable operation. As highlighted earlier, the motor is backed up with a 48 volt batter, more mosfets in the controller and higher current thruput. If you’re a larger rider or someone who plans to carry gear on the rack, this is a great thing.

Powering the motor and backlit display, but not the lights, is a 48 volt 13 amp hour battery pack mounted just behind the seat tube. To me, this is way above average in terms of capacity and very impressive to see on a folding electric bike. Depending on how you ride, the bike should get excellent range. Stick to the first few levels of pedal assist and under 20 mph for truly optimal performance. Note that the trigger throttle, mounted near the left grip, cuts out at 20 mph for legal reasons but that you can reach the higher speeds using the top level of assist, level 6. The battery pack is painted black which matches the saddle, rims and tires and it slides onto the frame easily. I felt it lock securely and noticed a 5 Volt USB power outlet on the right side. This would be handy for charging a portable electronic device stored in one of the panniers or a trunk bag but you could also string a longer USB cord across the frame with zip ties if you wanted to mount something to the handle bars. Just be careful near the folding point on the frame and dull the edges of cut zip ties so they don’t scratch and cut your legs while pedaling. A couple of downsides for the battery is that it doesn’t power the lights and that you must leave the key in while it’s being used. The key is mostly out of the way but might jingle if connected to a chain or other keys… this is quite common with the style of battery housing used here (called a Silver Fish in the industry). I like that Magnum fills the pack with premium cells (from Samsung, LG or Panasonic depending on supply) and that it has a handle and LED indicator on top. Another huge win is the flip-forward saddle mount which allows you to take the pack off without removing the seat and seat post. And when you do adjust the seat post, I noticed that the clamp is angled to the side so the lever won’t scratch the battery pack or collide with it… very smart.

Operating the bike is a multi-step process and one of the areas where improvements could be made. You have to press a little power button or switch on both lights, then turn the key to on in the battery pack then press a power button on the control pad. That’s four steps and it’s easier to miss one when parking or folding the bike. Perhaps you leave a light on and it runs out of juice? Perhaps you start folding and bump the trigger throttle which spins the wheel? These are areas to keep an eye on. All that aside, I do like the display panel and all of the options Magnum has offered. The throttle works at all times, even in assist level zero which I call “throttle only mode”. Arrowing up and down through assist is easy to do without taking your left hand off the grip because of the remote button pad. The trigger throttle on the left is a bit trickier to reach depending on where you mount it (behind the brake lever or in front of it closer to the grip). Given how responsive assist is, I’m not sure I’d use the throttle as much with this bike and fully appreciate that the brakes are higher quality disc style with rubberized levers that have motor inhibitors built in. And while I’d love to see hydraulic disc brakes, I appreciate the lower price point that they hit with this e-bike… again, compromises had to be made here and there so I get it.

The Magnum Premium comes with everything you need to commute, rain or shine, but it is a more advanced electric bike. With an always-active trigger throttle and higher top speed, I see this as a perfect option for commuters and younger riders (or those with more weight). Remember, you can tone down the power and speed by changing the six levels of assist but the throttle will always be ready with full up to 20 mph. I love this style of setup because I can save energy riding at lower assist then zoom up a hill or past another riding simply by pressing the throttle for a few moments. Note that the Aluminum fenders felt solid and didn’t make a lot of noise while riding on bumpy terrain. The rack uses standard gauge tubing which should work with panniers and other standard accessories and you could use the USB port on the battery to add additional lights if you wanted. I’m impressed with all of the frame and color options here and appreciate that Magnum now has 70+ dealers in the US who can let you take a test ride and help with service and warranty stuff. The bike comes with one year comprehensive and the company has been around globally for five plus years.

Pros:

  • One of the most noticeable and coolest features about this folding ebike, at least to me!, is the cast Aluminum wheelset which can support more weight and won’t go out of true the way traditional spokes might
  • I love that Magnum sells two versions of this bike, mid-step and wave step-thru, both are relatively easy to mount but might appeal to different tastes (I reviewed the wave style because it has the lowest downtube)
  • Four color combinations make it fun, you could get a set of these for your family and easily keep track of who owns which bike, my favorite is the white because it is the most visible for night riding
  • Solid rack with a full 25 kg max weight rating, I like the little spring latch for quick cargo additions and love that the battery is mounted to the frame leaving the rack clear vs. some older designs
  • This is a minor plus but I noticed how the seat tube and collar were twisted a bit so the quick release tab wouldn’t collide with the battery pack when fully closed! This is a wonderful attention to detail
  • I love the included lights and reflective tires but wish that the lights ran off the main battery pack, they are higher quality builds however (both from Spanninga)
  • The folding points seemed very reliable thanks to locking mechanisms (there’s even a spring run through the frame to help with alignment and unfolding if you’re by yourself)
  • Sturdy metal plates sandwich the chainring acting as protection when folded (along with a metal support arm directly below the bottom bracket), the metal plates also act as a guide, keeping the chain on track if you’re riding over bumpy terrain… this is especially important in throttle mode and when riding on bumpy terrain at high speed
  • Capable of ~25 mph top speeds (in pedal assist mode) this is one of the very few speed pedelec folding e-bikes I have ever seen and would work well for some people who want to commute faster
  • Excellent drive mode control here with throttle only mode, throttle override (with full power) and six levels of assist… just be careful to turn it off before folding or you could bump the throttle and have the bike take off
  • At under $2k I feel like this bike is priced well, especially because it comes with all the accessories you need for commuting (rack, sturdy Aluminum fenders and lights)
  • Mechanical disc brakes are a good upgrade from rim brakes because they stay cleaner and don’t wear out as fast, the brake levers on the Magnum Premium have motor inhibitors so you stop safer and don’t compete with the power of the bike
  • Smaller wheels keep the bike compact for folding but aren’t as comfortable as larger ones so it’s great that you get a mid-level suspension fork, suspension seat post and large gel saddle… it really makes a difference at speed and on longer journies
  • Telescoping stem offers more height options to improve the ride for taller people (the bike only comes in one size after all), don’t stretch it all the way up however because the cables can get stretched and messed up when steering if so
  • You can charge the battery on or off the frame with this bike and I love how easy it is to take off! The saddle flips forward and the slide and locking mechanisms just seemed to work here vs. some other folders I’ve tested
  • I really like the cadence sensor they chose for this pedelec, it’s not a big disc with exposed magnets (easier to bump and mess up), this thing is compact and sealed from water and mud but still very responsive
  • The fold point mid-frame does bulge out a little but is positioned much lower than some other e-bikes so I feel like it wouldn’t bruise your thigh as easily (this was an issue my girlfriend had with some of the folding fat bikes we tested)
  • I like that the battery features a USB charging port on the side so you can fill your phone, GPS or music player… in some ways I’d like it up by the handlebars but on the other hand, it’s very close to the rear rack so your gear could be charging while stored, consider buying a right angle USB dongle like one of these to keep it out of the way
  • The charger is pretty compact and very lightweight at ~1.5 lbs, the plug end for the bike is metal which seems tougher if it was dropped or stepped on, I’d probably bring it along all the time and just keep it in a trunk bag on the rack
  • I love the brake levers they chose for the Premium, you get a tiny (but loud!) integrated bell on the left and the levers themselves have a rubberized edge for comfort
  • Generally speaking, this is one of the most powerful folding electric bikes around given the 500 Watt motor, 9 Mosfet controller with 14 Amp thruput and 48 Volt battery, it was able to move Jesse who is a larger rider (6’3″ at 230 lbs), up hills as shown in the video review above

Cons:

  • The folding plastic pedals are light, inexpensive and compact but not as stiff or durable as some Aluminum ones I’ve seen, given the “premium” price and features found elsewhere on the bike this is one area that could be improved… or you could add some like this aftermarket
  • Weighing in at over 60 lbs, this is one of the heavier electric bikes out there (folding or otherwise) due in part to the cast wheels, suspension fork and larger battery… but at least the battery is removable so you can subtract ~9 lbs when moving the frame
  • Neither wheel offers quick release which means you’ll need tools to fix flats or break the bike down further (for super compactness), one positive here is that they’re less likely to be tampered with or stolen when parked
  • While I love the adjustable length feature of the kickstand, I wish it was mounted further back on the frame from the crank arms because it collides (especially when walking the bike backwareds as the cranks turn themselves)
  • Both lights require two AA batteries and must be switched on separately (that adds time and makes them easy to leave on accidentally to drain overnight or during the day when parked at a bike rack), the lights also don’t have flashing modes or other settings besides on/off
  • The key must be left in the battery pack in order to operate this bike, it’s positioned mostly out of the way but could jingle if you have a chain or other keys connected
  • The display looks great but isn’t removable, you can angle it forward and back to reduce glare but it could get scratched at a rack or weather worn being left on all the time
  • This is a minor con but the drivetrain is entry-level, with seven speeds you’re getting enough range to climb but might not keep up at the ~25 mph level, Shimano Tourney components work well enough but might need more tuneups, I love that they included a derailleur guard to protect it when folded
  • One way their folding design could be improved is with a rubber latch or maybe some magnets to keep the bike from coming unfolded during transport… this might also reduce banging and rattling as it flops around due to vibrations in your car trunk, plane, boat or whatever

Resources:

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Nirmala
6 months ago

Nice to see Magnum upgrading some of the features on their newer ebikes. I love my Ui5, but I do wish it had the throttle with full power at all times, the higher voltage battery and some other features found on this new model. Ebikes just keep getting better!

Reply
Court Rye
6 months ago

I see Magnum making incremental upgrades to their products and it’s exciting to think of where it will lead. Even today, I feel like you get a lot more bang for your buck than just a year or two ago. And yes, with the throttle settings and better display I like how it empowers riders to choose vs. limiting them or requiring extras steps. In short though, it sounds like you’re enjoying your Ui5 and I’m glad to hear that :D

Reply
Susan
6 months ago

Hi Court, I love your website and your video reviews! I’m short (5’1″) and a big fan of non-elecric folding bikes, and this is the first folding electric which has peaked my interest. I live in a hilly area of Northern San Diego, and wanted to know if you would recommend this bike for hilly areas.
Thanks in advance for your reply!

Reply
Court Rye
6 months ago

Hi Susan! Yeah, the Magnum Premium could be a good fit for your area. It’s much more powerful than the average hub motor driven folder, priced pretty well and comes in that deep step-thru configuration. As noted in the review, it’s heavy but depending on your needs (and a bit of help) it can work great for a wide range of uses. I continue to hear great things from shops and owners about Magnum and am seeing their brand grow significantly in the US which also gives me confidence. I hope this helps! You could also chime in at the EBR forums and ask for feedback, maybe people who already own their products will share.

Reply
Mark M
4 months ago

For a folding e-bike, this is a rather heavy bike at 61 lbs. The primary purpose of folding is going to be ability to put in compact spaces, carry on a train, or easily place in a car, or easily carry up steps into apmt or condo, so this ebike is a just not a very viable candidate for those purposes. Also, at 500 watts, and 48 volts its way more power than an ebike with those size tires and the likely speeds anyone would want to travel at, especially for the purposes of what most foldables are chosen for. The price point is also a few hundred dollars more, than more viable and purpose designed foldables. I’ve tried this and the Blix Vika’s and felt the Vika’s were actually sturdier, and gave a more confident and secure ride. Plus their models are 48 lbs and 36 lbs, respectively, which better suits the purposes most riders searching for foldables are seeking.

Reply
Court Rye
4 months ago

Thanks for chiming in and sharing your experiences Mark! I appreciate your perspective and am sure others will too. I like the Blix products and was excited to also see the lower powered, less expensive Magnum Classic as an alternative to the Premium here :)

Reply
Eric S
3 months ago

I went and bought one of these, and it’s been very nice- one thing I wish they had was a manual that reflected the actual bike’s screen, which is not at all what they show in the manual. I’m trying to figure it out as I go… it appears that the 20-inch wheels may be limited to a top speed of 20 miles an hour, but I’m not sure what that screen is. I think it’s the 4th one… it shows 2 numbers, one of which seems to change the bike’s top pedaling speed, the other of which I’m not sure about. Possibly wheel size? Scratching my head here.

Aside from the instruction manual not helping at all with learning the settings, it’s a good bike. The rear wheel’s not easy to remove if you get a flat there, and the tire takes patience to get back on afterward. As far as flats go, the folding is a godsend if you need to call someone to come pick you up and get out of the rainy roadside.

But on the positive side, the range I’m getting out of it is at LEAST 40 miles with pedal assist, and around 2 bars of battery left after a day of riding. It’s been handy for small grocery runs and has given me the freedom to commute locally, which is a good thing for someone without a car and no public transport in town.
20 MPH has been a good, serviceable top speed for me. It’d be nice to get it a little faster as advertised, but I’m fine with this.

I don’t find myself using the throttle for more than short bursts, at times when I want to get off the line quickly such as crossing roads or starting on steep slopes.

Pedal assist 2-4 are most comfortable for me in terms of just riding around, 1 is good for starting up or just taking my time, and 5-6 are nice and effortless ways to get somewhere fast.

I’ve used the USB charging from the battery, and my Samsung Note 4 tells me this battery is only capable of slow charging- turns out to be maybe half the speed of its normal charger, if that. But getting 40% of my phone’s battery recharged did not seem to tax or noticeably drain the Magnum’s battery at all, so for topping off electronics or charging stuff like a Kindle as I ride to my favorite reading spot is perfectly doable.

On another note, no reading or texting on-bike: even without doing these things I managed to WHUMP! myself into a signpost and a parked car in the month I’ve had it. The bike and I were both fine after each incident, aside from the usual shattered-dignity bit. :)

I tend to ride my bike in Eco mode (Settings screen 5- hold Set, press Set until you reach screen 5, and press minus to toggle between the three modes), just because I want this battery to last, and because so far I can’t tell a difference between that and Normal in terms of acceleration or top speed. Still trying to figure this one out. I’m not sure how Power mode differs either.

It’s a fun bike, and is turning out to be pretty practical whenever it’s not outright raining (in which case no bike of mine is going outside for long.) I’ve even gotten some interested questions from strangers at the bike rack. It’s weird how much more expensive people around me tend to think it is, and how much slower and shorter-range. It feels good to give ’em a pleasant surprise with “Yes, it’s electric. …20 miles an hour, 40+ miles range. …Yes, it folds. …$2000 including tax.”

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Jonathan55
4 days ago

Thanks, I made a post at Radpower's Facebook page.

I have yet to try it, but I had the thought that if the bike has a good kickstand, then I might be able to put my right hand on the seat, then grab my right knee or shin with my left hand, to help lift my right leg over the main tube. I think I could get over a tube 18" in height.

It looks like that little tube on the Big Cat is about 14 or 15" above the ground. I'll email them and ask. And I'll ask somebody at the Sondors Facebook group about the Fold X's main tube height, and lowest seat height.

Yeah, I'm definitely going to try before buying. I did ride my roommate's cheap Chinese scooter the other day though. It was more nerve-wracking than I would have liked, but it was wonky, wouldn't start properly, and had what seemed like really bad torque. That coupled with the fact that the Fold X is 50 pounds makes me feel like being able to ride an e-bike is promising. Regardless, I should be able to try at least the Rad Mini soon.

I forgot to mention, I'm considering buying an RV like a class B camper van. So for that reason, I think it would be better if I could store the bike inside the RV. A folder should make that a lot easier.

I have some back problems and have been considering the Rad Mini or the low step over version of the Magnum Premium. I think the Magnum has a 10 or 12 inch step over. EBR did a video of it. It has fork suspension and seat post too.

Can anyone say anything about the Magnum vs the others?

I drove a Class B (Travato) around the country with a Trek Conduit on the back but now want more than just pedal assist.

Lin B
2 weeks ago

With changes in the marketplace since 2015, I wouldn't bet against a retail price for Version 4 that is not much above--perhaps even below--the original Indiegogo prices. When add-on electric motors can be had for $250 or less on Amazon, how much of a premium will people be willing to pay for the Shareroller? If the Shareroller price is too high, I will buy a Bafang (or lesser) motor kit and forego the chance to electrify a scooter. If the Shareroller becomes the Rolls Royce of electric drives for bikes, it will not, unfortunately, be my electric drive.
For me, the advantage is the usability 00 on any bike, so I can put it on my 20" folder or my 16". That would require two completely separate hub motor setups. It also can go on any future bike I build. If you want something for one bike, dedicated to that bike, where the added weight of a permanent hub motor isn't an issue, then it might seem pricey. As we know, the smaller and lighter stuff gets, the higher the price. A hub motor system is going to equal the weight of the shareroller just in the hub unit, and then you have the batteries, wiring, controller, etc. When Rubbee first came out it was $1200 but recently was selling for $800 due to economies of scale. But now they are working on something new so the old ones are not available anymore. I'm sure it will be pricey at first, too. Plus, I don't want to have to file down my dropouts to fit a bigger axle.

Allie Miller
2 weeks ago

You v3 guys are really lucky to get it on this new version at the price you pledged

With changes in the marketplace since 2015, I wouldn't bet against a retail price for Version 4 that is not much above--perhaps even below--the original Indiegogo prices. When add-on electric motors can be had for $250 or less on Amazon, how much of a premium will people be willing to pay for the Shareroller? If the Shareroller price is too high, I will buy a Bafang (or lesser) motor kit and forego the chance to electrify a scooter. If the Shareroller becomes the Rolls Royce of electric drives for bikes, it will not, unfortunately, be my electric drive.

fredi
2 weeks ago

This is my first ebike and my decision to buy her was based on getting the best ebike for me at the best price. First a little about me, I’m 60 years old, 6’1” and 230 lbs. A have a 34” Class-A RV and travel the east coast. On long trips I normally tow a Jeep Wrangler with a tray-style bike rack loaded with two or three mountain bike from a big box store. On short trips I leave the Jeep at home and mount the bike rack to the RV. Typical use of the bikes is for recreational riding in National and State parks. I thought it was time for a better bike and was intrigued with the idea of using ebikes and leaving the Jeep at home more.

I originally looked at Evelo because of their mid-drive with the NuVinci hub. They didn’t offer any local sales but work with local bike shops to provide service in conjunction with their 4-year/20,000-mile warranty. I was drawn to the Delta with the 750 watt mid-drive since all I’ve ever owned was mountain bikes and I wanted to make sure that it would get me up the hills. I soon discovered that where I live they only allow 500 watts and mid-drives are more efficient using the power, so while a 750 watt hub drive may struggle to get me up the hill, a 350 watt mid-drive should have less problems because they have higher performance, more torque and use less battery power. I also have always hated not being in the right gear at the right time and gnashing the gears and an Internally Geared Hub (IGH) like the NuVinci would solve those problems. Since I was planning on adding lots of comfort accessories like a plush seat, road tires, rear rack, fenders, lights, etc. and the Galaxy comes with all of those so I felt it was a better fit for me.

The Galaxy is billed as a comfort cruiser with an upright riding position, 27.5″ wheels and 2” tires on a ridge frame. Evelo makes two models the Galaxy, the GT with a step-through frame and the TT a traditional top tube frame. Each model comes in two versions, Premium or Fully Loaded. The Fully Loaded version upgrades the NuVinci N380 transmission to the Harmony fully automatic transmission and adds hydraulic brakes. So I ordered the Fully Loaded Galaxy TT version with a list price of $3899.

The bike came in about a week. She was double boxed and very well packed. The hardest part was getting the bike out of the box. I recommend having a little help here. Evelo isn’t kidding when they say the bike come almost fully assembled. Install the brake caliper, front wheel and fender, handlebars, headlight, and you’re done. They recommend charging the battery for 12 hours before the first use, so I plugged it in to charge overnight and then set about the process of assembling the bike which took about 30 minutes. They provided several allen wrenches, a couple of “real” boxed end wrenches and armed with the step by step instructions it was much easier to assemble than any bike I’ve ever bought from a big box store. My recommendation is that you put the fender on before you install the front wheel and then attach the brake caliper. The front wheel comes with a “Quick Release” so it’s really not a big deal.

The Galaxy is one of a small number of electric bikes that offer the NuVinci Harmony Automatic Transmission which allows me to enjoy the ride while it takes care of the shifting. In automatic it finds the proper gear while I dial in a comfortable cadence and set the assist level for my perfect ride. No more gnashing the gears and getting stuck on a hill because I was in the wrong gear. A simple button press changes the hub to manual mode, but I mostly I keep it in automatic on the lowest setting. The brushless motor combined with the Gates belt drive and the Harmony makes the ride smooth and virtually silent. I set the tire pressure to 50 lbs for a softer ride.

She comes with a 350 watt Bafang Max mid-drive motor (peak 600 watts) and uses a torque sensor (internal to the motor) and speed to determine how much power is drawn from the battery. The torque sensor uses a strain gauge inside the motor to measure pressure on the pedals. This allows for quick engagement and better sensitivity. I was concerned about the Galaxy’s uphill performance but found that she can easily climb hills at 8-12 mph that would normally bring me to a crawl. On level roads I can quickly reach the 20+ mph limit. At those speeds it’s nice to have the Tektro 180mm hydraulic disc brakes that provide great stopping power and simultaneously cut power to the motor. Once you stop there is a double fork kickstand to keep her upright.

The large backlit LCD display panel (made by King) is mounted center of the handlebars and can swivel forward or back to reduce glare. It’s easy to read and offers information about speed, distance, pedal assist, watts and a five segment battery charge level indicator. The control pad is located near the left grip, from there you can turn the bike on/off and select the level of assist. I really liked that holding the UP button turns on/off the backlight and holding the DOWN button activates “Walk” mode which moves the bike forward at about two mph. Pressing both the UP and DOWN buttons for 3 seconds puts you in the settings menu where you can increase the maximum speed to 25 mph, set the backlight level, and miles or kilometers. I set the wheel diameter to 27.5 inches since it defaulted to 26.

The bike has a thumb throttle but as a safety feature it doesn't engage unless the bike is moving. I originally thought I would need the throttle to get across an intersection or when starting up a hill, but the bike's torque sensor measures pressure on the pedals, so it quickly engages. It is so responsive and natural feeling that I haven't used the throttle much but I certainly have used “walk” mode several times.

The rear tail light is mounted directly beneath the battery rack so it isn’t blocked by my pannier and is powered by a couple of AA batteries. The LED Head Light has five modes and is USB rechargeable. It quickly installs on the handlebars with a rubber strap and the single large button on top makes it easy to turn on and change modes while riding.

Powering the bike is a 36 volt, 13 amp (468 wh) battery pack with an advertised 50 miles of range. I rode for over twenty miles before the charge indicator dropped from five to four bars. The battery weighs 8 lbs, can be charged on or off the bike and has its own level indicator. The small rubber cap protecting the charge terminal opens easily and stays closed. The battery is nicely protected in the full-size cargo rack and has a key lock which keeps it there and provides anti-theft security. You don’t need to leave the key in while riding and there’s a built-in handle to help remove the battery and carry it. Removing the battery makes it easier to lift the 46 lb bike onto my tray style carrier. The battery placement in the rack makes the bike a little heavy in the back, but frees up space for bottle cage bosses on the seat tube and allowed me to mount my folding lock on the down tube. All I did was add my Cloud-9 seat, bottle cage, pannier and a suspension seat post and I was ready to go.

After about a week of riding I took her to a local dealer for a full checkup. They did a minor adjustment to the brakes and gave her a clean bill of health, no charge. They were impressed at how well “I” put the bike together (LOL) and they loved the belt and throttle. I’ll be sure to make the checkup an annual event and return to that dealer.

Let me know if you have any questions

1/1
Calicoskies
2 weeks ago

Model S from the Electric Bike Company (EBC) – Ordered June 19th and not delivered on July 28th as told, arrived August 1st instead. I built our first e-bike for the wife. After hours of research chose this kit: 48V-1000W-26-Front Wheel along with a LunaCycle 48v-Pansonic-17-5ah-black-killer-whale battery. Installed both on a new cruiser bike, Phat Cycles Del Ray. I am a first-time builder but did not have any issues and think it came out very nicely. Battery is on rear rack, controller in the basket on front. Went for my first ride and have been smiling ever since. Since this is my wife’s bike I needed a second one for me so we can ride together in very hilly Raleigh, NC. Being in our 50’s we gave up biking long ago because the hills were just too much to make it enjoyable. Now with a little bit of motor power the hills have disappeared.

We wanted to go the factory-built route and see if the differences were worth the 40% premium in cost. After doing more internet searches and reading reviews on electric beach cruisers we decided on a bike from Electric Bike Company in Newport Beach, CA. After Court Rye’s (electricbikereview.com) review, mostly the 20min YouTube, placed the order. I was not able to find any reviews from owners accept for the short comments on the EBC website. This is the main reason I am writing a longer review. Order process was easy and straight forward on the website. Communications with Sean Lupton-Smith, the CEO, have been outstanding. There is a $250 shipping charge that is considerable, but involves a large heavy box with a lithium battery that requires special handling.

Bike feels very sturdy and is a joy to ride. Bike components come together to make a really sharp looking bike. All the components seem to be high quality and makes the ride smooth. I had to go through options on LCD to turn the cruise function on but that was no big deal, some people may not even know it is available. The Pedal Assist is working great, not always using the thumb accelerator is nice and seems to go on and off without jerking you around. We went with the 18ah battery so should be able to go 40 miles easily even with me being 250lbs. Power is great and able to go up to 28 mph easily and quickly if I want. Kickstand is heavy duty and I asked if I could buy a second for my other bike which they ok’d and are shipping now. The lights on front and rear work well, I added more blinking lights because you can never have too many. Compared to the front hub motor on my other bike this one is louder, was surprising on my first ride. After taking a long ride the motor’s hum/whine does not bother me, so would not say it is a negative. I would give the bike itself a 10 out of 10 for me but my wife would say 1 out of 10 since she can’t ride it as the seat to ground clearance is too high for her and bike is very heavy so she wants to be able to firmly plant feet on ground not just tiptoes. She is 5’7”. She does agree that bike looks fantastic and seems extremely well made.

Bike arrived with some damage on the rear hitch from rubbing against something during ship. In my opinion the hitch scratches were the only damage from shipping. Overall packing was done well. The basket on the front was really messed up with several large paint flakes chipped off, it looks like the paint did not adhere properly during the painting process. Also several other paint chips IMO were possibly made when the bike was assembled and not during shipping. The Suntour suspension post that site talks about as being a great addition was not even installed on bike. After calling EBC, they explained they do not include those on bikes anymore, it’s a website error. I checked other items like the brakes, tires and motor and they all seem to be as advertised. Noticed a cut-out on side of battery case for 12VDC jack but it is not there, so no 12vdc to USB adapter to power items on back as listed in reviews. This may be an option or just not available with the 18ah battery.

Bike is taller from saddle to ground compared to other bikes. My wife was not able to touch the ground flat footed with seat post lowered completely. I was able to use a different seat that is thinner to make her more comfortable but when she went to try and ride it just didn’t feel comfortable for her. She has ridden multiple beach cruisers without this issue. Looks like she will never be able to even try it so I am not happy about that. Suggest you do measurements somehow if you think this may be issue for you, wife is 5’7”. A woman need some strength as the bike is very heavy.

I wrote an email to report the issues to EBC and did not receive a reply for more than 24hrs. Also called and left 3 messages. This was a Tuesday. EBC finally replied via email that a new basket would be sent but they are on back order. No red touch-up paint available for scratches on frame which is disappointing. They said they will send the suspension seat post with no explanation of why it was not included as advertised. I did happen to have some red paint that was a similar red from one of my cars to fix paint chips. I would have appreciated a little more concern about these issues after the considerable cost of bike and ship.

I could not get the Pedal Assist to work because I did not know that you needed to hold down the bottom arrow for 5 seconds to turn on. I did find it in the manual later but was frustrated at first thinking something was not working. After other items on bike were missing I assumed the PAS was another item.

I thought the battery came completely out including the built-in BMS and charger, but that’s not the case. This will not work for me in the summer heat of NC. I need to charge in a cool house and under supervision. EBC has an external charger that can be used with the battery while removed from bike, which I have ordered. In the mean time I am carrying heavy bike up front porch steps and inside to charge.

After all my concerns I asked if we could trade the seat post for the charger which is equal value but was told no and sent invoice instead. I find it odd that during the buying process I could send an email and get an answer within one hour and now after delivery I am lucky if I hear back the next business day. With the warranty EBC provides I hope I do not have any issues I can’t take care of myself. I guess this may be a reason to buy a bike locally. All three of my adult children want to buy e-bikes but I am not sure at this point I am going to recommend this company. I say this because the bike itself great after about 50 miles but the customer service and communication is concerning.

https://www.electricbikecompany.com/features-specifications/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2mRYmGTOY8A Court Rye from Electric Bike Review April 30th, 2017

https://electrek.co/2017/06/29/electric-bike-companys-beach-cruiser-is-the-perfect-1300-e-bike-for-summer/

http://www.ebikeschool.com/list-great-inexpensive-electric-bicycle-parts/ Used to select my battery and motor kit for build my own.

https://lunacycle.com/48v-pansonic-ga-17-5ah-black-killer-whale-ebike-pack-huge-range/

https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Wholesale-48V-1000W-26-Rear-Wheel-Electric-Bicycle-Ebike-Conversion-Kits-2015-New-Style-with-LCD/1947983314.html?spm=2114.13010608.0.0.2HJDYe

1/2
Marceltt
4 weeks ago

After just over 28 months and 32,000 kms on my 2014 Urban, I traded up to the 2017 model. I don't normally get into trading up a perfectly good ride for "something new", but this time I did spoil myself and took the leap.

What A treat!

It's not possible in my mind how anyone could improve on the power system on the Ohm so the electronics and power are the same with the Bionx D500 system. I had already upgraded the display and remote on the old bike, which by the way are fantastic, so the only change in electronics was I now have integrated Bluetooth which I can use on an app for my cell phone.
The big change-up was Ohm has one up'ed the frame with a sleek new look and upgraded to some premium components. It now features an integrated battery pack, dual piston brakes, and paddle shifters.

The battery pack is very very slick. Some designer should get an award for the design of this, so much easier to handle, install, and remove.

After over 500 kms on the new ride I still can't figure out how I am getting ~ 7-10% more on the same size battery but, I am loving it.

That comparison is apples to apples, as I did have a new spare battery for the 2014. The original battery I had, had over 1000 cycles on it over the two-plus years of operation and it was still performing great.

The TRP dual piston brakes are the best I have had. Great braking power, no road grid ingress, smooth as silk.
The paddle shifting took some getting used to after a grip shift for the last 7 years on different e-bike models but I've adapted, and shifting is fast and engages well.
I'm trying out the new Big Ben tires which came stock. The old Ben's had minimal puncture resistance but Schwalbe has upped this protection, and with their low rolling resistance, these tires provide a really nice ride.
I kept the Bodyfloat of course.

Getting a ton of compliments on it as I get around, it is an eye catcher.

So now I'm back to the start on my odometer, OH well.
Love the bike. Have you ever tried or owed a pedego e bike ?

tarhead
1 month ago

It deserves its own discussion.

How would suggest I install a water bottle holder?

Any suggestions, I'm struggling to find a decent spot. I'm tempted to do like Radrover, drill holes and install a few screws... Handlebar space is at a premium right now, anywhere else?
Maybe on top of the top tube held in place with a couple of hose clamps as another idea? You'd need a bottle holder with a "foot" on it and rubber strips to protect the paint.

AguassissiM
1 month ago

It deserves its own discussion.

How would suggest I install a water bottle holder?

Any suggestions, I'm struggling to find a decent spot. I'm tempted to do like Radrover, drill holes and install a few screws... Handlebar space is at a premium right now, anywhere else?
@Denis Shelston how about this:

1/3
EBs_are_fun
1 month ago

I am also considering the Mariner. Just sitting on the fence at the moment and have watched every Youtube video made (as of July 12). Some good, come bad. Had considered the eJoe and Magnum 48v but still leaning toward the Voltbike Mariner.

If I could afford the Magnum Premium, it seems like an extremely nice bike. How will you be riding your bike? Commuting? Mostly on road, or other surfaces?

Poincare
1 month ago

Hello,

I have tried to search the forum and I did not find anyone with experience with this folding e-bike. I am considering this e-bike but would like to do some research on it first.

I have read the review from early 2017 here on EBR of the bike and I'd also like to hear from any actual users about how they like the bike, what works well, what doesn't, things they wish they knew before buying the bike, etc.

Thank you in advance.

Denis Shelston
1 month ago

I struggled with that too. I already had Map My Walk+ and Map My Ride+.

Decided to stay with it, as I had a few years of data on file, it's nice to be able to revisit some old workouts.

I signed up for Premium or MVP. $30 per year more or less. It has worked well for me to date.

Many if my friend are Stava enthusiasts, but I find most of them are a tad too competitive for me. I like doing my own thing.

Reviews are close for both. Matter of taste I think, more than anything else.

BurbManDan
1 month ago

I asked the dealer this morning to do a software update, but they were not able to locate their equipment to do this... Seems they misplaced some part of it when they moved (6+ months ago)... They said they'd let me know as soon as they are able to perform the update. The shop owners, and the techs, are all very friendly and seem eager to help, but I'm afraid they don't seem as adept in bike maintenance or Bosch know-how as they need to be to provide the level of service I believe the buyer of a premium bike should be able to expect. Granted, I'm a demanding customer, partly because for me the bike is daily transportation - not an expensive toy.

Since these updates are a closely guarded Bosch secret, I don't know that there is any alternative but to wait for my dealer to come up with a solution. I'm just not confident in their ability to keep me informed about new software updates, or their ability to apply the updates properly. I know the dual-battery system is the newest tech, and Bosch is trying to maintain a quality standard, and R&M is new to the US, working to establish a dealer network. All these factors sometimes lead to frustration for the end user caught at the end of a complicated set of business and technical processes... So, the bike is fantastic, but the complexity of the support process for the electronics needs improvement.

Bill A
1 month ago

I just got my Riese & Muller Cruiser Mixte HS (large frame) a couple of weeks ago. With 70 miles on the odometer, I am very happy with this bike so far. Since there are so few reviews on this bike, I am posting some of my early impressions. I will throw in some comparisons to my wife’s IZIP Zumo as this is the only other electric bike that I have experience with. Keep in mind though that the R&M Cruiser cost almost twice as much as the IZIP Zumo.

Compared to any bike that I have ridden in the past the R&M Cruiser Mixte looks big and that’s mostly due to the 28” tires. Those big Schwalbe tires, along with the suspension, smooth out the ride tremendously. Even though this is a big bike, the Mixte frame design gives me easy standover and step-over height without sacrificing stiffness. And despite looking big the bike feels just right when riding.

In addition to cruiser ergonomics and superior craftsmanship, my other priorities were the Bosch power system and the NuVinci hub. The Bosch control is smooth and feels like riding a tandem with your riding partner perfectly plugged into you brain. The Bosch power delivery matches exactly what I want with no surprises. Compared to the Currie system on the IZIP Zumo the Bosch system seems to always put up some percentage of my effort whereas the Currie system will put up 100% of the effort if you are just turning the crank, with or without any pedal pressure. Let up on the Bosch peddles and you slow down; not so on the Currie. Although the Bosch system is intuitively smooth it requires some effort all of the time. The Currie system is jumpy, but requires no effort at all to go. However, the trade off on effort and distance is the same on both systems; minimal rider effort goes minimal distance whereas maximum rider effort goes maximum distance. Also (thanks to Court’s ‘Reeee’ comments) the Bosch system is much quieter than I expected and on par with or even quieter than the Currie.

On the NuVinci, no derailer means minimal wear on the gears and chain. The prospect of lower maintenance and positive recommendations from Chris at Propel Bikes sold me on this transmission. I know it’s probably a bit heavier and a newer technology, but if the NuVinci holds up I think it will be worth it.

On flat ground or on moderate hills the Cruiser is a pure joy to ride. At 60 years old and out of shape, I can easily maintain speeds over 25 mph, but I generally dial back the power assist to maintain 20 mph. Speeds over 25mph do require a bit more effort. On a short 15 mile ride this morning, in a mix of street traffic, bike trails, University sidewalks, and hills, I averaged 17 mph without breaking a sweat.

I got this bike the day before leaving on a vacation to Yosemite, CA. Since I was planning to drive anyway, I took the Cruiser along with my wife's IZIP Zumo. After that experience, I would highly recommend the Bosch Performance CX motor over the Performance Speed if you plan to ride steep mountain roads and you’re out of shape like me. We climbed 8 to 10% roads that were a couple of miles long and I was huffing and puffing up those hills. My wife’s Zumo, with it’s 500 watt motor and a simpler control system, handled them with ease; although my wife would tell you that she’s in better shape (and lighter) than me too.

In summary, I really appreciate the fact that R&M didn’t skimp on the power system, frame, and transmission on this bike as they are all top notch. Besides a very solid construction, the beautiful fit and finish are exactly what you expect from premium German engineering and craftsmanship. And for a couple of small gripes: although the suspension is adequate, I would have liked options for a better front fork and seat post suspension that are found on the R&M Charger. Also the battery charger that comes with this bike is a 2.5 amp and not the 4.0 amp; its more compact, but takes 7 hours for a charge. On the other hand, I like the chain guard, ABUS cafe lock, brakes, and tires. I added a Busch & Muller 701 mirror that looks perfect on this bike and is a simply brilliant design that folds out of way when storing the bike or pushing the bike through a gate or doorway. I will probably upgrade the seat post suspension and maybe the peddles.

One last shout out for Propel Bikes in Brooklyn as they were super responsive, courteous and very helpful in my selection. Before ordering a bike, I emailed a couple of other bike shops on the West Coast and they didn’t respond anything like Chris at Propel Bikes. It’s clear to me that Propel Bikes is top notch bike shop and Chris Nolte manages his business with passion and care. I ordered before Court made his phenomenal visit to NY and I had to wait a crazy 12 weeks for this bike. Propel shipped the bike on the same day that they received it. And even though I was on the receiving end of R&M’s growing pains, I am very happy with the Cruiser Mixte and would repeat the purchase if I had it all to do over again.

Denis Shelston
1 month ago

It deserves its own discussion.

How would suggest I install a water bottle holder?

Any suggestions, I'm struggling to find a decent spot. I'm tempted to do like Radrover, drill holes and install a few screws... Handlebar space is at a premium right now, anywhere else?

Francesco
2 months ago

I have a gravel bike that I use to go around.

I'm tempted by a foldable one and I was focusing on a ebike since I'd like to have an alternative to the one I own.

I'm looking for a small one and I'd like not to spend more than 1.200 euro (around 1.500 dollars).

I've checked a few reviews and I think that Xiaomi Qicycle seems to be what I'm looking for: it is cheap (about 700/800 euro), it is foldable, it is an ebike. Maybe it could be not a premium choice but eventually a good starting point.

On the other side, I maybe should go for a more expansive but (logically) better alternative. But I wouldn't like to go up to 3000$.

Do you have something to suggest me? Do you think Xiaomi is a good choice?

Thanks for help.

Superstig666
2 months ago

Another update and another vague estimate on delivery o_O I get the feeling that they are trying to accomplish too much as it seems every update they are constantly making tweaks which in turn adds to the delay. I wonder if it would have been better to issue a basic version for all the backers initially and then a premium version with all additional features. Then the lead time would be slightly shorter.

Early-mid August in reality will mean end of August + then to test all components together again I think if you have the units by December you would be lucky....

Shoestring
2 months ago

E-boy , that's an interesting question. I own one, and it's a great bike, so far. I looked at Haibike as THE premium brand. Prices from $2500- 15,000+ puts it in the "BMW" category as far as I'm concerned. That said, I've yet to need warrantee service, replacement parts or factory accessories, so I don't know what to think as a company. I can also say I was NOT prepared to pay full retail for the bike. I can afford 5k for a bike, but I cannot justify the expense. For example: I would love to have a Bulls Monster fs fatty, But there is no freaking way I'm dropping $5,300+shipping and taxes for one , no matter how cool it is. I'm sure that I'm not the only one who feels this way and I'm also sure this is an industry stumbling block bringing new riders to the ebike family.

Embra
2 months ago

It's a low probability but high stakes situation. I used to wear my helmet only occasionally, and was lucky enough to have it on when I fell and smacked my head on the pavement. I was so happy to be able to get up and continue on my ride rather than wait for an ambulance. Needless to say, I got religion that day (as far as bike helmets go).

Like most forms of insurance, we pay a relatively small premium for enhanced protection. Most people who buy fire insurance for their homes will not have their dwelling burn down, but few of us can afford to take the chance. I feel the same way about my brain. I can't afford to be among the unfortunate few who lost their gamble.

There's a saying (reportedly of Irish origin) that one can get used to anything--even hanging. I got used to wearing my helmet all the time to the point that I feel exposed and vulnerable if I ride without it now.

Tom Kriek
2 months ago

TRP also offers 180mm and 200mm rotors for separate sale. I initially ran them the OE rotors, and they work fine, it's not necessary to change them, the only difference being a higher grade of material. FYI, TRP is Tektro Racing Products Tektro's premium product lineup.

They are plug-and-play, installation and setup is actually easier than adjusting the OE brakes. http://img.artscyclery.com/pdf/TRP HYRD Brakes.pdf

The difference is significant, they work and feel better in every way. With upgraded Jagwire mountain pro cables, they're every bit as good as a full hydraulic system.
I am still a little confused as they make separate calipers for 140 and 160. So you are saying you can use the 160 mm model with the existing 180 mm rotors on the RadRover?

JoePah
3 months ago

That's the nature of the technology itself. We are all early adopters and we are paying heavy premium. You should peek into Nissan leaf and Chevy Volt forums. Some Nissan leaf owners paid $25,000 for a brand new car in 2013 and now the range has gone down like crazy.
On the flip side, if you use your eBike regularly, it will pay for itself many fold. It really brings so much positivity to your life. I assume you purchased an expensive bike with one of the premium drive systems. I am sure it will last long time, you may need to replace the batteries but that cost is nothing compared to paying hospitals.
Let's use Bosch for example, people who bought the Bosch performance line system in 2014 can still use their bike but may need to replace their batteries. It's always a trade-off. You could go DIY route with fancy Grin satiator charger etc but you don't get a good torque sensing system.

Agreed.. Buy a quality bike and drive system and you can enjoy your ebike for many years. The worst thing you can do is replace your bike every couple of years, since depreciation is about 50% in 2 years.

As far as partial charge or full charge life cycles, don't worry about it.. If you need to use the full range from the battery, use it! The difference in operating costs is neglibible, ie. a battery will last maybe 5 years instead of 3 years.. Who really cares about that when the added enjoyment of using your bike to its fullest range is considered.

The most significant expense is again depreciation, just like a car. So take good care of your bike, store it in a cool room, and use it!

Thomas Jaszewski
3 months ago

Hi, this is Ron/spinningmagnets. I try to be as independent as possible, and to write information to help the average guy, because I am an average blue-collar guy. Bosch/Yamaha vs BBSHD...whats my opinion?

I have ridden a Bosch, and also the Yamaha (at two Interbike conventions). If you like that sort of thing, save a few bucks and get the Yamaha. I don't hate on the Bosch, but they charge a premium just because Europeans have a bias towards German products over Japanese. If you own a Bosch and are happy with it? sweet...let's ride together and have fun on a beautiful spring day. When armchair mechanics argue, it's just another Ford vs Chevy crap-fest.

Are you foolish for buying an expensive Bosch / Yamaha? No...there is a market for that. If you like it? Be happy, and don't waste time with regrets. That being said...I can afford anything I want, and my most often ridden ebike is an Electra stretch cruiser with a BBSHD. I went with a 52V battery pack because, the stock controller will work with 48V or 52V. A nominal 60V battery can produce a spark that can penetrate dry human skin, but 52V? no. I literally wrote the article on electricbike.com about benefits/drawbacks of a 14S pack.

If a friend of mine had to make a choice between a small 52V pack, or getting a much larger 48V pack? I'd say get the larger pack, there are a lot of reasons a bigger pack (regardless of vendor) is better for the owner. That being said, I own a very large 52V pack, and I can afford as many watt-hours as I like.

Bosch and Yamaha drives are very sophisticated and they are very similar. They take a small amount of input watts, and turn that into as much wheel-torque as possible. It is accomplished in a very smooth and sophisticated way. This is like the Mercedes, Porsche, BMW market...when they sell a 4-cylinder car (which they have done). Its nice when they are new and under warranty by a local shop, but...if you buy a 5-year-old one? what can an average blue-collar guy do to hack a cheap used 5-year-old M/P/B car?

I am an old gear-head (58-ish), and as a much as I appreciate a sophisticated aluminum 4-cylinder turbo 4-valve engine with EFI...when it comes to buying and wrenching on a motor? the BBSHD is the Chevy 350 of the Ebike world.

Use a thermal IR camera on it...it is not even breathing hard at 52V X 30A = 1500W. I would not run it at 3000W, but...it has been verified to run at 52V X 50A = 2600W, or...72V X 35A (using an external controller)...so...the mechanical portion of the drive can sustain 2600W. Will it wear out faster than when it is run at 1500W? If you ask that question, then...you don't understand what is going on.

If a certain customer is like an engineer, and he wants decent wheel torque at the lowest possible input watts...get the Yamaha mid drive. If you want LOT of fun, and you also want the ability to upgrade your fun-result in the future? Get the BBSHD. Also, get a spare primary reduction gear and a tube of high-quality grease, because...I am going to beat on mine like it is a rented mule. Try 2600W on a cheap drive unit and then tell me that it doesn't put a freakin smile on your face...
I had hoped there would be a post revealing the facts that this isnt just a blue collar poster, rather an employee of Lunacycle and paid writer for electricbike.com. Hardly independent nor impartial. Always a good read but not always forthcoming.

Ron/Spinningmagnets
3 months ago

Hi, this is Ron/spinningmagnets. I try to be as independent as possible, and to write information to help the average guy, because I am an average blue-collar guy. Bosch/Yamaha vs BBSHD...whats my opinion?

I have ridden a Bosch, and also the Yamaha (at two Interbike conventions). If you like that sort of thing, save a few bucks and get the Yamaha. I don't hate on the Bosch, but they charge a premium just because Europeans have a bias towards German products over Japanese. If you own a Bosch and are happy with it? sweet...let's ride together and have fun on a beautiful spring day. When armchair mechanics argue, it's just another Ford vs Chevy crap-fest.

Are you foolish for buying an expensive Bosch / Yamaha? No...there is a market for that. If you like it? Be happy, and don't waste time with regrets. That being said...I can afford anything I want, and my most often ridden ebike is an Electra stretch cruiser with a BBSHD. I went with a 52V battery pack because, the stock controller will work with 48V or 52V. A nominal 60V battery can produce a spark that can penetrate dry human skin, but 52V? no. I literally wrote the article on electricbike.com about benefits/drawbacks of a 14S pack.

If a friend of mine had to make a choice between a small 52V pack, or getting a much larger 48V pack? I'd say get the larger pack, there are a lot of reasons a bigger pack (regardless of vendor) is better for the owner. That being said, I own a very large 52V pack, and I can afford as many watt-hours as I like.

Bosch and Yamaha drives are very sophisticated and they are very similar. They take a small amount of input watts, and turn that into as much wheel-torque as possible. It is accomplished in a very smooth and sophisticated way. This is like the Mercedes, Porsche, BMW market...when they sell a 4-cylinder car (which they have done). Its nice when they are new and under warranty by a local shop, but...if you buy a 5-year-old one? what can an average blue-collar guy do to hack a cheap used 5-year-old M/P/B car?

I am an old gear-head (58-ish), and as a much as I appreciate a sophisticated aluminum 4-cylinder turbo 4-valve engine with EFI...when it comes to buying and wrenching on a motor? the BBSHD is the Chevy 350 of the Ebike world.

Use a thermal IR camera on it...it is not even breathing hard at 52V X 30A = 1500W. I would not run it at 3000W, but...it has been verified to run at 52V X 50A = 2600W, or...72V X 35A (using an external controller)...so...the mechanical portion of the drive can sustain 2600W. Will it wear out faster than when it is run at 1500W? If you ask that question, then...you don't understand what is going on.

If a certain customer is like an engineer, and he wants decent wheel torque at the lowest possible input watts...get the Yamaha mid drive. If you want LOT of fun, and you also want the ability to upgrade your fun-result in the future? Get the BBSHD. Also, get a spare primary reduction gear and a tube of high-quality grease, because...I am going to beat on mine like it is a rented mule. Try 2600W on a cheap drive unit and then tell me that it doesn't put a freakin smile on your face...

Ravi Kempaiah
3 months ago

It's not encouraging to hear that my bike will be obselete in a couple of years.

That's the nature of the technology itself. We are all early adopters and we are paying heavy premium. You should peek into Nissan leaf and Chevy Volt forums. Some Nissan leaf owners paid $25,000 for a brand new car in 2013 and now the range has gone down like crazy.
On the flip side, if you use your eBike regularly, it will pay for itself many fold. It really brings so much positivity to your life. I assume you purchased an expensive bike with one of the premium drive systems. I am sure it will last long time, you may need to replace the batteries but that cost is nothing compared to paying hospitals.
Let's use Bosch for example, people who bought the Bosch performance line system in 2014 can still use their bike but may need to replace their batteries. It's always a trade-off. You could go DIY route with fancy Grin satiator charger etc but you don't get a good torque sensing system.

Desert Rider
3 months ago

There is HVC (high voltage cutoff) on most premium brands like Bosch, Brose, Shimano or Yamaha. Their charger shuts off charging once the cells reach certain voltage but some generic 2A chargers don't have that capability.

I am a doctoral researcher working on batteries, from my understanding the reason you don't want to keep your battery fully charged for a long time is ...... [analogy] it's like cooking on HIGH-setting, some dishes cook better at low setting. Similarly, a fully charged battery is like HIGH setting on your stove. The Li-ions are raring to go to the other electrode and release energy but since there is no load (your ebike is turned off), they can't move anywhere and this promotes the electrolyte oxidation and degradation. Recently, there was a lot of news about Prof. Goodnenough and his solid electrolyte batteries. The reason people are working on it is because, solid electrolyte won't attack the electrode like the liquid ones.
Anyway, the point is, keeping your batteries at high voltages is not a good idea... it's like arousing a boy intentionally and not let him release his pent up tension. LOL

If you charge it to 90%, for sure it's better but Bosch systems have puny batteries at 400Whr and if you only use it between 20% to 80%, you have roughly 300Whrs usable capacity and that seems very small.
Ideally, you would want a 700Whr battery and then you have lot of room to play with it.

To be honest, charging to only 90% may enhance the battery life but in 2 years the bike itself will be outdated and it seems too much cognitive work for a minor improvement. FYI, Bosch dropped the price in 400 powerpacks once they released the 500 powerpacks and if you don't leave your batteries plugged in all the time, a Bosch battery will last you ~500-600 cycles.

Thanks for you explanation. It's not encouraging to hear that my bike will be obselete in a couple of years. Especially given the expense. I'm not certain that a 700 Whr battery is available. It would be good if it is. As I understand a "cycle" is theoretically charging from 0 to100% percent. Am I wrong?

Rob T
4 weeks ago

PRICE? you forgot to give that.

ShiSha
2 weeks ago

Rob T They mentioned it at the beginning, are you serious? Any way it's 1899 and the classic is 1299

Josiah Vergonio
1 month ago

so, this bike can go up to 25 mph with pedal assist?? does the Voltbike Mariner also go up to 25 mph with pedal assist? I don't understand why this goes up to 25 mph, isn't 20 mph the legal limit?

Roger Ferreira Batista
2 months ago

Will there be some model that I can drag instead having to lift after folding to take inside subway and supermarkets. Does this model perform this function?

Aqua Gods
3 months ago

I just wish i knew which one to buy... So many on the market right now. Can't wait till we can start narrowing down the big players of the ebike. Honestly with the laws restricting top speed I feel reliability and distance are the most important factors. I have a feeling there is going to be endless hours of research.....................

Nyana11
4 months ago

The motor noise is really annoying ,imagine it like constant mosquito sound on all your tours

Gumption1111
5 months ago

Finally a 500 watt folder.

キングクリストファー
5 months ago

Batteries that are not integrated into the bike look amazingly ugly, especially in these smaller fold bikes.

Mark S
6 months ago

Not crazy about the looks but the versatility is amazing... Does the frame flex, considering it is a folding style??? What is the approximate range??

Miphone tech
6 months ago

If you can do a review of fisher electric bike that will be great. You can also check my Israel YouTube channel about electric bikes in Israel.

McNuggetEh
6 months ago

Wondering how the initial take off is. Does it sweep you off your feet or is it more intuitive? I think I have a similar hub motor(Volt Mariner) and just wondering if it's been dialed in different with the controller. I love mine but realize it can zip you off in a hurry and that may not be the best for a more tentative rider. Looking for my folks. Thanks :)

melonbarmonster
6 months ago

$1900

Dale Wildey
6 months ago

I like the step through bikes the most. So many options out there. It's really exciting to see what's going on with bicycles and tricycles today. The electric bikes stepped everything up to a new level

Peter Kenyon
6 months ago

I love folding e-bikes. The 20 inch wheels are great for getting around. I hardly ever fold the bike, I just love the geometry (no neck pain) and the step through. I'll always be a small wheel devotee. Thanks for the vids. Keep up the exceptional work.

rcespin
6 months ago

what is the folding dimensions of the bike and the weight ? thanks

ElectricBikeReview.com
6 months ago

The weight is listed back with the specs on the website and it's 61.3 lbs. I did not get the folding dimensions... sorry :O

Mathew Davis
6 months ago

Hey Court, have you ever used the Genesis folding bike? Matt

JohhnyPump
6 months ago

Marvelous video, and what an impressive folding ebike. Folding bikes are my preference(I own 2, non-electric), this one is awesome. Camera question, your videos images are very stable, even when you were jogging, the image stabilization was rock solid. What kind of camera(or phone) did you use? Thanks for your work, when it comes to ebike reviews, you are unrivaled. Thanks for putting it out there.

ElectricBikeReview.com
6 months ago

Hey JohhnyPump (cool name btw) I use a motorized handheld gimbal with GoPros and some deadcat mic fur to reduce wind noise. These are the exact items:
- GoPro 4 Silver with Memory Card (Bundle) http://amzn.to/1rUMzUq
- Deadcat Sticker http://amzn.to/27Bn6Qg
- 3 Axis Motorized Gimbal http://amzn.to/1U0dyXJ

Dip Shit
6 months ago

love the חי necklace Jesse has xD great review btw, my friend has the classic version and I am looking into getting a classic too

guy idel
3 months ago

xX_RealFaZeMember_Xx כן יש פה סירטונים יפים

Dip Shit
3 months ago

+guy idel גם אני, עם כל זה שזה ממש פופולרי בישראל לא חשבתי שישראלים צופים בזה...

guy idel
3 months ago

.Thanks bro I'm from Israel

Dip Shit
3 months ago

+guy idel yup

guy idel
3 months ago

?Magnum is an Israeli company

Armin Hirmer
6 months ago

nice bike

BBBYpsi
5 months ago

You threw me off with your screen name. My best friend is Matt N

Matt N
5 months ago

You always get what you paid for, my friend.

BBBYpsi
6 months ago

Total garbage. Range will be maybe 10 miles if lucky. Frame will not hold up long either. Have fun with it.

Chad Davis
6 months ago

I'd rather go for this one http://www.banggood.com/Xiaomi-Smart-Electric-Power-Folding-Bike-Bluetooth-4_0-Smart-Bike-With-Front-and-Rear-Light-Folding-Pedals-Support-For-APP-Aluminum-Alloy-Frame-p-1077093.html?p=B0221338596320131216 *under $799* it's a way better deal

Allen Janes
6 months ago

or an airplane. that thing will fit in my baggage compartment

ElectricBikeReview.com
6 months ago

Yeah, that's actually a great point... Depending on the airline you could take a folding ebike along :)

Quike Navarro
6 months ago

Great video and great channel. Congrats.
I think every time you have the chance to remove the battery you should.
It would be a great addition to your review.

ElectricBikeReview.com
6 months ago

Thanks for the constructive feedback Quike! I'll keep that in mind, sometimes I skip things like that to keep it going fast but it's great to hear that you and others would like to see it