Magnum Premium Review

Magnum Premium Electric Bike Review
Magnum Premium
Magnum Premium 500 Watt Internally Geared Hub Motor
Magnum Premium 48 Volt 13 Amp Hour Battery Pack
Magnum Premium Ergonomic Grips Das Kit Display And Buttons
Magnum Premium Rst Carve Suspension Fork
Magnum Premium Tektro Mechanical Disc Brakes
Magnum Premium Stand Alone Spanninga Rear Light On Rack
Magnum Premium 7 Speed Shimano Tourney Drivetrain
Magnum Premium Battery Handle Led Charge Indicator
Magnum Premium Selle Royal Look In Gel Saddle
Magnum Premium Folding Ebike In Trunk Of Car
Magnum Premium Portable 2 Amp Charger
Magnum Premium Electric Bike Review
Magnum Premium
Magnum Premium 500 Watt Internally Geared Hub Motor
Magnum Premium 48 Volt 13 Amp Hour Battery Pack
Magnum Premium Ergonomic Grips Das Kit Display And Buttons
Magnum Premium Rst Carve Suspension Fork
Magnum Premium Tektro Mechanical Disc Brakes
Magnum Premium Stand Alone Spanninga Rear Light On Rack
Magnum Premium 7 Speed Shimano Tourney Drivetrain
Magnum Premium Battery Handle Led Charge Indicator
Magnum Premium Selle Royal Look In Gel Saddle
Magnum Premium Folding Ebike In Trunk Of Car
Magnum Premium Portable 2 Amp Charger

Summary

  • A folding speed pedelec (capable of ~25 mph) that also offers throttle on demand, you get plenty of power from a 500 Watt hub motor and 48 Volt 13 amp hour battery pack
  • Two frame styles and four color choices let you personalize the product a bit, folding mechanisms have locks for safety, I like the reflective tires and LED lights even though they require separate batteries
  • Cast Aluminum rims can handle more weight than spokes and won't go out of true or break as easily, decent suspension fork, seat post shock, ergonomic grips and gel saddle enhance comfort
  • With so many features the bike weighs more at ~61 lbs, the kickstand would stay out of the way better if mounted towards the rear vs. bottom bracket, key must be left in to ride

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Magnum

Model:

Premium

Price:

$1,899

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Urban, Commuting, Travel

Electric Bike Class:

Speed Pedalec (Class 3)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States, Canada

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

61.3 lbs (27.8 kg)

Battery Weight:

9.2 lbs (4.17 kg)

Motor Weight:

8.5 lbs (3.85 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

15 in (38.1 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

15" Seat Tube, 21.5" Reach, 14.5" or 22.5" Stand Over Height, 65.5" Length

Frame Types:

Step-Thru, Mid-Step, Folding

Frame Colors:

Gloss White with Blue Accents, Matte Black with Blue Accents, Gloss White with Orange Accents, Matte Black with Orange Accents

Frame Fork Details:

RST Carve Suspension with Preload Adjustment, 60 mm Travel, 9 mm Axle with Nuts

Frame Rear Details:

11 mm Axle with Nuts

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses

Gearing Details:

7 Speed 1x7 Shimano Tourney, 11-28T

Shifter Details:

Shimano RevoShift Grip Twist on Right

Cranks:

Prowheel SOLID, 165 mm Length, 52T Chainring with Aluminum Alloy Guide

Pedals:

Wellgo K20410, Folding Plastic Platform

Headset:

Neco 1 1/8"

Stem:

Aluminum Alloy, Folding with QR Telescoping Height (10" to 13")

Handlebar:

Low-Rise, 24" Length, Aluminum Alloy

Brake Details:

Tektro Mechanical Disc with 160 mm Rotors, Tektro Levers with Rubberized Edge and Motor Inhibitor

Grips:

Ergonomic Stitched

Saddle:

Selle Royal Look In Gel, Oversized with Rubber Bumpers

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy, Basic Suspension, Flip-Up Saddle Clamp

Seat Post Length:

350 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

27.2 mm

Rims:

Solid Aluminum Alloy, Black

Spokes:

Cast Radial Support Arms

Tire Brand:

CST, 20" x 2.125"

Wheel Sizes:

20 in (50.8cm)

Tire Details:

Reflective Sidewall Stripes, 40-65 PSI, Nylon

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Flick Bell, Rear Rack with Pannier Blockers and Spring Latch 25 kg Max Weight (55 lbs), Single Side Adjustable Length Kickstand, Metal Derailleur Guard, Aluminum Alloy Fenders with Mud Flaps, Independent Spanninga GaLeo Headlight (2 AA Batteries), Independent Spanninga Back Light (2 AA Batteries), Support Bar on Bottom Bracket

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, 9 Mosfet 14 Amp Current Controller, 1.5 lb 2 Amp Charger, Max Weight Rated at 240 lbs

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

8Fun

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Motor Peak Output:

700 watts

Battery Brand:

Samsung, Panasonic or LG

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

13 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

624 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium Nickel Cobalt Manganese (Li-NCM)

Charge Time:

6.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

30 miles (48 km)

Estimated Max Range:

60 miles (97 km)

Display Type:

Das-Kit Fixed Backlit Monochrome LCD

Readouts:

Power Level (Power, Normal, Eco), Pedal Assist (0-6), Odometer, Time, Trip 1, Trip 2, Speed, Voltage, Battery Level (1-5), (Press Power Once for Backlighting, Hold Set for Menu)

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad (Power, Set, +, -)

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist, Trigger Throttle

Top Speed:

25 mph (40 kph) (20 mph Throttle Only)

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Written Review

The Magnum Premium is an interesting folding electric bike… Not only is it powerful with a 500 watt geared motor and 48 volt battery configuration, it’s also sturdy and fast. Rather than spoked wheels, which tend to be stronger at the 20″ size to begin with, they chose cast Aluminum 20″ wheels setup like mag wheels. And instead of a standard 6 Mosfet controller, the Premium uses 9 Mosfets which can handle 14 Amps of Current vs. just 10 or 12. During the ride test, I had one of the company’s co-founders, Jesse, hop on and ride around the parking lot. Even with his 6’3″ height and 200+ body weight, the bike worked fine. Smaller wheels offer a mechanical advantage to hub motors, which tend to be easier on drivetrains than mid-drives. You’re getting a zippy compact platform here which is great for space savings but it is not light. Weighing in at 61+ lbs, it’s worth taking a couple of minutes to remove the 9 lb battery before lifting. And even though the frame only comes in one size, there are two different styles (a mid-step and the deep wave step-thru shown in the video and images above). Both come with a longer suspension seat post and adjustable stem for increased height. This is a big deal if you’re a taller rider, I felt great on the bike at 5’9″ myself and I have longer legs. In short, the bike felt comfortable and solid which is very important given the higher assisted top speed of roughly 25 mph. Again, it’s an interesting folding e-bike because it delivers a platform that is truly capable as a speed pedelec and might be great for commuting if you’ve got limited space… Wheel it into work, fold it up under your desk and charge it there vs. locking it up at the rack?

Driving this electric bike is an 8Fun internally geared hub motor sealed inside the rear wheel. It puts out between 500 and 700 watts and produces a bit more whirring noise than weaker options. I found it to be zippy and capable, it switched on very fast in pedal assist mode thanks to a precise cadence sensor mounted near the left crank arm (around the spindle). The sensor used here is compact and sealed compared to the larger discs with visible magnets. I imagine it would stay cleaner and get bumped less easily which translates to more reliable operation. As highlighted earlier, the motor is backed up with a 48 volt batter, more mosfets in the controller and higher current thruput. If you’re a larger rider or someone who plans to carry gear on the rack, this is a great thing.

Powering the motor and backlit display, but not the lights, is a 48 volt 13 amp hour battery pack mounted just behind the seat tube. To me, this is way above average in terms of capacity and very impressive to see on a folding electric bike. Depending on how you ride, the bike should get excellent range. Stick to the first few levels of pedal assist and under 20 mph for truly optimal performance. Note that the trigger throttle, mounted near the left grip, cuts out at 20 mph for legal reasons but that you can reach the higher speeds using the top level of assist, level 6. The battery pack is painted black which matches the saddle, rims and tires and it slides onto the frame easily. I felt it lock securely and noticed a 5 Volt USB power outlet on the right side. This would be handy for charging a portable electronic device stored in one of the panniers or a trunk bag but you could also string a longer USB cord across the frame with zip ties if you wanted to mount something to the handle bars. Just be careful near the folding point on the frame and dull the edges of cut zip ties so they don’t scratch and cut your legs while pedaling. A couple of downsides for the battery is that it doesn’t power the lights and that you must leave the key in while it’s being used. The key is mostly out of the way but might jingle if connected to a chain or other keys… this is quite common with the style of battery housing used here (called a Silver Fish in the industry). I like that Magnum fills the pack with premium cells (from Samsung, LG or Panasonic depending on supply) and that it has a handle and LED indicator on top. Another huge win is the flip-forward saddle mount which allows you to take the pack off without removing the seat and seat post. And when you do adjust the seat post, I noticed that the clamp is angled to the side so the lever won’t scratch the battery pack or collide with it… very smart.

Operating the bike is a multi-step process and one of the areas where improvements could be made. You have to press a little power button or switch on both lights, then turn the key to on in the battery pack then press a power button on the control pad. That’s four steps and it’s easier to miss one when parking or folding the bike. Perhaps you leave a light on and it runs out of juice? Perhaps you start folding and bump the trigger throttle which spins the wheel? These are areas to keep an eye on. All that aside, I do like the display panel and all of the options Magnum has offered. The throttle works at all times, even in assist level zero which I call “throttle only mode”. Arrowing up and down through assist is easy to do without taking your left hand off the grip because of the remote button pad. The trigger throttle on the left is a bit trickier to reach depending on where you mount it (behind the brake lever or in front of it closer to the grip). Given how responsive assist is, I’m not sure I’d use the throttle as much with this bike and fully appreciate that the brakes are higher quality disc style with rubberized levers that have motor inhibitors built in. And while I’d love to see hydraulic disc brakes, I appreciate the lower price point that they hit with this e-bike… again, compromises had to be made here and there so I get it.

The Magnum Premium comes with everything you need to commute, rain or shine, but it is a more advanced electric bike. With an always-active trigger throttle and higher top speed, I see this as a perfect option for commuters and younger riders (or those with more weight). Remember, you can tone down the power and speed by changing the six levels of assist but the throttle will always be ready with full up to 20 mph. I love this style of setup because I can save energy riding at lower assist then zoom up a hill or past another riding simply by pressing the throttle for a few moments. Note that the Aluminum fenders felt solid and didn’t make a lot of noise while riding on bumpy terrain. The rack uses standard gauge tubing which should work with panniers and other standard accessories and you could use the USB port on the battery to add additional lights if you wanted. I’m impressed with all of the frame and color options here and appreciate that Magnum now has 70+ dealers in the US who can let you take a test ride and help with service and warranty stuff. The bike comes with one year comprehensive and the company has been around globally for five plus years.

Pros:

  • One of the most noticeable and coolest features about this folding ebike, at least to me!, is the cast Aluminum wheelset which can support more weight and won’t go out of true the way traditional spokes might
  • I love that Magnum sells two versions of this bike, mid-step and wave step-thru, both are relatively easy to mount but might appeal to different tastes (I reviewed the wave style because it has the lowest downtube)
  • Four color combinations make it fun, you could get a set of these for your family and easily keep track of who owns which bike, my favorite is the white because it is the most visible for night riding
  • Solid rack with a full 25 kg max weight rating, I like the little spring latch for quick cargo additions and love that the battery is mounted to the frame leaving the rack clear vs. some older designs
  • This is a minor plus but I noticed how the seat tube and collar were twisted a bit so the quick release tab wouldn’t collide with the battery pack when fully closed! This is a wonderful attention to detail
  • I love the included lights and reflective tires but wish that the lights ran off the main battery pack, they are higher quality builds however (both from Spanninga)
  • The folding points seemed very reliable thanks to locking mechanisms (there’s even a spring run through the frame to help with alignment and unfolding if you’re by yourself)
  • Sturdy metal plates sandwich the chainring acting as protection when folded (along with a metal support arm directly below the bottom bracket), the metal plates also act as a guide, keeping the chain on track if you’re riding over bumpy terrain… this is especially important in throttle mode and when riding on bumpy terrain at high speed
  • Capable of ~25 mph top speeds (in pedal assist mode) this is one of the very few speed pedelec folding e-bikes I have ever seen and would work well for some people who want to commute faster
  • Excellent drive mode control here with throttle only mode, throttle override (with full power) and six levels of assist… just be careful to turn it off before folding or you could bump the throttle and have the bike take off
  • At under $2k I feel like this bike is priced well, especially because it comes with all the accessories you need for commuting (rack, sturdy Aluminum fenders and lights)
  • Mechanical disc brakes are a good upgrade from rim brakes because they stay cleaner and don’t wear out as fast, the brake levers on the Magnum Premium have motor inhibitors so you stop safer and don’t compete with the power of the bike
  • Smaller wheels keep the bike compact for folding but aren’t as comfortable as larger ones so it’s great that you get a mid-level suspension fork, suspension seat post and large gel saddle… it really makes a difference at speed and on longer journies
  • Telescoping stem offers more height options to improve the ride for taller people (the bike only comes in one size after all), don’t stretch it all the way up however because the cables can get stretched and messed up when steering if so
  • You can charge the battery on or off the frame with this bike and I love how easy it is to take off! The saddle flips forward and the slide and locking mechanisms just seemed to work here vs. some other folders I’ve tested
  • I really like the cadence sensor they chose for this pedelec, it’s not a big disc with exposed magnets (easier to bump and mess up), this thing is compact and sealed from water and mud but still very responsive
  • The fold point mid-frame does bulge out a little but is positioned much lower than some other e-bikes so I feel like it wouldn’t bruise your thigh as easily (this was an issue my girlfriend had with some of the folding fat bikes we tested)
  • I like that the battery features a USB charging port on the side so you can fill your phone, GPS or music player… in some ways I’d like it up by the handlebars but on the other hand, it’s very close to the rear rack so your gear could be charging while stored, consider buying a right angle USB dongle like one of these to keep it out of the way
  • The charger is pretty compact and very lightweight at ~1.5 lbs, the plug end for the bike is metal which seems tougher if it was dropped or stepped on, I’d probably bring it along all the time and just keep it in a trunk bag on the rack
  • I love the brake levers they chose for the Premium, you get a tiny (but loud!) integrated bell on the left and the levers themselves have a rubberized edge for comfort
  • Generally speaking, this is one of the most powerful folding electric bikes around given the 500 Watt motor, 9 Mosfet controller with 14 Amp thruput and 48 Volt battery, it was able to move Jesse who is a larger rider (6’3″ at 230 lbs), up hills as shown in the video review above

Cons:

  • The folding plastic pedals are light, inexpensive and compact but not as stiff or durable as some Aluminum ones I’ve seen, given the “premium” price and features found elsewhere on the bike this is one area that could be improved… or you could add some like this aftermarket
  • Weighing in at over 60 lbs, this is one of the heavier electric bikes out there (folding or otherwise) due in part to the cast wheels, suspension fork and larger battery… but at least the battery is removable so you can subtract ~9 lbs when moving the frame
  • Neither wheel offers quick release which means you’ll need tools to fix flats or break the bike down further (for super compactness), one positive here is that they’re less likely to be tampered with or stolen when parked
  • While I love the adjustable length feature of the kickstand, I wish it was mounted further back on the frame from the crank arms because it collides (especially when walking the bike backwareds as the cranks turn themselves)
  • Both lights require two AA batteries and must be switched on separately (that adds time and makes them easy to leave on accidentally to drain overnight or during the day when parked at a bike rack), the lights also don’t have flashing modes or other settings besides on/off
  • The key must be left in the battery pack in order to operate this bike, it’s positioned mostly out of the way but could jingle if you have a chain or other keys connected
  • The display looks great but isn’t removable, you can angle it forward and back to reduce glare but it could get scratched at a rack or weather worn being left on all the time
  • This is a minor con but the drivetrain is entry-level, with seven speeds you’re getting enough range to climb but might not keep up at the ~25 mph level, Shimano Tourney components work well enough but might need more tuneups, I love that they included a derailleur guard to protect it when folded
  • One way their folding design could be improved is with a rubber latch or maybe some magnets to keep the bike from coming unfolded during transport… this might also reduce banging and rattling as it flops around due to vibrations in your car trunk, plane, boat or whatever

Resources:

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Nirmala
4 months ago

Nice to see Magnum upgrading some of the features on their newer ebikes. I love my Ui5, but I do wish it had the throttle with full power at all times, the higher voltage battery and some other features found on this new model. Ebikes just keep getting better!

Court Rye
4 months ago

I see Magnum making incremental upgrades to their products and it’s exciting to think of where it will lead. Even today, I feel like you get a lot more bang for your buck than just a year or two ago. And yes, with the throttle settings and better display I like how it empowers riders to choose vs. limiting them or requiring extras steps. In short though, it sounds like you’re enjoying your Ui5 and I’m glad to hear that :D

Susan
4 months ago

Hi Court, I love your website and your video reviews! I’m short (5’1″) and a big fan of non-elecric folding bikes, and this is the first folding electric which has peaked my interest. I live in a hilly area of Northern San Diego, and wanted to know if you would recommend this bike for hilly areas.
Thanks in advance for your reply!

Court Rye
4 months ago

Hi Susan! Yeah, the Magnum Premium could be a good fit for your area. It’s much more powerful than the average hub motor driven folder, priced pretty well and comes in that deep step-thru configuration. As noted in the review, it’s heavy but depending on your needs (and a bit of help) it can work great for a wide range of uses. I continue to hear great things from shops and owners about Magnum and am seeing their brand grow significantly in the US which also gives me confidence. I hope this helps! You could also chime in at the EBR forums and ask for feedback, maybe people who already own their products will share.

Mark M
2 months ago

For a folding e-bike, this is a rather heavy bike at 61 lbs. The primary purpose of folding is going to be ability to put in compact spaces, carry on a train, or easily place in a car, or easily carry up steps into apmt or condo, so this ebike is a just not a very viable candidate for those purposes. Also, at 500 watts, and 48 volts its way more power than an ebike with those size tires and the likely speeds anyone would want to travel at, especially for the purposes of what most foldables are chosen for. The price point is also a few hundred dollars more, than more viable and purpose designed foldables. I’ve tried this and the Blix Vika’s and felt the Vika’s were actually sturdier, and gave a more confident and secure ride. Plus their models are 48 lbs and 36 lbs, respectively, which better suits the purposes most riders searching for foldables are seeking.

Court Rye
2 months ago

Thanks for chiming in and sharing your experiences Mark! I appreciate your perspective and am sure others will too. I like the Blix products and was excited to also see the lower powered, less expensive Magnum Classic as an alternative to the Premium here :)

Eric S
1 month ago

I went and bought one of these, and it’s been very nice- one thing I wish they had was a manual that reflected the actual bike’s screen, which is not at all what they show in the manual. I’m trying to figure it out as I go… it appears that the 20-inch wheels may be limited to a top speed of 20 miles an hour, but I’m not sure what that screen is. I think it’s the 4th one… it shows 2 numbers, one of which seems to change the bike’s top pedaling speed, the other of which I’m not sure about. Possibly wheel size? Scratching my head here.

Aside from the instruction manual not helping at all with learning the settings, it’s a good bike. The rear wheel’s not easy to remove if you get a flat there, and the tire takes patience to get back on afterward. As far as flats go, the folding is a godsend if you need to call someone to come pick you up and get out of the rainy roadside.

But on the positive side, the range I’m getting out of it is at LEAST 40 miles with pedal assist, and around 2 bars of battery left after a day of riding. It’s been handy for small grocery runs and has given me the freedom to commute locally, which is a good thing for someone without a car and no public transport in town.
20 MPH has been a good, serviceable top speed for me. It’d be nice to get it a little faster as advertised, but I’m fine with this.

I don’t find myself using the throttle for more than short bursts, at times when I want to get off the line quickly such as crossing roads or starting on steep slopes.

Pedal assist 2-4 are most comfortable for me in terms of just riding around, 1 is good for starting up or just taking my time, and 5-6 are nice and effortless ways to get somewhere fast.

I’ve used the USB charging from the battery, and my Samsung Note 4 tells me this battery is only capable of slow charging- turns out to be maybe half the speed of its normal charger, if that. But getting 40% of my phone’s battery recharged did not seem to tax or noticeably drain the Magnum’s battery at all, so for topping off electronics or charging stuff like a Kindle as I ride to my favorite reading spot is perfectly doable.

On another note, no reading or texting on-bike: even without doing these things I managed to WHUMP! myself into a signpost and a parked car in the month I’ve had it. The bike and I were both fine after each incident, aside from the usual shattered-dignity bit. :)

I tend to ride my bike in Eco mode (Settings screen 5- hold Set, press Set until you reach screen 5, and press minus to toggle between the three modes), just because I want this battery to last, and because so far I can’t tell a difference between that and Normal in terms of acceleration or top speed. Still trying to figure this one out. I’m not sure how Power mode differs either.

It’s a fun bike, and is turning out to be pretty practical whenever it’s not outright raining (in which case no bike of mine is going outside for long.) I’ve even gotten some interested questions from strangers at the bike rack. It’s weird how much more expensive people around me tend to think it is, and how much slower and shorter-range. It feels good to give ’em a pleasant surprise with “Yes, it’s electric. …20 miles an hour, 40+ miles range. …Yes, it folds. …$2000 including tax.”

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Shoestring
2 days ago

E-boy , that's an interesting question. I own one, and it's a great bike, so far. I looked at Haibike as THE premium brand. Prices from $2500- 15,000+ puts it in the "BMW" category as far as I'm concerned. That said, I've yet to need warrantee service, replacement parts or factory accessories, so I don't know what to think as a company. I can also say I was NOT prepared to pay full retail for the bike. I can afford 5k for a bike, but I cannot justify the expense. For example: I would love to have a Bulls Monster fs fatty, But there is no freaking way I'm dropping $5,300+shipping and taxes for one , no matter how cool it is. I'm sure that I'm not the only one who feels this way and I'm also sure this is an industry stumbling block bringing new riders to the ebike family.

Embra
1 week ago

It's a low probability but high stakes situation. I used to wear my helmet only occasionally, and was lucky enough to have it on when I fell and smacked my head on the pavement. I was so happy to be able to get up and continue on my ride rather than wait for an ambulance. Needless to say, I got religion that day (as far as bike helmets go).

Like most forms of insurance, we pay a relatively small premium for enhanced protection. Most people who buy fire insurance for their homes will not have their dwelling burn down, but few of us can afford to take the chance. I feel the same way about my brain. I can't afford to be among the unfortunate few who lost their gamble.

There's a saying (reportedly of Irish origin) that one can get used to anything--even hanging. I got used to wearing my helmet all the time to the point that I feel exposed and vulnerable if I ride without it now.

Tom Kriek
2 weeks ago

TRP also offers 180mm and 200mm rotors for separate sale. I initially ran them the OE rotors, and they work fine, it's not necessary to change them, the only difference being a higher grade of material. FYI, TRP is Tektro Racing Products Tektro's premium product lineup.

They are plug-and-play, installation and setup is actually easier than adjusting the OE brakes. http://img.artscyclery.com/pdf/TRP HYRD Brakes.pdf

The difference is significant, they work and feel better in every way. With upgraded Jagwire mountain pro cables, they're every bit as good as a full hydraulic system.
I am still a little confused as they make separate calipers for 140 and 160. So you are saying you can use the 160 mm model with the existing 180 mm rotors on the RadRover?

JoePah
3 weeks ago

That's the nature of the technology itself. We are all early adopters and we are paying heavy premium. You should peek into Nissan leaf and Chevy Volt forums. Some Nissan leaf owners paid $25,000 for a brand new car in 2013 and now the range has gone down like crazy.
On the flip side, if you use your eBike regularly, it will pay for itself many fold. It really brings so much positivity to your life. I assume you purchased an expensive bike with one of the premium drive systems. I am sure it will last long time, you may need to replace the batteries but that cost is nothing compared to paying hospitals.
Let's use Bosch for example, people who bought the Bosch performance line system in 2014 can still use their bike but may need to replace their batteries. It's always a trade-off. You could go DIY route with fancy Grin satiator charger etc but you don't get a good torque sensing system.

Agreed.. Buy a quality bike and drive system and you can enjoy your ebike for many years. The worst thing you can do is replace your bike every couple of years, since depreciation is about 50% in 2 years.

As far as partial charge or full charge life cycles, don't worry about it.. If you need to use the full range from the battery, use it! The difference in operating costs is neglibible, ie. a battery will last maybe 5 years instead of 3 years.. Who really cares about that when the added enjoyment of using your bike to its fullest range is considered.

The most significant expense is again depreciation, just like a car. So take good care of your bike, store it in a cool room, and use it!

Thomas Jaszewski
3 weeks ago

Hi, this is Ron/spinningmagnets. I try to be as independent as possible, and to write information to help the average guy, because I am an average blue-collar guy. Bosch/Yamaha vs BBSHD...whats my opinion?

I have ridden a Bosch, and also the Yamaha (at two Interbike conventions). If you like that sort of thing, save a few bucks and get the Yamaha. I don't hate on the Bosch, but they charge a premium just because Europeans have a bias towards German products over Japanese. If you own a Bosch and are happy with it? sweet...let's ride together and have fun on a beautiful spring day. When armchair mechanics argue, it's just another Ford vs Chevy crap-fest.

Are you foolish for buying an expensive Bosch / Yamaha? No...there is a market for that. If you like it? Be happy, and don't waste time with regrets. That being said...I can afford anything I want, and my most often ridden ebike is an Electra stretch cruiser with a BBSHD. I went with a 52V battery pack because, the stock controller will work with 48V or 52V. A nominal 60V battery can produce a spark that can penetrate dry human skin, but 52V? no. I literally wrote the article on electricbike.com about benefits/drawbacks of a 14S pack.

If a friend of mine had to make a choice between a small 52V pack, or getting a much larger 48V pack? I'd say get the larger pack, there are a lot of reasons a bigger pack (regardless of vendor) is better for the owner. That being said, I own a very large 52V pack, and I can afford as many watt-hours as I like.

Bosch and Yamaha drives are very sophisticated and they are very similar. They take a small amount of input watts, and turn that into as much wheel-torque as possible. It is accomplished in a very smooth and sophisticated way. This is like the Mercedes, Porsche, BMW market...when they sell a 4-cylinder car (which they have done). Its nice when they are new and under warranty by a local shop, but...if you buy a 5-year-old one? what can an average blue-collar guy do to hack a cheap used 5-year-old M/P/B car?

I am an old gear-head (58-ish), and as a much as I appreciate a sophisticated aluminum 4-cylinder turbo 4-valve engine with EFI...when it comes to buying and wrenching on a motor? the BBSHD is the Chevy 350 of the Ebike world.

Use a thermal IR camera on it...it is not even breathing hard at 52V X 30A = 1500W. I would not run it at 3000W, but...it has been verified to run at 52V X 50A = 2600W, or...72V X 35A (using an external controller)...so...the mechanical portion of the drive can sustain 2600W. Will it wear out faster than when it is run at 1500W? If you ask that question, then...you don't understand what is going on.

If a certain customer is like an engineer, and he wants decent wheel torque at the lowest possible input watts...get the Yamaha mid drive. If you want LOT of fun, and you also want the ability to upgrade your fun-result in the future? Get the BBSHD. Also, get a spare primary reduction gear and a tube of high-quality grease, because...I am going to beat on mine like it is a rented mule. Try 2600W on a cheap drive unit and then tell me that it doesn't put a freakin smile on your face...
I had hoped there would be a post revealing the facts that this isnt just a blue collar poster, rather an employee of Lunacycle and paid writer for electricbike.com. Hardly independent nor impartial. Always a good read but not always forthcoming.

Ron/Spinningmagnets
3 weeks ago

Hi, this is Ron/spinningmagnets. I try to be as independent as possible, and to write information to help the average guy, because I am an average blue-collar guy. Bosch/Yamaha vs BBSHD...whats my opinion?

I have ridden a Bosch, and also the Yamaha (at two Interbike conventions). If you like that sort of thing, save a few bucks and get the Yamaha. I don't hate on the Bosch, but they charge a premium just because Europeans have a bias towards German products over Japanese. If you own a Bosch and are happy with it? sweet...let's ride together and have fun on a beautiful spring day. When armchair mechanics argue, it's just another Ford vs Chevy crap-fest.

Are you foolish for buying an expensive Bosch / Yamaha? No...there is a market for that. If you like it? Be happy, and don't waste time with regrets. That being said...I can afford anything I want, and my most often ridden ebike is an Electra stretch cruiser with a BBSHD. I went with a 52V battery pack because, the stock controller will work with 48V or 52V. A nominal 60V battery can produce a spark that can penetrate dry human skin, but 52V? no. I literally wrote the article on electricbike.com about benefits/drawbacks of a 14S pack.

If a friend of mine had to make a choice between a small 52V pack, or getting a much larger 48V pack? I'd say get the larger pack, there are a lot of reasons a bigger pack (regardless of vendor) is better for the owner. That being said, I own a very large 52V pack, and I can afford as many watt-hours as I like.

Bosch and Yamaha drives are very sophisticated and they are very similar. They take a small amount of input watts, and turn that into as much wheel-torque as possible. It is accomplished in a very smooth and sophisticated way. This is like the Mercedes, Porsche, BMW market...when they sell a 4-cylinder car (which they have done). Its nice when they are new and under warranty by a local shop, but...if you buy a 5-year-old one? what can an average blue-collar guy do to hack a cheap used 5-year-old M/P/B car?

I am an old gear-head (58-ish), and as a much as I appreciate a sophisticated aluminum 4-cylinder turbo 4-valve engine with EFI...when it comes to buying and wrenching on a motor? the BBSHD is the Chevy 350 of the Ebike world.

Use a thermal IR camera on it...it is not even breathing hard at 52V X 30A = 1500W. I would not run it at 3000W, but...it has been verified to run at 52V X 50A = 2600W, or...72V X 35A (using an external controller)...so...the mechanical portion of the drive can sustain 2600W. Will it wear out faster than when it is run at 1500W? If you ask that question, then...you don't understand what is going on.

If a certain customer is like an engineer, and he wants decent wheel torque at the lowest possible input watts...get the Yamaha mid drive. If you want LOT of fun, and you also want the ability to upgrade your fun-result in the future? Get the BBSHD. Also, get a spare primary reduction gear and a tube of high-quality grease, because...I am going to beat on mine like it is a rented mule. Try 2600W on a cheap drive unit and then tell me that it doesn't put a freakin smile on your face...

Ravi Kempaiah
3 weeks ago

It's not encouraging to hear that my bike will be obselete in a couple of years.

That's the nature of the technology itself. We are all early adopters and we are paying heavy premium. You should peek into Nissan leaf and Chevy Volt forums. Some Nissan leaf owners paid $25,000 for a brand new car in 2013 and now the range has gone down like crazy.
On the flip side, if you use your eBike regularly, it will pay for itself many fold. It really brings so much positivity to your life. I assume you purchased an expensive bike with one of the premium drive systems. I am sure it will last long time, you may need to replace the batteries but that cost is nothing compared to paying hospitals.
Let's use Bosch for example, people who bought the Bosch performance line system in 2014 can still use their bike but may need to replace their batteries. It's always a trade-off. You could go DIY route with fancy Grin satiator charger etc but you don't get a good torque sensing system.

Desert Rider
3 weeks ago

There is HVC (high voltage cutoff) on most premium brands like Bosch, Brose, Shimano or Yamaha. Their charger shuts off charging once the cells reach certain voltage but some generic 2A chargers don't have that capability.

I am a doctoral researcher working on batteries, from my understanding the reason you don't want to keep your battery fully charged for a long time is ...... [analogy] it's like cooking on HIGH-setting, some dishes cook better at low setting. Similarly, a fully charged battery is like HIGH setting on your stove. The Li-ions are raring to go to the other electrode and release energy but since there is no load (your ebike is turned off), they can't move anywhere and this promotes the electrolyte oxidation and degradation. Recently, there was a lot of news about Prof. Goodnenough and his solid electrolyte batteries. The reason people are working on it is because, solid electrolyte won't attack the electrode like the liquid ones.
Anyway, the point is, keeping your batteries at high voltages is not a good idea... it's like arousing a boy intentionally and not let him release his pent up tension. LOL

If you charge it to 90%, for sure it's better but Bosch systems have puny batteries at 400Whr and if you only use it between 20% to 80%, you have roughly 300Whrs usable capacity and that seems very small.
Ideally, you would want a 700Whr battery and then you have lot of room to play with it.

To be honest, charging to only 90% may enhance the battery life but in 2 years the bike itself will be outdated and it seems too much cognitive work for a minor improvement. FYI, Bosch dropped the price in 400 powerpacks once they released the 500 powerpacks and if you don't leave your batteries plugged in all the time, a Bosch battery will last you ~500-600 cycles.

Thanks for you explanation. It's not encouraging to hear that my bike will be obselete in a couple of years. Especially given the expense. I'm not certain that a 700 Whr battery is available. It would be good if it is. As I understand a "cycle" is theoretically charging from 0 to100% percent. Am I wrong?

Ravi Kempaiah
3 weeks ago

I see some mention about not letting a battery charge fall below 20% and not fully charging it. I get not running a battery until it's dead, but what is the concern about fully charging the battery? I have a Bosch system. Does this advice pertain to all batteries or just some brands?

There is HVC (high voltage cutoff) on most premium brands like Bosch, Brose, Shimano or Yamaha. Their charger shuts off charging once the cells reach certain voltage but some generic 2A chargers don't have that capability.

I am a doctoral researcher working on batteries, from my understanding the reason you don't want to keep your battery fully charged for a long time is ...... [analogy] it's like cooking on HIGH-setting, some dishes cook better at low setting. Similarly, a fully charged battery is like HIGH setting on your stove. The Li-ions are raring to go to the other electrode and release energy but since there is no load (your ebike is turned off), they can't move anywhere and this promotes the electrolyte oxidation and degradation. Recently, there was a lot of news about Prof. Goodnenough and his solid electrolyte batteries. The reason people are working on it is because, solid electrolyte won't attack the electrode like the liquid ones.
Anyway, the point is, keeping your batteries at high voltages is not a good idea... it's like arousing a boy intentionally and not let him release his pent up tension. LOL

If you charge it to 90%, for sure it's better but Bosch systems have puny batteries at 400Whr and if you only use it between 20% to 80%, you have roughly 300Whrs usable capacity and that seems very small.
Ideally, you would want a 700Whr battery and then you have lot of room to play with it.

To be honest, charging to only 90% may enhance the battery life but in 2 years the bike itself will be outdated and it seems too much cognitive work for a minor improvement. FYI, Bosch dropped the price in 400 powerpacks once they released the 500 powerpacks and if you don't leave your batteries plugged in all the time, a Bosch battery will last you ~500-600 cycles.

hemant
4 weeks ago

Thank for the reply
As I mention that Bionx is available in India, so if I would buy a kit it would be a Bionx kit.

Question:
Which one is better a premium Kit like Bionx or completely Intreated Ebike?
In terms of performance, comfort Quality of kit and battery.

Thank you
Regards

fxr3
1 month ago

Had my firmware updated by David at Espokes in SLC. He dropped what he was doing late afternoon day before SLC EBIKE EXPO even though I was 45 minutes late(snowstorm slowed me down). He hooked up laptop and spent a fair amount of time on it, talked with Barney to make sure it was latest and greatest, while I checked out their shop and walked around their nice hood.
Bike showed 10+% gains yesterday on my normal loop. Thanks Barney, Bulls, Brose and espokes.
Premium examples of LBS and MFG.

windmill
1 month ago

I checked out these brakes and they have them for 140mm or 160mm size rotors. Didn't dig deeper about 180mm-200mm rotors. It seems it wouldn't make that much of a difference at 180mm?

How do the new brakes feel compared to before with the hybrid setup? Did you keep the original rotors? How easy/hard was the set up? They look almost plug-n-play out the box?
TRP also offers 180mm and 200mm rotors for separate sale. I initially ran them the OE rotors, and they work fine, it's not necessary to change them, the only difference being a higher grade of material. FYI, TRP is Tektro Racing Products Tektro's premium product lineup.

They are plug-and-play, installation and setup is actually easier than adjusting the OE brakes. http://img.artscyclery.com/pdf/TRP%20HYRD%20Brakes.pdf

The difference is significant, they work and feel better in every way. With upgraded Jagwire mountain pro cables, they're every bit as good as a full hydraulic system.

Chic Lasser
1 month ago

Been doing a ton a research on folding bikes this past three months. Different application using on a sailboat, needs to be small but have many of your requirements since it will be a mode of transportation. After hours of research and test riding way to many bikes my bikes of choice would be the ejoe epic se ,the blix vika + or the magnum Premium. I prefer the down tube battery and at 13 ah the ejoe is our first choice. Check it out and the others and please keep me posted to what you find. In a perfect world that ejoe would come as a 16" foldable not the 20" so that it would be more compact.

Ken S
1 month ago

After just over 28 months and 32,000 kms on my 2014 Urban, I traded up to the 2017 model. I don't normally get into trading up a perfectly good ride for "something new", but this time I did spoil myself and took the leap.

What A treat!

It's not possible in my mind how anyone could improve on the power system on the Ohm so the electronics and power are the same with the Bionx D500 system. I had already upgraded the display and remote on the old bike, which by the way are fantastic, so the only change in electronics was I now have integrated Bluetooth which I can use on an app for my cell phone.
The big change-up was Ohm has one up'ed the frame with a sleek new look and upgraded to some premium components. It now features an integrated battery pack, dual piston brakes, and paddle shifters.

The battery pack is very very slick. Some designer should get an award for the design of this, so much easier to handle, install, and remove.

After over 500 kms on the new ride I still can't figure out how I am getting ~ 7-10% more on the same size battery but, I am loving it.

That comparison is apples to apples, as I did have a new spare battery for the 2014. The original battery I had, had over 1000 cycles on it over the two-plus years of operation and it was still performing great.

The TRP dual piston brakes are the best I have had. Great braking power, no road grid ingress, smooth as silk.
The paddle shifting took some getting used to after a grip shift for the last 7 years on different e-bike models but I've adapted, and shifting is fast and engages well.
I'm trying out the new Big Ben tires which came stock. The old Ben's had minimal puncture resistance but Schwalbe has upped this protection, and with their low rolling resistance, these tires provide a really nice ride.
I kept the Bodyfloat of course.

Getting a ton of compliments on it as I get around, it is an eye catcher.

So now I'm back to the start on my odometer, OH well.

Thomas Jaszewski
2 months ago

I stand corrected - meant to say "Aliexpress", i.e. retail quantities. Alibaba does wholesale.
Though I think that manufacturers that have been in business for a few years or more, have already established direct relations with their respective suppliers.

Reliability of Aliexpress vendors is a big issue, agreed. They won't necessarily take your money and run, but many of them (most?) don't have items that they advertise. They order it after you've paid, it takes time to arrive, and then a longer time yet to ship it overseas. Quality of the casing, cells, assembling - varies too. On the balance, if US "discounters" ;) offers something at the same or close cost - I'd rather deal with those. At least phone and email inquiries won't involve not-so-English language or delays due to different time-zone.
I won't blather it on here but you can save significantly over those USA goofs and their 30 day warranty by going direct to the same builder they use.

Aliexpress and a known reseller with lots of customers and reviews, $368.74 delivered. USA discounter with 30 day warranty, $430. I have referred dozens of buyers directly to the maker with no issues. $60 is enough to motivate me. My friend bought a battery from a USA seller and the warranty was no better, actually worse. The seller left him out in the cold after 30 days. I had a refund from the Aliexpress seller, once I proved the problem. The better sellers are rated and Aliexpress does offer protections. That said, these days I'd rather pay a premium and buy from an even better builder with advanced build systems. Also in China, but an English speaking company run by a bloke from the UK. Not much more than the USA guys with the smoke and mirrors. Sorry, I don't drink the discount, change and savior of the markets, kool aid being served up recently. I have batteries from 5 sources and have the experience to back it up.

Brooklyn Tony
2 months ago

What happened to the $999.00 HyperFat HF750? Price now shows startting at $1499,00.

When I called in March, they said the $999 Bafang 750w were sold out. I guess only a few were available in the first batch and they went quick. I'd be curious if anyone here ordered one and received it. I was checking every few days last month for a fork option announcement that still hasn't come, when I saw the July ETA change (for 2nd batch). Didn't see any 750w available then but I could be wrong. Big box stores like Walmart and car dealers employ similar tactics. Advertise a super cheap base model to get prospective buyers in the door and upsell them the much nicer premium one.

But now there's a MAC 750w option for the same price as the previous MAC 1000w price and the MAC 1000w is now $150 more.

Archaeonic
2 months ago

Hi folks. I’m really grateful I found this helpful review site and community!
So I’ve got my heart set on a folding fat tire ebike — one powerful 'nuff to move my 6’, 230lbs 50 something year-old body across 5 to 15 miles on everything from light local trails, to city streets, and our neighboring beach. I made my own spreadsheet highlighting differences between 10 models. ‡
I’m looking to spend between $1000 and $1800 and desire a 48V, 10+Ah, 500-to-750W battery/motor. A rear cargo rack capable of carrying an additional 30-50 pounds of gear is desired as well. Also FYI, I intend to fold down the rear seats in my 2017 Toyota Prius 2 to transport it between San Francisco and Los Angeles.

Anyhow, the top three picks I’ve narrowed down include:

A) Voltbike Mariner 500W Limited — $1320 with shipping.
http://www.voltbike.ca/voltbike-mariner/voltbike-mariner.html
https://electricbikereview.com/voltbike/mariner/

B) Radpower Mini — $1500 with free shipping but no suspension and fenders not included
https://electricbikereview.com/rad-power-bikes/radmini/
https://www.radpowerbikes.com/products/radmini-electric-folding-fat-bike?variant=16685709569

C) Ride Scoozy VeeGo — $1400 with free shipping but no LCD speedometer/odometer display
https://www.ridescoozy.com/products/veego-fat-tire?variant=40876671430
I like some of the details on ^ this one ^ but there’s no reviews of it yet.

I’m hoping to hear your candid and constructive thoughts on these models.

I appreciate the community’s time and kindly candor.
Thank you!!!
Andy

‡ The other 7 folding models I looked at include the Addmotor MOTAM M-150; Greenbike GB500 (no fat tires); Magnum Premium (no fat tires); MOAR Rapt 2 ($2500); ProdecoTech (fat tires?) and the SSR Motorsports Trail Viper ($1800- $1900). I also enjoyed looking over the the Radpower “Cargo” model even though it doesn’t fit the desired folding feature.

Dewey
2 months ago

Was looking at the
Magnum Premium
Any thoughts on this one?? I know it's a bit heavy

Yeah, it weighs more than 60lb! Speedy though. You might also like to try the Tern Vektron which has a nice adjustable handlebar, 20" 2.15" Schwalbe puncture resistant tires, a Bosch motor that has a neat walking pace assist feature that works when the bike is folded if you leave the handlebar up, or you can raise the seat post and push the folded bike around by the saddle, good range, and weighs 12lb less than the Magnum because it uses an aluminum frame, if it were my money that would be the one I'd buy.

Alex_G
2 months ago

Was looking at the
Magnum Premium
Any thoughts on this one?? I know it's a bit heavy but it looks like it would be durable

James Kohls
3 months ago

Thanks @JayVee. The Levo Comp Fat is certainly drool worthy, but certainly not setup for commuters. Just looking at the cost of swapping out for two 26x4.6" studded tires at well over $200 a piece makes me cringe. As far as carrying stuff, I'd probably have to add a beam rack or one of those Thule pack and pedal racks (if it even fits). A lot of the cheaper fat bikes out there certainly seem to do better in this department, but I'm really not interested in a geared rear-hub motor and certainly not cadence sensing. If I do a fat tire bike, I'd also really like to get one that can handle 4.6" tires—most seem to be 26x4.

I agree, the eventual obsolescence of the Turbo line is a bit disappointing. Stromer seems to be the only premium manufacturer that is still seeing DD as a long term drivetrain solution. They are such great motors for areas like mine that are not very hilly.

R&M looks like a great company and I'm excited they've come to the US now. Considering the cost of the Turbo S, the number of options you can configure a R&M with for about the same price is a dream. Nobody else seems to come close to their variety of options.

Mike's E-Bikes
3 months ago

The reason many e-bikes 'depreciate' so fast, has nothing to do with the batteries, but more to do with the fact that the vast majority of them are way over-priced at between $2600 and $12,000 for what you actually get. In fact, most that are priced over $3000, when you compare what's really on them, are not any better in quality of components, than a solid one priced at $1800. The bigger players like Pedego, Easy Motion, Stromer, Haibike, and so on, are demanding a hefty premium for their 'brand' and marketing. Not to target Pedego, but you can find virtually their exact same e-bikes at Asian factories that sell direct. The costs in USD are about $550 to $700 for e-bikes that Pedego sells for $2600 to $3400. Those factories build and sell in qty, but they do allow samples in smaller quantities. They are not set up to sell to the consumer, but just using it as a reference point to what it actually costs to build these. Sure you add some for shipping, which by sea is dirt cheap especially in any meaningful quantity, and then cost of customs and unloading. Maybe that adds about $60 to $100 per ebike at most. The market is an excellent 'weighing' mechanism, in that it is telling you that you paid way too much, if you can't sell it for anything close to its original sell price when new, if it's been used for a few months or even a year. Cars are the same way, and often worse in the first years, but people derive far more utilitarian value from a car, and usually can keep it for at least 10 years. Obsoleted by new technology advances, and they also extremely high prices. They get or take what the market can bear, but keep in mind that only goes so far, and thats why you have more than 30% of car purchases today coming from subprime buyers, with an absurd 7 year loan term. They are upside down almost the day they drive it off the lot. But then thats why too, the industry has such horrid boom and bust cycles. If you think of the utilitarian value of the ebike, and how often you will use it in your part of the US, in a 2 season area, where winter stinks, and late fall or early spring stink too in terms of temps, then you are probably not psychologically going to be willing to spend as much, as someone who can use it year round in places like FLA or AZ, or CA. Most seasoned IBD's who have been in the bike business for years, smell this stuff from a mile away and that's why they won't touch e-bikes with a 10 foot pole. Besides being a huge capital outlay, for fewer bikes, the margins aren't any better with e-bikes than with regular bikes. They can see the rapid technological obsolescence too, so the risk from season to season is quite high of clearing inventory. I have to laugh at these jokers who have 10,000 and 12,000 SF e-bike sales facilities who think they will remain a going concern. They will HAVE to discount the heck out of their ebikes, to make enough inventory turns to cover their nut for the size facility, limited buyers, and the infantile nature of this market. Asia and Europe view ebikes far differently, and require bikes for many of their needs, where here its just a recreational pursuit, when you have cars to get you around.

Jamesfw
3 months ago

I have the Xduro Trekking S 5.0. I needed something for commuting. Getting old and needed something to level out the 12mi and 1000 ft gain. So far it's working out real well. I'm happy I have the S because I spend a lot of time in the 20-25 mph range and it works well. Definitely not a free ride, just not wearing myself out like I used to. It's definitely not a light bike (approx 57lb), which makes it feel real solid. As for the fork, don't really notice it. For maintenance purposes I would have rather had a fixed fork, possibly would have saved some weight too. Not looking forward to flat tire repairs, will probably leave tire on and pull the tube out the side rather than remove the wheel (heavy bike). Lights are good, although they turned out to be cyo premium rather than the Haibike front light. Not a problem as it is as bright as my Luxos I used to use, just not quite the same pattern. And sizing was interesting, I luckily decided on the 52 for my 5'8" frame. The 56 would have been just too big. The Bosch system is taking a little time to get used to, but overall I'm very pleased with how it works. I just find myself picking a cadence then adjusting the setting for the leg resistance I want, mostly tour and sport. The Battery is usually down to one and a half bars (on the 500) after 25mi with hills (cutting an average of 10 minutes off my commute each way). Headwinds no longer matter. Nice.

Thats really helpful and good to hear thanks. I also have the S 5.0 on its way and all your points don't surprise. Like you I also would have liked something lighter, I had in mind the Urban S with rigid forks, but because of the recall they are not expected this side of the world till June (New Zealand). I am itching for it to arrive. I was previously a motorcycle rider for my commute, but want to add a health aspect to my life. As soon as it is in my hands I'll put the Nyon on and report back.

Mr. B
3 months ago

Can I ask, what did you buy, and your reasons? I ended up with the Trekking Xduro, although I first wanted Urban plus (style and speed), but they had a recall on the forks, and it made me look at the trekking a bit closer, and realised it really is much better suited to my everyday needs:)
I have the Xduro Trekking S 5.0. I needed something for commuting. Getting old and needed something to level out the 12mi and 1000 ft gain. So far it's working out real well. I'm happy I have the S because I spend a lot of time in the 20-25 mph range and it works well. Definitely not a free ride, just not wearing myself out like I used to. It's definitely not a light bike (approx 57lb), which makes it feel real solid. As for the fork, don't really notice it. For maintenance purposes I would have rather had a fixed fork, possibly would have saved some weight too. Not looking forward to flat tire repairs, will probably leave tire on and pull the tube out the side rather than remove the wheel (heavy bike). Lights are good, although they turned out to be cyo premium rather than the Haibike front light. Not a problem as it is as bright as my Luxos I used to use, just not quite the same pattern. And sizing was interesting, I luckily decided on the 52 for my 5'8" frame. The 56 would have been just too big. The Bosch system is taking a little time to get used to, but overall I'm very pleased with how it works. I just find myself picking a cadence then adjusting the setting for the leg resistance I want, mostly tour and sport. The Battery is usually down to one and a half bars (on the 500) after 25mi with hills (cutting an average of 10 minutes off my commute each way). Headwinds no longer matter. Nice.

Wil
3 months ago

Okay, so after a almost giving up, I finally got the wheel after 2 1/2 year wait. I must say, it was packed very nicely and build quality was top notch. Coming from the owner of more than 3 BBS bike builds, EMotion Cross, and Haibike, I have to say this thing is pretty slick for getting you around the city. Although it's not the most powerful thing out there, the integration (wireless) and power delivery is seamless. The app (requires a smart phone) was easy to set up and use. The installation of the wheel itself was equally as easy and painless.

I can see why they stuck to the guns about making it bright red ... it attracts a lot of attention and is good publicity for them. I'm pretty much asked on a daily basis by drivers, other cyclist, and bystanders about what it was.

So ... it is work the wait? So far, it's pretty much lived up to it's promise. So I am going to say "yes". But I know some folks backed that project way longer than I did and their communication and progress hasn't been the best. I know that turned a lot of people off. But in the end, I am happy to see they were able to deliver a premium product to the mass and help get more folks out of the car and on their bikes.

But a few things I like to see improved in the future
1. Needs a disc brake version. Currently only regular rim brakes.
2. Needs an 11 speed hub. Currently only fits 10.
3. Be nice if they can shrink it a bit and lose some weight to that it's more "stealth".
4. Maybe have another color option would be nice.

1/4
Roger Ferreira Batista
7 days ago

Will there be some model that I can drag instead having to lift after folding to take inside subway and supermarkets. Does this model perform this function?

VEEZER1
4 weeks ago

I just wish i knew which one to buy... So many on the market right now. Can't wait till we can start narrowing down the big players of the ebike. Honestly with the laws restricting top speed I feel reliability and distance are the most important factors. I have a feeling there is going to be endless hours of research.....................

Nyana11
2 months ago

The motor noise is really annoying ,imagine it like constant mosquito sound on all your tours

Gumption1111
3 months ago

Finally a 500 watt folder.

Christopher クリストファー
3 months ago

Batteries that are not integrated into the bike look amazingly ugly, especially in these smaller fold bikes.

Mark S
4 months ago

Not crazy about the looks but the versatility is amazing... Does the frame flex, considering it is a folding style??? What is the approximate range??

Miphone tech
4 months ago

If you can do a review of fisher electric bike that will be great. You can also check my Israel YouTube channel about electric bikes in Israel.

McNuggetEh
4 months ago

Wondering how the initial take off is. Does it sweep you off your feet or is it more intuitive? I think I have a similar hub motor(Volt Mariner) and just wondering if it's been dialed in different with the controller. I love mine but realize it can zip you off in a hurry and that may not be the best for a more tentative rider. Looking for my folks. Thanks :)

melonbarmonster
4 months ago

$1900

Dale Wildey
4 months ago

I like the step through bikes the most. So many options out there. It's really exciting to see what's going on with bicycles and tricycles today. The electric bikes stepped everything up to a new level

Peter Kenyon
4 months ago

I love folding e-bikes. The 20 inch wheels are great for getting around. I hardly ever fold the bike, I just love the geometry (no neck pain) and the step through. I'll always be a small wheel devotee. Thanks for the vids. Keep up the exceptional work.

rcespin
4 months ago

what is the folding dimensions of the bike and the weight ? thanks

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 months ago

The weight is listed back with the specs on the website and it's 61.3 lbs. I did not get the folding dimensions... sorry :O

Mathew Davis
4 months ago

Hey Court, have you ever used the Genesis folding bike? Matt

JohhnyPump
4 months ago

Marvelous video, and what an impressive folding ebike. Folding bikes are my preference(I own 2, non-electric), this one is awesome. Camera question, your videos images are very stable, even when you were jogging, the image stabilization was rock solid. What kind of camera(or phone) did you use? Thanks for your work, when it comes to ebike reviews, you are unrivaled. Thanks for putting it out there.

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 months ago

Hey JohhnyPump (cool name btw) I use a motorized handheld gimbal with GoPros and some deadcat mic fur to reduce wind noise. These are the exact items:
- GoPro 4 Silver with Memory Card (Bundle) http://amzn.to/1rUMzUq
- Deadcat Sticker http://amzn.to/27Bn6Qg
- 3 Axis Motorized Gimbal http://amzn.to/1U0dyXJ

Dip Shit
4 months ago

love the חי necklace Jesse has xD great review btw, my friend has the classic version and I am looking into getting a classic too

guy idel
1 month ago

xX_RealFaZeMember_Xx כן יש פה סירטונים יפים

Dip Shit
1 month ago

+guy idel גם אני, עם כל זה שזה ממש פופולרי בישראל לא חשבתי שישראלים צופים בזה...

guy idel
1 month ago

.Thanks bro I'm from Israel

Dip Shit
1 month ago

+guy idel yup

guy idel
1 month ago

?Magnum is an Israeli company

Armin Hirmer
4 months ago

nice bike

BBBYpsi
3 months ago

You threw me off with your screen name. My best friend is Matt N

Matt N
3 months ago

You always get what you paid for, my friend.

BBBYpsi
4 months ago

Total garbage. Range will be maybe 10 miles if lucky. Frame will not hold up long either. Have fun with it.

Chad Davis
4 months ago

I'd rather go for this one http://www.banggood.com/Xiaomi-Smart-Electric-Power-Folding-Bike-Bluetooth-4_0-Smart-Bike-With-Front-and-Rear-Light-Folding-Pedals-Support-For-APP-Aluminum-Alloy-Frame-p-1077093.html?p=B0221338596320131216 *under $799* it's a way better deal

Allen Janes
4 months ago

or an airplane. that thing will fit in my baggage compartment

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 months ago

Yeah, that's actually a great point... Depending on the airline you could take a folding ebike along :)

Quike Navarro
4 months ago

Great video and great channel. Congrats.
I think every time you have the chance to remove the battery you should.
It would be a great addition to your review.

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 months ago

Thanks for the constructive feedback Quike! I'll keep that in mind, sometimes I skip things like that to keep it going fast but it's great to hear that you and others would like to see it

Ariel Baum
4 months ago

try riding with no hands on this shit

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 months ago

Ha! Probably not at the top speed but I'm sure I could around 10 mph ;)

veronique chicheportiche
4 months ago

what a lovley bike! GREAT REVIEW!!

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 months ago

Hey Veronique, thanks for your supportive comment :D