2013 Pedego City Commuter Review

Pedego City Commuter Electric Bike Review 1
City Commuter Ebike Women
Rear Cassette Shimano Derailleur
Battery Pack Key Inserted
Grip Shifter Bell And Control Buttons City Commuter
White Low Step Pedego City Commuter
City Commuter Battery Pack Light
Chain Guard Pedal Assist Sensor
City Commuter Lcd Computer
City Commuter Fenders Front Light
Pedego City Commuter Secret Seat Storage
Pedego City Commuter Rear Hub
Pedego City Commuter Electric Bike Review 1
City Commuter Ebike Women
Rear Cassette Shimano Derailleur
Battery Pack Key Inserted
Grip Shifter Bell And Control Buttons City Commuter
White Low Step Pedego City Commuter
City Commuter Battery Pack Light
Chain Guard Pedal Assist Sensor
City Commuter Lcd Computer
City Commuter Fenders Front Light
Pedego City Commuter Secret Seat Storage
Pedego City Commuter Rear Hub

Summary

  • Classic upright commuter frame is quiet, sturdy and functional with welded rear rack
  • Integrated seat post shock, lights, bell, and computer with clean wire management
  • Offers five levels of pedal assist in addition to twist throttle, power on demand
  • Optional battery upgrades can provide an increase in power or range

Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Pedego

Model:

City Commuter

Price:

$2,495 USD

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Commuting, Urban

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Components, 3 Year Battery

Availability:

United States, Canada, Mexico, Australia, New Zealand, Europe

Model Year:

20142015

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

57 lbs (25.85 kg)

Battery Weight:

7 lbs (3.17 kg) (Varying by Battery Size)

Motor Weight:

8 lbs (3.62 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum

Frame Sizes:

20 in (50.8 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

(Wheelbase 46 in)

Frame Types:

High-Step, Step-Thru

Frame Colors:

White, Black

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack, Spring Latch

Gearing Details:

7 Speed 1x7 Shimano Acera

Shifter Details:

Grip Shifter on Right Bar

Pedals:

Aluminum Alloy Platform

Handlebar:

Tool-Free Adjustable

Brake Details:

Avid BB7 Mechanical Disc

Grips:

Padded

Saddle:

Comfort

Seat Post:

Suspension

Tire Brand:

Schwalbe Fat Frank, 28" x 2"

Wheel Sizes:

28 in (71.12cm)

Tire Details:

Kevlar Lined, Optional Balloon

Tube Details:

Pre-Slimed

Accessories:

Aluminum Fenders, Built-in Bell on Left Brake Lever, Integrated LED Lights Front and Rear,

Other:

If you weigh over 180 pounds I recommend upgrading to the 48 volt battery with 500 watt motor option

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Dapu

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts (Optional 400 Watt Motor for the 36 Volt Battery Version)

Battery Brand:

Samsung

Battery Voltage:

48 volts (Optional 36 Volt)

Battery Amp Hours:

15 ah (Optional 15 Ah)

Battery Watt Hours:

480 wh (Optional 360 and 525 Wh)

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

4.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

15 miles (24 km)

Estimated Max Range:

40 miles (64 km)

Display Type:

Backlit LCD Display on Left Handle Bar

Readouts:

Speed, Odometer, 5 Assist Levels, Battery Voltage

Display Accessories:

Aluminum Fenders, Built-in Bell on Left Brake Lever, Integrated LED Lights Front and Rear,

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist, Twist Throttle

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

The Pedego City Commuter picks up where the Pedego Classic and Step-through Cruisers left off but adds pedal assist, built in lights, a high end back-lit computer, dual disc brakes and better battery integration, all for a relatively small increase in price. This bike looks amazing, rides very well and features high end components all around. It changes the feel of the ride from relaxed and upright to a bit more aggressive forward leaning but isn’t nearly as aggressive as a road.

The City Commuter weighs ~55lbs depending on the battery you choose and is somewhat rear-heavy but rides well and is very maneuverable. The stock battery is a 36 volt 10 amp hour Lithium-ion pack that delivers fast charging and plenty of cycles (over 1,500 before it begins losing range). You also have the option of upgrading to a 15 amp hour battery that will make the ride last 50% longer for only $295 and in my opinion this is very worth it! That said, this bike already gets 15 to 30 miles range for midweight ~160lb riders. If you’re a heavier rider, opt for the 48 volt pack for improved torque and better range. Note that the batteries are not interchangeable and that the 48 volt pack comes paired with a 500 watt motor vs. 400 for the 36 volt model.

In addition to throttle mode, the City Commuter offers five levels of pedal assist which are great to experiment with. On days when I want an extra workout I’ll set it to 1 and pedal along. The lower settings really help when pedaling from a standstill but cut out as you gain speed letting your legs do the work. The pedal assist hardware Pedego chose for this bike is pedelec vs. torque sensing which means you don’t have to push hardly at all for the motor to kick in (which I love) but also means it can cut in or keep going when you don’t want it to, simply because the sensor is “catching up”. Torque sensors are much quicker and smoother but require more force and might defeat the purpose of an electric bike for those with knee injuries.

Regardless of whether you’re using the throttle or pedal assist, both brake levers have built in cut-off switches to kill the motor at any time. This is a nice option and pretty standard with electric bikes. A small bell has been integrated right into the left brake lever which is very handy (I ring mine all the time) but keeps the handlebars clean and clear. The computer unit is also positioned on the left side of the handlebars but manages to stay out of the way, even considering the brake and bell are right there next to it.

Speaking of computers… I like the unit on this bike a lot. It as four rubberized buttons that are easy to press and the screen is back lit. The back lighting includes three levels of brightness and only comes on when you turn on the lights. If you use the switch on the rear part of the battery pack to turn the lights on instead of on the computer, the screen stays completely dark which is nice if you feel like it’s distracting at night. The screen itself is monochrome and sealed, designed to stand up to direct sunlight, rain and other weather well. It controls five levels of pedal assist or throttle only mode by arrowing from zero to five. It displays your speed, distance, battery level, power input level, time, odometer and light mode which is pretty amazing considering how simple it is to use.

All in all this is one of the best electric bikes out there with years of experience and insight going in to the design. The founders of Pedego have been selling bikes since 2007 and really refined their offering since the Classic Cruiser which launched in 2009 and is still a best seller. I’ve been riding my City Commuter to and from work every day seven miles round trip and never had an issue. Even so, the company offers great support and works through a network of trained dealers nation wide who will help you out if something breaks.

Pros:

  • Strong 500 watt geared hub motor with upgraded gear material to last longer (400 watt for the 36 volt version)
  • Durable built-in computer with back lighting tracks speed, battery level, pedal assist settings, lights and includes an amp meter to tell you how much work it’s doing vs. you
  • Rear rack is very usable for saddle racks and panniers (I like the Elements from Basil), protects the battery well, battery has a built in power level indicator and light switch
  • Rear rack is welded right onto the frame making it more rugged and quiet going over bumps, features a spring loaded top mounting arm for grabbing stuff when you don’t have panniers or a saddle bag
  • Battery locks to bike but key is not required to ride, battery is completely removable for charging inside
  • Front handle bar quick adjust in the neck is sturdy with integrated cover latch
  • High quality integrated fenders with mud flaps, chain guard to protect pants
  • Bell built into the left brake lever, small, loud and out of the way
  • Oversized front and rear disc brakes for maximum stopping power
  • Built-in rubber caps protect the rear axle ends from hitting your leg or getting rusted or bent
  • Built in water bottle mount holes, even on the step-through design (sounds obvious but many ebikes don’t have them)

Cons:

  • No fork shock but the seat post shock and large tires help smooth out the ride
  • Tubing on the rear rack is wider and thicker than most panniers are setup for so it’s hard to find a good fit, I recommend the Double Bag styles or a top bag
  • Chain guard is bent easily if stepped on or installed incorrectly
  • Large kickstand can bounce over bumps and is also a bit unstable when parked
  • Battery can be hard to pull out
  • Shorter bars than the Cruiser means you lean forward and feel bumps a bit more but provides leverage when pedaling
  • Twist throttle does not override pedal assist, can only be used separately

Resources:

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Comments (74) YouTube Comments

Daniel Moore
7 years ago

I have been riding the Pedigo City Commuter 18 miles a day for 4 weeks now. I found this review interesting for a number of reasons. I am over 200 lbs and I do commute in an area that has many hills and long grades (seattle area). I also experienced several of the items described in the cons. The seat that came with the city commuter wasn’t that comfortable to me. Pedigo swapped it with the comfort cruiser seat. Problem solved. I did want to sit more upright than the bike enabled as shipped. I flipped the stem around to move the handlebars back. Problem solved. I also found the kickstand to be a bit more unstable than I needed. I replaced it with the Ursus Jumbo Double Kickstand. Problem solved. I love this bike. It does everything I want it to do. You can read and see more at http://www.danielmoorephoto.com/bicycle

  Reply
7 years ago

Great pictures Dan! I really like your cargo box, side mirror and GPS setup. It’s interesting that we both went through similar steps to improve the bike. I like the way the high-step version of your bike looks but ended up going with the low-step because it offers a shorter top tube distance and provides that upright positioning. Your stem flip idea worked out pretty well, I saw the final results in your video. Great setup.

  Reply
Brad Sloan
7 years ago

Hey dude, you got three thing wrong on the women’s Pedego City Commuter review, actually four. First Pedego refers to this bike as their step-through city commuter you titled the video as Women’s though you do say step-though in the video, second 36V bike comes with a 400watt motor, third the bike has five levels of pedal assist, and fourth the lights don’t have daylight sensors. You turn them on with the display button and run off the battery. You should call attention to the name brand parts it has. If people are going to trust your reviews you need to get the facts right. Read the spec first!

  Reply
7 years ago

Hey Brad, the video review you’re talking about did have several misquotes, you’re right on every count. I considered not posting originally (and have taken it down based on your feedback) but figured some people might want to see the bike since it’s relatively new, I plan to do a better review shortly.

I think the written review on this page is much more complete and accurate (please let me know if you see anything off). Appreciate your input, what kind of bike do you ride? Are you on the market right now trying to decide?

  Reply
John Dawson
7 years ago

Some notes based on my experience riding the Pedego City Commuter: In my experience, range is 20-30mph for 10ah battery under most circumstances. Generally I recommend a weight cut off for 36v bikes at about 180lbs to achieve this range. The other day, for example, I road a 36v comfort cruiser out to Circuit of the Americas Track from downtown Austin and got 19 miles on one battery carrying my 205lb body plus another 10lb of cargo. The ride included the climb up the Pleasant Valley Hill and another large hill near the track. So a person 180lb or less would easily be in the 20-30 mile range. The 48v 10ah can push me on the same ride and conditions for 25 miles before the battery runs out. The 48v has more power and thus can push me up the hill easier.

The back light on the computer can be dimmed with 3 different modes and has a way to be turned off while keeping the front and back lights on which is to use the button on the rear battery pack instead of the up/down arrows on the handlebar control unit.

Many shops will let you swap out the City Commuter seat for the more comfortable Beach Cruiser Seat at no extra charge including Rocket Electrics in downtown Austin. If you keep the stock City Commuter seat however, there is a hidden compartment to store keys etc. which is neat.

Side note for Austin residents: We now have $150-200 rebates from city depending on bike price and range. And we now have fixed rate financing through our Amplify Credit Union that can get bike payments down to $60-$100 a month.

  Reply
Eric Schmidt
6 years ago

Okay, let me say that all of you guys in the comments and the guy responsible for this site are AWESOME!!! I am soooo pumped to get my Pedego. I have sort of been trying to decide which one to get for almost TWO years! But, I think the city cruiser is the way to go. I just can’t decide if I want the 36v 15 ah or the 48v 10ah, seems like they’ll go about the same distance (all things being equal) – does that seem like a good guess? I really love all the info. Are there any competitors you guys feel like I should at least look at before I pull the trigger? Also, I won’t even come close with a conversion kit to get as cool of a bike – correct? I am handy, but have zero experience messing with bikes.

  Reply
Court
6 years ago

Thanks Eric, glad the review has helped you out! As for which bike to choose, I prefer the 48v version if you weigh over 150lbs and have some hills on your ride. The motor in that version is actually 500 watts vs. 450 and it just flies! I personally own the 36v and it works fine, but doesn’t have as much torque.

It’s hard to beat this bike in terms of price and convenience by building your own with a kit. I think Pedego did a wonderful job and includes everything you’d want and the cables are all integrated which is nice. The only downside is no shocks but I put a thudbuster seatpost shock on mine which helps. One comparable bike is the iZip E3 Zuma https://electricbikereview.com/izip/e3-zuma/ check that out.

  Reply
Kenny Jammin J
6 years ago

I truly enjoy my Pedego City Commuter. I have the 48 volt 500 watt motor. I live in the Chicago north suburbs and I ride with friends who owned Stromer electric bikes 500 watts motors. Our area is mostly flat land and I weight 266 lbs. Chicago Navy Pier is 14 miles from our home. I ride there regularly, 28 miles round trip only using 60 percent of my battery. I have ridden my bike from my home to Great lakes Navy base, which is 52 miles round trip with pedal assist set no higher than two casual riding and still had battery power when I got back home. I bought saddlebags took it to a shoe repair shop had them add more material in the center so to allow the bags to fit properly. I recommend using the Bully Bike Alarm when securing your bike, which has a remote monitoring for when you are out of view of your bike. Last, I have had to contact Pedego with a few concerns. They responded quickly and walked me thru each issue. Thanks to Pedego, Kozy Cycle in Chicago. KennyJ

  Reply
Charlotte Harris - Utah
6 years ago

After tons of research and nearly buying a Royal Dutch Gazelle Innergy electric bike. I have decided on Pedego City Commuter. For a $1,000.00 less I get a better product and better customer service. I can’t wait to pick up my new bike. These reviews have been very helpful. I tested it out and the Pedego is going cut my bike commute time to work by at 50%, I still get my daily workout, and save on gas and gym fees.

  Reply
Dave
6 years ago

Love the reviews, but now I am in a quandry. I am 6’4″ and 300 lbs fat guy, but I am working on shrinking. I think I have narrowed my choices down to the Pedigo City Commuter with the beefier battery or the Izip Zuma. You rated them both highly. For a big guy like me that commutes 20 miles round trip with a couple of large hills, and can recharge at work which one would you advise I purchase.

Or am I simply daydreaming because I am too big for an e-bike setup?

  Reply
Court
6 years ago

Hi Dave, it sounds like the Pedego Interceptor or the 48 volt City Commuter would be perfect for you. Both bikes offer enough power to get you around and the frames are larger so they will be more comfortable though possibly still a bit small. If you have a chance to try them in person that’s ideal but if you’re doing this online then I would make your decision based on features as follows:

Do you want pedal assist and a fancier (though more complex, fragile and expensive) computer system? If so, get the City Commuter. If you’re looking for something basic that only offers twist throttle but is simple, durable and less expensive then get the Interceptor.

  Reply
Joel Benson
6 years ago

My Pedego City Commuter, 48 v (10 ah) e-bike was delivered a few days ago and I have been giving it a pretty good workout. This e-bike is outstanding! This is a report of what I have experienced in terms of pedal-assist speed and battery life in riding on bike trails and some streets in the west suburban Chicago area. The terrain here is mostly flat with occasional inclines that may extend a block or two and very few hills. My weight is 230 pounds, so the extra power of 48 volts is required to move me along.

I find I’m most comfortable riding exclusively in high gear with the pedal assist set to “3.” The high gear ratio allows me to pedal at a comfortable but constant pace at any speed. I only stop or slow down my pedaling when I’m passing pedestrians or other cyclists, approaching a stop sign or making a sharp turn.

As a point of information, with constant pedaling and on flat terrain, the “2” setting moves me along at about 13-14 mph, the “3” setting moves me at about 16-17 mph and the “4” setting moves me at about 18-19 mph. I find the 16-17 mph speed is optimum for a wide bike path with few pedestrians and only occasional cyclists. This speed really gets me where I want to go!

My ride today was in sunny 80+ degree weather and high humidity. The other cyclists were typically traveling at no more than about 16 mph (for the young, muscular, and obviously well-conditioned cyclists). All were sweating profusely and were really laboring to go fast; while I was able to cruise along with constant pedaling but no pain or strain. I could keep moving at 17 mph with no sweat, even in the heat and high humidity.

And rest assured, I am not a spandex-wearing Lance Armstrong type of guy. Today I was passed only once by a couple guys hunched over and moving slightly in excess of 17 mph. I followed these guys for a couple miles until they pulled over to take some water and I cruised past them. Out of the corner of my eye I could see the amazed looks on their faces. This is what the Pedego does. It makes even long drives fun, with just enough exercise to give a moderate cardio workout.

My ride today was 32 miles. The computer power readout reads 6 bars with a full battery charge. When I completed my ride, I had two power bars left. I noted the first and second power bars dropped out at about 6 miles each, the third power bar dropped out at 12 additional miles and the forth bar disappeared at 8 additional miles. So on average each of the four power bars lasts for about 8 miles, moving a 230 pound guy over relatively flat terrain at a speed of between 16 and 17 mph with constant 7th-gear pedaling. Based on what I saw today, it seems a fully charged 48 v (10 ah) battery could take a rider about 50 MILES with the noted weight and pedaling parameters.

For me this is very impressive and is all I need for an e-bike. The only downside is I have to add regular treadmill and elliptical exercises to my exercise routine to get a good cardio-workout. The Pedego just doesn’t bring enough pain. In my opinion, this is a good thing.

  Reply
Amanda
6 years ago

I have been looking into this bike for a little while now and am about 99% sold on it but I can’t seem to find a good answer to my final question. I want to install a basket so I can take my dog with me when I ride to work, is this something that is possible? I contacted the company and they said they don’t recommend putting a rear rack over the battery and to try a trailer (she is over their recommend 5 pounds for a front basket).

But I’m not sure why a basket couldn’t go on top of the battery, it is a wire frame one so air ventilation shouldn’t be a problem. I was hoping I could find some sort of answer here, thanks!

  Reply
Court
6 years ago

Hi Amanda! Depending on how large your dog is I think the Basil Pasja could work well. This basket is designed to mount on rear racks, looks great and has an optional cover that will keep your pet from falling or jumping out. I’ve used Basil’s stuff before and was very pleased.

Regarding your concerns about the integrity of the rear rack on the City Commuter, I think it’s pretty strong but I’m not really an expert. Do make sure that you fasten the basket well however and add some zip ties from the basket to the aluminum tubing, don’t just use the tiny spring latch.

Here’s the basket for sale online http://talbotscyclery.com/about/pet-baskets-trailers-pg331.htm just scroll to the bottom of the page, it’s available in Small, Medium and Large and costs ~$100.

  Reply
Charles
6 years ago

I’ve had my City Commuter for almost two weeks and love it! I’m 270 lbs. and it has no problem getting me up hills and has all the power I need. Because of my weight the cruiser seat sinks all the way down and has no spring in it when I hit bumps. I want to buy a Thudbuster like yours but see they make different sizes. Could you tell me the length so the long range model that will fit the city commuter? Thanks in advance for the info and thanks for the review Court. Your video and Daniel Moore’s web site convinced me to test drive a city commuter and the ride convinced me to buy.

  Reply
Mike Moore
6 years ago

Bought city commuter in New Zealand. It’s so good,I’m buying another to use in Spain for a 10 day cycling trip around the Basque Country. then I’ll ship it back to Auckland for my wife to user need knee surgery one day but with my bike that day may be years away. Mike Moore

  Reply
Diana Beals
6 years ago

How much to replace battery? How long does one last? What if you only use once a month? This would be used at a second home. Thanks.

  Reply
Court
6 years ago

Hi Diana, the batteries cost around $600 to replace but should last several years if you treat them well. The key is to top off the charge once a month because if the battery starts to run down it can damage the chemistry. I think extreme hot and cold temperatures can also damage the battery so if you can keep it inside and away from windows that would be ideal :)

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robb krause
6 years ago

between the two: izip E3 dash or the pedego city commuter w/upgraded 48v battery… which did you feel was a better overall bike…? and can you tell me why..? i’m looking for reliability and ease of use… i appreciate your advise… thanks :)

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Court
6 years ago

Hi Rob, great question! These are both awesome bikes and each has something unique to offer but when you compare the upgrades they do both have a 48 volt battery and 500 watt motor so yeah… what makes them different or better? The Dash is much lighter and more balanced front to rear because of the battery pack mounting point. It delivers a more aggressive ride with the flat handle bars and thinner tires but tries to add comfort with the front shock. Compared with the City Commuter your head will be positioned more forward and pedaling will feel faster. The motor will also be quieter because it’s gearless.

Now the flip side of all this is the City Commuter 48 volt version which is super powerful and very fast. The swept back handlebars and adjustable neck are awesome and provide an upright ride which is great for city riding. Even though the rack and battery are both located at the rear, this bike is sturdy and heavy throughout so it rides naturally. The oversized tires add some shock absorption and are lined with kevlar to be very tough.

So these two bikes are not the same thing. If you are a mid-sized person who wants to pedal fast and take advantage of the 28mph top pedal assist speed while leaning forward more then the dash is a great choice. If you’re a heavier or larger person in general who wants a comfortable ride with the added torque of a geared hub motor and doesn’t have to carry it up stairs or maneuver around as much then the City Commuter is the winner. Both companies offer great customer support, you may be able to find a 2013 City Commuter for less since they changed a few things for 2014. The E3 Dash is a brand new bike for 2014.

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George Sears
6 years ago

I’ve been looking at electric bikes for 10 years or more, and it seems to finally be working in a lot of ways. I would credit the superior battery technology. This bike is really intriguing. Even with the 10AH 48 volt system, that is only 480 watt/hours. In theory, the 100 watt solar panels you can buy online for $150 deliver 100 watts per hour, so they could fully charge the system in 6 or 7 hours. To me it would be fun to just use solar power and feel good about that. Even on the grid that half a kilowatt hour battery is only a dime or so in electric power. Nothing is ever going to be more efficient than this.

It’s just hard to believe how little energy it takes to move a person around on this bike. Using the motor as an assist makes sense. People can find a comfortable level of exertion and still get where they want. Everyone realizes they need some exercise, but climbing a strenuous hill can put using a bicycle beyond what many are going to do. And a full workout can mean having to take a shower if one rides to work.

I was wondering what the weight of this bike means if you are 100% pedal power. I have a 30 pound upright hybrid bike, and I’m sure the weight and ride position slow it down, along with the fairly fat tires. Since the Pedego has a somewhat limited number of gears, I was wondering if it is just a slow ride or a really difficult one. Not that you would do this, most of the time, but I like to know the worst case.

I also wonder if changing the rear tire, or tube, is difficult.

I hope this generation of bikes is the real deal, and I’d really like to pick one up at some point. Up to now I have always been able to find so many problems, the bikes didn’t seem like they were worth the risks. This bike is trying to be practical, which is where the product would have to be as a real transport alternative.

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Court
6 years ago

Great thoughts George, thanks for sharing! I agree that it’s amazing just how efficient ebikes can be and your solar power suggestion is quite inspiring indeed. This generation of ebikes is definitely getting it right and the City Commuter is a leader for sure, especially in the more upright category with the larger tires etc.

You are correct however that this bike is heavier and the weight is all situated in the rear. Changing a flat takes some extra work and just lifting the bike can be a challenge. I got a flat on mine and brought it to the local bike shop for repair, they were excited to see an ebike and had no problem changing the tube. The cool thing about the City Commuter is that it has the larger tires which are Kevlar lined to resist punctures! They also come pre-Slimed so they self-seal.

If you have to pedal this bike on human power the extra weight is definitely noticeable going up hills but on the flats it’s not so bad, just takes a bit of extra effort to get started. The gear range works fine and in a worse case scenario you can push it up a hill then hop back on (this is what I do because my knees are sensitive). This bike vs. a lighter bike is really about style, motor power and brand. Pedego makes great stuff, they back their products up and their shops offer excellent service. This bike is more upright, has a larger frame and battery and a unique design. There are lots of ebikes on the site to explore and some are more lightweight but less powerful, others are well balanced in terms of weight distribution but less sturdy or harder to find at shops. It’s a trade off but the City Commuter is definitely a great choice. I’ve put hundreds of miles on mine and really enjoyed the pedal assist + throttle combination.

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Harry Moy
6 years ago

Hi,
I have enjoyed comprehensive review on the city commuter. As the is intended for city and pavement riding, How would it perform on mix gravel surface paths on foot hills?

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Court
6 years ago

Good question Harry! The City Commuter offers a bit of cushion because of the large seat and balloon tires but it isn’t optimal for off road and foothills. I’ve ridden mine on gravel and flat dirt paths in Austin (and the fenders actually work great to keep the dust and rocks down) but if it gets really bumpy the bike feels a bit jerky and clunkier because of its weight. If you’re looking for more off road riding check out the Pedego Trail Tracker or one of the electric mountain bikes with shocks.

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George
6 years ago

I purchased a standard White 48v 500w Pedego City Commuter 6 months ago. I am a 6 ft, 200lb, athletic- framed veteran. The bike is a showstopper. Since most bikes on the road are traditional mountain/regular bikes, the cruiser-style elicits smiles, positive comments, and thumbs-ups from motorists and pedestrians alike. It is a much more comfortable style than any other bike I’ve owned; you sit up on the bike instead of being hunched over. The ladies at my office love the classic styling and faux-leather accents; the guys like the 25mph speed. BTW, going 25mph on an ebike on level ground feels like pedaling hard downhill really fast on a regular bike. I use the bike 3-4 times a week to ride to work and back (5 mile round trip). It is great because I’m not sweaty when I get to work (its uphill), but I still get some exercise.
The bike is about 50 lbs without the 5 lb battery; it is also long and wide. I live in a second floor apartment with stairs, so that has been annoying; but I imagine that most people have a house to park it in easily, so it may only be my problem. Battery life is fine, I charge it every 2 weeks. The tires are great shock absorbers. I use pedal assist on 2 mostly, which shoots me around town at 13mph or so. The bike seat and kickstand were fine with me.
I have used traditional nylon panniers, modified messenger bags, and a bungee-corded crate to haul stuff. The rack is thick and sturdy to support the battery weight. I added a drink holder on the handlebars to hold a shower radio so I can listen to tunes while commuting.
While I have saved on gas money and CO2 emissions, the real savings are coming from not having to start my car and drive it 140 times so far. Not going over sets of speed bumps every day to damage the suspension, not having to shift gears to wear on the transmission, etc…
The bell that comes on the bike is well placed, creative, and fine (). However, I’ve found that adding a traditional 2” bell (!!DING DING!!) has proven to be more effective at announcing your presence. Many people wear hats, hoodies, headphones, and with road noise (and cell phone conversations) are oblivious to a noise.

It is hard to describe how much fun it is to ride a bicycle around town, to see the sunrise, to smell the morning dew, to feel the wind on your face, to hear the birds chirping, to show up to work refreshed…

Thanks to Court Rye for making the helpful videos and answering my questions.

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Quentin Graham
6 years ago

Hi, I am really loving your reviews and have a question regarding the 2014 Interceptor II vs the City Commuter.

I love the style and cruiser looks of the interceptor however will have a 25 mile work commute once I get my Pedego.
As you have reviewed both my question is other than looks and style would the Interceptor II be up to the level of the City Commuter for traveling to and from work and also what would any other differences be?

Cheers and keep up the awesome work

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Court
6 years ago

Hi Quentin, great question here. The best way to extend the range on any electric bike is to pedal along and that is made easier with pedal assist since you get the support of electric drive but don’t have to regulate it manually using the throttle… instead, the bike actually detects your pedaling and sort of rewards you by kicking in to help.

The 48v 10ah version of the City Commuter is essentially the same system as what is used on the Interceptor 2 because both use the same geared 500 watt motor and control system which offers throttle and pedal assist. The primary difference is ergonomics with the Interceptor setup as a cruiser and lacking lights and fenders (actually fenders are optional). The wheel size of the City Commuter is a bit larger and the handlebars aren’t quite as large.

If you ride either of these two bikes with pedal assist they should get roughly the same range but if you only use the throttle and don’t pedal along then the range will be decreased. I hope this helps you out! Here’s the full review of the Interceptor https://electricbikereview.com/pedego/interceptor/

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Quentin Graham
6 years ago

Thanks for your help, yeah everything’s customizable I.e lights etc. I spose at the end of the day I’m really wanting to know the speed difference. I am assuming that the City Commuter would be the better time saving option.

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Joanne
6 years ago

I am sold on the Pedego but have a question. I am 60 yrs old, 5 ft 1″ and ride only in the Summer in the mountains at high altitude. I need a step thru but am wondering should I get the comfort cruiser or the commuter? The average distance I ride is 25 miles mostly on bike paths but with major hills especially for a non bike rider female. What do you suggest?

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Court
6 years ago

Hey Joanne, awesome question! I can narrow it down very quickly for you… Do you want pedal assist or is a throttle-only system going to be enough? The City Commuter has the lights, fenders and five levels of assist in addition to throttle while the Cruiser and Step-Thru Cruiser are much simpler with just a throttle, no lights and optional fenders (that cost extra).

I owned the step-through City Commuter for quite a while and it worked great for commuting to work! I’m about 5’9″ and weigh ~135 and it felt comfortable. If you want an even smaller step-through frame then consider the 24″ Step-Thru Cruiser which uses smaller 24-inch tires and has a shorter frame. This bike was designed specifically for more petite people. Since it’s a cruiser however, you’ll only get throttle mode with that bike. Hope this helps you out! Chime in with any more questions and I’ll do my best to clarify ;)

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Joanne
6 years ago

Thanks for the information. I would like the peddle assist too, but is the frame too tall ( large) for my 5’1″ size or will I be able to reach the peddles and the handlebars comfortably? I dont’t want to look like I am riding a child’d bike either!

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Court
6 years ago

I think it’s going to feel a bit large Joanne, have you considered something like the e-Joe Epik Lite or Epik SE? These offer assist, throttle and have a nice step-through design. They are light weight and a bit smaller due to the 20″ wheels and folding design. I like the SE (Sport Edition) because it even comes with a front suspension fork. Both are ~$1,500 which is pretty great.

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Miguel
6 years ago

Hi,

Thanks for your detailed review. I am 5’7″ and 180lbs. I am sold on getting the 48V model but I am debating between the Classic and the Step-Thru model. I will use it to commute and most of time wearing standard clothing. You mentioned you’re 5’9″ tall and used an step-thru. Do you think that given my 5’7″ height the step thru will be easier (in the specs they say frame size is 18″ vs 20″ for the Classic model). Thanks a lot!!!

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Court
6 years ago

Hi Miguel! I definitely prefer the smaller step-thru design given my height. I’ve tried both and can handle the larger high-step but it just wasn’t as comfortable because I had to lean further forward and stretch vs. an upright relaxed position.

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Paul Kelley
5 years ago

Although I really like my new Pedego City Commuter what I don’t like is the fact that I can’t use my grocery shopping panniers that fold flat when not in use. There are no panniers that I could find that can hook onto the over sized tubing with the battery so close to the tubing, no panniers can clip on. I realize that some expensive saddle type panniers would work but would have to be removed all the time or else they would get stolen. I wish Pedego would have considered this and made the tubing with sections that were thinner to allow for grocery trips. Thanks for the great review. Paul.

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Steve
5 years ago

Who is the vendor/product name for the shock seat post you added to the bike?

Thanks in advance

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Court
5 years ago

That’s called a Thudbuster and it’s made by Cane Creek. Here’s a forum discussion on the Thudbuster with more info, tips and even a video showing how it works.

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Jim McNitt
5 years ago

Paul, I use Ortlieb Back Roller Classic Bags. Believe or not, they snap on and off the City Commuter rack in a just a couple seconds.

The snap/locking mechanism needs to be inserted over the rack a slight angle, but then it clicks into the fully locked position– and unlocks with just a quick tug of the release handle.

I did have to move both locking clips inward, but they designed to adjust in exactly this way.

I also repositioned the small arm that hooks the lower part of the bag to the rack support. It turns out all that was necessary was to re-mount the arm on one of the plastic strip that protects bottom edge of the pannier. Strictly speaking, this probably wasn’t even necessary, but I like the security of having the bag attached at the top and bottom.

Ortlieb bags aren’t cheap — but they will last forever and a part of system that provides hardware mounting options for almost any conceivable situation. They are water and air-tight and have thick PVC coated walls that protect the contents. There are internal pockets to help organize tools and spare parts and because they have roll tops, you can carry a few small items snugly — or expand them to their full 40 Liters for camping or shopping.

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Christian Beaupre
5 years ago

Ok, so two weeks ago I went ahead and test rode the City Commutrer and the Neo City. I sure am happy I did, and am now a proud owner of a Pedego City Commuter. This is a great bike.

The Neo City is a beautiful bike, and feature rich as Court mentioned. It felt more like a traditional bike, and certainly is great if you are looking for an e-bike with stealth appeal. Ultimately I made the choice based on a few factors. I found that the handle bar positioning and shape were not very comfortable on the Neo City, the Commuter has a more swept back array. The Neo City’s seat is pretty hard too, not that it can’t be changed though. To be fair the Pedego stock seat is not very useful for commuting, and due to a lack of shocks you should definately consider modding the seat post.

I much prefer the Cadence sensor to the Torque sensor, the latter giving the ride a jerky feeling every time the motor kicks in. The cadence assist provides smooth even power, and the seven gears are more than enough. The Pedego isn’t difficult to pedal without power, and I love that the new models have a feature that allows you to throttle on any setting, overriding the pedal assist when you need more control and maybe don’t want to deal with changing the settings on the console in traffic.

And finally, the most important topic; battery and range. Well, I decided to go with the 36V 15ah and am very pleased with the results thus far. I’m a 163lbs rider and have ridden on city streets with the occasional hill for more than 60 km (37 miles) and have used about 2/3 of the battery. Here’s the kicker; I’ve been riding on assist level 3/5 and 4/5 the whole time. I found 1 to be a little slow, and 2 I used for maybe 5 km before deciding I needed some speed. My typical commuting speed was about 30.3 Km/hr on flats and 24km/hr on hills. Gonna be riding it all week so I will report back should I have anything else to share.

  Reply
Court
5 years ago

Thanks for sharing your thoughts Christian! I also like the City Commuter but am surprised that the torque sensor felt jerkier to you than the cadence sensor. The 2014 Easy Motion models have a smoother assist level in eco so that might feel a bit better and benefit from being more responsive. Ride safe out there! Excited to hear your update :)

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Gerry
5 years ago

Hi: Thanks for your great detailed review and to all of the folks who posted their comments/questions. As I live in a hilly area, I have decided on the 48v version of the City Commuter and what to ask if there is a 48v 15 amp hr battery available for this bike? Also, while watching the review, there was no mention of the controller being removable as on the Neo City. Thanks again!

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Court
5 years ago

Hi Gerry, the display panel on this bike is not removable (to the best of my knowledge) without unscrewing bolts and stuff. You’re correct, the Easy Motion Neo ebikes do have removable displays and the one that would most resemble the City Commuter is the Neo City or smaller Neo Street. Regarding your battery question, I don’t think the packs go any larger than 48 volt 10 amp hour for the Pedego electric bikes.

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Gerry
5 years ago

Thanks for the info Court. Has anyone experienced any problems with their controller after being exposed to the elements (rain) or worse vandals when left locked-up outside? I work downtown in a major Canadian city (Ottawa) and am concerned that some people would be attracted to a shiney electronic gadget such as the controller as we have to lock our bikes up outside our building in a rack on the street. Am I correct in assuming that the 48v 10 amp hr battery would provide almost as much range as the 36v 15 amp hr battery?

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christian beaupre
3 years ago

Hi, a little late with the comment I know. I live in Ottawa as well, and have had no problems weather wise vis-a-vis the controller/console. I even stored my bike on my porch for all of January and February in -20 C degree weather; it worked just fine come spring. I assure you, weather poses no problem, I’ve ridden through many a shower, for hours at a time.

I’ve done just about 7000 km on my City Commuter, and have had to do very little work to keep it up. I’ve had to change the chain and cassette thats all. The tires have been excellent, though the rear one has finally been punctured by a roofing nail. Battery is doing great, no problems with range thus far.

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Court
3 years ago

What an excellent little testimonial Christian! Thank you for chiming in to help Gerry. I enjoyed reading about your positive experience as well and hope the bike continues to perform well for you :)

Court
5 years ago

I feel you… the consoles are tested to be water resistant and are pretty durable. They are also modular (with a quick disconnect) so you can replace it if something bad does happen. I have never had a console vandalized with my City Commuter but I really only park it outside during the day. As far as the battery pack sizes… I feel like it depends on your weight. If you weigh <= 160 the 36v 15ah might go further than the 48v 10ah but beyond that the motor will just struggle more so the extra power actually gets you efficiency which helps with range. Does that make sense? The stronger 48v pack will be more efficient for larger riders and negate the higher amp hours of the 36v pack :)

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Claude Tremblay
5 years ago

Just bought two City Commuters has anyone tried to put a Portland Design Works Takeout front Basket on it? I asked PDW and the guy there says it doesn’t look like it would fit but their own video shows it mounted to a mustache bar. I think it will fit but would appreciate info from anyone that’s got one on.

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Court
5 years ago

Wish I could help you Claude, I’m not sure whether this basket will work or not but if you end up ordering and trying it out I’d love to hear back from you! I’m sure others are looking at accessories like this as well and you’re correct about their video showing that it does work with similar bars. I think depending on where the display is mounted on yours (center or off to one side) there may be enough room in the center (as long as it is flat) to mount the PWD Takeout Basket.

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Bjørn Husby
5 years ago

Is the Acera 7-speed Derailleurs Gear system working efficiently and hassle-free? And how is a Backwheel Motor working out compared to a Frontwheel Motor?

I am riding an Ecoride Ambassador bike with Nexus 8 Hubgear and with a Frontwheel Motor presently, but I want to upgrade to the Pedego City Commuter after seeing this review.

Anyone having problems with Water Intrusion in the Battery-pack (supposedly a known problem)? I live in Norway so I have to get an PEDELEC rated bike with only 250W motor and top speed at max 15mph, while the throttle can only assist up to 4mph… Europe sucks in that regard :P

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Bjørn Husby
5 years ago

Thanks for the quick reply :)

Yeah, I think the white Pedigo Commuter step-thru model looked like a million dollars!

I tried out a german crank motor bike (Kalkhoff) the other day, and it sucked. Even if all the reviews looked good…. It might be that I am used to the pulling power of a wheel motor. The crank motor just didn’t make me feel the flying magic :D

I guess it isn’t possible to combine the Nexus 8 with a Backwheel motor… Always a trade-off…

I’m quite happy with my current bike setup (Nexus 8 and Frontwheel motor) except that it is huge and heavy, and sometimes weak uphill and slow in the start… It was very cheap (probably chinese-made, even though it is a swedish brand) So I was hoping a more expensive bike could bring in more benefits and keep the good things that my bike has today.

Have you looked at / tried out other e-bikes recently that looks promising compared to the Pedigo Commuter?

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Court
5 years ago

Great questions Bjørn, I think the Nexus 8 is more durable than the Acera 7 because it’s internally geared so dirt and water will be kept out and there is no derailleur that could get bumped… That said, it might weigh more.

In my opinion the rear motor design is preferable to front hub because most bikes split the weight of the rider ~40% front and ~60% rear so you get more traction in the rear this way. Also, adding the 2.3kg+ to the front wheel changes steering a little bit. Maybe it will be less for you in Europe because the 250 watt motor is smaller.

I did not have problems with water getting into my battery but the LCD display can be a bit more sensitive and it is not removable so if it is raining you might want to cover it with a clear plastic sack. There are lots of great cruiser style electric bikes to choose from (at least in the US), the City Commuter has a rear-heavy design and the battery is very high on the rack so that is a downside. The upside is good support, solid build and a larger frame than most bikes. I am 5’9″ at ~59kg and I got the smaller step-thru model because the high step was just too large.

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Fernando
5 years ago

dear friends I need help, I want to buy a Pedego City commuter 48v, I live in Santiago, Chile close to Andes Mountain, but I want to know if is good for hills , I have in my trip to my granddaughters house in some places a 10% gradient, is a round trip of 18 miles, regards Fernando,

We have a very good road, starting in my house (2400 feet Above sea level (ASL) and my daughter house located at 3200 feet ASL), with uphill and downhill, coming back to home is mostly downhill.

  Reply
Court
5 years ago

Hi Fernando, one of the co-founders of Pedego lives at the top of a hill in California and he wanted to make bikes that would be powerful enough to get him all the way up (he is a larger fellow as well, maybe ~200lbs). I believe the 48 volt City Commuter would work very well for your situation and it is fairly durable so it should perform well over the long term even without having a shop nearby. The only thing I would suggest is carry a plastic bag to put over the control panel if it rains and try to keep the bike (or at least the battery) stored inside to avoid overheating it on very hot days. Hope this helps! Depending on your size and preference for cruiser vs. more aggressive city frame the Pedego Interceptor has throttle, assist and lights just like the City Commuter and could be a good choice.

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Fernando
5 years ago

Many thanks Court, very useful your information, I’ll be ordering the Pedego City Commuter 48v, I was reading many review in internet and I think this is the correct choice, I’ll be sending as soon as I can my report using the bike in a hill area. Regards, Fernando

  Reply
Court
5 years ago

Awesome! Excited to hear your thoughts on the bike Fernando, I hope it arrives in great shape and performs well for you :)

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Ronald
5 years ago

I’m short guy, 5’4″ to be exact. I was wondering which Pedego bike would fit a short guy like me? I’ve been trying out different ebikes to find a good size bike along with the right motor power! I know going with a 350w motor is a good starting point for a bike that doesn’t weigh much over 50 lbs. I weigh 140 lbs. so I know a 500w motor is plenty of power! The 2013 izip Zuma, that I tried out was powerful enough and largest frame size that I can stand but I have to swing my right leg over the battery rack in the rear to get on. Having said that I think the 2014 izip Path + was more comfortable because I could get the seat to go lower!

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Court
5 years ago

Hi Ronald, Pedego does make a smaller frame called the 24″ Cruiser but it only offers twist throttle mode (no pedal assist). It sounds like you enjoyed the IZIP Zuma but tried an older model or maybe the high-step? They also offer the bike in low-step which sounds like it would be perfect for you. I like that bike because the battery pack is low and center (mounted in the seat tube vs. rear rack). The new Path+ also comes in step-thru and is great. Another smaller electric bike worth considering is the eProdigy Banff. Depending on your intended use the folding electric bikes tend to be easy to mount and a bit smaller. Hope this helps :)

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Fernando
5 years ago

Many Thanks Court, for your comments , for me was very clear, I ordered the City Commuter Sept thru, 48V to local dealer, and I hope to receive my new Elec Bike by Sept 12, as soon as I’ll be riding I’ll resending more comments., regards Fernando

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Paul Kelley
5 years ago

Am I the only one who has extremely loud squeaky brakes on my Pedego City Commuter? Since day one. I will not buy a Pedego again because of this. Of all the scooters and electric bikes I have owned this one is the worst.

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Court
5 years ago

Sorry to hear you’re having issues with the disc brakes on your Pedego City Commuter. We were talking about this type of thing on the forum the other day and a few solutions were shared. Check it out here, I think all disc brakes can get squeaky and cleaning or replacing pads can help but different metals and pads may also squeak more than others (I’m not super knowledgeable about this space or I’d try to help more).

  Reply
Paul Kelley
5 years ago

Thank you for the link to possible fixes for this issue.

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Court
5 years ago

Sure thing Paul! I hope it helps you out, I have sensitive ears and I know it’s not a lot of fun to hear that loud squeaking on a regular basis ;)

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frank
5 years ago

Thx Court. You are amazing and this site is amazing. Ive been researching after your first post. I love the 48/500 pedego. I also really like the optibike pioneer and the izip path e3+. So looks like it may be the pedego because of looks… and seat maybe swap with the comfort and your idea of a Thudbuster shock. It also seems to get the best upright relaxed and comfortable seating position. Am I right? That all said it still comes down to the ominous in places, san francisco hills. Try vallejo to broadway. It must be a 60% grade. Ouch. And I ve seen worse on Russian Hill. Am I walking all these bikes or will the city commuter pull it off? or the optibike? thx again, Frank

  Reply
Court
5 years ago

Hi Frank, I think you’ll have good luck with the Pedego and the City Commuter or Interceptor offer that strong 500 watt 48 volt combination as well as pedal assist. These are heavier bikes but the geared motor design is very capable and in assist mode with you helping out, they should be able to make it up the hills… but you will have to help. The price is solid on these bikes and the quality is decent along with support and warranty. For the best hardware and drive systems for San Francisco hills I’d suggest Kalkhoff. They only offer pedal assist but their mid-drive setup and stiffer frames are more capable.

  Reply
Jim Howell
5 years ago

I just had my first problem with my Pedego City Cruiser. My bike was just under 1 year old and I had 2400 miles on the odometer. It was fixed no questions asked (ELV Motors, San Jose, CA). The controller was replaced and I now have the newest features including Throttle and Pedal Assist at the same time. It works great. I can get an extra burst of speed at start up and through intersections. Most of my commute (8 mile round trip) is bike lanes. I have 2 freeway entrances to get past with lots of traffic. I use the throttle to get a quick burst of speed to get past the freeway entrances and I then drop back to my pedal assist (usually a 4). My commute only takes about 7-8 minutes more than my car would take. I would much rather ride my bike and get outside in the fresh air and get a little exercise. I get 2 round trips from home to work (16 very flat miles) and always have some battery left (48V 10-Ah). A new 15Ah battery is available if you need the extra range. I am a very happy Pedego City Commuter owner.

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Court
5 years ago

This is so great to hear! Thanks for sharing your great experience with ELV Motors and mentioning all of the new features. I plan to review the 2015 Pedego models very soon :D

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Frank
5 years ago

Hi Court. I love the pedego city commuter. I want the strength for hills so I’m thinking the 500/15ah; but also I really want the upright cruiser feel and a super comfortable seat and ride. I’m 5’10” and 180 lbs. Would you suggest the 26″ or 28″? and would the right idea be to ask to swap the seat for the comfort or the beach cruiser? and how about recommending a gel cushion overlay? and as above do you think it would be better the flip the stem and move the handlebars back? Thx Court. Your reviews are appreciated and outstanding.

  Reply
Court
5 years ago

Hi Frank, the City Commuter is one of my favorite Pedego models but it does tend to ride stiffer than their cruisers. I like the Interceptor model because it’s comfortable but powerful and feature rich with lights and assist as well as throttle mode. I believe they have a mini-Interceptor now if the full size model seems too large. I think you could actually do well with either one. I’m planning to review the new Pedego models in the coming month or so, they’ve really improved the little details and continue to be a trustworthy brand (did a voluntary battery recall recently). Frankly, I’d try the Interceptor “as is” before flipping stems or getting special seats. You may find that it offers the features found on the City Commuter but the comfortable upright body position you want. As far as power, I think the 48 volt 10 amp hour battery would be your best bet vs. the 36 volt 15 amp hour. Amp hours are more about capacity and range whereas voltage gives you the feel of power and torque.

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Johannes
5 years ago

You might like to add to your review that since the 2014 model, the city commuter has throttle override when in paddle assist mode.

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Court
5 years ago

Thanks Johannes, you’re right! Thanks for adding this, I plan to review all of the 2015 Pedego models soon and get them onto the site ;)

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AJ
5 years ago

Court, thanks for your awesome reviews. You know, I was thinking of getting a mid drive bike but I may not need that torque for my needs. I would be using the bike to commute 10 miles each way, relatively flat, with only occasional weekend trips into the city (San Francisco). So maybe a bike with a hub motor, possibly geared, would work for me. Do you know the actual chemistry of the City Commuter battery? I can’t seem to find the details. I’ve heard LifePo4 can last up to 3x as long as other types of lithium batteries. There is a really old message board that says Pedego uses LiMN batteries. Considering the battery is the most expensive part of the bike, this would be a major deciding factor for me.

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Court
5 years ago

Hi AJ, I bet the City Commuter would work fine for your ~10 mile trips and even handle a bit of climbing in pedal assist mode. I owned a 2013 model and was really impressed. It’s comfortable, feature rich and the company is responsible. They’ve actually initiated a voluntary recall of some older batteries that weren’t performing well and I’m fairly confident that their new packs use Samsung brand, 18650 size, Lithium Manganese Oxide (known for being light weight and long lasting). Very few ebikes use Lithium Iron Phosphate (LiFePO4) but you are correct about them having some of the longest life spans and being the most stable. They tend to be less energy dense (heavier for the same energy capacity) than Lithium-ion like the Samsung cells that I believe Pedego uses.

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stephen stuntz
5 years ago

Court, My friend Donna Rye told me at lunch yesterday that her Grandson was reviewing electric bikes and to check out your website. I was glad to find your writeup on the Pedego. My wife, Jeannie, just bought a Diamond Back from REI and is getting used to it. Your information on the Pedego is really interesting and should help us learn about electric bikes more easily. Do you have a web site with a comparison of other bikes? Stephen – the happy wanderer.

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Court
5 years ago

Hi Stephen, yes! This is Court and my Grandmother is named Donna. I’m glad to hear that your wife is enjoying the Diamondback ebike, do you know which one she purchased? My website here is designed to let you compare each bike side by side. You can use this compare page which has a video linked at the top for more information. I’ve reviewed over 300 electric bikes so most of the ones you’re thinking about should be available on the site and here’s a top ten list if you need ideas ;)

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