Tern Link D8 with BionX Review

Tern Link D8 With Bionx Electric Bike Review
Tern Link D8 With Bionx
Tern Link D8 With Bionx Motor Suntour Cassette
Tern Link D8 With Bionx Removable Battery Pack
Tern Link D8 With Bionx Display Throttle
Tern Link D8 With Bionx Portage Rack
Tern Link D8 With Bionx Rear V Brake
Tern Link D8 With Bionx Steel Fork
Tern Link D8 With Bionx Electric Bike Review
Tern Link D8 With Bionx
Tern Link D8 With Bionx Motor Suntour Cassette
Tern Link D8 With Bionx Removable Battery Pack
Tern Link D8 With Bionx Display Throttle
Tern Link D8 With Bionx Portage Rack
Tern Link D8 With Bionx Rear V Brake
Tern Link D8 With Bionx Steel Fork

Summary

  • High quality folding frame from Tern combined with sophisticated and quiet drive system from BionX
  • Four levels of pedal assist and regen as well as regenerative braking and variable speed trigger throttle
  • One of the most compact folding ebikes around, display panel and battery pack are removable for convenience and reduced weight

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Tern

Model:

Link D8 with BionX

Price:

$2,700 USD

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Travel, Urban

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

5 Year Frame, 2 Year Electronics and Battery

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

2015

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

42 lbs ( 19.05 kg )

Battery Weight:

6 lbs ( 2.72 kg )

Motor Weight:

9 lbs ( 4.08 kg )

Frame Types:

Folding (Patented OCL Joint, DoubleTruss Technology)

Frame Sizes:

(Folded Size 38 cm x 79 cm x 72 cm)

Frame Material:

7005 Aluminum

Frame Colors:

Black with Blue Accents

Frame Fork Details:

Hi-Tensile Steel

Attachment Points:

Fender Bosses, Rack Bosses, Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

8 Speed 8x1 Suntour Neos 1.0, (12-32T)

Shifter Details:

SRAM MRX Comp Half-Twist on Right Handle Bar

Pedals:

Folding Aluminum and Plastic Platform

Headset:

Flux, Cartridge Bearings, Tri-Seal Technology

Stem:

Physis 3D, Forged Aluminum

Handlebar:

Flat (Aluminum)

Brake Details:

V-Brakes

Grips:

BioLogic Ergo

Saddle:

Velo

Seat Post:

SuperOversize, 6061 Aluminum with Micro Adjust Clamp

Rims:

Aluminum (With Brass Spoke Nipples)

Spokes:

Stainless Steel

Tire Brand:

Schwalbe Citizen with Puncture Protection, 20" x 1.6"

Wheel Sizes:

20 in ( 50.8 cm )

Tire Details:

Reflective Sidewalls

Accessories:

Front and Rear Fenders with Mud Flaps, Rear Portage Rack with Bungee Cords

Other:

Magnetix 2.0 Folding Clasp Connector, Water Bottle Cage Bosses on Right of Main Tube

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

BionX

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Gearless Direct Drive Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

350 watts

Motor Torque:

40 Newton meters (10 Nm Nominal)

Battery Brand:

Panasonic

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

6.6 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

316.8 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium Manganese Cobalt

Charge Time:

3.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

35 miles ( 56 km )

Estimated Max Range:

50 miles ( 80 km )

Display Type:

Backlit LCD (Removable, Symmetrical Integrated Buttons for Right or Left Handed Users)

Readouts:

4 Proportional Assist and Generate Modes, Lighting Controls, Battery Voltage, Trip Distance, Odometer, Chronometer, Average Speed, Clock

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad (With Variable Speed Trigger Throttle) (With Variable Speed Trigger Throttle)

Drive Mode:

Torque Sensing Pedal Assist, Trigger Throttle (Throttle Will Not Activate Below 2 mph, Assist Levels 35%, 75%, 150%, 300%)

Top Speed:

20 mph ( 32 kph )

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Written Review

The Tern Link D8 with BionX is an ultra portable folding electric bike with a higher-end drive system from BionX. It folds perfectly with the battery attached but you can also take it off to reduce weight or charge separately. The motor offers excellent torque, multiple levels of assist and regen, regenerative braking and throttle operation and it runs extremely quiet. Both Tern and BionX are respected manufacturers, known for quality builds and good support. In my opinion they’ve created one of the most functional, well balanced and beautiful folding electric bikes around with the Link D8. Its smaller 20″ wheels enable the super small form factor (when folded) but aren’t as smooth as the larger 24″ wheels chosen for the Node D8. Depending on your needs, either bike performs well but costs a bit more than some entry level folding ebikes that lack assist and some of the nicer accessories in use here.

The motor driving the Tern Link D8 electric is a 350 watt gearless direct drive hub from BionX. It’s located in the rear wheel and painted black to match the Tern frame. Note that this motor has a larger diameter and higher weight than some equally specced gearless hubs but delivers increased toughness and quieter operation. I’m not aware of many folding electric bikes that offer regenerative braking or regen modes but the Link D8 with BionX has both. There are actually four levels of regen here to help you recapture energy while simultaneously slowing the bike and sparing your brakes when coasting down hills. This feature can also be used as a form of increased challenge if you want to raise your heart rate and don’t have any hills around to climb. While this bike does not have a rear quick release mechanism (only on the front wheel) the rear wheel remains easy to service because the motor has a built in torque sensor vs. an external dropout strain gauge.

Powering the Tern Link D8 is a BionX-made Lithium-ion battery pack containing Panasonic cells (known for being super high quality). It offers 48 volts of power which is above average. This has several benefits including increased torque, improved climbing ability and more efficient electricity transfer. In terms of overall capacity, this pack is slightly smaller than the stock BionX kits but that enables the folding feature mentioned earlier and keeps the overall weight of the bike down. At 42 pounds (with the 6 pound battery attached) this isn’t the world’s lightest folding ebike but that’s due in part to the high quality fenders and rack that add utility. You could always remove these extras to shave a bit off and reduce any rattling noise that can develop over time with use, folding and storage.

The control panel on this bike is one of my favorites because it’s slim, removable, backlit and packed with readouts but not overly complex to use. It’s a second generation display from BionX with four buttons (two on each side) that are symmetrical – designed to be usable on the left or right hand side. What I’ve found is that I usually only press the upper right hand button on the display to get the bike powered up and then rely on the stand-alone button pad and throttle which are mounted on the right handle bar. Many ebikes forego throttles but it can be useful when your legs get tired (especially on a smaller bike like this) or when trying to balance groceries or packages. The rear rack helps out with the latter experience but you get the point… imagine crossing a puddle and wanting to keep your feet raised temporarily but still needing to move forward, that’s where throttles can really shine. On this system (as well as other BionX) you have to get the bike up to 2 mph before the throttle will activate and this is a safety feature. Aside from the display and buttons I like the ergonomic grips and simple grip-shifter on the right side of the handlebar. You might consider adding a bell and lights to this setup depending on your intended use. I should mention that only the right brake lever has a motor cutoff and regen activator built in. If you brake with the left lever, regenerative braking will not activate. This is a minor gripe and again, a design feature related to all BionX kits at the time of this review.

The Tern Link D8 with BionX combines two proven platforms. The locking mechanisms and folding design from Tern are superb and I love the magnetic clasp designed to keep the bike from unfolding. The silent and durable motor from BionX feels zippy and the removable battery is very convenient. I’m a fan of pedal assist but see the value in throttles so it’s nice that this folding ebike offers both. The eight speed cassette delivers a good range for climbing or pedaling fast (which can be precarious on a smaller 20″ wheel bike like this). I like the reflective sidewalls on the wheels and am okay with the standard v-brakes and plastic folding pedals. The crank arms on this bike are actually quite long for a smaller bike and that makes pedaling feel natural. While many folding electric bikes opt for rear mounted batteries I love that this one has a more balanced weight distribution and appreciate that they even added water bottle cage bosses on the side of the downtube so you can still bring some fluids along (you could also store water in a bag on the rear rack). If you’re looking for quality but need an extremely small footprint on your boat, RV or closet then the Link D8 would be an excellent choice.

Pros:

  • Solid two year warranty on the frame, drive system and battery pack – Tern and BionX are both large, well established companies
  • Beautiful aesthetic with matching black and blue frame, custom black hub motor and black battery casing featuring co-branded Tern + BionX art
  • Just about every drive mode you could ask for including four levels of torque sensing pedal assist, four levels of energy regeneration and variable speed trigger throttle
  • Independent button pad on right side of handle bar is easy to reach (to change assist mode or use the throttle) doesn’t require that you take your hand off the grip to use
  • Battery pack can be charged on or off the bike, does not have to be removed for the frame to fold completely
  • Motor is powerful, durable (thanks to the gearless direct drive configuration) and very quiet to operate
  • Full length front and rear fenders with mud flaps, rear carry rack includes built in bungee cords for securing cargo
  • Several nice extras including reflective sidewalls on tires and backlit LCD display panel for improved safety during evening and night riding, ergonomic grips for improved comfort and magnetic clasp for secure folded position
  • Good weight distribution with the 9 pound hub motor at the rear and the 6 pound battery pack mounted forward on the downtube
  • BionX battery has a deep sleep protection feature that keeps it from discharging in a way that could hurt the battery over longer periods of storage
  • Satisfying to pedal thanks to the longer crank arms and eight speeds cassette, good for climbing or riding faster

Cons:

  • Smaller 20″ wheels allow the bike to achieve an extremely small folded footprint but don’t offer the same cushion or gap-spanning potential as larger wheels, consider the Tern Node D8 which has 24″ wheels if this is a concern
  • Only the right brake lever cuts power to the motor and activates power regeneration mode, it would be nice if both did
  • Rear wheel does not feature quick release, will have to use traditional tools during maintenance or fixing a flat

Resources:

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Franco Bujosa
2 years ago

Where can I purchase this? I have looked online, even Tern's website and NYCEWheels and with no success. When will you review the Tern eLink?

Court Rye
2 years ago

Hi Franco! I reached out to Tern regarding availability of the Link D8 and they said "If interested in locating a Tern Link D8/Node D8 with BionX please contact north.america@ternbicycles.com so we can assist you in finding a Tern retailer in your area." sorry I can't be more specific... I feel like NYCeWheels should be able to special order one for you? I hope to review the eLink eventually and will post it here as soon as I do :D

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Ann M.
8 months ago
@iurly , are you sure it's a G1 console? that wouldn't work with the later, G2 systems that support the 6V port. The early consoles were vulnerable to moisture damage, so whitexkr's suggestion is a good one.

A pretty extensive post was made on EBR about accessing the Console Codes which may be of value to you.
Error code 28 indicates that there is a problem with the 6V port; Error code 22 is an indicator that the motor controller circuit board has a problem; that will require opening the battery where the primary controller is and possibly the motor.
Nycewheels has an excellent list of what the email BionX about the issue.
A dealer would be able to run diagnostics using BionX's program and make recommendations about what needs the repair.
bareyb
2 years ago
Ann M.
Just on Falco Motors forum and your post , so that doesn't help. Ok, just tried to upload the 7 page file for startup, but that's too big to put here, so a link instead:
http://falcoemotors.com/dealers/Quick_Start_Guide_for_Falco_eBike_Drive_System.pdf

If you have the Falco USB stick, then you can access the speed settings as shown on page 7 of their guide. Also, take a close look at your dropouts and see if the kit's torque sensor needs alignment to be able to power properly. Much like the BionX torque sensor positioning, misalignment can totally kill power. Falco does have a simple set of diagrams to illustrate the necessary dropout alignment:
http://falcoemotors.com/dealers/Torque_Sensor_Operation.pdf

Hope this helps and they respond soon; I test road the kit and was quite impressed--really liked the wireless interface and built in heart rate monitor.
I think if I hang in there and let Rakesh help me set up the parameters the way I want them, I'll end up being very happy with it. Another owner told me that the default settings are optimized for battery not power. Rakesh helped him set it up and he's really happy with it. So thank goodness they have such an accessible feature set.
Ann M.
2 years ago
Just on Falco Motors forum and your post , so that doesn't help. Ok, just tried to upload the 7 page file for startup, but that's too big to put here, so a link instead:
http://falcoemotors.com/dealers/Quick_Start_Guide_for_Falco_eBike_Drive_System.pdf

If you have the Falco USB stick, then you can access the speed settings as shown on page 7 of their guide. Also, take a close look at your dropouts and see if the kit's torque sensor needs alignment to be able to power properly. Much like the BionX torque sensor positioning, misalignment can totally kill power. Falco does have a simple set of diagrams to illustrate the necessary dropout alignment:
http://falcoemotors.com/dealers/Torque_Sensor_Operation.pdf

Hope this helps and they respond soon; I test road the kit and was quite impressed--really liked the wireless interface and built in heart rate monitor.
GiantEnemyCrab
2 years ago
E-Joe has a folding capability but yeah, it's not for rolling around at all. I've folded it into the bus when it was snowing a lot outside, etc, and needing to take a bus. When folded, it does the job of being smaller, but the size isn't super compact to my taste.

Also note that if you are driving 10 miles one way from your home to the train station, that's 20 miles total.
EJoe Epik SE's battery will be able to barely fit that range, initially, but battery gets weaker over time, too.
So you might see the bike not being able to handle that distance over time in 3 - 6 months.

If both portability (like rolling the bike in the city) and range are important, have you seen or considered these below yet?
http://electricbikereview.com/tern/link-d8-with-bionx/
http://electricbikereview.com/tern/node-d8-with-bionx/

They are around $2700, and above twice as much as EJoe, so that's the downside indeed, but I think these will do a job for you. There are also other choices like electric brompton, and it's compact, but you will probably need that power from a motor / battery combo like bionx to handle your commute. BionX is a much more tested system, too.

And around metro DC area, it still snows in the winter, so tern node's 24 inch tires would be preferred in these weather conditions, compared to tern link's 20 inch. But that's assuming that 24 inch isn't a problem for bringing into the train.

Let me know what you thought of my opinion.

This is a comment coming from an EJoe owner.
86 and still kicking
2 years ago
Chandlee EBS
Super pleased with both. It's about the most powerful motor out there with the best torque sensor. The level one pedal assist is my favorite in the industry. You genuinely won't feel it helping you, so you'll feel like superman. It also runs really quite, which I love.

I'm currently riding a Surly Karate Monkey Bionx setup. It's my sixth e-bike in two years (not too difficult when you have a shop and don't have a car). Admittedly after doing this build, I'm looking at a titanium build for myself. I'd like to be under 40 lbs., but that's a pipe dream right now. BTW Bionx advises against carbon frames so ti is the way to go.

The coolest thing is I feel like it's one of the best ways to future-proof yourself. Once you have the bike that you really like, you can save money on getting the best. Just upgrade kits down the line and don't worry about the bike. Bionx is stellar and backwards compatible! If you have an 48v s series you can upgrade to a d-series motor right now and save $1300! You just won't have the range.

@
Ann M.
: Montague builds are so cool. Any bike designed by paratroopers definitely gets my approval. I haven't found that the D-series is quieter than the S-series, however, it's still quieter than everything else, and it has a more guttural sound that I find quiet satisfying.

@Crazy Lenny Ebikes: I love super moto x tires. Hope they come out in retail at some point. I actually went small block eight front and rear. It'll have fantastic road and off road characteristics, but 30-80 psi mirrors Schwalbe balloon styles.

I'll create a link for the karate monkey soon. I've done some silly stuff to it.
Chandlee, Can you change your profile photo for me? At my age, looking at a good looking women causes my heart to fibrillate.....and that ain't a good thing for me.
Chandlee EBS
2 years ago
86 and still kicking
Chandlee: How is the power delivery with the new d500 motor? Are you happy with both the speed and the torque.
Super pleased with both. It's about the most powerful motor out there with the best torque sensor. The level one pedal assist is my favorite in the industry. You genuinely won't feel it helping you, so you'll feel like superman. It also runs really quite, which I love.

I'm currently riding a Surly Karate Monkey Bionx setup. It's my sixth e-bike in two years (not too difficult when you have a shop and don't have a car). Admittedly after doing this build, I'm looking at a titanium build for myself. I'd like to be under 40 lbs., but that's a pipe dream right now. BTW Bionx advises against carbon frames so ti is the way to go.

The coolest thing is I feel like it's one of the best ways to future-proof yourself. Once you have the bike that you really like, you can save money on getting the best. Just upgrade kits down the line and don't worry about the bike. Bionx is stellar and backwards compatible! If you have an 48v s series you can upgrade to a d-series motor right now and save $1300! You just won't have the range.

@
Ann M.
: Montague builds are so cool. Any bike designed by paratroopers definitely gets my approval. I haven't found that the D-series is quieter than the S-series, however, it's still quieter than everything else, and it has a more guttural sound that I find quiet satisfying.

@Crazy Lenny Ebikes: I love super moto x tires. Hope they come out in retail at some point. I actually went small block eight front and rear. It'll have fantastic road and off road characteristics, but 30-80 psi mirrors Schwalbe balloon styles.

I'll create a link for the karate monkey soon. I've done some silly stuff to it.
Court
2 years ago
biknut
That's pretty interesting isn't it. The Storm company seems to be thumbing their nose at Prodeco., but after this report I would think they'll probably have to respond in some way. Maybe not though, but I probably would if it was me.

This is the third eBike company I've heard making disparaging remarks about Storm, and I'll be surprised if there's not more. This is a fight for survival, and if Storm succeeds it's going to upset a lot of apple carts.

Court, I have a question for you. Obviously you've talked to Prodeco. What about Yahoo? Is Prodeco one of your sponsors? If so does Yahoo know they sponsor you, and further did you mention to Yahoo that you've never actually touched a Storm bike, and your comments are all just opinions ? Cause if someone didn't know better it kind of looks like you're trying pretty hard to help Prodeco torpedo Storm's operation.

You'd be well advised to be careful what you say. If this turns into a court battle you don't get dragged into it.
Actually, ProdecoTech has asked me about advertising in the past (like early last year) but the slots were all full (I try not to do to many ads so the site can load quickly). The way banners work on EBR is usually by invitation, I only invite companies that have great scoring bikes so that the messaging on the site reflects the content of my reviews. I haven't been in touch with ProdecoTech for at least a month but did email them today to say that I had referenced the comment they made on the Indiegogo campaign (that's how I heard about the whole Storm copyright thing to begin with as noted in the video I posted last night). I haven't heard back from ProdecoTech as of this moment.

I don't feel like other ebike companies are thumbing their noses up at Storm, there have actually been many disputes over naming in the past (way before Storm) and they were all resolved. I'm not at liberty to discuss what happened but you may notice that ProdecoTech themselves actually used to go by Prodeco until about a year and a half ago. I'd be interested to hear what the other two companies you referenced in your comment that have been "making disparaging remarks" about Storm? The past couple of days have been a whirlwind for me so maybe I missed something?

I understand that you may feel a bit insecure about your investment in Storm at this point but you're making some assumptions and assertions here that don't make me feel very good. Dan Tynan from Yahoo! reached out to me via phone yesterday to ask a few questions and then confirmed some quotes with me this morning before running the story... I decided not to mention anything until it went live out of respect for him and anyone else being interviewed. Dan didn't ask about sponsors but I label all of the advertisers on EBR very clearly and right now that includes the Accell Group, BionX, Pedego and Felt as well as several minor advertisers who are promoting their bikes in respective categories such as e-Joe on the affordable category (this is clearly labeled with the "promoted listing" link there). There are several shops who also pay a monthly listing fee to me and Pete Prebus of Electric Bike Report for a geo-targeted shop ad. When you said "Obviously you've talked to Prodeco" it made me feel like you've got a suspicious attitude about me and I'd like to help address any concerns you might have.

What I'm trying to do is be transparent, available and diligent. I am careful of what I say... or rather, open and honest about what I say. I do not want to be dragged into a court battle but I if I could be of assistance as an expert witness I'd be much obliged to help
Brambor
2 years ago
Looks great. I wonder how much wider you can get with the tires? 3.2 is not that fat these days.

46 lbs is great for eFatBike

Ravi Kempaiah
BionX D series motor is a true performer. VERY strong acceleration compared to Stromer ST1 platinum or Spl Turbo.
The nominal torque is 25Nm and the peak torque is 50Nm (Stromer's ultramotor specs out at 9Nm nominal and 40Nm peak).
The extra torque can be felt at all pedal assist levels.
There is a fat bike with D series motor by OHM which I really liked. The ride was super smooth. I'll post pics later but here is the link

http://ohmcycles.com/e-bikes/electric-mountain-bikes/xs-750/xs-750-at-2015
Ravi Kempaiah
2 years ago
BionX D series motor is a true performer. VERY strong acceleration compared to Stromer ST1 platinum or Spl Turbo.
The nominal torque is 25Nm and the peak torque is 50Nm (Stromer's ultramotor specs out at 9Nm nominal and 40Nm peak).
The extra torque can be felt at all pedal assist levels.
There is a fat bike with D series motor by OHM which I really liked. The ride was super smooth. I'll post pics later but here is the link

http://ohmcycles.com/e-bikes/electric-mountain-bikes/xs-750/xs-750-at-2015
Court
3 years ago
Chandlee EBS
The short review here along with a link to the older model if you find that one on sale. The newer one has a removable battery and the motor in the rear which is ideal if you're transporting cargo or a passenger.

Chandlee is right on with the Big Dummy suggestion... 8Fun BBS01 mid-drive motor to create a cool bike and we tested it with multiple passengers which held up very well... video below:

Electric Bike Specialists
3 years ago
Ravi,

Great link and excellent observations. Addressing the battery chemistry question, I'd say pretty much all of the stuff coming from major brands is working well. You're right. There are thousands of combinations. Most of the Ebikes we've taken on are new enough that they shouldn't start degrading for a few more years (more than enough time to make it into SSD gen stuff). We've seen some problems with a couple of new battery types, but I'd attribute it to a factory issues instead of the actual chemistry. These are almost always easily warrantied. Court does a good job of pointing out who has good service.

Otherwise, I'd use caution in buying second-hand Ebikes with proprietary or unique battery casing. For example, my wife picked up an old Currie Enlightened series last year and we immediately replaced the battery with a new one from Currie. Unfortunately, the new battery was probably sitting in a warehouse and now her range is already close to nothing. Her only option is to repack with new chemistry and that can be costly. Fortunately, many of the Currie models still use the same casing and can easily be updated. (I'd also say that Currie's batteries became MUCH better after Accel purchased them.)

Buying batteries direct from China is going to be hit or miss. We do a lot a repairs on these, and it's difficult to say if the wholesalers are trying different companies or the quality control is simply poor. Unfortunately, QC in China is always going to be a problem, even for major brands (as we've seen this year). Again, the Ebike companies are quick to warranty any problems, but Chinese sellers usually offer short warranties and are difficult to follow up with. Do your homework before you buy.

In terms of getting the best range, well, that's a big question.

First understand that every Ebike is going to have a huge variation in range depending on the rider and conditions. SERIOUSLY. We're talking about 10 vs. 50 miles. Rider weight is a giant consideration. Hilly terrain (mountain biking) can seriously sap a battery. That said, large riders in mountainous terrain will still get great range provided they are doing their share of the work.

For example, yesterday I did some serious mountain biking with a 140 lb. rider and a 230 lb. rider. Both were on BH NEO MTB's and after an hour of hard riding the larger guy had only used 10-15% more battery because he was the more experienced of the two. Amazingly, I've seen a 300+lb. guy do the exact same trail on the exact same bike and use the same amount of battery! All he did differently was gear down and spin it out.

The important thing in extending range is balance your work with the motor's. With a PAS/cadence sensor, it's about finding a speed which your pedaling is starting to match or overtake the motor. This can make your range unreal with a bike like an e-Joe Angun which has a 16 amp/hr battery and a 12 mph level one PAS. With a torque sensor, maintaining a good cadence with proper gearing (as you should with any bike) is the key to good range. As Court frequently points out, this is also good for the freewheel.

Obviously, throttle bikes are going to require more attention and finesse. I find that just using the throttle for acceleration and then cruising really extends range.

Also, note that some of the smoother torque sensors are better for range as well (Eflow). You'll just get more of a workout!

Sorry for the giant response.
-Chandlee
nebula722
2 years ago

I like thumb throttles as they are easier to use with gloves on.   Does this bike have a cruise control?

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+nebula722 Very interesting, this is great feedback that might help others to consider what it's like riding an ebike and how to use this feature. Definitely makes me think differently about the feature. Thanks!

nebula722
2 years ago

+ElectricBikeReview.com I set the cruise control at a speed a little lower than I want to go and then I pedal and add some speed to it.  This is really a power lock as it does not apply more power on a hill.  I leave the cruise set where it is and downshift till I can make it up the hill.  I use it as soon as I turn out of my driveway and I use it often.  With the cruise on I pedal as hard or soft as I want.  Perhaps this is a feature seniors will use more often than younger riders. 

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+nebula722 I'm really glad you brought it up, most people don't think or talk about it but it sounds like you've found a good use for cruise control on ebikes. I'd like to hear how it comes in handy for you - when do you put it to use?

nebula722
2 years ago

+ElectricBikeReview.com IZIP has a lot of interesting products.  When I purchased my Magic Pie with throttle and pedal assist I laughed when he told me of the cruise.  I use it constantly to my surprise. 

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

Great question! No cruise control here, I actually know of very few ebikes with that feature but many of the 2015 IZIP models will have it: http://electricbikereview.com/category/izip/

wojtek1425
2 years ago

Do you really think the all four regen modes matter?
After riding the ST1 for over a year I still can't find any significance in the two modes it offers. It looks more like a gimmick than a significant feature.

visualray
1 month ago

I have a Tern Link D8 with a 250W Bionx, and I can say that I use all the regen modes. When you're going down a super steep hill, it makes it so that I hardly use my brakes plus it does put a decent amount of energy back for the short amount of time.

wojtek1425
2 years ago

I wanted to do a comprehensive review of ST1 but stumbled on the issue of two regen modes, and even the tech support could not offer a reasonable explanation other than design features (in this case the wagon is ahead of the horse). Having said that I saw some designs with more significant energy return modes (forgot where). With regen modes being presents in many electric bikes, it is time to evaluate them and see who the winner is.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+wojtek1425 Great question, this is something I'd like to test but I haven't had the time to focus on it. Currently doing my best just to keep up with the site and add some new sorting features and reviews from Interbike :)

wojtek1425
2 years ago

I know nothing about BionX, but wanted to know best case scenario percentage-wise. How much power can you possibly get back? I tried the ST1 but 1 bar was all I could get (long downhill coasting)

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

The four levels of assist and four levels of regen on BionX are pretty well spaced out. I could see myself using the first, second and third levels of regen when riding on flats or coasting down hills. The fourth level is pretty aggressive but I think they added it to balance out the four levels of assist. If they only had one level then it would likely feel too powerful and be less useful for actual fitness training or small hills... you'd have to pedal while going downhill vs. the very light regen level 1 that can actually still let you coast. I don't think it's a gimmick.

Marc Ariss
2 years ago

I try and I try to find something about folding bikes I like.....still no success, good review though.

markharrispt
2 years ago

Tern, like dahon, Brompton etc are a good frame to build an ebike on. More integrated battery solutions, integrated motor solutions, & disk brakes, a minimum.

hassmann2000
2 years ago

Very nice. 

Way over my budget though. 

There's a bike called the "Cyclomatic folding bike" which is similar to this but is about £500 (or less). 

It's obviously not as nice as this bike, but would you recommend it anyway?

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

Interesting... I've reviewed a very similar bike to this called the EG Vienna http://electricbikereview.com/eg/vienna-250-ex/ and thought it was decent. I liked the suspension elements but felt the body position was more squished. Could be good for a shorter rider. The battery and motor size is also significantly smaller and the bike doesn't have regen. It's a trade off but yeah, those bikes seem to work alright :)